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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Project (SCAMP) The National Ambient Air Quality Standards for airborne fine particles (PM2.5) are based on the mass of PM2.5 measured at outdoor monitoring stations; however, most people spend the majority of their time indoors. In order to fully understand the relationship between ambient PM2.5 and human health effects, it is important to define how ambient PM2.5 concentrations and compositions compare to those actually breathed by humans during normal daily activities. The objective of SCAMP is to measure the concentrations of PM2.5 and other potential air pollutants at ambient monitoring stations in and around Steubenville, OH, and relate them to the pollutant concentrations in air that is actually breathed by people living in the area. Steubenville was chosen by DOE for this study because of the ability to integrate its results with those of the UORVP, and also because Steubenville was one of the six cities where correlations between ambient PM2.5 mass and adverse health effects had been noted. These correlations had been cited by EPA as one of the primary justifications for its 1997 ambient PM2.5 standards. Complete characterization of the relationships between ambient PM2.5 and human exposure, including the chemical components of PM2.5 at various locations, will provide a comprehensive database for use in subsequent epidemiological studies, long-range transport studies, and State Implementation Program development. CONSOL Energy is the primary performer of SCAMP, and will provide the necessary coordination and data integration between the various components of the study.

2

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Air Quality Database and Analytical Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Database and Analytical Tool for Air Quality in the Upper Ohio River Valley Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. with Ohio University and Texas A&M University - Kingsville as subcontractors, will develop a state-of-the-art, scalable and robust computer application for NETL to manage the extensive data sets resulting from the DOE-sponsored ambient air monitoring programs in the upper Ohio River valley region. Efforts will be made to include, to the greatest extent possible, ambient air data collected by other agencies in the upper Ohio River valley region, such as U.S. EPA, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA-DEP), West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WV-DEP), Ohio EPA, and the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD). Although emphasis will be placed on data collected in the upper Ohio River valley region, the computer application developed under this Agreement will be designed, to the greatest extent possible, to access data collected at NETL-sponsored ambient air monitoring sites outside the region, such as sites operated by the Tennessee Valley Authority in the Great Smoky Mountains (under DOE Interagency Agreement DE-AI26-98FT40406) and by Southern Research Institute in North Birmingham, AL (under DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40770). The data base and analytical tool development effort will also be coordinated, to the greatest extent possible, with similar tools being developed for use by U.S. EPA. This will ensure that the database and analytical tools produced under this Agreement will be readily accessible to a wide variety of stakeholders.

3

Automatic electrochemical ambient air monitor for chloride and chlorine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical monitoring system has been provided for determining chloride and chlorine in air at levels of from about 10-1000 parts per billion. The chloride is determined by oxidation to chlorine followed by reduction to chloride in a closed system. Chlorine is determined by direct reduction at a platinum electrode in 6 M H.sub.2 SO.sub.4 electrolyte. A fully automated system is utilized to (1) acquire and store a value corresponding to electrolyte-containing impurities, (2) subtract this value from that obtained in the presence of air, (3) generate coulometrically a standard sample of chlorine mixed with air sample, and determine it as chlorine and/or chloride, and (4) calculate, display, and store for permanent record the ratio of the signal obtained from the air sample and that obtained with the standard.

Mueller, Theodore R. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont) Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility...

5

Ambient air monitoring during the 2011 Las Conchas wildland fire near Los Alamos, U.S.A.  

SciTech Connect

Air monitoring data collected during the Las Conchas fire near the Los Alamos National Laboratory during 2011 are presented. Data included are for selected radionuclides and selected metals found in particulate matter. None of these analytes were seen at levels which exceeded any state or federal standards.

Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schlemann, Shea A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates; Young, Daniel L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Ambient Air Quality Criteria (Manitoba, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Manitoba Ambient Air Quality Criteria schedule lists maximum time-based pollutant concentration levels for the protection and preservation of ambient air quality within the Province of Manitoba...

7

Vermont Air Pollution Control Regulations, Ambient Air Quality Standards (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ambient air quality standards are based on the national ambient air quality standards. The Vermont standards are classified as primary and secondary standards and judged adequate to protect...

8

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and nitrogen dioxide.

9

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alpha-environmental continuous air monitor inlet  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind deceleration and protective shroud that provides representative samples of ambient aerosols to an environmental continuous air monitor (ECAM) has a cylindrical enclosure mounted to an input on the continuous air monitor, the cylindrical enclosure having shrouded nozzles located radially about its periphery. Ambient air flows, often along with rainwater flows into the nozzles in a sampling flow generated by a pump in the continuous air monitor. The sampling flow of air creates a cyclonic flow in the enclosure that flows up through the cylindrical enclosure until the flow of air reaches the top of the cylindrical enclosure and then is directed downward to the continuous air monitor. A sloped platform located inside the cylindrical enclosure supports the nozzles and causes any moisture entering through the nozzle to drain out through the nozzles.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ambient Operation of Li/Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, Li/air batteries based on nonaqueous electrolytes were investigated in ambient conditions (with an oxygen partial pressure of 0.21 atm and relative humidity of ~20%). A heat-sealable polymer membrane was used as both an oxygen-diffusion membrane and as a moisture barrier for Li/air batteries. The membrane also can minimize the evaporation of the electrolyte from the batteries. Li/air batteries with this membrane can operate in ambient conditions for more than one month with a specific energy of 362 Wh kg-1, based on the total weight of the battery including its packaging. Among various carbon sources used in this work, Li/air batteries using Ketjenblack (KB) carbon-based air electrodes exhibited the highest specific energy. However, KB-based air electrodes expanded significantly and absorbed much more electrolyte than electrodes made from other carbon sources. The weight distribution of a typical Li/air battery using the KB-based air electrode was dominated by the electrolyte (~70%). Lithium-metal anodes and KB-carbon anodes account for only 5.12% and 5.78% of the battery weight, respectively. We also found that only ~ 20% of the mesopore volume of the air electrode was occupied by reaction products after discharge. To further improve the specific energy of the Li/air batteries, the microstructure of the carbon electrode needs to be further improved to absorb much less electrolyte while still holding significant amounts of reaction products

Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Deyu; Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Williford, Ralph E.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) 3 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) Chapter 53 Ambient Air Quality (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 53, entitled Ambient Air Quality, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 53 sets the air quality standards for pollutants regulated under the federally mandated Clean Air Act. The purpose of the

13

Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This article lists specific standards for ambient air quality standards for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, lead and

15

Ambient Air Sampling During Quantum-dot Spray Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for nano-size particle emissions was performed during spot spray coating operations with a Sono-Tek Exactacoat Benchtop system (ECB). The ECB consisted of the application equipment contained within an exhaust enclosure. The enclosure contained numerous small access openings, including an exhaust hook-up. Door access comprised most of the width and height of the front. The door itself was of the swing-out type. Two types of nanomaterials, Cadmium selenide (Cd-Se) quantum-dots (QDs) and Gold (Au) QDs, nominally 3.3 and 5 nm in diameter respectively, were applied during the evaluation. Median spray drop size was in the 20 to 60 micrometer size range.1 Surface coating tests were of short duration, on the order of one-half second per spray and ten spray applications between door openings. The enclosure was ventilated by connection to a high efficiency particulate aerosol (HEPA) filtered house exhaust system. The exhaust rate was nominally 80 ft3 per minute producing about 5 air changes per minute. Real time air monitoring with a scanning mobility particle size analyzer (SMPS ) with a size detection limit of 7 nm indicated a significant increase in the ambient air concentration upon early door opening. A handheld condensation particle counter (CPC) with a lower size limit of 10 nm did not record changes in the ambient background. This increase in the ambient was not observed when door opening was delayed for 2 minutes (~10 air changes). The ventilated enclosure controlled emissions except for cases of rapid door opening before the overspray could be removed by the exhaust. A time delay sufficient to provide 10 enclosure air changes (a concentration reduction of more than 99.99 %) before door opening prevented the release of aerosol particles in any size.2 Scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrated the presence of agglomerates in the surfaces of the spray applied deposition. A filtered air sample of the enclosure overspray examined by AFM also demonstrated the presence of agglomerates for the Au QDs. The AFM system was not able to resolve individual QDs as was the STEM. Chemical fingerprinting of the QDs with STEM/EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy) was performed for the Cd-Se surface deposition, but not the aerosol. Both STEM and AFM background characterization by morphology and chemical fingerprinting were performed throughout the laboratory for a period of about one year. Outdoor sources were primarily biological, combustion fume, salt and other crustal particles. Indoor sources were primarily paper/clothing fibers, spray-on insulation fragments, fiber glass, and human skin cells.

Jankovic, John Timothy [ORNL; Hollenbeck, Scott M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) Ambient Air Quality Standards (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info Start Date 11/30/1995 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation establishes ambient air quality standards for the areas of New Mexico under the jurisdiction of the Environmental Improvement Board. The maximum allowable concentrations of total suspended particulate in the ambient air are as follows: 24-hour average: 150 ug/m3; 7-day average: 110 ug/m3; 30-day average: 90 ug/m3; Annual geometric mean: 60 ug/m3. The maximum allowable concentrations of sulfur-containing

17

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Fine Particulate Monitoring Project (SRI) Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, is operating a research station in North Birmingham for monitoring fine particulate matter (PM2.5) that exists in that part of the Deep South. The station will be a core PM2.5 mass monitoring and chemical speciation station in the nationwide EPA PM2.5 network. As such, it will be a complement and supplement to DOE-NETL's other ongoing projects for monitoring fine particulate matter in the upper Ohio River valley. Locating additional monitoring equipment in the Deep South will fill an important gap in the national particulate monitoring effort. The region's topography, weather patterns, and variety of emission sources may affect the chemical make-up and airborne transport of fine particles in ways that are different than in other parts of the country. The project's results will support DOE's comprehensive program to evaluate ambient fine particulate matter through better understanding of the chemical and physical properties of these materials.

18

Diffusion Tubes for Ambient NO2 Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the field of diffusive sampling, and other stakeholders. The following (in alphabetical order) actively or vapour phase pollutant directly from the surrounding air by means of diffusion, without actively drawing

Short, Daniel

19

Energy efficient cooperative multimodal ambient monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless Video Sensor Networks (WVNs) are lively interest in the research community as flexible means for monitoring isolated areas. WVN effectiveness can be augmented when coupled with a network of low-power, low-cost Pyroelectric InfraRed (PIR) detectors ... Keywords: multimodal surveillance, power aware design, pyroelectric infrared, solar harvester, wireless video sensor network

Michele Magno; Davide Brunelli; Piero Zappi; Luca Benini

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semi-volatile Organics in PM Semi-volatile Organics in PM This project is a cooperative effort between Brigham Young University (BYU) and researchers from the DOE-NETL Office of Science and and Engineering Research to determine the contribution of semi-volatile particulate organic compounds (SVOC) to total ambient suspended fine particulate mass at the NETL-Pittsburgh air monitoring facility. Project funding comes from DOE‘s University Coal Research (UCR) program. The hypothesis of the project is that fine particulate mass will be significantly under-determined in urban environments using single filter samplers such as the PM2.5 Federal Reference Method (FRM) because of the loss of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) from the particles during sampling and storage. It is postulated that fine particulate mass, including the semi-volatile fine particulate organic species, are an appropriate surrogate for the components of fine particles which are associated with observed mortality and morbidity effects in epidemiological studies. Further, it is postulated that the most important fraction of the semi-volatile organic material with respect to exacerbation of health problems will be semi-volatile secondary compounds formed from reactions of volatile organic material with ozone and nitrogen oxides. Under-determination of these semi-volatile species will tend to over emphasize the importance of non-volatile fine particulate components such as sulfate or may reduce the significance of correlations with measured health effects.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Contribution of Semi-volatile Organic Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project In a collaborative effort between ChemImage Biothreat, LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project will acquire the ability to discern between chemical/biological threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. The project will focus on potential background interferences, specifically from the ambient backgrounds collected at NETL-supported ambient air collection facilities. Potential substrate interferences such as pollen, insecticides and industrial PM will be addressed. Using Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) and fluorescence chemical imaging, a background - void of pathogen spores - will be collected and compared to known pathogens. Interactions causing possible false positives will be identified and studied. This study would systematically identify potential problems and provide a baseline of ambient particulates found in the mid-eastern United States .

22

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations This...

23

Chapter 51 Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 51, entitled Attainment and Maintenance of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality...

24

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based on Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Turner, W. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Improving Boiler Efficiency Modeling Based On Ambient Air Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimum economic operation in a large power plant can cut operating costs substantially. Individual plant equipment should be operated under conditions that are most favorable for maximizing its efficiency. It is widely accepted that boiler load significantly effects boiler efficiency. In the study reported here, the measured performance of a 300,000 lb/h steam boiler was found to show more dependence on ambient air temperature than on boiler load. It also showed an unexplained dependence on the month of the year that is comparable to the load dependence.

Zhou, J.; Deng, S.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Zone based indoor mobile air pollution monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollution is one of the main problems that humans are suffering from. Moreover air pollution is one of the hardest to escape. Although human spend most of their time indoor, most of the previous pollution monitoring studies focused on outdoor air monitoring. ... Keywords: indoor pollution, mobile sensing, nfc

Noura Alhakbani, Eiman Kanjo

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Projected compliance with the PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, the State of Maryland had no available ambient Federal Reference Method data on particulate matter less than 2.5 microns in aerodynamic diameter (PM2.5) but did have annual ambient data for particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM10) at twenty-four sites. The PM10 data was analyzed in conjunction with local annual and seasonal ZIP code-level emission inventories and with speciated PM2.5 data from four nearby monitors in the IMPROVE network (located in the national parks and wilderness areas) in an effort to predict annual average and seasonal high PM2.5 concentrations at the twenty-four PM10 monitor sites operated from 1992 to 1996. All seasonal high concentrations were predicted to be below the 24-hour PM2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) at the sites operated in Maryland between 1992 and 1996. A geographic analysis of the emission inventories was also performed to evaluate the impact of PM2.5 emissions from Maryland`s power plants on fourteen monitor locations that were predicted to have a reading exceeding the annual NAAQS for any year.

Walsh, K.; Gardner, R.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper addresses the real-time use of ambient wet bulb temperature measurements in the optimization of building air conditioning system control as a means to… (more)

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-pre The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC04-76DP03533 between the Department of Energy and Rockwell International Corporation.

Balmer, David K. (Broomfield, CO); Tyree, William H. (Boulder, CO)

1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

Room air monitor for radioactive aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A housing assembly for use with a room air monitor for simultaneous collection and counting of suspended particles includes a casing containing a combination detector-preamplifier system at one end, a filter system at the other end, and an air flow system consisting of an air inlet formed in the casing between the detector-preamplifier system and the filter system and an air passageway extending from the air inlet through the casing and out the end opposite the detector-preamplifier combination. The filter system collects suspended particles transported directly through the housing by means of the air flow system, and these particles are detected and examined for radioactivity by the detector-preamplifier combination. 2 figs.

Balmer, D.K.; Tyree, W.H.

1987-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor Docket No. EO-05-01: Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor, March 2002 to November 2004, showing the model overprediction Mirant: Ambient 24 Hour SO2 Values: Model vs Monitor More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station and Proposed Mirant Compliance Plan Answer of Potomac Electric Power Company and PJM lnterconnection, L.L.C. to the October 6, 2005 motion filed by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating

33

Tritium Room Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring the breathing air in tritium facility rooms for airborne tritium is a radiological safety requirement and a best practice for personnel safety. Besides audible alarms for room evacuation, these monitors often send signals for process shutdown, ventilation isolation, and cleanup system actuation to mitigate releases and prevent tritium spread to the environment. Therefore, these monitors are important not only to personnel safety but also to public safety and environmental protection. This paper presents an operating experience review of tritium monitor performance on demand during small (1 mCi to 1 Ci) operational releases, and intentional airborne inroom tritium release tests. The tritium tests provide monitor operation data to allow calculation of a statistical estimate for the reliability of monitors annunciating in actual tritium gas airborne release situations. The data show a failure to operate rate of 3.5E-06/monitor-hr with an upper bound of 4.7E-06, a failure to alarm on demand rate of 1.4E-02/demand with an upper bound of 4.4E-02, and a spurious alarm rate of 0.1 to 0.2/monitor-yr.

L. C. Cadwallader; B. J. Denny

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Modeling Ambient Air Quality In The Detroit-Windsor Airshed.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The spatial variability of airborne contaminants in an international airshed was investigated using geostatistics and air dispersion modeling. Analyses were conducted on contaminant species measured… (more)

Molaroni, Shannon Marie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Upper Ohio River Valley Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Ohio River Valley Project Upper Ohio River Valley Project In cooperation with key stakeholders including EPA, local and state environmental agencies, industry, and academia, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), a network for monitoring and characterizing PM2.5 in the Upper Ohio River Valley. This region was chosen because it has a high density of coal-fired electric utilities, heavy industries (e.g. coke and steel making), light industry, and transportation emission sources. It is also ideally situated to serve as a platform for the study of interstate pollution transport issues. This region, with its unique topography (hills and river valleys) as well as a good mix of urban and rural areas, has a high population of elderly who are susceptible to health impacts of fine particulate as well as other related environmental issues (e.g., acid rain, Hg deposition, ozone). A world-class medical research/university system is also located in the region, which will facilitate the subsequent use of the air quality data in studies of PM2.5 health effects.

37

Monitoring Air Fluoride (F-) Concentration around ALUAR Smelter in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Aluminum Reduction Technology. Presentation Title, Monitoring Air Fluoride ...

38

Time-resolved shadowgraphic study of femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures  

SciTech Connect

Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of aluminum under different ambient air pressures between 1 atm and 4 x 10{sup -4} Pa is investigated using a femtosecond time-resolved shadowgraphic method. It is observed that as the ambient air pressure decreases, the contact front becomes more and more distinct for a certain pressure range, demonstrating that the confinement effect of the ambient air to the ablated target material can play a critically important role in the laser ablation process. It is also found that the concentric and semicircular stripe pattern, which results from the diffraction of the probe beam by the expanding plume of a specific material state and is typically observed in the shadowgraphs for 1-2 ns delay time, gradually blurs and disappears while the ambient air pressure decreases from 1 atm to 7000 Pa. If a prepulse or a relatively large pulse pedestal exists before the main pulse, however, the stripe pattern can still be observed even though the ambient air pressure is 5 x 10{sup -4} Pa. It is thus inferred that what contributes to the formation of the unique stripe pattern is a mixture of the ejected target material and ionized background gas induced by the femtosecond laser ablation.

Wu Zehua; Zhu Xiaonong; Zhang Nan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous air monitors (CAMs) are used to sense radioactive particulates in room air of nuclear facilities. CAMs alert personnel of potential inhalation exposures to radionuclides and can also actuate room ventilation isolation for public and environmental protection. This paper presents the results of a CAM operating experience review of the DOE Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly reviewed. CAM location selection and operation are briefly discussed. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. Department of Energy and in other literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Power losses, human errors, and mechanical issues cause the majority of failures. The average “all modes” failure rate is 2.65E-05/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 9 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 252 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of CAMs in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER experiment.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for Primary lithium/air batteries operated in Ambient Enviroment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selection and optimization of non-aqueous electrolytes for ambient operations of lithium/air batteries has been studied. Organic solvents with low volatility and low moisture absorption are necessary to minimize the change of electrolyte compositions and the reaction between lithium anode and water during discharge process. It is critical to make the electrolytes with high polarity so that it can reduce wetting and flooding of carbon based air electrode and lead to improved battery performance. For ambient operations, the viscosity, ionic conductivity, and oxygen solubility of the electrolyte are less important than the polarity of organic solvents once the electrolyte has reasonable viscosity, conductivity, and oxygen solubility. It has been found that PC/EC mixture is the best solvent system and LiTFSI is the most feasible salt for ambient operations of Li/air batteries. Battery performance is not very sensitive to PC/EC ratio or salt concentration.

Xu, Wu; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Deyu; Zhang, Jiguang

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest Characterization of Ambient PM2.5 in the Upper Midwest As part of a Cooperative Agreement with DOE-NETL, the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is developing advanced sampling and analysis methodologies for particulate matter that can be used for source apportionment and to assist in health studies. These techniques will be used to determine sources of fine particulate matter in rural states such as North Dakota. Ambient particulate matter (PM) sampling and automated scanning electron microscopy, (ASEM) are being used to characterize and evaluate the sources of PM2.5 at three rural sites. Land use in the sampling site locations is dominated by ranching and small grain farming. Potential sources of PM in these areas include diesel- and gasoline-fueled motor vehicles, fugitive dust from gravel roads and agriculture, vegetation and fires, an oil refinery, and coal-fired power plants. PM2.5 samples were collected using an automatic cartridge collection unit for ASEM analysis. An ASEM method has been developed to size and chemically classify individual particles composing PM2.5.

42

Continuous air monitor filter changeout apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and corresponding method for automatically changing out a filter cartridge in a continuous air monitor. The apparatus includes: a first container sized to hold filter cartridge replacements; a second container sized to hold used filter cartridges; a transport insert connectively attached to the first and second containers; a shuttle block, sized to hold the filter cartridges that is located within the transport insert; a transport driver mechanism means used to supply a motive force to move the shuttle block within the transport insert; and, a control means for operating the transport driver mechanism.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various urban sulfate aerosol production mechanisms.radius of an evaporating aerosol droplet in which oxidationEnvironment THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOL DROPLETS IN AMBIENT AIR:

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Ambient monitoring of pollutants around synfuel plants : final report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was undertaken to aid in the evaluation of Environmental Monitoring Plans (EMP) submitted to the U.S. Synfuel Corporation by prospective operators of large-scale synfuel plants who are applying for financial ...

Golomb, D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air The Science Behind EPA's Proposed Revisions to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone (O3) and Particulate Matter Speaker(s): Morton Lippmann Date: May 17, 1997 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Richard Sextro Most scientific studies that are relevant to the setting of the NAAQS were not designed or performed with that specific application in mind, resulting in bits and pieces of the overall puzzle. Despite these limitations, the particulate matter (PM) and O3 literature reviews and analyses in the recently issued EPA Criteria documents and staff papers are the best prepared and most comprehensive ever available to an EPA Administrator as a basis for NAAQS decisions. This seminar will discuss the scientific basis

47

Abatement of Air Pollution: Air Pollution Control Equipment and Monitoring Equipment Operation (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations contain instructions for the operation and monitoring of air pollution control equipment, as well as comments on procedures in the event of equipment breakdown, failure, and...

48

Ambient air pollution exposure and the incidence of related health effects among racial/ethnic minorities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences among racial and ethnic groups in morbidity and mortality rates for diseases, including diseases with environmental causes, have been extensively documented. However, documenting the linkages between environmental contaminants, individual exposures, and disease incidence has been hindered by difficulties in measuring exposure for the population in general and for minority populations in particular. After briefly discussing research findings on associations of common air pollutants with disease incidence, the authors summarize recent studies of radial/ethnic subgroup differences in incidence of these diseases in the US. They then present evidence of both historic and current patterns of disproportionate minority group exposure to air pollution as measured by residence in areas where ambient air quality standards are violated. The current indications of disproportionate potential exposures of minority and low-income populations to air pollutants represent the continuation of a historical trend. The evidence of linkage between disproportionate exposure to air pollution of racial/ethnic minorities and low-income groups and their higher rates of some air pollution-related diseases is largely circumstantial. Differences in disease incidence and mortality rates among racial/ethnic groups are discussed for respiratory diseases, cancers, and lead poisoning. Pollutants of concern include CO, Pb, SO{sub 2}, O{sub 3}, and particulates.

Nieves, L.A.; Wernette, D.R.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental continuous air monitor inlet with combined preseparator and virtual impactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inlet for an environmental air monitor is described wherein a pre-separator interfaces with ambient environment air and removes debris and insects commonly associated with high wind outdoors and a deflector plate in communication with incoming air from the pre-separator stage, that directs the air radially and downward uniformly into a plurality of accelerator jets located in a manifold of a virtual impactor, the manifold being cylindrical and having a top, a base, and a wall, with the plurality of accelerator jets being located in the top of the manifold and receiving the directed air and accelerating directed air, thereby creating jets of air penetrating into the manifold, where a major flow is deflected to the walls of the manifold and extracted through ports in the walls. A plurality of receiver nozzles are located in the base of the manifold coaxial with the accelerator jets, and a plurality of matching flow restrictor elements are located in the plurality of receiver nozzles for balancing and equalizing the total minor flow among all the plurality of receiver nozzles, through which a lower, fractional flow extracts large particle constituents of the air for collection on a sample filter after passing through the plurality of receiver nozzles and the plurality of matching flow restrictor elements.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

51

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Climate, ambient air quality, and noise  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive background scientific data and related information on climate, ambient air quality, and ambient noise levels collected during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The report presents a general description of the climate add air quality for the islands of Hawaii (henceforth referred to as Hawaii), Maui and Oahu. It also presents a literature review as baseline information on the health effects of sulfide. The scientific background data and related information is being made available for use by others in conducting future scientific research in these areas. This report describes the environmental resources present in the areas studied (i.e., the affected environment) and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts.

Lombardi, D.A.; Blasing, T.J.; Easterly, C.E.; Reed, R.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hamilton, C.B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Performance assessment on continuous air monitors under real operating conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the nuclear industry, workers may be exposed to artificial radioactive aerosols. These aerosols are generally composed of particles with a diameter measuring between 0.1 {mu}m and 10 {mu}m. To protect workers in nuclear facilities, monitors that continuously measure radioactivity in the air are used. The main function of the monitor is to provide real-time measurement of activity concentration. Measurement of aerosol activity concentration can be affected by a number of factors specific to the aerosols and the instrument. The first part of the article will present the general operating principles of continuous air monitors (CAMs) and inherent measurement difficulties, as well as the main standard tests. The second section describes the experimental ICARE facility The ICARE facility generates standard artificial and natural radioactive aerosols for calibrating continuous air monitors under real operating conditions. (authors)

Monsanglant-Louvet, C.; Liatimi, N.; Gensdarmes, F. [Inst. of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety- IRSN, Saclay (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Concepts for Environmental Radioactive Air Sampling and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radioactive air sampling and monitoring is becoming increasingly important as regulatory agencies promulgate requirements for the measurement and quantification of radioactive contaminants. While researchers add to the growing body of knowledge in this area, events such as earthquakes and tsunamis demonstrate how nuclear systems can be compromised. The result is the need for adequate environmental monitoring to assure the public of their safety and to assist emergency workers in their response. Two forms of radioactive air monitoring include direct effluent measurements and environmental surveillance. This chapter presents basic concepts for direct effluent sampling and environmental surveillance of radioactive air emissions, including information on establishing the basis for sampling and/or monitoring, criteria for sampling media and sample analysis, reporting and compliance, and continual improvement.

Barnett, J. M.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

55

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Air Pollution Background Monitoring over the Former Soviet Union: Fifteen Years of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular air pollution observations in background areas over the former Soviet Union (FSU) were started in the 1980s. The air background monitoring network consisted of 16 stations working under the Integrated Monitoring (IM) Program. Several air ...

Sergey G. Paramonov

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Air Monitoring of Emissions from the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, and the subsequent emissions from Fukushima-Daiichi, we monitored the air near Los Alamos using four air-monitoring systems: the standard AIRNET samplers, the standard rad-NESHAP samplers, the NEWNET system, and high-volume air samplers. Each of these systems has advantages and disadvantages. In combination, they provide a comprehensive set of measurements of airborne radionuclides near Los Alamos during the weeks following March 11. We report air-monitoring measurements of the fission products released from the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear-power-plant accident in 2011. Clear gamma-spectrometry peaks were observed from Cs-134, Cs-136, Cs-137, I-131, I132, Te-132, and Te-129m. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides, are adequate for an assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi did not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos. The data demonstrate the capabilities of the Los Alamos air-monitoring systems.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Allen, Shannon P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Debra C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brock, Burgandy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coronado, Melissa A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dewart, Jean M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Eisele, William F. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fuehne, David P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, Milan S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Green, Andrew A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lujan, Joan J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MacDonell, Carolyn [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Whicker, Jeffrey J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

Influence of seasonal variations on ambient air quality in Al Jahra governorate, in the state of Kuwait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes the air pollution yearlong hourly mean continuous data from one of the monitoring station located at the top of polyclinic in Al-Jahra city in the State of Kuwait. The measurements cover major pollutants such as carbon monoxide, methane, ... Keywords: Al-Jahra, air pollution, continuous monitoring, seasonal variations, traffic

Raslan Alenezi

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Monitoring radioactive xenon gas in room air using activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

A method for monitoring room air for radioactive xenon gas is described. It uses activated charcoal vials, a vacuum source and a well-type scintillation counter. The method may be adapted for detection and identification of any radioactive gas excluding those with ultra-short half-lives. Sampling room air during xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) ventilation lung studies was performed using this technique. The results show that low concentrations of {sup 133}Xe in room air can be reliably detected and that staff exposure to {sup 133}Xe at this institution was within ICRP recommendations.

Langford, J.; Thompson, G. (Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth (Australia) Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

News and Update: Sensors Continually Monitor Water and Air Quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Initial Microstructural Analysis of A36 Steel from WTC Building 7 by J.R. Barnett, R.R. ... a system of sensors developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Sandia ... The system is designed to continually monitor water or air, in- situ, so sample ... to develop a program to train water utilities to assess system vulnerabilities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NETL: News Release - Energy Department Expands Air Monitoring Efforts to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 11, 2000 September 11, 2000 Energy Department Expands Air Monitoring Efforts to Deep South The Energy Department is expanding its efforts to collect data on microscopic airborne particles to the deep South. The department will award Southern Research Institute (SRI), Birmingham, AL, a $750,000 contract to augment an air monitoring station in Alabama with new capabilities to study fine particulate matter called PM2.5. The term stands for particulate matter with a diameter less than 2.5 micrometers, or about 1/30th the width of a human hair. The effort is intended to assist the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state agencies and the energy industry in gauging the level and sources of the tiny particles which are now regulated under new federal air quality standards.

62

ENHANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING THROUGH AN IMPROVED AIR MONITORING TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect

Environmental sampling (ES) is a key component of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguarding approaches throughout the world. Performance of ES (e.g. air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) supports the IAEAs mission of drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear material or nuclear activities in a State and has been available since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the IAEA Board of Governors (1992-1997). A recent step-change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at uranium/plutonium bulk handling facilities is an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Utilizing commonly used equipment throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories for particle analysis, researchers are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) silicon substrate has been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. The new collection equipment will allow IAEA nuclear safeguards inspectors to develop enhanced safeguarding approaches for complicated facilities. This paper will explore the use of air monitoring to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility that could be used for comparison of consistencies in declared operations. The implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Technical aspects of the air monitoring device and the analysis of its environmental samples will demonstrate the essential parameters required for successful application of the system.

Hanks, D.

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

63

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO[subscript 2] from ambient air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (“air capture”) in an industrial process has been proposed as an option for stabilizing global CO[subscript 2] concentrations. Published analyses suggest these air capture systems ...

House, Kurt Zenz

65

A Ruggedized Ultrasensitive Field Air Sampler for Differentially Determining Tritium Oxide and Gas in Ambient Air Atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

The instrument described is an operational, practical, ruggedized, ultrasensitive, tritium field air sampler assembled for the simultaneous, differential sampling of the environmental air for tritium oxide and elemental tritium. The system uses hardware assembled and packaged in such manner as to facilitate use in the field as well as in the laboratory. The sampling system occupies relatively small space and is simple to operate. The detection sensitivity approaches tritium background levels and is achieved by high volume sampling, efficient removal of tritium oxide and elemental tritium ("tritium gas"), and counting the recovered fractions by liquid scintillation spectrometry.

Brown, R.; Meyer, H. E.; Robinson, B.; Sheehan, W. E.

1971-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reflecting the Revised PM 2.5 National Ambient Air Quality Standard in NEPA Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This letter, from the Director of the Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Federal Activities, outlines EPA's position as to how the revised National Air Quality Standard should be reflected in NEPA evaluations of proposed actions.

67

Real-time automatic interpolation of ambient gamma dose rates from the Dutch radioactivity monitoring network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of radiological accidents and monitoring the spread of the contamination is of great importance. Following the Chernobyl accident many European countries have installed monitoring networks to perform this task. Real-time availability of automatically ... Keywords: Automatic interpolation, Interoperability, Kriging, Monitoring networks, Web services

Paul H. Hiemstra; Edzer J. Pebesma; Chris J. W. Twenhöfel; Gerard B. M. Heuvelink

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A rugged continuous air monitor for sampling radionuclides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new rugged continuous air monitor (CAM) for sampling radionuclide has been developed. The sampler was designed for analyzing aerosols from occupied environments of laboratories and samples extracted from stacks and ducts. Experiments were conducted to characterize the collection efficiency of the aerosol sampler system and to characterize the uniformity of particulate deposition on the filter surface as affected by variations in particle size and sampler flow rates. An experimental parametric analysis was conducted to determine the best internal geometric flow configuration, in order to achieve optimum aerosol collection. The results showed that at a flow rate of 56.6 L/min, 90% of 10 []m aerodynamic diameter (AD) aerosol particles penetrated through the sampler. The 10% loss was attributed to particle impaction at the location where the aerosol stream is turned from the vertical direction and then enters a 4 mm gap between a sampler filter and a planar detector, both of which are horizontally oriented. The cut point for the sampler was 20 []m AD. Uniformity of aerosol collection on the filter, as characterized by the coefficient of variation of the areal density deposits, was less than 10% for 10 []m AD aerosol particles. The sampler sealing integrity with respect to air leaks was tested by placing the sampler in a pressurized container and operating the sampler with the pressure in the container higher than that in the sampler for in-leakage, and with the pressure in the container less than that in the sampler for out-leakage. The pressure inside the container did not exceed 10 inches of water. For in-leakage tests, sulfur hexafluoride (SF?) was diluted with air and released into the container, external to the sampler. The ratio of the SF? concentration in the sampler to the SF? concentration in the container was calculated to characterize the integrity of the sampler system. For pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, the in-leakage was 0.03% and 0.02%, respectively. The same procedure was repeated for out-leakage except that the diluted SF? was released into the sampler. The leakage results for this procedure were 0.04% and 0.02% for pressure differences of 5 and 10 inches of water, respectively.

Martinez, Joseph Thaddeus

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Capturing CO2 from ambient air: a feasibility assessment Joshuah K. Stolaroff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

course. Second, the tower walls should be sprayed with a 1/2 inch layer of isofoam. Third, the internal model were exactly correct). We suggest to spray onto the vertical tower walls, all around and full, the central bearing tower walls are expanding for warmer air, causing a parabolic deformation of the ceiling

70

Distributed GIS for Monitoring and Modeling Urban Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The progress of technology has made the measurement of air quality and the simulation of complex air pollution models both feasible and cost-effective. However, there is a long way to go in terms of facilitating widespread ...

Yeang, Chen-Hsiang, 1969-

71

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla, Shyamnath Gollakota, David Wetherall, Joshua R. Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Backscatter: Wireless Communication Out of Thin Air Vincent Liu, Aaron Parks, Vamsi Talla owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise. Request permissions from permissions@acm.org. SIGCOMM'13, August 12­16, 2013, Hong Kong, China. Copyright

Hochberg, Michael

73

Monitoring System Used to Optimize Compressed Air System Efficiency, Cut Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1994, Thomson Consumer Electronics (RCA), an international manufacturer of electronics equipment purchased a UtillTRACK® Monitoring System for a plant in Indianapolis, Indiana. The system monitored gas and electric meters, substations, main feeders, and major equipment and systems including compressed air. For the compressed air system, monitored data included compressor amps, electrical demand and consumption, pressure and airflow. The resulting UtiliTRACK® reports and graphs showed a significant variation in system efficiency depending upon the demand for air (day of week, time of day, production schedule) and which compressor or compressors were operating. By working with the boiler plant operators and making minor modifications to the existing compressor controls, the operating sequence was modified to maintain high system efficiency under all operating conditions. Monitored data after the changes were made showed a 20% reduction in compressed air system operating costs.

Holmes, W. A.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Real-Time In-Situ Water (& Air) Field Monitor  

2 Managed by UT-Battelle Presentation_namefor the U.S. Department of Energy The Problem: Environmental impact of VOCs and high cost of monitoring

75

Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

JONES, R.A.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

MAQS: a personalized mobile sensing system for indoor air quality monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most people spend more than 90% of their time indoors; indoor air quality (IAQ) influences human health, safety, productivity, and comfort. This paper describes MAQS, a personalized mobile sensing system for IAQ monitoring. In contrast with existing ... Keywords: air quality sensing, location based service, smartphone

Yifei Jiang; Kun Li; Lei Tian; Ricardo Piedrahita; Xiang Yun; Omkar Mansata; Qin Lv; Robert P. Dick; Michael Hannigan; Li Shang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

79

Technical basis and evaluation criteria for an air sampling/monitoring program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air sampling and monitoring programs at DOE facilities need to be reviewed in light of revised requirements and guidance found in, for example, DOE Order 5480.6 (RadCon Manual). Accordingly, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) air monitoring program is being revised and placed on a sound technical basis. A draft technical basis document has been written to establish placement criteria for instruments and to guide the ``retrospective sampling or real-time monitoring`` decision. Facility evaluations are being used to document air sampling/monitoring needs, and instruments are being evaluated in light of these needs. The steps used to develop this program and the technical basis for instrument placement are described.

Gregory, D.C.; Bryan, W.L.; Falter, K.G.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Investigating the association between birth weight and complementary air pollution metrics: a cohort study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land use regression models for traffic-related air pollution.air pollution metrics, for pregnancy-long exposures (a) Landpollution were used (measurements from ambient monitoring stations, predictions from land

Laurent, Olivier; Wu, Jun; Li, Lianfa; Chung, Judith; Bartell, Scott

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 6- Continuous Emissions Monitors and Opacity Monitors (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stationary sources, including fossil fuel fired steam or hot water generating units, may be required to install and operate a continuous emissions monitoring system equipped with an opacity monitor...

82

Dynamic Control of Lab Air Change Rates using Multiplexed IEQ Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Control of Lab Air Change Rates using Multiplexed IEQ Monitoring Dynamic Control of Lab Air Change Rates using Multiplexed IEQ Monitoring Speaker(s): Gordon P. Sharp Date: October 14, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Many aspects of a lab are monitored today in real time such as HVAC equipment operation and lab airflow quantities. However, the quality of lab room airflow or more specifically, the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) performance of a lab, beyond just temperature or perhaps humidity, is rarely monitored due to sensor cost and calibration issues. This is unfortunate, since detailed IEQ monitoring data can be used to substantially reduce lab energy consumption, increase lab safety and with some additional analysis, this data can be used to perform effective continuous commissioning. This presentation discusses a new type of real

83

Analysis of historical residential air-conditioning equipment sizing using monitored data  

SciTech Connect

Monitored data were analyzed to determine whether residential air conditioners in the Pacific Northwest historically have been sized properly to meet or slightly exceed actual cooling requirements. Oversizing air-conditioning equipment results in a loss of efficiency because of increased cycling and also lowers humidity control. On the other hand, the penalty of undersizing air-conditioning equipment may be some loss of comfort during extremely hot weather. The monitored data consist of hourly space-conditioning electrical energy use and internal air temperature data collected during the past 7 years from 75 residences in the Pacific Northwest. These residences are equipped with central air conditioners or heat pumps. The periods with the highest cooling energy use were analyzed for each site. A standard industry sizing methodology was used for each site to determine a sizing estimate. Both the sizing recommendation based on Manual J and peak monitored loads are compared to the capacity of the installed equipment for each site to study how the actual capacity differed from both the estimate of proper sizing and from actual demands. Characteristics of the maximum cooling loads are analyzed here to determine which conditions put the highest demand on the air conditioner. Specifically, internal air temperature data are used to determine when the highest cooling loads occur, at constant thermostat settings or when the thermostat was set down. This analysis of monitored data also provides insight into the extent that occupant comfort may be affected by undersizing air conditioners. The findings of this research indicate that cooling equipment historically has often but not always been oversized beyond industry-recommended levels. However, some occupants in homes with undersized, properly sized, and, in rare occasions, even oversized cooling equipment appear to suffer because the cooling equipment cannot always provide adequate cooling. Key findings are summarized.

Lucas, R.G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Influence of Topography and Ambient Stability on the Characteristics of Cold-Air Pools: A Numerical Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution numerical investigation of a cold-air pooling process (under quiescent conditions) is carried out that systematically highlights the relations between the characteristics of the cold-air pools (e.g., slope winds, vertical ...

Marwan Katurji; Shiyuan Zhong

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient Noise in the Arctic Ocean,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol.for sound speed in the oceans,” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. Vol. 70,Pritchard, R. S. , “Arctic Ocean Background Noise Caused by

Roth, Ethan H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING USING LOCATION SPECIFIC AIR MONITORING IN BULK HANDLING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Since the introduction of safeguards strengthening measures approved by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (1992-1997), international nuclear safeguards inspectors have been able to utilize environmental sampling (ES) (e.g. deposited particulates, air, water, vegetation, sediments, soil and biota) in their safeguarding approaches at bulk uranium/plutonium handling facilities. Enhancements of environmental sampling techniques used by the IAEA in drawing conclusions concerning the absence of undeclared nuclear materials or activities will soon be able to take advantage of a recent step change improvement in the gathering and analysis of air samples at these facilities. Location specific air monitoring feasibility tests have been performed with excellent results in determining attribute and isotopic composition of chemical elements present in an actual test-bed sample. Isotopic analysis of collected particles from an Aerosol Contaminant Extractor (ACE) collection, was performed with the standard bulk sampling protocol used throughout the IAEA network of analytical laboratories (NWAL). The results yielded bulk isotopic values expected for the operations. Advanced designs of air monitoring instruments such as the ACE may be used in gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEP) to detect the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or enrichments not declared by a State. Researchers at Savannah River National Laboratory in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing the next generation of ES equipment for air grab and constant samples that could become an important addition to the international nuclear safeguards inspector's toolkit. Location specific air monitoring to be used to establish a baseline environmental signature of a particular facility employed for comparison of consistencies in declared operations will be described in this paper. Implementation of air monitoring will be contrasted against the use of smear ES when used during unannounced inspections, design information verification, limited frequency unannounced access, and complementary access visits at bulk handling facilities. Analysis of technical features required for tamper indication and resistance will demonstrate the viability of successful application of the system in taking ES within a bulk handling location. Further exploration of putting this technology into practice is planned to include mapping uranium enrichment facilities for the identification of optimal for installation of air monitoring devices.

Sexton, L.; Hanks, D.; Degange, J.; Brant, H.; Hall, G.; Cable-Dunlap, P.; Anderson, B.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Notification to Mirant by the Commonwealth of Virginia of Serious Violations of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Sulfur Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2005 9, 2005 Lisa D. Johnson, President Mirant Potomac River, LLC 8711 Westphalia Road Upper Marlboro, Maryland 20774 Dear Ms. Johnson: DEQ is in receipt of the results of Mirant's "downwash" modeling provided by Mirant to DEQ pursuant to the consent special order between the State Air Pollution Control Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC. A cursory review of the modeling reveals that emissions from the Potomac River Generating Station result in, cause or substantially contribute to serious violations of the primary national ambient air quality standards or "NAAQS" for sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and PM 10 . NAAQS are established by the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency at concentrations necessary to protect human health with an adequate margin of safety.

89

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

New and Emerging Technologies for Real-Time Air and Surface Beryllium Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, five emerging technologies were identified for real-time monitoring of airborne beryllium: Microwave-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (MIPS), Aerosol Beam-Focused Laser-Induced Plasma Spectroscopy (ABFLIPS), Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Surfaced-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Spectroscopy, and Micro-Calorimetric Spectroscopy (CalSpec). Desired features of real-time air beryllium monitoring instrumentation were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies as well as their unique demonstrated capability to provide real-time monitoring of similar materials. However, best available technologies were considered, regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features. None of the five technologies have the capability to measure the particle size of airborne beryllium. Although reducing the total concentration of airborne beryllium is important, current literature suggests that reducing or eliminating the concentration of respirable beryllium is critical for worker health protection. Eight emerging technologies were identified for surface monitoring of beryllium. CalSpec, MIPS, SERS, LIBS, Laser Ablation, Absorptive Stripping Voltametry (ASV), Modified Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) Spectroscopy, and Gamma BeAST. Desired features of real-time surface beryllium monitoring were developed from the Y-12 CBDPP. These features were used as guidelines for the identification of potential technologies. However, the best available technologies were considered regardless of their ability to comply with the desired features.

Phifer, B.E. Jr.; Churnetski, E.L.; Cooke, L.E.; Reed, J.J.; Howell, M.L.; Smith, V.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Monitoring and evaluation of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached houses in Austin, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE initiated this project to evaluate the performance of an air conditioner retrofit program in Austin, Texas. The City's Austin's Resource Management Department pursued this project to quantify the retrofit effect of replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency air conditioners in single-family detached homes. If successfully implemented, this retrofit program could help defer construction of a new power plant which is a major goal of this department. The project compares data collected from 12 houses during two cooling seasons under pre-retrofit and then post-retrofit air conditioner units. The existing low-efficiency air conditioners were monitored during the 1987 cooling season, replaced during the 1987--88 heating season with new, smaller sized, high-efficiency units, and then monitored again during the 1988 cooling season. Results indicated that the air conditioner retrofits reduce the annual air conditioner electric consumption and peak electric demand by an average of 38%. When normalized to the nominal capacity of the air conditioner, average demand savings were 1.12 W/ft{sup 2} and estimated annual energy savings were 1.419 kWh/ft{sup 2}. Individual air conditioner power requirements were found to be a well defined function of outdoor temperature as expected. In the absence of detailed data, estimates of the peak demand reductions of new air conditioners can be made from the manufacturer's specifications. Air conditioner energy consumption proved to be strongly linear as a function of the outdoor temperature as expected when taken as an aggregate. No noticeable differences in the diversity factor of the air conditioner usage were found. Analysis of the retrofit effect using PRISM yields estimates of the reduction in normalized annual consumption (NAC) and annual cooling consumption of 12% and 30%. 2 refs., 11 figs., 17 tabs.

Burns, R.; Hough, R.E. (Fleming (W.S.) and Associates, Inc., Syracuse, NY (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calculation of SY tank annulus continuous air monitor readings after postulated leak scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to determine whether or not a continuous air monitor (CAM) monitoring the annulus of one of the SY Tanks would be expected to alarm after three postulated leak scenarios. Using data and references provided by Lockheed Martin`s Tank Farm personnel, estimated CAM readings were calculated at specific times after the postulated scenarios might have occurred. Potential CAM readings above background at different times were calculated for the following leak scenarios: Leak rate of 0.01 gal/min; Leak rate of 0.03 gal/min (best estimate of the maximum probable leak rate from a single-shell tank); and Leak of 73 gal (equivalent to a {1/4}-in. leak on the floor of the annulus). The equation used to make the calculations along with descriptions and/or explanations of the terms are included, as is a list of the assumptions and/or values used for the calculations.

Kenoyer, J.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air conditioning units in psychrometric rooms at Texas A&M University. All units were tested using ARI Standard 210/240 (1989) test procedures. Tests were conducted at indoor conditions of 80'F (26.7'C) db and 67'F (19.4'C) wb, and outdoor db temperatures of 82'F (27.8'C), 95-F (35-C), 100-F (37.8-C), 105-F (40.6-C), 1 10-F (43.3-C), and 120-F (48.90C). The second phase of the research involved the analysis of manufacturers' published cooling performance data for various hardware configurations. For the experimental work, measurements were taken to determine total capacity, system power, EER, and power factor. These results were then compared to manufacturers' predicted values. For the capacity, the experimental results were an average of 2.6% below the manufacturers' published values for outdoor temperatures from 85'F (29.4'C) to 115'F (46.l'C). Experimental power measurements were on average 0.4% above manufacturers' listed results. For the EER, experimental results were an average of 2.9% less than the manufacturers' predicted values. The power factors of all units were above 0.95 for the tested outdoor temperatures. In the analysis of manufacturers' published data, relationships between steady-state performance, cyclic performance, and hardware configuration were investigated for a variety of air conditioning units. A statistical relationship was found between the SEER of a unit and its corresponding EER. The split-system units possessed greater increases in EER for a given increase in SEER than the package or two-speed units. Averages values of EER/SEER for EER's at 95F (350C) were highest for the split-system units, followed by the package and two-speed units, respectively. Normalized capacity, power, and EER curves were investigated at outdoor temperatures from 85F (29.40C) to 115OF (46.1"C). On average, the two-speed units showed the smallest decrease in capacity with an increase in outdoor temperature, followed by the split-system and package-system units. The smallest power increase and smallest EER decrease with an increase in outdoor temperature were exhibited by the split-system units, followed by the two-speed and package-system units.

Bain, Joel Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Use of MCNPX for Alpha Spectrometry Simulations of a Continuous Air Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if the alpha energy spectrum in a Passive Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector, as modeled by MCNPX [1], can be used to design a radon stripping algorithm for a continuous air monitor (CAM). This stripping algorithm would be employed to discriminate naturally occurring radioisotopes from the anthropogenic for nuclear safety -related applications. It is hoped that using an algorithm based on MCNPX simulations, the CAM will not be prone to false alarms when radon levels are dynamic as identified in other CAM systems [2,3]. This work is focused on the design of the next generation air particulate detector (NGAPD) for the United States Navy. The primary isotope of interest is Co-60. This radionuclide emits a beta with an average energy of 96 keV. Therefore, once deposited on the CAM filter, it will produce a beta continuum seen by the PIPS detector. In addition, as radon progeny is deposited on the air filter, these will give rise to characteristic alpha peaks and a beta continuum. This is primarily an issue in port-or land-based applications. Ultimately, measurement of a radon alpha spectrum is desired to predict the amount of beta activity which would be measured from the radon progeny decay chains. All excess beta activity could then be attributed to anthropogenic sources once the radon progeny contributions have been stripped out.

Robert Hayes, Craig Marianno

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Air Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What We Monitor & Why » What We Monitor & Why » Air Quality Air Quality To preserve our existing wilderness-area air quality, LANL implements a conscientious program of air monitoring. April 12, 2012 Real-time data monitoring for particulate matter An air monitoring field team member tests one of LANL's tapered element oscillating microbalance samplers, which collects real-time particulate matter data. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email LANL monitors air quality 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Why we monitor air LANL monitors many different pathways in order to assess their impact on workers, the public, animals, and plants. We monitor the air around the Laboratory to ensure our operations are not affecting the air of nearby

97

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

98

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S.Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

102

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Tonopah Airport, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Tonopah Airport, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and the Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl, D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Crater Flat, Nye County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) (cover page figure) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch  

SciTech Connect

Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded an RPD of 50% between years. However, they did not exceed the bioaccumulation critical values or the critical body residues corresponding to the no observed effect dose (NOED) and the lowest observed effect dose (LOED) with one exception. The Cd concentrations exceeded the NOED and LOED for the Manchester Lab Pier and the Pike Place Market samples. For the PAHs and PCB, the 2012 data were generally lower than 2010 and some cases significantly lower for PAHs and none of the available invertebrate benchmarks were exceeded.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations  

SciTech Connect

In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station 401. This difference may be the result of using filter media at Station 400 with a smaller pore size than the media used at the other two stations. Average annual gamma exposure at Station 401 is slightly greater than at Station 400 and 402. Average annual gamma exposure at all three TTR stations are in the upper range to slightly higher than values reported for the CEMP stations surrounding the TTR. At higher wind speeds, the saltation counts are greater at Station 401 than at Station 402 while the suspended particulate concentrations are greater at Station 402 than at Statin 401. Although these observations seem counterintuitive, they are likely the result of differences in the soil material present at the two sites. Station 401 is located on an interfluve elevated above two adjacent drainage channels where the soil surface is likely to be composed of coarser material. Station 402 is located in finer sediments at the playa edge and is also subject to dust from a dirt road only 500 m to the north. During prolonged high wind events, suspended dust concentrations at Station 401 peaked with the initial winds then decreased whereas dust concentrations at Station 402 peaked with each peak in the wind speed. This likely reflects a limited PM10 source that is quickly expended at Station 401 relative to an abundant PM10 source at Station 402. In CY2013, to facilitate comparisons between radiological analyses of collected dust, the filter media at all three stations will be standardized. In addition, a sequence of samples will be collected at Station 400 using both types of filter media to enable development of a mathematical relationship between the results derived from the two filter types. Additionally, having acquired approximately four years of observations at Stations 400 and 401 and a year of observations at Station 402, a period-of-record analysis of the radiological and airborne dust conditions will be undertaken.

Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) Air Pollution Control Program (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Department of Environment and Natural Resources South Dakota's Air Pollution Control Program is intended to maintain air quality standards through monitoring the ambient air quality throughout the

107

Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

108

Air Pollution (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states regulations for monitoring air pollution, methods for permit applications, emission limitations for pollutants and air quality standards.

109

Air pollutant monitoring for the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the methodology and presents the summary results of the air pollutant monitoring program conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in support of the East Bay Children's Respiratory Health Study. The full study is examining the effects of chronic exposure to traffic-related pollutants on respiratory health among 3rd and 4th grade children attending ten neighborhood elementary schools in the San Francisco East Bay Area (Hayward, San Leandro and Oakland, CA). The demographically similar schools are located at varying distances from the I-880 and CA-92 freeways. Several schools were selected because they are located within 300 m in the predominant downwind direction (east) from either of the freeways. Measurements of multiple pollutants were made outdoors at the schools over 1-2 week intervals for 14 weeks in spring and eight weeks in fall 2001 using a custom-designed and validated package of commercially available monitoring equipment. Particulate matter was sampled over all hours (24 h per day) or during schools hours only with battery-operated programmable pumps and inlet devices for PM{sub 10} and PM{sub 2.5}. These pumps were modified to allow for up to 10 days of continuous operation. Fine particle mass and black carbon (BC) were determined from the collected filters. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2}) were measured with passive samplers. Carbon monoxide (CO) was measured continuously with an electrochemical sensor. Gasoline-related volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured with passive samplers during three 4-week intervals in spring 2001 and two 4-week periods in early 2002. All samplers were deployed in a metal cabinet located outside at each school. Ranges of study average pollutant concentrations (all-hours) at the ten individual schools were: NO{sub x}, 33-68 ppb; NO{sub 2}, 19-31 ppb; PM{sub 10} mass, 27-32 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; PM{sub 2.5} mass, 12-15 {micro}g/m{sup 3}; and BC associated with PM{sub 2.5}, 0.6-1.0 {micro}g/m{sup 3}. Although statistical analysis of the data is yet to be performed, some general observations can be made. Absolute pollutant levels varied by season and week, but the simultaneous sampling design allowed for comparisons of concentrations among schools during each interval. Pollutant concentrations at each school were normalized to the sampling period averages among all schools. The normalized concentrations were generally consistent at each school throughout the entire study, suggesting that measured differences represent ongoing conditions and chronic exposures in the vicinities of the schools. Substantially elevated concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC, and somewhat elevated concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} were observed at one school located less than 100 meters to the east of I-880. Normalized concentrations of NO{sub x}, NO{sub 2}, and BC were also higher at the three other ''nearby and downwind'' schools relative to those located far from any freeway or other major traffic source. An ancillary monitoring program was implemented to examine the correlation between school-based pollutant measurements and measurements throughout the neighborhoods adjacent to three of the schools. Volunteer households were obtained from among the families of participating schoolchildren. Concentrations of NO{sub x} and NO{sub 2} were measured with passive samplers outside the homes of these volunteers during one of two 1-week periods in spring 2002. Simultaneous measurements were conducted at all ten of the schools and a central monitoring station during each week. The neighborhoods surrounding two schools were predominantly upwind of the I-880 freeway, while the neighborhood surrounding the other school was downwind from I-880. The overall distribution of concentrations observed for the residences near the downwind school appeared to be substantially higher than the regional background concentrations. The variability observed within the neighborhoods appeared to be, at least in part, explained by the proximity of individual residences to the freeway or

Singer, Brett C.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > Air Quality Research Innovations for Existing Plants Air Quality Research Ambient Monitoring Emissions Characterization Predictive Modeling & Evaluation Health Effects Regulatory Drivers Air Quality Research Reference Shelf The NETL Air Quality Research program is designed to resolve the scientific uncertainties associated with the atmospheric formation, distribution, and chemical transformation of pollutant emissions from today's coal-fired power plants, and to obtain a realistic assessment of the human health impacts of these emissions. Results of this research will help the DOE Office of Fossil Energy address policy questions regarding coal plant emissions and provide guidance for future emissions control R&D programs at

111

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: In-House R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Ambient Monitoring - NETL / OST Monitoring Site This project is part of the NETL In-House R&D Ambient Air Quality Research Program. As part of the overall DOE-FE air quality sampling and analysis activities, NETL's Office of Science & Technology (OST) has initiated an in-house ambient monitoring program that builds upon the Center's core capabilities and competencies in inorganic and organic analyses and instrumentation. The program has culminated with the establishment of a fine particulate/air toxics sampling station at the Center's research laboratory in Pittsburgh. This air monitoring station consists of a new 715 ft2 indoor facility housing equipment to monitor continuously gaseous pollutants O3, SO2, NH3, NOy, NOx, CO, H2S, and peroxide, and PM2.5 particulates containing carbon and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. In addition, a fully-instrumented, fourteen bay rack has been constructed to support a variety of ambient monitoring equipment. OST will also collaborate with Consol and the Allegheny (PA) County Health Department in evaluating the performance of PM2.5 FRM samplers. The NETL sampling station will use an existing 10-meter meteorological tower that has been collecting weather-related data for the past seven years. Two in-house laboratories have been completely renovated to support the analysis of PM2.5/air toxics samples, including the installation of a Kratos MS50 high-resolution mass spectrometer for the detailed characterization of organic compounds.

112

Monitoring Air Quality from Space: The Case for the Geostationary Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality (AQ) is defined by the atmospheric composition of gases and particulates near the Earth's surface. This composition depends on local emissions of pollutants, chemistry, and transport processes; it is highly variable in space and time. Key ...

W. A. Lahoz; V.-H. Peuch; J. Orphal; J.-L. Attié; K. Chance; X. Liu; D. Edwards; H. Elbern; J.-M. Flaud; M. Claeyman; L. El Amraoui

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Automatic monitoring of selected indoor air parameters at three apartment complexes  

SciTech Connect

The impact of three different ventilation systems on the temperature and humidity of three similar apartment complexes is investigated in this study. Each complex has six apartments. The ventilation systems are: natural ventilation, mechanical exhaust ventilation, and mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation. The computer controlled data collection system measures the ventilation rate, relative humidity, indoor air temperature, wind speed, wind direction, outdoor temperature, and humidity. The air change rate depends mainly on the habits of the tenants. The mean air change rate of the houses was between 0.1 to 0.8 ac/h. Great daily variation of the air exchange was observed in the data. Negative correlation between relative humidity and ventilation was very significant in 27 out of 47 cases. Only two cases had very significant positive correlation between ventilation and humidity. Mechanical supply and exhaust ventilation have the greatest variation in ventilation/relative humidity relations.

Savolainen, T.; Raunemaa, T (Univ. of Kuopio (Finland)); Wellman, K. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Helsinki (Finland))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Estimation of a semi-physical GLBE model using dual EnKF learning algorithm coupled with a sensor network design strategy: Application to air field monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the fusion of two complementary approaches for modeling and monitoring the spatio-temporal behavior of a fluid flow system. We also propose a mobile sensor deployment strategy to produce the most accurate estimate of the true ... Keywords: Air field monitoring, Grey-box modeling, Model fusion, Sensor network design

Gilles Roussel, Laurent Bourgois, Mohammed Benjelloun, Gilles Delmaire

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte reservoirs for increased long-term baseline stability, and larger integral batteries allowing operation for in excess of 3 months without intervention. In this case sensors were sealed with rubber O-rings on the bottom of the enclosure behind a... The use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring urban air quality in low-cost, high-density networks. M. I. Mead1*, O.A.M. Popoola1, G. B. Stewart1, P. Landshoff3, M. Calleja2, M. Hayes2, J. J. Baldovi1, T. F. Hodgson1, M. W. McLeod1, J. Dicks4...

Mead, M I; Popoola, O A M; Stewart, G B; Landshoff, P; Calleja, M; Hayes, M; Baldovi, J J; Hodgson, T F; McLeod, M W; Dicks, J; Lewis, A; Cohen, J; Baron, R; Saffell, J R; Jones, R L

116

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis There has been invented a process for analyzing ambient air in a microwave induced plasma without use of an additional carrier gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and sample gas conduits is used to enhance dependability of the plasma. This apparatus embodiment of the invention has a concentric arrangement of

117

Los Alamos Air Monitoring Data Related to the Fukushima Daiichi Reactor  

SciTech Connect

In response to the disasters in Japan on March 11, 2011, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is collecting air data and analyzing the data for fission products. At present, we report preliminary data from three high-volume air samplers and one stack sampler. Iodine-131 (I-131) is not optimally measured by our standard polypropylene filters. In addition to the filter data, we have one measurement obtained from a charcoal cartridge. These data, together with measurements of other radionuclides are adequate for a preliminary assessment and assure us that radionuclides from Fukushima Daiichi do not present a threat to human health at or near Los Alamos.

McNaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Real-time air quality monitoring through mobile sensing in metropolitan areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, pollution measurements are performed using expensive equipment at fixed locations or dedicated mobile equipment laboratories. This is a coarse-grained and expensive approach where the pollution measurements are few and far in-between. ... Keywords: air quality, mobile sensing, participatory sensing, pollution, social networks, urban sensing

Srinivas Devarakonda, Parveen Sevusu, Hongzhang Liu, Ruilin Liu, Liviu Iftode, Badri Nath

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Monitoring the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner under Degraded Conditions on a Test Bench  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under degraded conditions. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 threeton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion device. Results are presented here for a series of tests in which the various commonly occurring degraded conditions were simulated on a test bench. At present, very little information is available which quantifies the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of systemwide maintenance programs. This report also discuss the development of a diagnostic procedure based on measurement of refrigerant and air side temperatures.

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Haberl, J. S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archived Projects Archived Projects Ambient PM 2.5 Air Sampling & Analysis - The Upper Ohio River Valley Project ATS-Chester Engineers / Desert Research Institute 9/15/1998 Steubenville Comprehensive Air Monitoring Program CONSOL Energy Inc. / Wells Cargo / Air Quality Sciences, Inc. / Wheeling Jesuit University / Saint Vincent College / Franciscan University of Steubenville / Optimal Technologies Inc. / Harvard School of Public Health / Ohio University 3/8/2000 National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographical Information System (NATCARB) University of Kansas Center for Research 9/27/2000 Environmental Regulatory Analysis Argonne National Laboratory 1/15/2003 Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions in Coal Power Plant Plumes Electric Power Research Institute / Frontier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Second order ambient intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text attempts to describe an imagined future of ambient intelligence. It assumes that one day most of the current issues within ambient intelligence will be solved and that a second order ambient intelligence will be formulated, one with new research ... Keywords: Critique of ambient intelligence, adaptive systems, animal machine interaction, critical futurism, long-term behavior, second order ambient intelligence, temporal design

Marc Böhlen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Air Monitoring Modeling of Radioactive Releases During Proposed PFP Complex Demolition Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is part of the planning process for the demolition of the 234-5Z, 236-Z, 242-Z, and 291-Z-1 structures at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) facilities on the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) demolition planning effort by making engineering estimates of potential releases for various potential demolition alternatives. This report documents an analysis considering open-air demolition using standard techniques. It does not document any decisions about the decommissioning approaches; it is expected that this report will be revisited as demolition plans are finalized.

Napier, Bruce A.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

124

Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results  

SciTech Connect

During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

Hartwell William T.,Daniels Jeffrey,Nikolich George,Shadel Craig,Giles Ken,Karr Lynn,Kluesner Tammy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A sensor management architecture concept for monitoring emissions from open-air demil operations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, CA proposed a sensor concept to detect emissions from open-burning/open-detonation (OB/OD) events. The system would serve two purposes: (1) Provide data to demilitarization operations about process efficiency, allowing process optimization for cleaner emissions and higher efficiency. (2) Provide data to regulators and neighboring communities about materials dispersing into the environment by OB/OD operations. The proposed sensor system uses instrument control hardware and data visualization software developed at Sandia National Laboratories to link together an array of sensors to monitor emissions from OB/OD events. The suite of sensors would consist of various physical and chemical detectors mounted on stationary or mobile platforms. The individual sensors would be wirelessly linked to one another and controlled through a central command center. Real-time data collection from the sensors, combined with integrated visualization of the data at the command center, would allow for feedback to the sensors to alter operational conditions to adjust for changing needs (i.e., moving plume position, increased spatial resolution, increased sensitivity). This report presents a systems study of the problem of implementing a sensor system for monitoring OB/OD emissions. The goal of this study was to gain a fuller understanding of the political, economic, and technical issues for developing and fielding this technology.

Johnson, Michael M.; Robinson, Jerry D.; Stoddard, Mary Clare; Horn, Brent A.; Lipkin, Joel; Foltz, Greg W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

127

Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

DOE/NV/26383-LTR2008-01 Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Caliente, Lincoln County, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Beatty, Sarcobatus Flats, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat NWR, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of the site's sampling program.

J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Improvement to Air2Air® Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cooling tower with relatively drier and cooler ambient air. This is done in an air-to-air heat exchanger made up of plastic sheets with two discreet air pathways. As the warm,...

131

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

Unknown

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Prediction and Monitoring of Clear-Air Turbulence: An Evaluation of the Applicability of the Rawinsonde System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to sense turbulent layers in the free atmosphere is a fundamental requirement necessary for further progress in the area of clear air turbulence (CAT) prediction. Results from an investigation of the applicability of rawinsonde (RW) ...

John L. Keller

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Visual calibration and correction for ambient illumination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many applications require that an image will appear the same regardless of where or how it is displayed. However, the conditions in which an image is displayed can adversely affect its appearance. Computer monitor screens not only emit light, but can ... Keywords: Viewing conditions, ambient illumination, contrast correction, device independence, ergonomics, perceptually accurate display, reflections

Kate Devlin; Alan Chalmers; Erik Reinhard

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comparison of Near-field and Far-field Air Monitoring of Plutonium-contaminated Soils from the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Operation Roller Coaster, a series of nuclear material dispersal experiments, resulted in three areas (Clean Slates 1, 2, and 3) of widespread surface soil plutonium (Pu) contamination on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), located 225 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The State's Division of Environmental Protection raised concerns that dispersal of airborne Pu particles from the sites could result in undetected deposition further downwind that the background monitoring stations. Air monitoring data from different distances from the Clean Slate sites but during the same period of time were compared. From the available data, there is no indication that airborne PM10 particles are being transported to the farther distance,however, the data are statistically insufficient to conclude whether there is a difference in transport of respirable Pu particles to the closer verses the farther sites from the Clean Slate sites.

John L. Bowen; David S. Shafer

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Oklahoma Clean Air Act (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the authority for the Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality to administer programs to maintain and monitor air quality across Oklahoma. The Department monitors...

136

2006 LANL Radionuclide Air Emissions Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the impacts from emissions of radionuclides at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for calendar year 2006. This report fulfills the requirements established by the Radionuclide National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad-NESHAP). This report is prepared by LANL's Rad-NESHAP compliance team, part of the Environmental Protection Division. The information in this report is required under the Clean Air Act and is being reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The highest effective dose equivalent (EDE) to an off-site member of the public was calculated using procedures specified by the EPA and described in this report. LANL's EDE was 0.47 mrem for 2006. The annual limit established by the EPA is 10 mrem per year. During calendar year 2006, LANL continuously monitored radionuclide emissions at 28 release points, or stacks. The Laboratory estimates emissions from an additional 58 release points using radionuclide usage source terms. Also, LANL uses a network of air samplers around the Laboratory perimeter to monitor ambient airborne levels of radionuclides. To provide data for dispersion modeling and dose assessment, LANL maintains and operates meteorological monitoring systems. From these measurement systems, a comprehensive evaluation is conducted to calculate the EDE for the Laboratory. The EDE is evaluated as any member of the public at any off-site location where there is a residence, school, business, or office. In 2006, this location was the Los Alamos Airport Terminal. The majority of this dose is due to ambient air sampling of plutonium emitted from 2006 clean-up activities at an environmental restoration site (73-002-99; ash pile). Doses reported to the EPA for the past 10 years are shown in Table E1.

David P. Fuehne

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Environmental monitoring report, May 10, 1993--June 1, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) DOE Oversight Division (DOE-O) monitoring effort will serve as oversight with ongoing compliance and ambient sampling by Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor staff programs. These sources provide a comprehensive database which must be reviewed and analyzed in order to streamline DOE-O sampling efforts. DOE-O monitoring is necessary to provide quality control, to ensure compliance, to ensure completeness, and to assure protection of public health and the environment. The Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA), includes a section on Environmental Monitoring as Attachment A. To accomplish these objectives, DOE-O will implement the following monitoring programs: surface waters; ground water; air; fish and wildlife. In addition, radiation monitoring has been conducted in all of these areas.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Environmental Quality: Air (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Environmental Quality regulates air quality in Louisiana. The Department has an established a fee system for funding the monitoring, investigation and other activities required...

139

Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Archived Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archived Projects Ambient PM 2.5 Air Sampling & Analysis - The Upper Ohio River Valley Project ATS-Chester Engineers Desert Research Institute 9151998 Steubenville...

140

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23E 23E A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building E.S. Lee, L.L. Fernandes, B. Coffey, A. McNeil, R. Clear Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory T. Webster, F. Bauman, D. Dickerhoff, D. Heinzerling, T. Hoyt University of California Berkeley Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 ! 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Title Exploring relationships between outdoor air particulate-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and PM2.5: A case study of benzo(a)pyrene in California metropolitan regions Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-514E Year of Publication 2008 Authors Lobscheid, Agnes B., Thomas E. McKone, and D. A. Valleroc Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 41 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5659-5672 Abstract Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particulate matter (PM) are co-pollutants emitted as by-products of combustion processes. Convincing evidence exists for PAHs as a primary toxic component of fine PM (PM2.5). Because PM2.5 is listed by the US EPA as a "Criteria Pollutant," it is monitored regularly at sites nationwide. In contrast, very limited data is available on measured ambient air concentrations of PAHs. However, between 1999-2001, ambient air concentrations of PM2.5 and benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) are available for California locations. We use multivariate linear regression models (MLRMs) to predict ambient air levels of BaP in four air basins based on reported PM2.5 concentrations and spatial, temporal and meteorological variables as variates. We obtain an R2 ranging from 0.57-0.72 among these basins. Significant variables (p<0.05) include the average daily PM2.5 concentration, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity, and the coastal distance as well as season, and holiday or weekend. Combining the data from all sites and using only these variables to estimate ambient BaP levels, we obtain an R2 of 0.55. These R2-values, combined with analysis of the residual error and cross validation using the PRESS-statistic, demonstrate the potential of our method to estimate reported outdoor air PAH exposure levels in metropolitan regions. These MLRMs provide a first step towards relating outdoor ambient PM2.5 and PAH concentrations for epidemiological studies when PAH measurements are unavailable, or limited in spatial coverage, based on publicly available meteorological and PM2.5 data

142

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inventory of current environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of a study commissioned to survey and summarize major environmental monitoring projects in the US-Canadian transboundary region. Projects with field sites located within 400 km (250 mi) of the border and active after 1980 were reviewed. The types of projects included: ambient air-quality monitoring, ambient water-quality monitoring, deposition monitoring, forest/vegetation monitoring and research, soil studies, and ecosystem studies. Ecosystem studies included projects involving the measurement of parameters from more than one monitoring category (e.g., studies that measured both water and soil chemistry). Individual descriptions were formulated for 184 projects meeting the spatial and temporal criteria. Descriptions included the official title for the project, its common abbreviation, program emphasis, monitoring site locations, time period conducted, parameters measured, protocols employed, frequency of sample collection, data storage information, and the principal contact for the project. A summary inventory subdivided according to the six monitoring categories was prepared using a computerized data management system. Information on major centralized data bases in the field of environmental monitoring was also obtained, and summary descriptions were prepared. The inventory and data base descriptions are presented in appendices to this document.

Glantz, C.S.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Chapman, E.G.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fugitive Air Emissions of Radionuclides from Diffuse SourcesHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 section 313 list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this volume, detailed procedures recommended for the measurement of selected petroleum refinery emissions in ambient air are presented.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Monitoring near refineries or airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume identifies publications and databases that address ambient air concentrations measured near petroleum refineries for the selected target chemicals.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12/2011 12/2011 Air Monitoring Groundwater Monitoring Surface Water Monitoring A continuously operating air monitoring network was in place from 1986 through 2000 for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to measure levels of gamma radiation, radioactive dust particles, radon gas, and asbestos. With remediation of contaminated materials essentially complete and measurements indistinguishable from background, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ceased perimeter and offsite air monitoring as of December 31, 2000. Groundwater has been routinely monitored at the site since 1986. Separate groundwater monitoring programs were established for the Chemical Plant and Quarry sites because of geographic separation and differences in the hydrogeologic features that influence

148

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) Air Pollution Control (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality This chapter enumerates primary and secondary ambient air quality standards and the significant deterioration increments. Significant deterioration refers to an increase in ambient air pollution above a baseline plus a specific increment allowed for one of three classes of areas. It is required for potential sources of air contaminants to register with the

149

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooling Cooling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Air Cooling: Air cooling is commonly defined as rejecting heat from an object by flowing air over the surface of the object, through means of convection. Air cooling requires that the air must be cooler than the object or surface from which it is expected to remove heat. This is due to the second law of thermodynamics, which states that heat will only move spontaneously from a hot reservoir (the heat sink) to a cold reservoir (the air). Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Air Cooling Air Cooling Diagram of Air Cooled Condenser designed by GEA Heat Exchangers Ltd. (http://www.gea-btt.com.cn/opencms/opencms/bttc/en/Products/Air_Cooled_Condenser.html) Air cooling is limited on ambient temperatures and typically require a

150

Ambiental PV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambiental PV Ambiental PV Jump to: navigation, search Name Ambiental PV Place Bahia, Brazil Zip 40140-380 Sector Carbon Product Bahia-based carbon consultancy firm. References Ambiental PV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ambiental PV is a company located in Bahia, Brazil . References ↑ "Ambiental PV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Ambiental_PV&oldid=342095" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 186306960

151

Imaging with ambient noise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent developments in seismology, ultrasonics, and underwater acoustics have led to a radical change in the way scientists think about ambient noise--the diffuse waves generated by pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere, the scattering of water waves in the ocean, and any number of other sources that pervade our world. Because diffuse waves consist of the superposition of waves propagating in all directions, they appear to be chaotic and random. That appearance notwithstanding, diffuse waves carry information about the medium through which they propagate.

Snieder, Roel; Wapenaar, Kees [Colorado School of Mines, Golden (United States); Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geothermal power production: impact assessments and environmental monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The role that baseline and postoperational environmental monitoring plays in assessing impacts of geothermal power production is emphasized. Based on experience in the Imperial Valley, where substantial geothermal resources exist, the important characteristics of monitoring programs involving subsidence, seismicity, and air and water quality are examined. The importance of environmental monitoring for situations where predictive models either do not exist (e.g., seismicity), or are still being developed (e.g., land subsidence) are discussed. In these cases the need for acquiring and analyzing data that can provide timely information on changes caused by geothermal operations are emphasized. Monitoring is also useful in verifying predictions of air quality changes - in particular, violations of ambient standards after control technologies are implemented. Water quality can be monitored with existing sampling programs where the potential for geothermal impacts is thought to be rather small. The significant issues in these environmental areas, the status of baseline data and predictive capability that currently exists, and the need for future monitoring and modeling programs to assess the impacts of geothermal development are summarized.

Layton, D.W.; Pimentel, K.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ambient Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corp Place Newton, Massachusetts Zip 24580 Product Ambient develops open standards-based technologies for creating smart grid communication platforms and technologies. References...

154

A Triple-Path Denuder Instrument for Ambient Particulate Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field instrument for sampling sulfate and nitrate particulate matter in a controlled chemical environment has been constructed and field tested. The instrument contains HNO3 and NH3 denuders and an ambient air path, all connected by manifold to ...

Briant L. Davis; L. Ronald Johnson; Bryan J. Johnson; Robert J. Hammer

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and...

156

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Office of Legacy Management Weldon Spring Site Air and Water Monitoring 32008 This fact sheet provides information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S....

157

Abatement of Air Pollution: Connecticut Primary and Secondary Standards (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

No person shall operate a source which has a significant impact on air quality in such a manner as to cause or contribute to a violation of ambient air quality standards. Connecticut primary and...

158

What We Monitor & Why  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by monitoring wildlife, plants, water quality, and air quality. June 27, 2012 Raft Trip: rafts on the Rio Grande Workers prepare for the annual Fall sampling campaign on the...

159

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels

160

Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors for safety monitoring  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid-state, resistive hydrogen sensors have been designed and fabricated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sensor response has been successfully tested with H{sub 2} gas in argon and air under ambient temperature and pressure, while immersed in transformer oil at temperatures between 25{degrees}C and 90{degrees}C, and under site-specific conditions at Westinghouse Savannah River Co. Current versions of the sensors (25 {times} 25 {times} 0.6 mm) are small enough to be incorporated into hand-held leak detectors or distributed sensor systems for safety monitoring throughout a large area. Another foreseeable application is in electrical power transformers where the buildup of hydrogen gas accompanies oil breakdown. The use of these sensors to monitor transformer oil changes could help predict and prevent catastrophic failure.

Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.; Fleming, P.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Nave, S.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, CY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1992 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State in 1992. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sediments, soil, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and to control the impacts of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the workers and the local environment. Additionally, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although impacts from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and are slightly elevated when compared to offsite, these impacts are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; McKinney, S.M.; Perkins, C.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

AIRNET Data from Los Alamos National Laboratory: Air Concentration Data by Site and Isotope/Element  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

AIRNET is a radiological ambient air sampling network in Los Alamos, Santa Fe, and Rio Arriba counties designed to measure levels of airborne radionuclides such as plutonium, tritium, and uranium that may be emitted from Laboratory operation. {copied from http://www.lanl.gov/environment/air/airnet.shtml] The numeric data are provided in tables for each monitoring site and also graphed as plots to show trends from 1999 to the present. LANL also provides emissions data from stacks that may vent to the environment. This is in accordance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H: National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities (EPA 1989). See http://www.lanl.gov/environment/air/neshap/stack_sampling.shtml for a full explanation of this program and the resulting data.

163

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter (BI City Concentrated Ambient Particle Study)  

SciTech Connect

Alterations in heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported in rodents exposed to concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) from different regions of the United States. The goal of this study was to compare alterations in cardiac function induced by CAPs in two distinct regional atmospheres. AirCARE 1, a mobile laboratory with an EPA/Harvard fine particle (particulate matter <2.5 {micro}m; PM{sub 2.5}) concentrator was located in urban Detroit, MI, where the PM mixture is heavily influenced by motor vehicles, and in Steubenville, OH, where PM is derived primarily from long-range transport and transformation of power plant emissions, as well as from local industrial operations. Each city was studied during both winter and summer months, for a total of four sampling periods. Spontaneously hypertensive rats instrumented for electrocardiogram (ECG) telemetry were exposed to CAPs 8 h/day for 13 consecutive days during each sampling period. Heart rate (HR), and indices of HRV (standard deviation of the average normal-to-normal intervals [SDNN]; square root of the mean squared difference of successive normal-to-normal intervals [rMSSD]), were calculated for 30-minute intervals during exposures. A large suite of PM components, including nitrate, sulfate, elemental and organic carbon, and trace elements, were monitored in CAPs and ambient air. In addition, a unique sampler, the Semi-Continuous Elements in Air Sampler (SEAS) was employed to obtain every-30-minute measurements of trace elements. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) methods were applied to estimate source contributions to PM{sub 2.5}. Mixed modeling techniques were employed to determine associations between pollutants/CAPs components and HR and HRV metrics. Mean CAPs concentrations in Detroit were 518 and 357 {micro}g/m{sup 3} (summer and winter, respectively) and 487 and 252 {micro}g/m{sup 3} in Steubenville. In Detroit, significant reductions in SDNN were observed in the summer in association with cement/lime, iron/steel, and gasoline/diesel factors, while associations with the sludge incineration factor and components were less consistent. In winter, increases in HR were associated with a refinery factor and its components. CAPs-associated HR decreases in winter were linked to sludge incineration, cement/lime, and coal/secondary factors and the majority of their associated components. Specific relationships for increased rMSSD in winter were difficult to determine due to lack of consistency between factors and associated constituents. In Steubenville, we observed significant changes in HR (both increases and decreases), SDNN, and rMSSD in the summer, but not in the winter. We examined associations between individual source factors/PM components and HRV metrics segregated by predominant wind direction (NE or SW). Changes in HR (both increases and decreases) were linked with metal processing, waste incineration, and iron/steel factors along with most of their associated elemental constituents. Reductions in SDNN were associated with metal processing, waste incineration, and mobile source factors and the majority of elements loading onto these factors. There were no consistent associations between changes in rMSSD and source factors/components. Despite the large number of coal-fired power plants in the region, and therefore the large contribution of secondary sulfate to overall PM mass, we did not observe any associations with the coal/secondary factor or with the majority of its associated components. There were several inconsistencies in our results which make definitive conclusions difficult. For example, we observed opposing signs of effect estimates with some components depending on season, and with others depending on wind direction. In addition, our extensive dataset clearly would be subject to issues of multiple comparisons, and the 'true' significant results are unknown. Overall, however, our results suggest that acute changes in cardiac function were most strongly associated with local industrial sources. Results for coal-fired power plant-deriv

Annette Rohr; James Wagner Masako Morishita; Gerald Keeler; Jack Harkema

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

164

In Situ Electrostatic Separation of Ambient PM2.5 into Source-Specific Fractions During Collection in a FRM Sampler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal combustion is generally viewed as a major source of PM2.5 emissions into the atmosphere. For some time, toxicologists have been asking for an exposure environment enriched with the coal combustion source specific PM{sub 2.5} to conduct meaningful exposure studies to better understand the mechanisms of the adverse health effects of coal combustion specific PM2.5 in the ambient environment. There are several unique characteristics of primary PM generated from coal combustion. In this research project, an attempt has been made to exploit some of the unique properties of PM generated from coal fired power plants to preferentially separate them out from the rest of the primary and secondary PM in the ambient environment. An existing FRM sampler used for monitoring amount of PM{sub 2.5} in the ambient air is modified to incorporate an electrostatic field. A DC corona charging device is also installed at the ambient air inlet to impart positive or negative charge to the PM. Visual Basic software has been written to simulate the lateral movement of PM as it passes through the electrostatic separator under varying operating conditions. The PM samples collected on polycarbonate filters under varying operating conditions were extensively observed for clustering and/or separation of PM in the direction parallel to the electric field. No systematic PM separation was observed under any of the operating conditions. A solution to overcome this kind of turbulence caused remixing has been offered. However, due to major programmatic changes in the DOE UCR program, there are no venues available to further pursue this research.

Naresh Shah; Frank E. Huggins; Gerald P. Huffman

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Test facility for well logging cables (in air at atmospheric pressure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system has been built to test, in air at ambient pressure, short sections of electromechanical cables which are potentially useful for geothermal well logging service. Electrical characteristics of the test cable are monitored while the cable is exposed to elevated temperature and tensioned in a manner simulating loading experienced by a typical well logging cable. Cable conductor resistance, dielectric resistance and capacitance are measured. The cable can be exposed to bending, simulating that which occurs when passing over sheaves or wound on or off a drum. Cable anchors are arranged to permit nearly 100 percent strength tensioning in the heated section. Electrical connectors are made at the unstrained ends at ambient temperature. The system can also be used to tension test cable terminations at elevated temperatures.

Not Available

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

167

Lifting of Ambient Air by Density Currents in Sheared Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two aspects of vorticity associated with cold pools are addressed. First, tilting of horizontal vortex tubes by the updraft at a gust front has been proposed as a means of getting near-ground rotation and hence a tornado. Theory and a numerical ...

Robert Davies-Jones; Paul Markowski

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Development of a Low-Cost Particulate Matter Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

could also be applied to ventilation control for better indoor air quality with lower energy expenditure, monitoring airplane cabin air quality and improving industrial...

169

AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect

The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Air Pollution Control Rules (West Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The listed rules were enacted as directed by the Air Pollution Control Act. Together, these rules guide the monitoring, permitting and compliance enforcement of air quality in the state.

171

NETL: IEP - Air Quality Research: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulatory Drivers Regulatory Drivers DOE/NETLÂ’s Air Quality Research Program is in direct response to the need to ensure that fossil-fuel-fired power systems continue to meet current and future environmental requirements. Specific environmental regulatory requirements driving this research are briefly summarized below: I. Clean Air Act (Including 1990 Amendments) Title I - Air Pollution Prevention and Control Part A - Air Quality and Emission Limitations Sect. 109 - National Ambient Air Quality Standards In July 1997 EPA promulgated new standards for particulate matter finer than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) and revised the ambient ozone standards. Sect. 111 - Standards of Performance for New Stationary Sources Part C - Prevention of Significant Deterioration of Air Quality

172

Exploring early evaluation techniques of ambient health promoting devices in home environments of senior citizens living independently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, our goal is to explore different early evaluation techniques and their effectiveness for designing better ambient health- promoting devices for the elderly. One cannot assess the complete impact of these devices without full implementation ... Keywords: Wizard of Oz, ambient technology, early evaluation methods, health monitoring devices, senior citizens, storyboarding, technology probe

Rajasee Rege; Heekyoung Jung; William Hazelwood; Greg Orlov; Kay Connelly; Kalpana Shankar

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Compressed Air Energy Storage Act (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act lays out regulations for the local authorities related to site selection, design, operation and monitoring for underground storage of compressed air.

174

Radionuclide Air Emission Report for 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon FromHazardous Air Pollutants (Radionuclides), Availability ofLBNL to Revise Its Radionuclide NESHAP Monitoring Approach,”

Wahl, Linnea

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Great Smoky Mountains National Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Great Smoky Mountains Project (GSMP) Background Fine particle annual mass concentrations in the Tennessee Valley range from 14 to20 micrograms per cubic meter. All seven urban/suburban sites exceeded the annual PM2.5 standard; only the rural Lawrence County TN site remained below the 15 µg/m3 annual standard. None of the stations exceeded the 65 µg/m3 level of the 24-hour PM2.5 standard. Summer high-winter low seasonality is evident. The current FRM PM2.5 mass measurements under-estimate the contribution of volatile/semi-volatile nitrates and organic carbon species. The semi-volatile organic fraction is both highly variable and significant, and assessments of semi-volatile and non-volatile organic carbon fractions are needed when particle composition measurements are made, especially at urban sites.

176

NETL: Ambient Monitoring - Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal & Power Systems Major Demonstrations Innovations for Existing Plants Gasification Turbines Fuel Cells FutureGen Advanced Research Contacts Industrial Capture & Storage...

177

Moments of ambient Doppler spectra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author studied the first four moments (center of mass, standard deviation, skew, and kurtosis) of the Doppler spectra in ambient regions of LLNL-Hughes real aperture radar data collected during WCSEX91--92. The goal was to correlate trends in the moments with wind velocity and direction. Although the center of mass appears to increase when the wind is blowing into the radar antenna, no other conclusions have been drawn from the higher order moments.

Lehman, S.K.

1993-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Review: Ambient intelligence: Technologies, applications, and opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient intelligence is an emerging discipline that brings intelligence to our everyday environments and makes those environments sensitive to us. Ambient intelligence (AmI) research builds upon advances in sensors and sensor networks, pervasive computing, ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Artificial intelligence, Context awareness, Decision making, Privacy, Sensors

Diane J. Cook; Juan C. Augusto; Vikramaditya R. Jakkula

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Identification and Tracking of Polluted Air Masses in the South-Central Coast Air Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canister samples of air taken during the South-Central Coast Cooperative Air Monitoring Program (SCCCAMP) 1985 field study program were analyzed for concentrations of over 50 hydrocarbons as well as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), carbon monoxide, ...

G. E. Moore; S. G. Douglas; R. C. Kessler; J. P. Killus

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Development and Analysis of Desiccant Enhanced Evaporative Air...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory OA outdoor air P amb ambient pressure (psi) P fan fan power (kW) v PP polypropylene Q cooling total cooling (kW or Btuh) Q latent latent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING PLAN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Triennial update that describes the BNL Environmental Monitoring Program for all media (air, surface water, ground water, etc.) in accordance with DOE ORDER 5400.5

DAUM,M.; DORSCH,WM.; FRY,J.; GREEN,T.; LEE,R.; NAIDU,J.; PAQUETTE,D.; SCARPITTA,S.; SCHROEDER,G.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

182

Vapor concentration monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for monitoring the concentration of a vapor, such as heavy water, having at least one narrow bandwidth in its absorption spectrum, in a sample gas such as air. The air is drawn into a chamber in which the vapor content is measured by means of its radiation absorption spectrum. High sensitivity is obtained by modulating the wavelength at a relatively high frequency without changing its optical path, while high stability against zero drift is obtained by the low frequency interchange of the sample gas to be monitored and of a reference sample. The variable HDO background due to natural humidity is automatically corrected.

Bayly, John G. (Deep River, CA); Booth, Ronald J. (Deep River, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

184

A wireless sensor network For structural monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural monitoring---the collection and analysis of structural response to ambient or forced excitation--is an important application of networked embedded sensing with significant commercial potential. The first generation of sensor networks for structural ... Keywords: Wisden, sensor network, structural health monitoring

Ning Xu; Sumit Rangwala; Krishna Kant Chintalapudi; Deepak Ganesan; Alan Broad; Ramesh Govindan; Deborah Estrin

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal storage HVAC system retrofit provides economical air conditioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes an EMS-controlled HVAC system that meets the ventilation and cooling needs of an 18,000-seat indoor ice hockey arena. The Buffalo Memorial Auditorium (affectionately referred to as the Aud) was built in 1937 under the Works Project Administration of the federal government. Its original configuration included a 12,000-seat arena with an ice skating rink. By the late 1980s, the city was unsuccessfully attempting to attract events and tenants to the auditorium, which lacked air conditioning and other modern amenities. Thus, it was decided to renovate the facility to make it marketable. The first phase of the renovation included installing an air-conditioning system in the arena and repairing the existing building systems that were inoperable because of deferred maintenance. After considering the existing conditions (such as size of the space, intermittent usage, construction restrictions, operating budgets and the limited operations staff), the engineering team designed an innovative HVAC system. The system's features include: a carbon dioxide monitoring device that controls the intake of outside air; an ice storage system that provides chilled water and shifts electrical demand to off-peak hours; and a design that uses the building mass as a heat sink. A new energy management system (EMS) determines building cooling needs based on the type of event, ambient conditions and projected audience size. Then, it selects the most economical method to obtain the desired arena temperature.

Smith, S.F. (Wendel Engineers, P.C., Buffalo, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Microwave remote sensing of ionized air.  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of microwave scattering from ambient room air ionized with a negative ion generator. The frequency dependence of the radar cross section of ionized air was measured from 26.5 to 40 GHz (Ka-band) in a bistatic mode with an Agilent PNA-X series (model N5245A) vector network analyzer. A detailed calibration scheme is provided to minimize the effect of the stray background field and system frequency response on the target reflection. The feasibility of detecting the microwave reflection from ionized air portends many potential applications such as remote sensing of atmospheric ionization and remote detection of radioactive ionization of air.

Liao, S.; Gopalsami, N.; Heifetz, A.; Elmer, T.; Fiflis, P.; Koehl, E. R.; Chien, H. T.; Raptis, A. C. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ga Air Compressor, Ga Air Compressor Products, Ga Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ga Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Ga Air Compressor Products from Global Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Ga Air Compressor ...

188

Workshop on indoor air quality research needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workshop participants report on indoor air quality research needs including the monitoring of indoor air quality, report of the instrumentation subgroup of indoor air quality, health effects, and the report of the control technology session. Risk analysis studies addressing indoor environments were also summarized. (DLS)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report - calendar year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1995 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water,groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Westinghouse Hanford Company operational environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1994  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the results of the Westinghouse Hanford Company near-facility operational environmental monitoring for 1994 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with Federal, State, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities are still seen on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Schmidt, J.; Fassett, J.W.; Johnson, A.R.; Johnson, V.G.; Markes, B.M.; McKinney, S.M.; Moss, K.J.; Perkins, C.J.; Richterich, L.R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thermoelectric Ambient Energy Harvester - Energy Innovation Portal  

A novel thermoelectric generator (TEG) design by PNNL allows the conversion of ambient thermal energy into electric power for a variety of low-power uses. These ...

193

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring provides a means to measure the impacts of operations, waste management, and remediation activities on the environment adjacent to facilities and ensure compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Specifically, near-facility environmental monitoring monitors new and existing sites, processes, and facilities for potential impacts and releases; fugitive emissions and diffuse sources associated with contaminated areas, facilities (both active and those undergoing surveillance and maintenance), and environmental restoration activities. External radiation, ambient air particulates, ground and surface water, soil, sediment, and biota (plants and animals) are sampled or monitored. Parameters include, as appropriate, radionuclides; radiation fields; chemical or physical constituents, such as nitrates; pH; and water temperature. All ambient air results were below the US Department of Energy (DOE) Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs). Groundwater concentrations at the two wells at the 107-N Facility were below both the DOE DCG and US Environmental Protection Agency Interim Drinking Water Standards for gamma emitting radionuclides. Soil and vegetation results were generally within historic ranges and mostly below the Accessible Soil Concentration limits (included in HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites) with the exception of one soil sampling location at 1 00 N Area. External radiation fields continued an overall downward trend. Surface water disposal unit samples (water, sediment, and aquatic vegetation) showed radionuclide concentrations below their respective DCG and Accessible Soil Concentration limits. The 100 N Area Columbia river shoreline springs results were below DCGs with the exception of one Sr concentration. More than 4,600 ha (11,300 acres) of radiologically controlled areas were surveyed in 1997, approximately the same as in 1996.

Perkins, C.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Best practice techniques for environmental radiological monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Medium Volume Air Sampling (HVAS/MVAS). #12;Science Report Best Practice Techniques for Environmental Community FSA: Food Standards Agency H2O2: Hydrogen peroxide HPA: Health Protection Agency HVAS/MVAS: High/monitoring type code Terrestrial dose rate monitoring T1 Air passive shades and HVAS/MVAS T2 Wet, dry, total

195

Market Potential for Ambient Assisted Living Technology: The Case of Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) environment is an integration of stand-alone assistive technologies, with elements of smart homes, and telehealth services. Successful development of this emerging technology will promote the ability for older people ... Keywords: aging-in-place, gerontechnology, health monitoring, smart homes

Robert Savage; Yongjie Yon; Michael Campo; Ashleigh Wilson; Ravin Kahlon; Andrew Sixsmith

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Compressed Air 101: Getting Compressed Air to Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Air compressors are a significant industrial energy user. Based on a survey (conducted by Oregon State University and the Bonneville Power Administration) of energy audit reports from 125 plants, air compressors account for roughly 10% of total plant energy use. Furthermore, air compression is inefficient with up to 95% of compressor power dissipated as heat. Thus even minor improvements in system operation, control strategies, and efficiency can yield large energy savings and significant non-energy or productivity benefits from reliable compressed air. Compressed air is often called the ""fourth utility"" in industrial facilities after electricity, natural gas, and water. It provides motive power for machinery, cooling, materials handling, and hand tools. It is a safe, flexible, and powerful resource, but one that is seldom run for low operating costs or best productivity. Learning the basics of compressed air systems represents the beginning of both reducing energy costs and enjoying the productive benefits of reliable compressed air. Compressed air management systems, including a system approach to managing demand, stabilizing pressure, reducing leaks and compressor controls, can allow the industrial end user to save 20% - 50% of their air compressor electricity usage. The monitoring capabilities of compressed air management systems provide a useful tool through power, pressure and flow trending to maintain both the energy savings and increased system reliability. More efficiently managed compressed air systems are less costly to maintain and have less impact on the environment. The most important issues of industrial compressed air in relation to energy efficiency and management are: 1. Compressed air is an essential industrial utility; 2. Compressing air is a fundamentally inefficient energy transformation process; 3. Optimal operation of compressed air systems in industrial plants is seldom a priority and adequate management infonnation is rare, resulting in negative impacts on production and even less efficiency."

Burke, J. J.; Bessey, E. G.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Jump to: navigation, search Name SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Agency/Company /Organization Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) Sector Energy, Land, Water, Climate Resource Type Video, Publications, Training materials, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.actualidadambiental UN Region Caribbean, Central America, South America References SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental[1] SPDA-Actualidad Ambiental Screenshot "SPDA current environmental journalism is a service of the Peruvian Society for Environmental Law (SPDA) , which seeks to inform about the latest news and events related to the environment in Peru and the world in search of greater awareness and action for preservation of our planet. On this site you can also obtain and use for free videos, high resolution photos and the

198

AirCore: An Innovative Atmospheric Sampling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the AirCore, a simple and innovative atmospheric sampling system. The AirCore used in this study is a 150-m-long stainless steel tube, open at one end and closed at the other, that relies on positive changes in ambient ...

Anna Karion; Colm Sweeney; Pieter Tans; Timothy Newberger

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Continuous Air Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium, Safety, and Environment / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 1)

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

200

Beta/alpha continuous air monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

1988-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office environmental monitoring program summary data report, first calendar quarter 1997  

SciTech Connect

The continuing moratorium on the testing of nuclear explosive devices, possibility of alternate uses for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and reduced budget have led to significant changes in the extent of environmental surveillance activities on and around the NTS. Not only have the number of monitored locations been reduced since 1992, but also the frequency and types of analyses have been changed. The onsite radiological surveillance program is shown in a table, and this report gives the first quarter results for that program. During the first calendar quarter of 1997, air samples were collected and analyzed from 45 air particulate sampling stations, 3 noble gas sampling stations, and 12 tritiated water (HTO) vapor sampling stations. Surface water samples were collected and analyzed from one wastewater containment pond and nine sewage lagoons. Groundwater samples were obtained from ten potable supply wells, one non-potable supply well, and seven drinking water distribution end points. Ambient radiation levels were measured at 168 locations.

Black, S.C.; Haworth, O.L.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Microsoft Word - VACANCY_ANNOUNCEMENT_ORISE_EOR_post-doc NJP...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambient air quality using field data and atmospheric modeling techniques, including conducting operation and maintenance of ambient air quality monitoring instruments; (3) Source...

203

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Dynamic Control of Lab Air Change Rates using Multiplexed IEQ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

commissioning. This presentation discusses a new type of real time, multiplexed facility monitoring technology. Packets of air and data are routed through a unique, hollow...

205

Overview of Strategies for Making Connections Between Transportation, Land Use and Air Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Use Regulation : Designing Parking Policies to Reduce Automotive PollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection deals with the mobile monitoring of pollutionLand Use, Air Quality Connection The Comprehensive Behavior Alternative approach views air pollution

Shirazi, Elham; Taylor, Brian

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Depth profiling ambient noise in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acoustic Ambient Noise in the Ocean: Spectra and Sources,"and Osterhus, S. (1999). "Ocean Ambient Sound Instrumenta Subsurface Package," J. Atmos. Ocean. Tech. 16, 1118-1126.

Barclay, David Readshaw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Prediction of Air Conditioning Load Response for Providing Spinning Reserve - ORNL Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the use of air conditioning load for providing spinning reserve and discusses the barriers and opportunities. Air conditioning load is well suited for this service because it often increases during heavy load periods and can be curtailed for short periods with little impact to the customer. The report also provides an appendix describing the ambient temperature effect on air conditioning load.

Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Rice, C Keith [ORNL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) Air Pollution Control Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Alabama Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider ADEM This rule states standards for emission inventory reporting requirements, ambient air quality standards, sampling and testing methods and guidelines for maintenance of equipment. It also states guidelines for air pollution

209

Multizone infiltration monitoring system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Modal parameter extraction from large operating structures using ambient excitation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique called the Natural Excitation Technique or has been developed to response extract response parameters from large operational structure when subjected to random and unmeasured forces such as wind, road noise, aerodynamics, or waves. Six applications of NExT to ambient excitation testing and NExT analysis are surveyed in this paper with a minimum of technical detail. In the first application, NExT was applied to a controlled-yaw Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). By controlling the yaw degree of freedom an important class of rotating coordinate system effects are reduced. A new shape extraction procedure was applied to this data set with good results. The second application was to a free-yaw HAWT. The complexity of the response has prompted further analytical studies and the development of a specialized visualization package. The third application of NExT was to a parked three-bladed Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) in which traditional modal testing could not excite all modes of interest. The shape extraction process used cross-correlation functions directly in a time-domain shape-fitting routine. The fourth application was to ground transportation systems. Ongoing work to improve driver and passenger comfort in tractor-trailer vehicles and to refine automobile body and tire models will use NExT. NExT has been used to process ambient vibration data for Finite Element Model correlation and is being used to study Structural Health Monitoring with ambient excitation. Shape fitting was performed using amplitude and phase information taken directly from the cross-spectra. The final application is to an offshore structure. This work is on-going, however initial studies have found a high-modal density, high noise content, and sparse data set.

James, G.H. III; Carne, T.G.; Mayes, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ambient dependence of the phase of nanowires grown by annealing brass  

SciTech Connect

The growth of oxide nanowires has been studied by the annealing of brass (Cu 65%, Zn 35%) at different annealing temperatures and in different ambient. The annealing temperature was varied from 400 deg. C to 650 deg. C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) results showed that the temperature has a significant effect on the density and size of the nanowires. The annealing temperature of 600 deg. C was found to be optimum for the growth of nanowires. The growth at 600 deg. C was observed in two ambient-air and moist nitrogen. Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) results on Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) showed that with changing the ambient from air to moist nitrogen, the phase of the nanowires changed from Zn doped CuO to Cu doped ZnO. This result can be of significance importance as it suggests the use of ambient for the tuning of phase of oxide nanowires and in turn for the tuning of their physical properties.

Srivastava, Himanshu; Ganguli, Tapas; Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Deb, S. K. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced technology, Indore-452013 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Definition: Line Transformer Monitors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transformer Monitors Transformer Monitors Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Line Transformer Monitors Transformer Monitoring System can monitor different aspects of transformers, including oil levels and multiple temperatures within the transformer. This allows for analysis of the health of either individual key power transformers or multiple power transformers networked in the system. For example, the transformer monitors provide transformer oil dissolved gas analysis (DGA), oil temperature, ambient temperature, and moisture in oil measurements. These measurements are made in relation to transformer load.[1] Related Terms transformer, system, transformer References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/line_transformer_monitors [[Cat LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

213

Environmental Monitoring Plan: Environmental Monitoring Section. Appendix A, Procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents information about the environmental monitoring program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics discussed include: air sampling; air tritium calibrations; storm water discharge; non-storm water discharge; sampling locations; ground water sampling; noise and blast forecasting; analytical laboratory auditing; document retention; procedure writing; quality assurance programs for sampling; soil and sediment sampling; sewage sampling; diversion facility tank sampling; vegetation and foodstuff sampling; and radiological dose assessments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Winterscape and ambient video: an intermedia border zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Ambient Video" is an emergent media form that operates in an intermedia border zone, sharing the aesthetics of cinema, video, painting, and fine art photography. Winterscape is an ambient video work that incorporates these directions. Like any ambient ... Keywords: ambient video, cinema, experimental film, moving image, poetics, post-production, video, video art, visual effects

Jim Bizzocchi

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Program on Technology Innovation: An Alternate Framework for the Risk Assessment of Ambient Particulate Matter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designation of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is based on the protection of human health. PM2.5 is currently regulated on a mass concentration basis (particle mass per volume of air), with the standard providing limits on both 24-hour and annual average concentrations. A fundamental tenet of this mass-based approach to regulation is its implicit assumption that all particle components are equally harmful to health. In light of the complexity of t...

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

217

Overview - WIPP Effluent Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of the WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program Compliance with Title 40 CFR Part 191, Subpart A Environmental Standards for Management and Storage L. Frank-Supka, D. J. Harward, S. C. Casey May 2005 INTRODUCTION This document provides an overview of the effluent air monitoring activities at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP Effluent Monitoring Program is designed to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radiation protection standards for management and storage of spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste and transuranic (TRU)-waste at the WIPP. The standards issued by the EPA are contained in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Subpart A. The standards require the

218

Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling Network Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Mauna Loa, Hawaii Mauna Loa weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Barrow, Alaska American Samoa South Pole Daily average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Kumukahi Christmas Island Baring Head Kermadec Island La Jolla Pier La Jolla Pier weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples PDF Documentation available as Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S, (NDP-001a) For information on calibration and some additional literature, go to

219

Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Ambient Hydro Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ambient Hydro Ltd Ambient Hydro Ltd Place Corsham, United Kingdom Zip SN13 9TZ Sector Hydro, Services Product Ambient Hydro Ltd develops small Hydroelectric projects. It also offers a range of technical and financial consultancy services. Coordinates 51.431505°, -2.187229° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.431505,"lon":-2.187229,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

HEAT PUMP AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEM ANALYSIS BASED ON VARIABLE SPEED COMPRESSOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mechanical Engineering M.S.E. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of ambient air temperatures on the heat pump performance using a variable speed compressor.… (more)

Zhang, Hao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Health monitoring of civil infrastructures using wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is designed, implemented, deployed and tested on the 4200ft long main span and the south tower of the Golden Gate Bridge (GGB). Ambient structural vibrations are reliably measured ... Keywords: deployment, large-scale, structural health monitoring, wireless sensor networks

Sukun Kim; Shamim Pakzad; David Culler; James Demmel; Gregory Fenves; Steven Glaser; Martin Turon

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) Air Resources: Prevention and Control of Air Contamination and Air Pollution, Air Quality Classifications and Standards, and Air Quality Area Classifications (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations establish emissions limits and permitting and operational

227

Analysis of air-temperature measurements from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of the ambient air resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) just after the hydrogen burn in the TMI-2 Reactor Building is examined. The performance of the sensors is compared with physical models of the sensor/ambient air system. With one exception, the RTD data appear to be valid for the period examined. Based on the data, the hydrogen burn ended considerably before the first data points were recorded.

Fryer, M.O.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Air thermosiphon solar heating system: the Jones house, Santa Fe, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hybrid passive/active solar heating system, featuring a passive air thermosiphon loop, is described. Heated air is supplied to a rock storage bin, coupled with blower-driven air distribution to the house. The house, of 246 m/sup 2/ (2650 ft/sup 2/) heated area and located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, also includes a greenhouse located under the planar collector array. Architectural features and construction details of the house, the solar collector, storage, and distribution system are presented. Representative results of three months of monitoring by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory of collector, rock bin, and greenhouse temperatures, as well as outside ambient temperature and insolation, are reported and discussed. Data recorded hourly since the system was placed in operation in early February 1978, show temperatures in the rock bin in excess of 71/sup 0/C (160/sup 0/F) and in the collector absorber mesh in excess of 93/sup 0/C (200/sup 0/F). Delivery temperatures from the charged bin, without auxiliary boost, range from 38 to 54/sup 0/C (100 to 130/sup 0/F).

Hunn, B.D.; Jones, M.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent regulations on NO, emissions are promoting the use of lean premix (LPM) combustion for industrial gas turbines. LPM combustors avoid locally stoichiometric combustion by premixing fuel and the air upstream of the reaction region, thereby eliminating the high temperatures that produce thermal NO.. Unfortunately, this style of combustor is prone to combustion oscillation. Significant pressure fluctuations can occur when variations in heat release periodically couple pressure to acoustic modes in the combustion chamber. These oscillations must be controlled because resulting vibration can shorten the life of engine hardware. Laboratory and engine field testing have shown that instability regimes can vary with environmental conditions. These observations prompted this study of the effects of ambient conditions and fuel composition on combustion stability. Tests are conducted on a sub-scale combustor burning natural gas, propane, and some hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixtures. A premix, swirl-stabilized fuel nozzle typical of industrial gas turbines is used. Experimental and numerical results describe how stability regions may shift as inlet air temperature, humidity, and fuel composition are altered. Results appear to indicate that shifting instability instability regimes are primarily caused by changes in reaction rate.

Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States); Robey, E.H. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling of coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in lined rock caverns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We applied coupled nonisothermal, multiphase fluid flow and geomechanical numerical modeling to study the coupled thermodynamic and geomechanical performance of underground compressed air energy storage (CAES) in concrete-lined rock caverns. The paper focuses on CAES in lined caverns at relatively shallow depth (e.g., 100 m depth) in which a typical CAES operational pressure of 5 to 8 MPa is significantly higher than both ambient fluid pressure and in situ stress. We simulated a storage operation that included cyclic compression and decompression of air in the cavern, and investigated how pressure, temperature and stress evolve over several months of operation. We analyzed two different lining options, both with a 50 cm thick low permeability concrete lining, but in one case with an internal synthetic seal such as steel or rubber. For our simulated CAES system, the thermodynamic analysis showed that 96.7% of the energy injected during compression could be recovered during subsequent decompression, while 3.3% of the energy was lost by heat conduction to the surrounding media. Our geomechanical analysis showed that tensile effective stresses as high as 8 MPa could develop in the lining as a result of the air pressure exerted on the inner surface of the lining, whereas thermal stresses were relatively smaller and compressive. With the option of an internal synthetic seal, the maximum effective tensile stress was reduced from 8 to 5 MPa, but was still in substantial tension. We performed one simulation in which the tensile tangential stresses resulted in radial cracks and air leakage though the lining. This air leakage, however, was minor (about 0.16% of the air mass loss from one daily compression) in terms of CAES operational efficiency, and did not significantly impact the overall energy balance of the system. However, despite being minor in terms of energy balance, the air leakage resulted in a distinct pressure increase in the surrounding rock that could be quickly detected using pressure monitoring outside the concrete lining.

Rutqvist, J.; Kim, H. -M.; Ryu, D. -W.; Synn, J. -H.; Song, W. -K.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Manual on indoor air quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This reference manual was prepared to assist electric utilities in helping homeowners, builders, and new home buyers to understand a broad range of issues related to indoor air quality. The manual is directed to technically knowledgeable persons employed by utility companies - the customer service or marketing representative, applications engineer, or technician - who may not have specific expertise in indoor air quality issues. In addition to providing monitoring and control techniques, the manual summarizes the link between pollutant concentrations, air exchange, and energy conservation and describes the characteristics and health effects of selected pollutants. Where technical information is too lengthy or complex for inclusion in this volume, reference sources are given. Information for this manual was gathered from technical studies, manufacturers' information, and other materials from professional societies, institutes, and associations. The aim has been to provide objective technical and descriptive information that can be used by utility personnel to make informed decisions about indoor air quality issues.

Diamond, R.C.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Prev'air: An Operational Forecasting and Mapping System for Air Quality in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current state of the art in three-dimensional chemistry-transport models allows them to be considered as mature and reliable enough to be combined with observations networks for implementing integrated air quality monitoring systems over ...

Laurence Rouil; Cécile Honoré; Bertrand Bessagnet; Laure Malherbe; Frédérik Meleux; Robert Vautard; Matthias Beekmann; Jean-Marie Flaud; Anne Dufour; Daniel Martin; Aline Peuch; Vincent-Henri Peuch; Christian Elichegaray; Nathalie Poisson; Laurent Menut

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The ambient wood journals: replaying the experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ambient Wood project aims to facilitate a learning experience using an adaptive infrastructure in an outdoor environment. This involves sensor technology, virtual world orchestration, and a wide range of devices ranging from hand-held computers to ... Keywords: adaptive infrastructure, consolidation, record and replay, storytelling

Mark J. Weal; Danius T. Michaelides; Mark K. Thompson; David C. DeRoure

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Air-Microfluidics: Towards Lab-on-a-Chip Systems for Low-Cost Air-Quality Monitoring Speaker(s): Igor Paprotny Date: November 12, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Lara Gundel Air-microfluidic devices that monitor particles suspended in air, as opposed to liquids, can dramatically reduce the size and cost of future air-quality sensors. The use of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies and wafer-scale integration permits the inclusion of many different sensors onto a small footprint. Benefits of air-microfluidics are many. For example, air-microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices can be used as portable sensors for tracking individual exposure to airborne pollutants. Such sensors will enable linking exposure and biometric information to

235

Detonation of hydrogen-air mixtures. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The detonation of a hydrogen-air cloud subsequent to an accidental release of hydrogen into ambient surroundings cannot be totally ruled out in view of the relative sensitivity of the hydrogen-air system. The present paper investigates the key parameters involved in hydrogen-air detonations and attempts to establish quantitative correlations between those that have important practical implications. Thus, for example, the characteristic length scale lambda describing the cellular structure of a detonation front is measured for a broad range of hydrogen-air mixtures and is quantitatively correlated with the key dynamic detonation properties such as detonability, transmission and initiation.

Lee, J.H.S.; Knystautas, R.; Benedick, W.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

237

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

238

De-icing thermostat for air conditioners  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic thermostat adapted to be connected to an air-cooling apparatus to control the operative state of the apparatus. The thermostat includes a means for generating a digital electrical signal representative of a desired temperature setpoint and means for generating a digital electrical signal representative of the ambient temperature at the thermostat. The improvement described here comprises: means for generating control signals for the aircooling apparatus in order to inhibit the accumulation of ice on the cooling element of the air-cooling apparatus when the ambient temperature is above the temperature setpoint; means, responsive to the control signals, for deenergizing the compressor in the air-cooling apparatus for a first preselected period of time whenever the compressor is determined to have run continuously for a second preselected period of time; and means for adaptively adjusting the length of at least one of the first or second preselected periods of time as a function of the change in the rate of change of the ambient temperature.

Levine, M.R.

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

239

Airlift mission monitoring and dynamic rescheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the Flight Manager Assistant (FMA), a prototype system, designed to support real-time management of airlift operations at the USAF Air Mobility Command (AMC). In current practice, AMC flight managers are assigned to manage individual air ... Keywords: Collaboration, Dynamic schedule repair, Execution monitoring, Mediation, Scheduling

David E. Wilkins; Stephen F. Smith; Laurence A. Kramer; Thomas J. Lee; Timothy W. Rauenbusch

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Tunable Diode Laser Sensor for Monitoring and Control of Harsh Combustion Environments  

SciTech Connect

This work represents the collaborative effort between American Air Liquide and Physical Sciences, Inc. for developing a sensor based on near-IR tunable diode lasers (TDL). The multi-species capability of the sensor for simultaneous monitoring of CO, O2, and H2O concentration as well as gas temperature is ideal for in-situ monitoring on industrial furnaces. The chemical species targeted are fundamental for controlling the combustion space for improved energy efficiency, reduced pollutants, and improved product quality, when coupling the measurement to a combustion control system. Several add-on modules developed provide flexibility in the system configuration for handling different process monitoring applications. For example, the on-Demand Power Control system for the 1.5 ?m laser is used for high particle density exhaust streams where laser transmission is problematic. For long-distance signal collection a fiber optic communication system is used to reduce noise pick-up. Finally, hardened modules to withstand high ambient temperatures, immune to EMF interference, protection from flying debris, and interfaced with pathlength control laser beam shielding probes were developed specifically for EAF process monitoring. Demonstration of these different system configurations was conducted on Charter Steel's reheat furnace, Imco Recycling, Inc. (now Aleris International, Inc.) aluminum reverberatory furnace, and Gerdau Ameristeel's EAF. Measurements on the reheat furnace demonstrated zone monitoring with the measurement performed close to the steel billet. Results from the aluminum furnace showed the benefit of measuring in-situ near the bath. In this case, low-level furnace optimization was performed and demonstrated 5% fuel savings. Monitoring tests on the EAF off-gas demonstrated the level of industrialization of the sensor to survive the harsh EAF environment. Long-term testing on the EAF has been on-going for over 6 months with essentially zero maintenance. Validation of the TDL measurement on the EAF was confirmed by comparison with extractive sampling CO measurements.

VonDrasek, William; Melsio-Pubill, Anna

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Monitoring near refineries for airborne chemicals on the SARA Title 3 Section 313 list  

SciTech Connect

This study provides an ambient air concentration perspective to the engineering estimates of petroleum refinery emissions required under SARA Title III Section 313. It presents and discusses ambient air concentrations of 25 selected target chemicals measured at and near the perimeter (fenceline) of three refineries. Measurements were made over three consecutive 24-hour sampling periods at each refinery. The extent to which the concentrations of the target chemicals were due to fugitive emissions from the refineries is estimated.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Correlations between Ambient Noise and the Ocean Surface Wave Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the ambient noise spectrum level N with simultaneous, coincident wind and wave measurements were made from RP FLIP in fall 1991. The measurements were designed to investigate the correlation between the ambient noise and relevant ...

Francis C. Felizardo; W. Kendall Melville

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Control Systems Control Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ambient Control Systems Name Ambient Control Systems Address 1810 Gillespie Way Place El Cajon, California Zip 92020 Sector Solar Product Solar energy device with a computerized energy management Website http://www.ambientalert.com/ma Coordinates 32.8193566°, -116.981232° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8193566,"lon":-116.981232,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Electric Power From Ambient Energy Sources  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research on opportunities to produce electric power from ambient sources as an alternative to using portable battery packs or hydrocarbon-fueled systems in remote areas. The work was an activity in the Advanced Concepts Project conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Office of Research and Development in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nonproliferation and National Security.

DeSteese, John G.; Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Perkins, C.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Relay contact monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A switching system for switching on and off heating and air conditioning units in an environmental control system. The switching system includes a thermostat and a relay conductively coupled to the thermostat. The relay has a contact, which is responsive to a change signal for changing its position. The system further includes a programmable monitor having predetermined positions stored in a memory. The monitor is conductively coupled to the contact and to the thermostat for continually determining the position of the contact, and for sending a change signal to the relay for switching the position of the contact, as needed, to be in conformance with a predetermined position stored in the memory. 3 figs.

Mehta, V.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Radiation monitor reporting requirements  

SciTech Connect

Within High-Level Waste Management (HLWM), CAMs and VAMPs are currently considered Class B equipment, therefore, alarm conditions associated with the CAMs and VAMPs result in an Unusual Occurrence or Off-Normal notification and subsequent occurrence reporting. Recent equipment difficulties associated with Continuous Air Monitors (CAMs) and Victoreen Area Radiation Monitors (VAMPs) have resulted in a significant number of notification reports. These notification have the potential to decrease operator sensitivity to the significance of specific CAM and VAMP failures. Additionally, the reports are extremely costly and are not appropriate as a means for tracking and trending equipment performance. This report provides a technical basis for a change in Waste Management occurrence reporting categorization for specific CAM and VAMP failure modes.

Bates, W.F.

1993-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ambient social tv: drawing people into a shared experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine how ambient displays can augment social television. Social TV 2 is an interactive television solution that incorporates two ambient displays to convey to participants an aggregate view of their friends' current TV-watching status. Social TV ... Keywords: ambient displays, field trial, interactive television, social presence awareness, social television

Gunnar Harboe; Crysta J. Metcalf; Frank Bentley; Joe Tullio; Noel Massey; Guy Romano

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

A battery-free tag for wireless monitoring of heart sounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a wearable, battery-free tag that monitors heart sounds. The tag powers up by harvesting ambient RF energy, and contains a low-power integrated circuit, an antenna and up to four microphones. The chip, ...

Mandal, Soumyajit

250

Optimizing Electric Humidifier Operation with an Air Side Economizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air side economizer cycle is a control scheme that is often used in WAC systems to reduce cooling energy consumption by introducing variable quantities of ambient air into a conditioned space to satisfy the space cooling load (free cooling). Humidifiers are used to maintain the pre-set humidity levels in a conditioned space by introducing steam or atomized water into the space. An WAC system containing both electric humidifier and air side economizer cycle can appear to be energy efficient, but has the potential of being inefficient due to lack of proper controls. The economizer, which often operates independently of the humidifier, introduces large quantities of cool and dry ambient air into the space to reduce the mechanical cooling energy, but because of the environmental requirement of the space, the air has to be humidified. The humidification energy could offset the energy savings from the reduction in mechanical cooling energy. The solution for this potential problem is a control scheme that makes the operation of the economizer and electric humidifier interdependent. The control scheme will use ambient conditions and space environmental requirements to calculate the appropriate amount of outside air that the economizer should draw into the space. The control scheme can be implemented through a Direct Digital Control system.

Shami, U. F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

O estudo de impacto ambiental e sua complexidade jurídico-administrativa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??O Estudo de Impacto Ambiental (EIA) como instrumento da Política Nacional do Meio Ambiente, é imprescindível para a gestão pública ambiental. Contudo, são inúmeras as… (more)

Andréia Ponciano de Moraes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

253

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

254

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Air Quality, Transportation, Health, and Urban Planning: Making the Links Speaker(s): Julian Marshall Date: May 18, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Thomas McKone It is well documented that exposure to ambient air pollution at concentrations typically found in U.S. cities causes significant health effects. Reducing exposure to air pollution is a large, long-term goal for the environmental health community. In this talk, I will address three questions: 1) How should we prioritize emission reduction efforts? 2) Can urban planning help reduce exposure to air pollution? 3) Are there correlations between exposure to air pollution and demographic attributes such as ethnicity and income? I use three case studies to address these

255

High strength air-dried aerogels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

256

Numerical Simulations of the Meteorological and Dispersion Conditions during an Air Pollution Episode over Athens, Greece  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a summer air pollution episode from 6 to 8 August 1994 over Athens, Greece, is investigated through advanced atmospheric modeling. This episode was reported from the air quality monitoring network, as well as from research aircraft ...

V. Kotroni; G. Kallos; K. Lagouvardos; M. Varinou; R. Walko

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Metropolitan New York in the greenhouse: Air quality and health effects  

SciTech Connect

A variety of potential effects on human health resulting from climate change have been identified in several assessments. According to an international panel{sup 1} they include direct effects of extreme temperatures on cardiovascular deaths, secondary effects due to vector-borne diseases or crop yields, and tertiary effects such as those that might arise from conflicts over freshwater supplies. To this fist we add the secondary effects of increased air pollution, which may result either directly from climate change or indirectly from increased air conditioning loads and the corresponding pollutant emissions from electric utilities. Higher ozone concentrations have been linked to increased ambient temperatures by both theory and observations of monitoring data. A similar association with particulate matter has been limited to observations, thus far. The pollution-heat linkage has been recognized before` but health effects have not been evaluated in terms of predictions of the joint effects of both agents. This paper has been prepared in two sections. First, we discuss the ozone situation with special reference to the Northeast Corridor and New York. In the second section, we present estimates of the health effects of climate change on New York and discuss some mitigation options.

Kleinman, L.I.; Lipfert, F.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

259

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Title Air Leakage of Furnaces and Air Handlers Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5553E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Mile Lubliner, Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Journal 2010 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings The Climate for efficiency is now Date Published 08/2010 Abstract In recent years, great strides have been made in reducing air leakage in residential and to a lesser extent small commercial forced air duct systems. Several authorities have introduced low leakage limits for thermal distribution systems; for example, the State of California Energy Code for Buildings gives credit for systems that leak less than 6% of the total air flow at 25 Pa.

260

Linear air-fuel sensor development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

Garzon, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, C. [General Motors, Flint, MI (United States). GM/Delphi E. Division

1996-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration, and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. One plant will be a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage, and the other will be a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project that is necessary to enable higher penetration of ...

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

266

ROLE OF TOXICITY ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING IN MANAGING THE RECOVERY OF A WASTEWATER RECEIVING STREAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluate the roles of a long-term comprehensive toxicity assessment and monitoring program in management and for ecological recovery of a freshwater receiving stream impacted by industrial discharges and legacy contamination. National Pollution Discharge Elimination Permit (NPDES)-driven whole effluent toxicity (WET) tests using Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnows were conducted for more than twenty years to characterize wastewaters at the US National Nuclear Security Agency s Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Ambient toxicity tests also were conducted to assess water samples from EFPC, the stream receiving the wastewater discharges. The ambient tests were conducted as part of an extensive biological monitoring program that included routine surveys of fish, invertebrate and periphyton communities. WET testing, associated toxicant identification evaluations (TIEs), and ambient toxicity monitoring were instrumental in identifying toxicants and their sources at the Y-12 Complex, guiding modifications to wastewater treatment procedures, and assessing the success of various pollution-abatement actions. Through time, as requirements changed and water quality improved, the toxicity monitoring program became more focused. Ambient testing with Ceriodaphnia and fathead minnow larvae also was supplemented with less-standardized but more-sensitive alternative laboratory and in situ bioassays. The Y-12 Complex biological monitoring experience demonstrates the significant roles effluent and ambient toxicity testing can have in controlling and managing toxic discharges to receiving waters. It also emphasizes the value of supplementing WET and standardized ambient toxicity tests with alternative laboratory and in situ toxicity tests tailored to address specific problems.

Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen [ORNL; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

AIRS Subpixel Cloud Characterization Using MODIS Cloud Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) measurements from the Earth Observing System's (EOS's) Aqua satellite enable improved global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. MODIS is ...

Jun Li; W. Paul Menzel; Fengying Sun; Timothy J. Schmit; James Gurka

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Retrieval of Cloud Microphysical Properties from MODIS and AIRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) measurements from the NASA Earth Observing System Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds during day and night. ...

Jun Li; Hung-Lung Huang; Chian-Yi Liu; Ping Yang; Timothy J. Schmit; Heli Wei; Elisabeth Weisz; Li Guan; W. Paul Menzel

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Spectral analysis of ambient weather patterns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Fourier spectral analysis of ambient weather data, consisting of global and direct solar radiation, dry and wet bulb temperatures, and wind speed, is given. By analyzing the heating and cooling seasons independently, seasonal variations are isolated and a cleaner spectrum emerges. This represents an improvement over previous work in this area, in which data for the entire year were analyzed together. As a demonstration of the efficacy of this method, synthetic data constructed with a small number of parameters are used in typical simulations, and the results are compared with those obtained with the original data. A spectral characterization of fluctuations around the moving average is given, and the changes in the fluctuation from season to season are examined.

Anderson, J.V.; Subbarao, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ambient-pressure silica aerogel films  

SciTech Connect

Very highly porous (aerogel) silica films with refractive index in the range 1.006--1.05 (equivalent porosity 98.5--88%) were prepared by an ambient-pressure process. It was shown earlier using in situ ellipsometric imaging that the high porosity of these films was mainly attributable to the dilation or `springback` of the film during the final stage of drying. This finding was irrefutably reconfirmed by visually observing a `springback` of >500% using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Ellipsometry and ESEM also established the near cent per cent reversibility of aerogel film deformation during solvent intake and drying. Film thickness profile measurements (near the drying line) for the aerogel, xerogel and pure solvent cases are presented from imaging ellipsometry. The thickness of these films (crack-free) were controlled in the range 0.1-3.5 {mu}m independent of refractive index.

Prakash, S.S. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brinker, C.J. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)]|[Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hurd, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Feasibility of air capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing CO2 from air, referred to as Air Capture, is being proposed as a viable climate change mitigation technology. The two major benefits of air capture, reported in literature, are that it allows us to reduce the ...

Ranjan, Manya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Navigating the Database. DVD-video. Cambridge MA: MITnetworked and more ubiquitous. Video screens are steadily [with the nature of the ambient video experience, and can be

Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NETL: Health Effects - Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cardiopulmonary Toxicity Induced by Ambient Particulate Matter The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the potential for adverse cardiopulmonary effects of airborne...

274

Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente AIMA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Invests in projects that aim to generate energy from biodegradable residues and waste. References Age Inversiones in Media Ambiente (AIMA)1 LinkedIn Connections...

275

Design of an ambient aerosol sampling system for high and medium speed applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two ambient sampling systems were designed and tested for high speed sampling application for a wind speed range of 4.47 m/s to 26.82 m/s. These systems will be used as inlets for sampling of bioaerosol from air. These systems consist of shrouded probes for sampling at higher speeds and omni-directional inlets for low speed ambient sampling. The two systems operate at 780 L/min and 90 L/min. Another system was designed and tested for medium speed ambient sampling. This unit will be used as a reference sampler for speed ranges from zero to 20.12 m/s. This system consists of a Sierra-Andersen SA-246 inlet for sampling at speeds up-to 6.71 m/s (15 mph) and a shrouded probe operating at variable flow rate for sampling in speed range of 6.71 m/s and 20.12 m/s. An aircraft-borne shrouded probe was also tested at wind speeds as high as 50 m/s in an upgraded high speed wind tunnel.

Irshad, Hammad

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Primary zone air proportioner  

SciTech Connect

An air proportioner is provided for a liquid hydrocarbon fueled gas turbine of the type which is convertible to oil gas fuel and to coal gas fuel. The turbine includes a shell for enclosing the turbine, an air duct for venting air in said shell to a gasifier, and a fuel injector for injecting gasified fuel into the turbine. The air proportioner comprises a second air duct for venting air from the air duct for mixing with fuel from the gasifier. The air can be directly injected into the gas combustion basket along with the fuel from the injector or premixed with fuel from the gasifier prior to injection by the fuel injector.

Cleary, Edward N. G. (San Diego, CA)

1982-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

280

Air Pollution Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes the Department of Environmental Management and the Air Pollution Control Board, which are tasked with the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution by all...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by Concent Issued to Mirant Potomac River, LLC, Registration No. 70228 Docket No. EO-05-01: This is a Consent Order issued under the authority of Va. Code § § 10.1-1307D and 10.1-1307.1, between the Board and Mirant Potomac River, LLC for the purpose of ensuring compliance with ambient air quality standards incorporated at 9 VAC Chapter 30 and Va, Code § 10.1-1307.3(3) requiring certain emissions modeling and analysis related to the Potomac River Power Station located in Alexandria, Virginia, Commonwealth of Virginia, State Air Pollution Control Board, Order by

282

TANGO ARRAY An Air Shower Experiment in Buenos Aires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new Air Shower Observatory has been constructed in Buenos Aires during 1999, and commissioned and set in operation in 2000. The observatory consists of an array of four water \\v{C}erenkov detectors, enclosing a geometrical area of $\\sim$ 30.000 m$^{2}$, and is optimized for the observation of cosmic rays in the ``knee'' energy region. The array detects $\\sim$ 250 to $\\sim$ 1500 showers/day, depending on the selected triggering condition. In this paper, the design and construction of the array, and the automatic system for data adquisition, daily calibration, and monitoring, are described. Also, the Monte Carlo simulations performed to develop a shower database, as well as the studies performed using the database to estimate the response and the angular and energy resolutions of the array, are presented in detail.

P. Bauleo; C. Bonifazi; A. Filevich; A. Reguera

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Frequency Monitoring and Simulation Analysis for Historical Structures Being Retrofitted  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many historical structures now need to be retrofitted to meet the requirements of fast developing cities. To ensure the safety of a historical masonry building during its retrofitting, natural frequency of the structure was measured through ambient vibrating ... Keywords: Historical masonry building, Retrofit, Monitoring, Simulation

Chao Wang, Bin Peng, Peng Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stack Monitor Operating Experience Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stack monitors are used to sense radioactive particulates and gases in effluent air being vented from rooms of nuclear facilities. These monitors record the levels and types of effluents to the environment. This paper presents the results of a stack monitor operating experience review of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS) database records from the past 18 years. Regulations regarding these monitors are briefly described. Operating experiences reported by the U.S. DOE and in engineering literature sources were reviewed to determine the strengths and weaknesses of these monitors. Electrical faults, radiation instrumentation faults, and human errors are the three leading causes of failures. A representative “all modes” failure rate is 1E-04/hr. Repair time estimates vary from an average repair time of 17.5 hours (with spare parts on hand) to 160 hours (without spare parts on hand). These data should support the use of stack monitors in any nuclear facility, including the National Ignition Facility and the international ITER project.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. A. Bruyere

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Continuous emission monitor for incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to continuous monitoring of incinerator emissions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is well suited to this application because it can identify and quantify selected target analytes in a complex mixture without first separating the components in the mixture. Currently, there is no on-stream method to determine the destruction of hazardous substances, such as benzene, or to continuously monitor for hazardous products of incomplete combustion (PICs) in incinerator exhaust emissions. This capability is especially important because of Federal regulations in the Clean Air Act of 1990, which requires the monitoring of air toxics (Title III), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). An on-stream continuous emission monitor (CEM) that can differentiate species in the ppm and ppb range and can calculate the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) could be used to determine the safety and reliability of incinerators. This information can be used to address reasonable public concern about incinerator safety and aid in the permitting process.

Demirgian, J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

288

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Progress report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1996. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 74 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Struckmeyer, R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network progress report, October--December 1994. Volume 14, No. 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1994. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mental models of ambient systems: a modular research framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines our current research program in the fields of ambient intelligence and context-aware computing and the tools we are building to accomplish this research program. From a discussion of our conception of mental models in the domain of ... Keywords: ambient intelligence, context awareness, mental models

Felix Schmitt; Jörg Cassens; Martin Christof Kindsmüller; Michael Herczeg

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Generating Ambient Behaviors in Computer Role-Playing Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computer games use custom scripts to control the ambient behaviors of nonplayercharacters. As a result, story authors mustwrite computer code for the game world'shundreds or thousands of NPCs. Creating entertaining, nonrepetitive NPC behaviors without ... Keywords: ambient behavior, nonplayer character, intelligent agents, scripting language, generative pattern, collaborative behavior, computer games

Maria Cutumisu; Duane Szafron; Jonathan Schaeffer; Matthew McNaughton; Thomas Roy; Curtis Onuczko; Mike Carbonaro

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Learning patterns in ambient intelligence environments: a survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is essential for environments that aim at helping people in their daily life that they have some sort of Ambient Intelligence. Learning the preferences and habits of users then becomes an important step in allowing a system to provide such personalized ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Intelligent environments, Machine learning techniques, Pattern learning

Asier Aztiria; Alberto Izaguirre; Juan Carlos Augusto

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Extracting Key Factors to Design Applications in Ambient Intelligence Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an ambient intelligence environment, the design of applications influences the users behavior heavily. The purpose of this paper is to provide key factors considered necessary in developing those applications. We developed four applications applied ... Keywords: ambient feedback, persuasive technology, behavior modification, emotional engagement

Hiroaki Kimura; Tatsuo Nakajima

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

The DFKI competence center for ambient assisted living  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DFKI Competence Center for Ambient Assisted Living (CCAAL) is a cross-project and cross-department virtual organization within the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence coordinating and conducting research and development in the area ... Keywords: ambient assisted living, intelligent environments, living labs

Jochen Frey; Christoph Stahl; Thomas Röfer; Bernd Krieg-Brückner; Jan Alexandersson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ambient intelligence technologies in support of shipping markets' operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Intelligent Maritime Environment (i-MARE) framework and technological platform we introduce in our paper conceptualize an innovative, collaborative and context-aware network business model for cargo shipping. The i-MARE framework considers ambient-intelligence ... Keywords: Agent technology, Ambient intelligence, Cargo shipping operations, Enterprise modelling, Web semantics

Maria A. Lambrou; Kay Endre Fjørtoft; Efstathios D. Sykas; Nikitas Nikitakos

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Newsletter, April 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter, October 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) Demonstration Newsletter, July 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping.This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis [Department of Mechanical Engineering Educators, ASPETE, N. Iraklio, GR 14121 (Greece); Tsoutsos, Theocharis [Environmental Engineering Dept., Technical University of Crete, Technical University Campus, GR 73100, Chania (Greece); Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis [Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES), 19th km Marathon Ave., GR 19001, Pikermi (Greece)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 La conferencia regresa a D.C. del 26 al 28 de marzo de 2014 con la celebración de los 20 años de justicia ambiental pasados y futuros. PREPARATIVOS EN MARCHA PARA LA CONFERENCIA SOBRE JUSTICIA AMBIENTAL NACIONAL Y EL PROGRAMA DE CAPACITACIÓN 2014 More Documents & Publications SE HAN FINALIZADO LOS PREPARATIVOS PARA LA CONFERENCIA NACIONAL DE JUSTICIA MEDIOAMBIENTAL Y PROGRAMA DE FORMACIÓN 2013 2013 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program EIS-0281: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Summary (Spanish)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Ambient Corporation submits the following comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) in hopes that their contribution can highlight and further the understanding of the DOE on the key role that integrated communications will play ineneabling utilities to deploy cost-effective long-term smart grid benefits. Ambient Corporation's Reply comments to DOE RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation More Documents & Publications Comments of Tendril Networks Inc Technical Standards Newsletter - September 2001

302

A New Portable Instrument for Continuous Measurement of Formaldehyde in Ambient Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument for the in situ measurement of formaldehyde with online concentration output was built on the base of the Hantzsch chemistry fluorimetric detection of formaldehyde in liquid phase. The instrument was specially designed for ...

W. Junkermann; J. M. Burger

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Economic and energetic analysis of capturing CO2 from ambient air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artist, Robin Hopper, required The Artist's Guide, Jackie Battenfield, required Ceramics Handbook clay and glaze materials and applying glaze with a spray gun. Fowlett's Bookstore has ordered N95 PROTECTION. The link for information regarding the SA+AH H&S policy and handbook on health and safety is

304

The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industries Petrol evaporation Gasoline vehicle exhaustb Solvents and storage Fuel combustion by electric

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related to fan electricity demand. All of these equationsmeasurements. The electricity demand outputs of all modelsonly overall building electricity demand measurements. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

The Contribution of Motor Vehicles and Other Sources to Ambient Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and alliedmainly residential wood combustion) Chemicals and allied

Delucchi, Mark A.; McCubbin, Donald R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

THE LIFETIME OF AEROSOLS IN AMBIENT AIR: CONSIDERATION OF THE EFFECTS OF SURFACTANTS AND CHEMICAL REACTIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lltion to tre sol,thll! ' aerosols and sulfur dioxidP. inof snlfur rlioxirle by aerosols of rnanganesP KinPtics ofof various urhan Sillfate aerosols prorluction r1echani sns.

Toossi, R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of ambient humidity on the energy use of air conditioning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

els to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationels to the solar measurements from the ebu weather stationto the hourly solar data from the cz07 weather file. The

White, Justin George

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

1985 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program is designed to determine that BNL facilities operate such that the applicable environmental standards and effluent control requirements have been met. The data were evaluated using the appropriate environmental regulatory criteria. The environmental levels of radioactivity and other pollutants found in the vicinity of BNL during 1985 are summarized in this report. Detailed data are not included in the main body of the report, but are tabulated and presented in Appendix D. The environmental data include external radiation levels; radioactive air particulates; tritium concentrations; the amounts and concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of the stream into which liquid effluents are released; the water quality of the potable supply wells; the concentrations of radioactivity in biota from the stream; the concentrations of radioactivity in and the water quality of ground waters underlying the Laboratoy; concentrations of radioactivity in milk samples obtained in the vicinity of the Laboratory; and the 1984 strontium-90 data which was not available for inclusion in the 1984 Environmental Monitoring Report. In 1985, the results of the surveillance program demonstraed that the Laboratory has operated within the applicable environmental standards.

Day, L.E.; Miltenberger, R.P.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Pollution control and environmental monitoring efforts at DOE's Coal-Fired Flow Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale demonstration of such technology is currently being carried out at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF), located at The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in Tullahoma, Tennessee and at the Component Development and Integration Facility in Butte, Montana. The CFFF is dedicated to the evaluation of downstream (steam cycle) components and technology that may be considered for a full-scale MHD system. The objectives of the CFFF testing include the demonstration of various pollution control devices and techniques at a scale sufficient for future scale-up. The CFFF offers a unique test environment in which emissions control techniques can be developed and evaluated through emissions and environmental monitoring. Results thus far have demonstrated the ability of sulfur oxide (SO{sub x}), nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and particulate emissions well below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). Regeneration of the potassium sulfate to produce sulfur-free compounds also has been demonstrated. The experimental program at the CFFF is now aimed at determining the optimum conditions for future commercial scale designs. Because of increased interests in Air Toxics, measurements of nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), a potential greenhouse gas, priority pollutants (inorganic as well as organics), and chlorine-containing species (Cl{sub 2} and HCl) are also included in our ongoing efforts. Environmental monitoring activities are being pursued to develop an environmental impact assessment data base. These include the use of three ambient air sites to determine the impacts of gaseous and particulate emissions, five lake water sites to determine impacts due to process water discharges and seven sites to collect terrestrial data on possible soil contamination and tree growth. In this paper, we will summarize the status of our ongoing environmental program. 16 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Attig, R.C.; Crawford, L.W.; Lynch, T.P.; Sheth, A.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Short-Term Monitoring to Diagnose Comfort Problems in a Residence in Central Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents results from a project to resolve comfort problems created by high indoor humidity in a 3,400 sq.ft. house in Bryan, Texas. The case study house had been certified by the local utility to meet their energy efficiency standards. However, the resident of the house complained that the house felt too humid although the desired temperature conditions were being maintained. Several HVAC contractors had been previously hired to resolve the problem without success. The field measurements undertaken to diagnose the problem are typical of those that could be undertaken by a house inspector and include an inspection of the construction of the house, short-term monitoring of temperature and humidity, blower door tests and whole-house pressurization tests. To perform the analysis both floors of the house were instrumented with portable data loggers and monitored for a period of two weeks to measure the temperature and relative humidity of the supply, return and ambient conditions. Analysis procedures applied to the house include comparing the measured data against the ASHRAE comfort zone (ASHRAE, 1997) which confirmed adequate zone temperatures with high humidity conditions, and inadequate supply air delivery temperatures for humidity removal. Combined results of the blower door tests and whole-house pressurization tests indicated a potential for leakage through the return air duct. After the recommendations were presented to the homeowner, a new contractor was hired and retrofits applied on the house (i.e., cleaning the cooling coils, enlarging the compressor and relining of the return duct). Measurements were then repeated to determine that the problem had been f ~ e d . This paper describes the case study residence, the measurements used to diagnose the problem, analysis methods, and presents results of the application of the analysis.

Kootin-Sanwu, V.; Sresthaputra, A.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Air Heating Solar air heating systems use air as the working fluid for absorbing and transferring solar energy. Solar air collectors (devices to heat air...

313

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 1): Otis Air National Guard (USAF), Operable Unit 5, Falmouth, MA, September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence (AFCEE) selected remedial action decisions for contaminant source areas at the following Areas of Contamination (AOCs) at the Massachusetts Military Reservation (MMR) in Barnstable County on Cape Cod, Massachusetts: Fire Training Area No. 2 and Landfill No. 2 (FTA-2/LF-2); Petroleum Fuels Storage Area, Fuel Spill No. 10, and Fuel Spill No. 11 (PFSA/FS-10/FS-11); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fuel Spill No. 6, and Fuel Spill No. 8 (SD-2/FS-6/FS-8); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 2, Fire Training Area No. 3, and Coal Storage Yard No. 4 (SF-3/FTA-3/CY-4); Storm Drainage Ditch No. 4 (SD-4); and Storm Drainage Ditch No. 5 and Fuel Spill No. 5 (SD-5/FS-5). The selected remedy for AOC FTA-2/LF-2 is Biosparging with Ambient Air Monitoring. This remedial action is a source control action that addresses leaching of organic compounds to groundwater, the principal known threat at AOC FTA-2/LF-2. It consists of designing, constructing, and operating a biosparging treatment system, maintaining institutional controls, and five-year reviews of remedy protectiveness. The remedy reduces the release of contaminants from subsurface soils by treating subsurface soils to meet protective cleanup levels.

NONE

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effectiveness of Shading Air-Cooled Condensers of Air-Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In air-conditioning (A/C) systems with air-cooled condensers, the condensing unit has to be kept in the open for easy access to outdoor air in order to efficiently dissipate heat. During daytime, the solar radiation falling on the surfaces of the condenser and the high ambient temperatures can be detrimental for the energy performance. The effectiveness of shading the condensing unit to mitigate this adverse impact is investigated in this paper. A limiting analysis compares the performance of several A/C systems with ideal shade to those with ideal solar heat gain. The comparison is based on a theoretical model and data from equipment catalogs. The theoretical increase in the coefficient of performance (COP) due to shading is found to be within 2.5%. Furthermore, this small improvement in ideal efficiency decreases at higher ambient temperatures, when enhancements to efficiency are more needed. The actual efficiency improvement due to shading is not expected to exceed 1%, and the daily energy savings will be lower.

ElSherbini, A.; Maheshwari, G. P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Isokinetic air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An isokinetic air sampler includes a filter, a holder for the filter, an air pump for drawing air through the filter at a fixed, predetermined rate, an inlet assembly for the sampler having an inlet opening therein of a size such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained at a particular wind speed, a closure for the inlet opening and means for simultaneously opening the closure and turning on the air pump when the wind speed is such that isokinetic air sampling is obtained. A system incorporating a plurality of such samplers provided with air pumps set to draw air through the filter at the same fixed, predetermined rate and having different inlet opening sizes for use at different wind speeds is included within the ambit of the present invention as is a method of sampling air to measure airborne concentrations of particulate pollutants as a function of wind speed.

Sehmel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

MOISTURE MONITOR TESTING AND CALIBRATION  

SciTech Connect

ABS>Electrolytic moisture monitors which continuously analyze the moisture content of gases are commercially available. After a period of operation, these instruments may give erroneous readings, frequently because of damage to the electrolytic cell. A gas with a known and reproducible moisture content within the operating range would be useful for making operational response tests on these monltors and for checking their calibration. A paired- hydrate system of a chemical compound exhibits a water vapor pressure that is constant at a constant temperature. ff an unreactive gas is allowed to equilibrate with a paired-hydrate system, the moisture content of the gas is determined by the vapor pressure of the hydrate pair, the total pressure, and the temperature. Hydrated magnesium perchlorate was prepared which contained between four and six moles of water per mole of perchlorate. This material was pulverized lightly then packed into a stainless steel column and 100 cc/minute of air at atmospheric pressure was passed through the bed. The exit air from the column was analyzed with a moisture monitor. A gas residence time of two minutes in the column was found to be sufficient for establishing moisture equilibrium in the exit flow. The moisture content of the exit air was found to vary from 34 to 70 ppm by volume as the temperature of the paired-hydrate system varied from 20 to 28 un. Concent 85% C. Other paired-hydrate systems can extend this range to higher moisture levels. (auth)

Montgomery, C.D.; Googin, J.M.; Phillips, L.R.

1963-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

A liquid over-feeding military air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A 3-ton military air conditioning unit has been experimentally studied for baseline and liquid over-feeding operation (LOF). The test results indicate that LOF outperforms the baseline case over a wide ambient temperature range in terms of cooling capacity, power consumption, and system coefficient of performance (COP). At 95 F test point, the COP improvement for LOF is 19.8% over that of the baseline case. However, optimal refrigerant charge is essential for LOF to work properly.

Mei, V.C.; Chen, F.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bolton, C. [Army CECOM Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Fort Belvoir, VA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Blue LED for RS Monitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We report on a design of RS gain monitor system based on blue LED. Gain of each RS PMT is monitored by a LED, which is mounted in front of the PMT window in its _-metal shield. The blue LED well simulates scintillation light with its short pulse and wavelength. The LED is as small as 3 mmOE. The light yield is stable and has small temperature dependence. These are nice properties to install in present RS system with small modification and to operate without air conditioning. In this note we will present outline of our design and test results which demonstrate its desirable properties. 1 Introduction RS gain monitor has been carried out with K_2 events at E787. They are sat- isfactory to monitor long and medium term stability but it is not satisfactory to monitor short term stability and to check PMT and related electronics quickly and frequently. These capabilities are important to reduce setup time and loss time in long E949 run. For these purpose triggerable and stable light source is required at RS system. We consider two types of monitoring system. One is the system which consists of one light source and its light distribution network, such as a Xe lamp with a optical fiber network. It has the advantage that light intensity of the source itself can be monitored and be corrected. But, practically, it is not easy to estimate light output of individual fiber correctly by checking light source and to handle optical fibers, and we have to think out a solution how we introduce lights to RS or its PMT. Also the system is rather expensive and it will take long time to

unknown authors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Urban land use, air toxics and public health: Assessing hazardous exposures at the neighborhood scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use data are increasingly understood as important indicators of potential environmental health risk in urban areas where micro-scale or neighborhood level hazard exposure data are not routinely collected. This paper aims to offer a method for estimating the distribution of air toxics in urban neighborhoods using land use information because actual air monitoring data rarely exist at this scale. Using Geographic Information System spatial modeling tools, we estimate air toxics concentrations across neighborhoods in New York City and statistically compare our model with the US Environmental Protection Agency's National Air Toxic Assessment and air monitoring data across three NYC neighborhoods. We conclude that land use data can act as a good proxy for estimating neighborhood scale air toxics, particularly in the absence of monitoring data. In addition, the paper suggests that land use data can expand the reach of environmental impact assessments that routinely exclude analyses of potential exposures to urban air toxics at the neighborhood scale.

Corburn, Jason [Columbia University, Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and School of International and Public Affairs, 400 Avery Hall, 1172 Amsterdam Ave. New York, NY 10027 (United States)]. E-mail: jtc2105@columbia.edu

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Undulator Hall Air Temperature Fault Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Recent experience indicates that the LCLS undulator segments must not, at any time following tuning, be allowed to change temperature by more than about {+-}2.5 C or the magnetic center will irreversibly shift outside of acceptable tolerances. This vulnerability raises a concern that under fault conditions the ambient temperature in the Undulator Hall might go outside of the safe range and potentially could require removal and retuning of all the segments. In this note we estimate changes that can be expected in the Undulator Hall air temperature for three fault scenarios: (1) System-wide power failure; (2) Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) system shutdown; and (3) HVAC system temperature regulation fault. We find that for either a system-wide power failure or an HVAC system shutdown (with the technical equipment left on), the short-term temperature changes of the air would be modest due to the ability of the walls and floor to act as a heat ballast. No action would be needed to protect the undulator system in the event of a system-wide power failure. Some action to adjust the heat balance, in the case of the HVAC power failure with the equipment left on, might be desirable but is not required. On the other hand, a temperature regulation failure of the HVAC system can quickly cause large excursions in air temperature and prompt action would be required to avoid damage to the undulator system.

Sevilla, J.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Products from Global Vsd Oil Free Air Compressor Suppliers ...

322

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Products ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

China Ga Air Compressor, China Ga Air Compressor Suppliers and Manufacturers Directory - Source a Large Selection of Ga Air Compressor Products at ...

323

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor, You Can Buy Various High Quality Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Products from Global Oil Free Vsd Air Compressor Suppliers ...

324

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers, Screw Type Ac Air ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Screw Type Ac Air Compressor, Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Screw Type Ac Air Compressor Traders, ...

325

Chemical characterization of the ambient organic aerosol soluble in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the water-soluble organic car- bon (WSOC) components of ambient aerosol particles into hydrophilic and Weber [2006]. In the XAD-8 method, the WSOC components that penetrate the column are hydro- philic

Weber, Rodney

326

Ambient pressure synthesis of nanostructured tungsten oxide crystalline films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the results of the ambient pressure synthesis of tungsten oxide nanowires and nanoparticles on AlN substrates using the hot filament CVD techniques. The morphologic surface, crystallographic structures, chemical compositions, and bond structures ...

H. X. Zhang; B. Q. Yang; P. X. Feng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Shipping source level estimation for ambient noise forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to accurately estimate shipping source levels from ambient noise data is an essential step towards creating a forecast model of the ocean soundscape. Source level estimates can be obtained by solving the system of linear equations

Jeffrey S. Rogers; Steven L. Means; Stephen C. Wales

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Street media : ambient messages in an urban space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient street media are the media of our everyday lives in cities. Manifested in bits and fragments on the surfaces of the streetscape, these media often escape our notice - tuned out as visual clutter or dismissed as ...

Murthy, Rekha (Rekha S.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Space and Time Scales in Ambient Ozone Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the characteristic space and time scales in time series of ambient ozone data. The authors discuss the need and a methodology for cleanly separating the various scales of motion embedded in ozone time series data, namely, ...

S. T. Rao; I. G. Zurbenko; R. Neagu; P. S. Porter; J. Y. Ku; R. F. Henry

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Air Conditioning and lungs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Conditioning and lungs Name: freeman Status: NA Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: Around 1993 Question: What affect does air conditioning have upon the lungs of the...

331

Monitoring-based HVAC Commissioning of an Existing Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-5940E Monitoring-based HVAC Commissioning of an Existing Office Building for Energy Efficiency thereof or The Regents of the University of California. #12;1 Monitoring-based HVAC Commissioning@lbl.gov, Tel: 1-510-486-4921 Abstract The performance of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC

332

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development of a Computer Heating Monitoring System and Its Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a computer heating monitoring system, introduces the components and principles of the monitoring system, and provides a study on its application to residential building heating including analysis of indoor and outdoor air temperature, heating index and energy savings. The results show that the current heating system has a great potential for energy conservation.

Chen, H.; Li, D.; Shen, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

CO2 Capture by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Sub-Ambient Membrane by Sub-Ambient Membrane Operation Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing

335

TV as a human interface for Ambient Intelligence environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the challenges that Ambient Intelligent (AmI) faces is the provision of a usable interaction concept to its users, especially for those with less technical background. In this paper, we describe a new approach to integrate interactive services ... Keywords: information service, human interface, ambient intelligence environments, usable interaction concept, interactive services, television set, home environment, natural human computer interface, elderly people, graphical user interfaces, TV remote control, voice interaction, videoconference

Gorka Epelde; Xabier Valencia; Julio Abascal; Unai Diaz; Ingo Zinnikus; Christian Husodo-Schulz

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Design of a particulate-monitoring network for the Y-12 plant  

SciTech Connect

An Air Quality Monitoring Network Design (AQMND) with multiple objectives is being developed for the Y-12 Plant production facilities. The objectives are: Y-12 facility surveillance; monitoring the transport of Y-12 generated airborne effluents towards either the Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the developed region of the City of Oak Ridge; and monitoring population exposure in residential areas close to the Y-12 Plant. A two step design process was carried out, using the Air Quality Monitor Network Design Model (AQMND) previously used for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory network. In the first step of the design we used existing air quality monitor locations, subjectively designated locations, and grid intersections as a set of potential monitor sites. The priority sites from the first step (modified to account for terrain and accessibility), and subjectively designated sites, were used as the potential monitor sites for the second step of the process which produced the final design recommendations for the monitor network.

Hougland, E.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Underwood, J.N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System FEMP Technology Brief: Boiler Combustion Control and Monitoring System October 7, 2013 - 9:12am Addthis This composite photo shows technicians observing operation at the monitoring station and making subsequent fine adjustments on combustion system controls Technical staff are making boiler adjustments with the control and monitoring system. Photo courtesy of the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. Technology Description A novel combustion control system, along with gas sensors, sets the opening of fuel and air inlets based on flue-gas concentrations. Continuous feedback from measurements of oxygen, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxide concentrations enable the control system

338

Air Pollution- Local Air Quality (Ontario, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Air Pollution regulation administered by the Ministry of the Environment enforces compliance to the standards set in the Ontario law. The law is phased in, with portions taking effect in 2010,...

339

Radon Monitoring Results BPA Residential Weatherization Program, Report Number 1.  

SciTech Connect

In October 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began offering free radon monitoring to participants of its regionwide Residential Weatherization Program. The purpose of the radon monitoring is to provide information to participating homeowners or consumers on the average radon concentrations within their residences. This radon concentration information and other information on indoor air quality (IAQ) is provided to assist homeowners on their decision to install ''house-tightening'' weatherization measures. This radon report will present background information on why BPA decided to offer radon monitoring, the procedures used for monitoring, the extent of BPA radon monitoring in the region, and results of this monitoring. Subsequent BPA radon monitoring reports will be produced on a quarterly basis which will include a brief narrative on the radon monitoring and provide a summary of the radon data received to date.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity [>=]10[sup [minus]4] (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1], and preferably [>=]0.01 (ohm-cm)[sup [minus]1]. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag[sup +] ions, as in Ag[sub 2]WO[sub 4], or to F[sup [minus

Zaromb, S.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thin Air Breathing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Air Breathing Thin Air Breathing Name: Amy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why is it hard to breathe in thin air? What health dangers do mountain climbers face at high altitudes? Replies: Among the obvious dangers of losing ones footing, the oxygen available in the air is considerable less at higher altitudes. If I recall correctly, 21% of the atmosphere at standard temperature and pressure at sea level is composed of oxygen. This is less at higher altitudes. One can lose consciousness and even die in an oxygen deficient environment with changes from oxygen content to lower than 19.5%. This can unfortunate effect can occur within minutes. Dr. Myron The air is not really thin at high altitudes. The problem is that air pressure is lower. As altitude increases, air pressure decreases. In order for your lungs to fill with air, the air pressure in your lungs has to be less than the pressure of the air outside your lungs. Air moves from areas of higher pressure to lower pressure. As your diaphragm (the muscle that separates your chest cavity from your abdominal cavity) moves downward, the size of your chest cavity increases. This decreases the pressure in your chest and air flows in. When the diaphragm is up, it puts pressure on the chest cavity and the pressure in the lungs is greater than outside the lungs. Air flows out. This is an example of Boyle's Law. The movement of the diaphragm is controlled by the brainstem. Anyway-the reason that it is harder for some people to breathe at higher altitudes is that the air pressure differences aren't as great between the inside of the lungs and outside.

342

NRC TLD Direct Radiation Monitoring Network. Volume 15, No. 4: Quarterly progress report, October--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the NRC Direct Radiation Monitoring Network for the fourth quarter of 1995. It provides the ambient radiation levels measured in the vicinity of 75 sites throughout the United States. In addition, it describes the equipment used, monitoring station selection criteria, characterization of the dosimeter response, calibration procedures, statistical methods, intercomparison, and quality assurance program.

Struckmeyer, R.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Fast track article: Designing an extensible architecture for Personalized Ambient Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient displays provide us with information in the background of our awareness. However, as each user has individual wishes and needs of how, which and when information is presented, the acceptance of ambient displays is low. In this paper we introduce ... Keywords: Ambient display, Ambient fixture, Notification system, Peripheral display, Ubiquitous computing

Jan-Patrick Elsholz; Guido de Melo; Marc Hermann; Michael Weber

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

China-GHG Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » China-GHG Monitoring (Redirected from GIZ-China GHG Monitoring) Jump to: navigation, search Name China - GHG Monitoring Agency/Company /Organization German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ), Center for Clean Air Policy Partner on behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU) Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Low emission development planning Program Start 2011 Program End 2014 Country China Eastern Asia References GTZ in the People's Republic of China[1] Overview The project aims to develop capacities for a GHG-Monitoring system and an

346

An inlet air washer/chiller system for combined cycle planet repowering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conditioning method to achieve increased output at any relative humidity condition is an air washer and absorption chiller arrangement. At elevated temperatures and low humidity, the air washer operates as an evaporative cooler without the chiller in operation. In this mode, the air washer will give similar results as a media type evaporative cooler at a fraction of the pressure loss. In the air washer plus chiller operating mode the chiller maintains cooling effectiveness of the air washer during periods of high relative humidity. This makes such a system very appropriate anywhere relative humidity is high. Many combined cycle plants utilize supplemental firing of the heat recovery steam generators to offset the loss of gas turbine power at high ambient temperatures. This paper shows that in contrast to supplementary firing, the combination air washer/chiller system can generate power more efficiently and at lower cost.

Sengupta, U.; Soroka, G. (Bechtel Power Corp., Gaithersburg, MD (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Indoor Air Quality Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... CONTAM has been used at NIST to study the indoor air quality impacts of HVAC systems in single-family residential buildings, ventilation in large ...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (the Board or ARB) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider amendments to the Verifkztion

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Air Resources Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Air Resources Board (the Board or ARB) will conduct a public hearing at the time and place noted below to consider amendments to the Verification

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Air Pollution Project: Scenario  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Summary HELP Index Summary Scenario Internet Links Student Pages SubjectContent Area: ScienceChemistry, Environment - Air Pollution Target Audience: High school chemistry...

351

Forced air fireplace furnace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of heating system for buildings including a fireplace with an open front hearth for burning firewood, a chimney extending from the upper portion of the hearth, a metal firebox being open in the front and closed on the sides and back, a plenum chamber within and surrounding the sides and back of the metal firebox and the chimney lower portion, a horizontal heat distribution chamber positioned in the building attic and communicating at one end with the plenum chamber is described. An air distribution duct connects to the other end of the air distributing chamber, the duct extending to discharge heated air to a place in the building remote from the fireplace. A fan is placed in the horizontal air distributing chamber, and a return air duct extends from selected place in the building and communicates with the plenum chamber lower portion so that the fan draws air through the return air duct, through the plenum chamber around the firebox where the air is heated, through the horizontal distribution chamber, and out through the distribution duct for circulation of the heated air within the building.

Bruce, R.W.; Gorman, R.E.

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Movements in air conditioning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Movements in Air Conditioning is a collection of poems that explores the obstacles inherent in creating a new sense of home in a country that… (more)

Hitt, Robert D. (Robert David)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Adsorption air conditioner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar powered air conditioner using the adsorption process is constructed with its components in a nested cylindrical array for compactness and ease of operation.

Rousseau, Jean L. I. (Redondo Beach, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Room Air Conditioners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Superefficient Room Air Conditioners year month keywords appliance energy efficiency energy efficiency incentives Market Transformation standards url https isswprod lbl gov...

355

Air Pollution Controls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Various statutes within the Wisconsin Legislative Documents relate to air pollution control. These statutes describe zoning, permitting, and emissions regulations for hazardous and non-hazardous...

356

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient temperature with 40 C (104 F) cooling water temperature. This is in close agreement with the manufacturer data of 0.60 for COP and 3.9 kW for cooling capacity. This study resulted in a complete performance map of RAC which will be used to evaluate the potential benefits of rotating heat exchangers in making the "next-generation" absorption chillers more compact and cost effective without any significant degradation in the performance. In addition, the feasibility of using rotating heat exchangers in other applications will be evaluated.

Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Experiments with structural concrete blocks which double as solar air heaters. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because concrete is a low cost, low energy content material, and because many buildings have unobstructed south-facing walls, the concept of an air heating structural block was evolved. Four configurations are described, two routinely available from concrete block manufacturers, and two specially designed. Test walls were evaluated heating ambient air in a single pass, so the temperature difference was low. With that reservation, there was little difference between any of the configurations (one of the special designs was best) or between the blocks and conventional solar air heaters.

Payne, P.R.; Brown, J.P.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Update on State Air Emission Regulations That Affect Electric Power Producers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Several States have recently enacted air emission regulations that will affect the electricity generation sector. The regulations are intended to improve air quality in the States and assist them in complying with the revised 1997 National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ground-level ozone and fine particulates. The affected States include Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, Missouri, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Texas, and Washington. The regulations govern emissions of NOx, SO2, CO2, and mercury from power plants.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Recirculating electric air filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Portable oven air circulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable air circulating apparatus for use in cooking ovens which is used to create air currents in the oven which transfer heat to cooking foodstuffs to promote more rapid and more uniform cooking or baking, the apparatus including a motor, fan blade and housing of metallic materials selected from a class of heat resistant materials.

Jorgensen, Jorgen A. (Bloomington, MN); Nygren, Donald W. (Minneapolis, MN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Meeting the Air Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting the Air Leakage Meeting the Air Leakage Requirements of the 2012 IECC The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes the enormous potential that exists for improving the energy efficiency, safety and comfort of homes. The newest edition of the International Energy Conservation Code ® (IECC) (2012) sets the bar higher for energy efficiency, and new air sealing requirements are one of the key new provisions. This guide is a resource for understanding the new air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these new measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America's Air Sealing Guide, Best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code (IRC) requirements are referenced throughout the guide.

363

Ambient functionality in MIMOSA from technology to services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MIcrosystems platform for MObile Services and Applications (MIMOSA) is an European Integrated Project in the Information Society Technology (IST) priority. The goal of MIMOSA is to make Ambient Intelligence (AmI) a reality by developing a mobile-phone ...

Pascal Ancey

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Ambient Intelligence in Product Life-cycle Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fulfil the increasing demands today the short innovation time and the high quality of production itself is not enough in production of goods, but all phases of a product (from idea to recycling) should be managed by advanced tools and means. Nowadays ... Keywords: Ambient Intelligence, Product Life-cycle Management, Service engineering

G. Kovács; S. Kopácsi; G. Haidegger; R. Michelini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ambient intelligence as enabling technology for modern business paradigms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays the competition among companies, joined to the environmental protection rules, is so compelling that they should not only be on the top of technology in they area, but also run their business according to life-long models. The emphasis on the ... Keywords: Ambient intelligence, Extended product, Knowledge-based systems, Maintenance, Product lifecycle management, Service engineering

S. Kopácsi; G. Kovács; A. Anufriev; R. Michelini

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The role of ambient intelligence in future lighting systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LED-based lighting systems have introduced radically new possibilities in the area of artificial lighting. Being physically small the LED can be positioned or embedded into luminaires, materials and even the very fabric of a building or environment. ... Keywords: LED, ambient intelligence, lighting, user interaction

Dzmitry Aliakseyeu; Jon Mason; Bernt Meerbeek; Harm van Essen; Serge Offermans

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Turning Homes into Low-Cost Ambient Assisted Living Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today motion recognition has become more popular in areas like health care. In real-time environments, the amount of information and data required to compute the user's motion is substantial, while the time to collect and process this information are ... Keywords: Ambient Assistant Living (AAL), Depth Image, Kinect Skeletal Data, Motion, Motion Recognition System

Alexiei Dingli; Daniel Attard; Ruben Mamo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Continuous aqueous tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for a selective on-line determination of aqueous tritium concentration is disclosed. A moist air stream of the liquid solution being analyzed is passed through a permeation dryer where the tritium and moisture and selectively removed to a purge air stream. The purge air stream is then analyzed for tritium concentration, humidity, and temperature, which allows computation of liquid tritium concentration.

McManus, Gary J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weesner, Forrest J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ozone Modeling for Compliance Planning: A Synopsis of "The Use of Photochemical Air Quality Models for Evaluating Emission Control Strategies--A Synthesis Report"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require that many nonattainment areas use gridded, photochemical air quality models to develop compliance plans for meeting the ambient ozone standard. This report reviews the status of photochemical air models--the computer simulation programs that will be used to set emission control programs to meet ground level (tropospheric) ozone standards currently in use for regulatory planning. Regulatory application guidelines are discussed, as are the limitations and reliabili...

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter, July 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter, October 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Energy Crossroads: Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Ventilation, Infiltration & Indoor Air Quality Suggest a Listing Air Infiltration and Ventilation Centre (AIVC) The AIVC fulfills its objectives by providing a range of services and facilities which include: Information, Technical Analysis, Technical Interchange, and Coordination. American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) The ACGIH offers high quality technical publications and learning opportunities. Americlean Services Corp. (ASC) ASC is a certified SBA 8(a) engineering/consulting firm specializing in HVAC contamination detection, abatement, and monitoring. In addition to highly professional ductwork cleaning and HVAC cleaning services, ASC offers a wide range of other engineering/ consulting/ management services

373

Compressed Air Energy Storage Demonstration Newsletter, January 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) demonstration project includes the phased planning, engineering design, construction, demonstration and performance monitoring of two CAES plants. These plants are envisioned to be the following: 1) a system rated at 300 MWs for up to 10 hours with a below-ground reservoir for bulk energy air storage and 2) a system rated at 15 MWs for 2 hours with above-ground air vessel/piping. This is a critical technology demonstration project, necessary to enable higher penet...

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

374

Numerical Analysis of the Channel Wheel Fresh Air Ventilator Under Frosting Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As new equipment, the channel wheel fresh air ventilator has become increasingly popular in recent years. However, when such equipment is operated under low ambient temperature in the freezing area in winter, the formation of frost on the outdoor waste air surface becomes problematic, leading to the degradation of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's performance or even the shutdown of equipment. Therefore, it is necessary to have a detailed investigation on the operational characteristics of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting in order to guide its application. This paper first reports on the development of a detailed model for the channel wheel heat exchanger, which is the core part of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator under frosting conditions. The model developed, first seen in open literature, consists of a frosting sub-model and a channel wheel heat exchanger sub-model. This is followed by reporting an evaluation of the operational characteristics of a frosted channel wheel heat exchanger under different ambient conditions using the model developed. These include frost formation on the surface of the channel wheel heat exchanger, and impacts on the operational performance of the channel wheel fresh air ventilator. Furthermore, the interval of defrosting is obtained, which provides the basis for the adoption of effective defrosting measures, and thus increasing the channel wheel fresh air ventilator's energy efficiency and operating reliability.

Gao, B.; Dong, Z.; Cheng, Z.; Luo, E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All air pollution not otherwise covered by these regulations is prohibited. Stationary sources which cause air pollution must be operated in accordance with all applicable emissions standards and...

376

Abatement of Air Pollution: Prohibition of Air Pollution (Connecticut...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DEEP Air Management Department Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division; Bureau of Air Management Address 79 Elm Street Place...

377

Air ejector augmented compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Energy is stored in slack demand periods by charging a plurality of underground reservoirs with air to the same peak storage pressure, during peak demand periods throttling the air from one storage reservoir into a gas turbine system at a constant inlet pressure until the air pressure in the reservoir falls to said constant inlet pressure, thereupon permitting air in a second reservoir to flow into said gas turbine system while drawing air from the first reservoir through a variable geometry air ejector and adjusting said variable geometry air ejector, said air flow being essentially at the constant inlet pressure of the gas turbine system.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Synergistic Use of MODIS and AIRS in a Variational Retrieval of Cloud Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) measurements from the Earth Observing System's (EOS's) Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. MODIS is able to ...

Jun Li; W. Paul Menzel; Wenjian Zhang; Fengying Sun; Timothy J. Schmit; James J. Gurka; Elisabeth Weisz

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Estimation of Meteorological Parameters for Air Quality Management: Coupling of Sodar Data with Simple Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper an attempt is made to couple sodar data and simple numerical models to calculate the wind field and the boundary layer parameters that are relevant to air quality monitoring and studies. For this purpose, a diagnostic, mass-...

Dimitrios Melas; Giulia Abbate; Dias Haralampopoulos; Alexandros Kelesidis

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Air Shower Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Air shower simulations are a vital part of the design of air shower experiments and the analysis of their data. We describe the basic features of air showers and explain why numerical simulations are the appropriate approach to model the shower simulation. The CORSIKA program, the standard simulation program in this field, is introduced and its features, performance and limitations are discussed. The basic principles of hadronic interaction models and some gerneral simulation techniques are explained. Also a brief introduction to the installation and use of CORSIKA is given.

Alania, Marco; Gomez, Adolfo V. Chamorro [Centro de Tecnologias de Informacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Lima (Peru); Araya, Ignacio J. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av. Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Santiago (Chile); Huerta, Humberto Martinez; Flores, Alejandra Parra [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Knapp, Johannes [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Air heating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-starting, fuel-fired, air heating system including a vapor generator, a turbine, and a condenser connected in a closed circuit such that the vapor output from the vapor generator is conducted to the turbine and then to the condenser where it is condensed for return to the vapor generator. The turbine drives an air blower which passes air over the condenser for cooling the condenser. Also, a condensate pump is driven by the turbine. The disclosure is particularly concerned with the provision of heat exchanger and circuitry for cooling the condensed fluid output from the pump prior to its return to the vapor generator.

Primeau, John J. (19800 Seminole Rd., Euclid, OH 44117)

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Feature - Lithium-air Batteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develop Lithium-Air Battery Li-air Li-air batteries hold the promise of increasing the energy density of Li-ion batteries by as much as five to 10 times. But that potential will...

383

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (benthic macroinvertebrates, fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from Jan. 1995 to Dec. 1995, although activities conducted outside this period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Consultation for the H/sub 2/S and meteorological monitoring program of the Ente Nazionale per l'Energia Electtrica (ENEL). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assistance in setting up a program for monitoring air quality in the vicinity of geothermal development in Larderello's vapor-dominated fields is reviewed. (MHR)

Ruff, R.E.; Cavanagh, L.A.; Collis, R.T.H.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Air Carrier Flight Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air carriers operate under a system of prioritized goals including safety, customer service (on-time departures and arrivals) and operating economics. The flight operations department is responsible for the safe and ...

Midkif, Alan H.

388

AIR RESOURCES BOARD Acknowledgements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared with the assistance and support from other agencies, divisions and offices of the Air Resources Board, and private firms. Staff would especially like to thank the following individuals for their assistance in developing this proposed pathway:

Green Wastes; Green Wastes; Richard Corey; Deputy Executive Officer; Cynthia Marvin Chief; Michael Waugh Chief; Kamal Ahuja; Brian Helmowski; Wes Ingram; Ray Asregadoo (arb; Juliet Bohn (hwma; Richard Boyd (arb; Alicia Chakrabarthy (ebmud; Steven Cliff (arb; Kevin Dickison (ebmud; Jacques Franco (calrecycle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Breathing zone air sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

Tobin, John (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Air Handling Unit Supply Air Temperature Optimization During Economizer Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most air handling units (AHUs) in commercial buildings have an air economizer cycle for free cooling under certain outside air conditions. During the economizer cycle, the outside air and return air dampers are modulated to seek mixing air temperature at supply air temperature setpoint. Mechanical cooling is always required when outside air temperature is higher than the supply air temperature setpoint. Generally the supply air temperature setpoint is set at 55°F for space humidity control. Actually the dehumidification is not necessary when outside air dew point is less than 55°F. Meanwhile the space may have less cooling load due to envelope heat loss and/or occupant schedule. These provide an opportunity to use higher supply air temperature to reduce or eliminate mechanical cooling and terminal box reheat. On the other hand the higher supply air temperature will require higher air flow as well as higher fan power. Therefore the supply air temperature has to be optimized to minimize the combined energy for fan, cooling and heating energy. In this paper a simple energy consumption model is established for AHU systems during the economizer and then a optimal supply air temperature control is developed to minimize the total cost of the mechanical cooling and the fan motor power. This paper presents AHU system energy modeling, supply air temperature optimization, and simulated energy savings.

Xu, K.; Liu, M.; Wang, G.; Wang, Z.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Air Quality | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Air Quality Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAirQuality&oldid612070" Category: NEPA Resources...

392

FREE AIR PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Indenter gages, Wiancko gages, and interferometer gages were used to measure air overpressure vs time at essentially ground level stations for both the surface (S) and undprground (U) atomic explosions. For the S Burst several instruments were placed on a line extending from an overpressure region of 13 psi to a region of less than one psi. The air measurements for the U Burst ranged from 32 to 2 psi. (D. L.G.)

Howard, W.J.; Jones, R.D.

1952-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

393

Regional air quality in the four corners studys region: modeling approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional Eulerian air pollutant transport model was used in an air quality study of the Four Corners region conducted for the National Commission on Air Quality. The regional modeling methodology and some sample results from the regional air quality analysis are presented. One major advantage of the regional transport model that was employed is that its solution involves the calculation of transfer coefficients that relate emissions to ambient concentrations and deposition and which can be used repeatedly to evaluate alternative scenarios and regulatory policies which represent different emission source configurations. The regional transport model was used in the calculation of the concentration and deposition of SO/sub 2/, SO/sub 4/, and primary fine particulates; and these estimates were used as inputs to regional atmospheric visibility and mass budget calculations. Previous studies have shown that the methods used in the regional air quality analysis give good agreement when comparing observed and estimated values.

Nochumson, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual environmental monitoring report, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress made in the monitoring and inspection program for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during 1983 is reported. The following sites were monitored: Bayou Choctau, Bryan Mound, St. James Terminal, Sulfur Mines, Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Discussion is presented under the headings: air quality monitoring; oil spills and NPDES compliance; and water quality monitoring. The discussion on water quality monitoring is by far the most extensive. Surface waters from the sites previously mentioned were sampled and monitored for general water quality (except for St. James Terminal where there is a lack of potentially impacted surface waters). The following parameters were measured: pH value; salinity; total suspended particulates; temperature; dissolved oxygen; biochemical oxygen demand; oil and grease; and general observations. 12 references, 6 figures. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Retrofitting Air Conditioning and Duct Systems in Hot, Dry Climates  

SciTech Connect

This technical report describes CARB's work with Clark County Community Resources Division in Las Vegas, Nevada, to optimize procedures for upgrading cooling systems on existing homes in the area to implement health, safety, and energy improvements. Detailed monitoring of five AC systems showed that three of the five systems met or exceeded air flow rate goals.

Shapiro, C.; Aldrich, R.; Arena, L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Regional emissions of air pollutants in China.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the China-MAP program, sponsored by the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, regional inventories of air pollutants emitted in China are being characterized, in order that the atmospheric chemistry over China can be more fully understood and the resulting ambient concentrations in Chinese cities and the deposition levels to Chinese ecosystems be determined with better confidence. In addition, the contributions of greenhouse gases from China and of acidic aerosols that counteract global warming are being quantified. This paper presents preliminary estimates of the emissions of some of the major air pollutants in China: sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and black carbon (C). Emissions are estimated for each of the 27 regions of China included in the RAINS-Asia simulation model and are subsequently distributed to a 1{degree} x 1{degree} grid using appropriate disaggregation factors. Emissions from all sectors of the Chinese economy are considered, including the combustion of biofuels in rural homes. Emissions from larger power plants are calculated individually and allocated to the grid accordingly. Data for the period 1990-1995 are being developed, as well as projections for the future under alternative assumptions about economic growth and environmental control.

Streets, D. G.

1998-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

397

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, May 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Abbreviations i Executive Summary iii 1 Introduction 1 2 Positive Attributes 3 3 Program Enhancements 5 4 INL Site Environmental Monitoring Program 7 4.1 Overall Assessment 7 4.2 Crosscutting Concerns and Recommendations 7 4.3 Media-Specific Perspectives and Recommendations 11 4.3.1 Air Monitoring 11 4.3.2 Liquid Effluent Monitoring 12 4.3.3 Soil Monitoring 12 4.3.4 Agricultural Products and Game Animals Monitoring 13

398

New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low Ambient/Task Lighting Low Ambient/Task Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Low Ambient/Task Lighting October 4, 2013 - 4:51pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for low ambient/task lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits The low ambient/task lighting strategy improves the visual environment by adding controllable task fixtures that provide light directly where needed for a given task, while reducing the overhead (ambient) light level. Occupancy sensors can also be incorporated into the system. Application Low ambient/task lighting is applicable in most building categories. Key Factors for Deployment Low ambient/task lighting is suitable for most office spaces, including both cubicle and private office space environments, and should be

399

TQL: a query language for semistructured data based on the ambient logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ambient logic is a modal logic that was proposed for the description of the structural and computational properties of distributed and mobile computation. The structural part of the ambient logic is, essentially, a logic of labelled trees, hence ...

Luca Cardelli; Giorgio Ghelli

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions  

SciTech Connect

We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Combustion Gas Turbine Power Enhancement by Refrigeration of Inlet Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion gas turbines have gained widespread acceptance for mechanical drive and power generation applications. One key drawback of a combustion turbine is that its specific output and thermal efficiency vary quite significantly with variations in the ambient temperature. On hot days, a machine may experience considerable difficulty in meeting its power demand. One concept that has not received much attention is the cooling down of compressor inlet air. This paper will examine the theoretical and practical implications of concept such as evaporative cooling, intercooling, expansion cooling and compression and absorption refrigeration.

Meher-Homji, C. B.; Mani, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Block Tensor Decomposition for Source Apportionment of Air Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ambient particulate chemical composition data with three particle diameter sizes (2.5mmDetroit, MI is examined. Standard multiway (tensor) methods like PARAFAC and Tucker tensor decompositions have been applied extensively to many chemical data. However, for multiple particle sizes, the source apportionment analysis calls for a novel multiway factor analysis. We apply the regularized block tensor decomposition to the collected air sample data. In particular, we use the Block Term Decomposition (BTD) in rank-(L;L;1) form to identify nine pollution sources (Fe+Zn, Sulfur with Dust, Road Dust, two types of Metal Works, Road Salt, Local Sulfate, and Homogeneous and Cloud Sulfate).

Hopke, Philip K; Li, Na; Navasca, Carmeliza

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Clean Air Interstate Rule (released in AEO2009)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CAIR is a cap-and-trade program promulgated by the EPA in 2005, covering 28 eastern U.S. States and the District of Columbia [29]. It was designed to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions in order to help States meet their National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and particulate matter (PM2.5) and to further emissions reductions already achieved through the Acid Rain Program and the NOx State Implementation Plan call program. The rule was set to commence in 2009 for seasonal and annual NOx emissions and in 2010 for SO2 emissions.

Information Center

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Evaluation of the Impact of Off-Design Operation on an Air-Cooled Binary Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal power plants are designed and constructed to provide a rated power output at specific resource and ambient conditions. Due to both diurnal and seasonal changes in the ambient air temperature, as well as a decline in resource productivity over time, plants seldom operate at these ''design'' conditions. This paper examines the impact of ''off- design'' operation of an air-cooled binary geothermal power plant. An available energy analysis is used to evaluate operation at these conditions. This evaluation identifies those portions of the power cycle that are most sensitive to changing resource and ambient conditions, as well as where improvements in cycle component or system performance would have the largest impact in increasing power output.

Mines, G.L.

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

InAir: sharing indoor air quality measurements and visualizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes inAir, a tool for sharing measurements and visualizations of indoor air quality within one's social network. Poor indoor air quality is difficult for humans to detect through sight and smell alone and can contribute to the development ... Keywords: air quality, domestic technology, environment, health, iphone, persuasive technology, sensors, sustainability

Sunyoung Kim; Eric Paulos

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Single particle characterization, source apportionment, and aging effects of ambient aerosols in Southern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detection efficiencies of aerosol time of flight masscomposition of ambient aerosol particles. Environmentalsize dependent response of aerosol counters, Atmospheric

Shields, Laura Grace

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Identification of dynamic properties from ambient vibration measurements  

SciTech Connect

To better understand the dynamic behavior of structures under normal dynamic loads as well as extreme loads such as those caused by seismic events or high winds, it is desirable to measure the dynamic properties (resonant frequencies, mode shapes and modal damping) of these structures. The cross-correlation function between two response measurements made on an ambiently excited structure is shown to have the same form as the system`s impulse response function. Therefore, standard time-domain curve-fitting procedures such as the complex exponential method, which are typically applied to impulse response functions, can now be applied to the cross-correlation functions to estimate the resonant frequencies and modal damping of the structure. A direct comparison of resonant frequencies identified by curve-fitting the cross-correlation functions, using traffic excitation as the ambient vibration source, and modal properties identified by standard forced vibration testing of a highway bridge, after traffic was removed, showed a maximum discrepancy of 3.63%. Similar comparisons for the average modal damping values identified by the two methods showed a 9.82% difference. This experimental verification implies that the proposed method of analyzing ambient vibration data has the potential to accurately assess the dynamic properties of large structures subjected to seismic excitations and small structures that are tested on a shake table.

Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); James, G.H. III [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

McQuaid, James H. (Livermore, CA); Lavietes, Anthony D. (Hayward, CA)

1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Air Quality Scoping Study for Rachel, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Air Quality Scoping Study for Beatty, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

Johann Engelbrecht, Ilias Kavouras, Dave Campbell, Scott Campbell, Steven Kohl and David Shafer

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Continuous aqueous tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for a selective on-line determination of aqueous tritium concentration is disclosed. A moist air stream of the liquid solution being analyzed is passed through a permeation dryer where the tritium and moisture are selectively removed to a purge air stream. The purge air stream is then analyzed for tritium concentration, humidity, and temperature, which allows computation of liquid tritium concentration. 2 figs.

McManus, G.J.; Weesner, F.J.

1987-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

416

Ensure cogen steam supply with fresh-air-fired HRSGs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat-recovery steam generators (HRSG) are used to capture thermal energy from the exhaust of gas turbines (GT), thus increasing a plant's overall efficiency. Where additional steaming capacity--above what can be recovered from the GT exhaust--is required, supplementary-fired duct or register burners can be installed. Because gas-turbine exhaust contains a relatively high level of excess air, no additional ambient combustion air is required in most cases; only fuel is needed. This article describes fresh-air-fired HRSGs which are similar to supplementary-fired units, but employ forced- or induced-draft (FD or ID) fans to rapidly convert to fully fired operation in the absence of hot exhaust during GT outages. Thus, fresh-air firing (FAF) is typically employed only at industrial plants where steam needs are more critical than electric-power generation requirements. In most plants using FAF, the GT is isolated using a damper or slide gate during fully fired HRSG operation. In virtually all applications, an FD fan is engaged automatically when a significant drop in exhaust flow is sensed, permitting the conversion to FAF with little or no interruption to the steam supply. However, one plant in Oklahoma employs an ID air fan, which operates even during GT operation, ensuring very rapid, reliable changeover to the FAF mode.

Froemming, J.; Hjalmarson, L.; Houshmand, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) are successfully utilized as a novel air electrode for Li-O2 batteries. An extremely high capacity of 15,000 mAh/g was achieved by using the as-prepared graphene air electrode at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2 in the pure oxygen environment. Although there is no pore in the two-dimensional FGS the as-prepared graphene air electrode consists of randomly arranged graphene nano-sheets which automatically form tunnels with different sizes. The large tunnels work as highways for the oxygen to quickly flow into the air electrode while the small pore-like tunnels can be considered as the numerous exits where the discharge products are accumulated. Combined with an appropriate electrolyte, the ideal discharge product Li2O2 is obtained without any carbonates byproducts in this system. Even when operated in ambient environment with a relative humidity of ~20% the specific capacity delivered from the pouch type cell achieves more than 5000 mAh/g making the graphene-based air electrode extremely attractive in the energy storage applications.

Xiao, Jie; Mei, Donghai; Li, Xiaolin; Xu, Wu; Wang, Deyu; Graff, Gordon L.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Nie, Zimin; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy efficiency in military housing: Monitoring to support revitalization guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is working with the US Army, the US Air Force, and the US Department of Energy to develop a guidebook to be used by architectural and engineering firms in the design phases of military family housing revitalization projects. The purpose of the guidebook is to ensure that energy efficiency is properly addressed in revitalization projects. Monitoring space-heating and cooling energy used in houses both before and after they are revitalized is necessary in order to assess the amount of energy saved by the revitalization process. Three different methods of conducting monitoring experiments are discussed, as well as the methods of data analysis to be used. Houses will be monitored individually using standard gas and electric meters to obtain heating and cooling data for the houses. The authors recommend conducting monitoring programs at Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma, and Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, because of their project schedules and potential for savings. They do not recommend doing any monitoring at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, because of the relatively small savings that they expect revitalization to accomplish there. They do not recommend seeking out alternative sites for monitoring because of the time required to become familiar with the installation and also because revitalization schedules at alternative sites may be no better than those at the sites they inspected.

Levins, W.P.; Ternes, M.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Effect of Moisture on Layer Thicknesses Used to Monitor Global Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean layer virtual temperature estimates, based on geopotential height measurements, form the basis for one approach being used to monitor changes in upper-air temperature. However, virtual temperature is a function of atmospheric moisture ...

W. P. Elliott; D. J. Gaffen; J. K. Angell; J. D. W. Kahl

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Diagnostic indicators for shipboard mechanical systems using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the use of Non-intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) in auxiliary shipboard systems, such as a low pressure air system, to determine the state of equipment in larger connected systems, such as the main ...

McKay, Thomas Duncan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Compressed Air System Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "Compressed Air System Maintenance Guide" provides fossil plant personnel with information on the operation and maintenance of the compressed air system. The contents of this guide will assist personnel in improving performance of the compressed air system, reducing maintenance costs, and increasing air system reliability.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Solar Buildings: Transpired Air Collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transpired air collectors preheat building ventilation air by using the building's ventilation fan to draw fresh air through the system. The intake air is heated as it passes through the perforated absorber plate and up the plenum between the absorber and the south wall of the building. Reduced heating costs will pay for the systems in 3--12 years.

NONE

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Calibration of Nondispersive Infrared CO2 Analyzers with CO2-in-Air Reference Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of eight CO2-in-air secondary standard calibration gases has been established by NOAA/Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) for use in its global CO2 monitoring program. Use of these gases obviates the need for pressure ...

W. D. Komhyr; T. B. Harris; L. S. Waterman

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

CERTS 2012 Program Review - Oscillation Monitoring System - Mani Venkatasubramanian, WSU  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System System Mani V. Venkatasubramanian Washington State University Pullman WA 2 Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 TCP or UDP Real-time PMU data stream OMS results Oscillation Monitoring System OpenPDC OMS OMS action adapter built into OpenPDC 64 bit version 1.4 sp1. Available for beta testing. IEEE C37.118 Real-time PMU data stream SQL server txt file 3 Event Analysis Engine Damping Monitor Engine OMS Flowchart FDD analysis for ambient data Event? Prony analysis for post- disturbance data Start Read data from PDC Moving window crosscheck Yes No Moving window crosscheck Alarm Controller trigger Poorly damped mode detected? Yes No 4 Complementary Engines

426

Improved Combustion Health Monitoring Techniques - Longer Life, Higher Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Health Combustion Health Monitoring Techniques Longer Life, Higher Availability Georgia Tech Jerry Seitzman SR102 * Modern Dry Low Emissions combustors have low emissions, but at a cost - significantly lower availability and reliability than "conventional" systems * The input data to the combustor monitor is pressure fluctuations, same as in currently available systems, but from this project the system analyzes the data differently, accounting for changes such as ambient temperature and doing analyses that show trends which indicate when planned maintenance should be performed to avoid an unplanned shut down. * Technology Transfer: Worked with 3 GT manufacturers. Method licensed to turbine monitoring company and installed at a number of power plants in the United States.

427

Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinese translation of the Reduce Air Infiltration in Furnaces fact sheet. Provides suggestions on how to improve furnace energy efficiency. Fuel-fired furnaces discharge combustion products through a stack or a chimney. Hot furnace gases are less dense and more buoyant than ambient air, so they rise, creating a differential pressure between the top and the bottom of the furnace. This differential, known as thermal head, is the source of a natural draft or negative pressure in furnaces and boilers. A well-designed furnace (or boiler) is built to avoid air leakage into the furnace or leakage of flue gases from the furnace to the ambient. However, with time, most furnaces develop cracks or openings around doors, joints, and hearth seals. These openings (leaks) usually appear small compared with the overall dimensions of the furnace, so they are often ignored. The negative pressure created by the natural draft (or use of an induced-draft fan) in a furnace draws cold air through the openings (leaks) and into the furnace. The cold air becomes heated to the furnace exhaust gas temperature and then exits through the flue system, wasting valuable fuel. It might also cause excessive oxidation of metals or other materials in the furnaces. The heat loss due to cold air leakage resulting from the natural draft can be estimated if you know four major parameters: (1) The furnace or flue gas temperature; (2) The vertical distance H between the opening (leak) and the point where the exhaust gases leave the furnace and its flue system (if the leak is along a vertical surface, H will be an average value); (3) The area of the leak, in square inches; and (4) The amount of operating time the furnace spends at negative pressure. Secondary parameters that affect the amount of air leakage include these: (1) The furnace firing rate; (2) The flue gas velocity through the stack or the stack cross-section area; (3) The burner operating conditions (e.g., excess air, combustion air temperature, and so on). For furnaces or boilers using an induced-draft (ID) fan, the furnace negative pressure depends on the fan performance and frictional losses between the fan inlet and the point of air leakage. In most cases, it would be necessary to measure or estimate negative pressure at the opening. The amount of air leakage, the heat lost in flue gases, and their effects on increased furnace or boiler fuel consumption can be calculated by using the equations and graphs given in Industrial Furnaces (see W. Trinks et al., below). Note that the actual heat input required to compensate for the heat loss in flue gases due to air leakage would be greater than the heat contained in the air leakage because of the effect of available heat in the furnace. For a high-temperature furnace that is not maintained properly, the fuel consumption increase due to air leakage can be as high as 10% of the fuel input.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Air Charter Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42.2 (April 2012) 42.2 (April 2012) 1 Documentation and Approval of Federally Funded International Travel (Fly America Act-Open Skies Agreement) Overview This section provides guidance to DOE Contracting Officers, Contracting Officer Representatives, and Program Officials on documentation and approval of federally funded international travel by Federal contractors and subcontractors in accordance with FAR 52.247-63 PREFERENCE FOR U.S.-FLAG AIR CARRIERS (JUNE 2003), 49 U.S.C. §40118 (Fly America Act) and the Open Skies Agreements as amended. Background Contracts that include FAR clause 52.247-63, PREFERENCE FOR U.S.-FLAG AIR CARRIERS (JUNE 2003) as prescribed in FAR 47.405 require that, if available, the Contractor (and subcontractors), in performing work under the contract, shall use U.S.-flag air carriers for

429

AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

1958-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Inverter Controlled Screw Air Compressor Manufacturers ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Inverter Controlled Screw Air Compressor, Inverter Controlled Screw Air Compressor Manufacturers & Suppliers Directory - Find here Inverter ...

432

Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the gases or vapors, liquids with volatility need sensors near the potential sources of release, nature and concentration of gas releases, natural and mechanical ventilation, detector installation locations not vulnerable to mechanical or water damage from normal operations, and locations that lend themselves to convenient maintenance and calibration. The guidance also states that sensors should be located in all areas where hazardous accumulations of gas may occur. Such areas might not be close to release points but might be areas with restricted air movement. Heavier than air gases are likely to accumulate in pits, trenches, drains, and other low areas. Lighter than air gases are more likely to accumulate in overhead spaces, above drop ceilings, etc. In general, sensors should be located close to any potential sources of major release of gas. The paper gives data on monitor sensitivity and expected lifetimes to support the monitor selection process. Proper selection of indoor and outdoor locations for monitors is described, accounting for the vapor densities of hydrogen and oxygen. The latest information on monitor alarm setpoint selection is presented. Typically, monitors require recalibration at least every six months, or more frequently for inhospitable locations, so ready access to the monitors is an important issue to consider in monitor siting. Gas monitors, depending on their type, can be susceptible to blockages of the detector element (i.e., dus

Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Solar air collector  

SciTech Connect

A solar heating system including a radiant heat collector apparatus made up of an enclosure having glazed panels. The collector provided within the enclosure is upstanding with the enclosure and the collector has heat absorbent flat walls spaced inwardly from the glazed panels. A heat storage core is provided centrally within the collector and spaced from the walls of the collector. The heat storage core includes an insulated housing and a heat retaining member within the insulated housing. Air passageways are formed between the collector walls and the insulated housing for passing input air, and duct members are provided for communicating with a household.

Deschenes, D.; Misrahi, E.

1981-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy consumption. Both reset strategies make engineering sense as long as the reset schedules are reasonable. Quite often the decision to use one over the other is made with the assumption that they will all achieve some sorts of energy savings. However, the impact of these two strategies on AHU energy consumption could be very different. A comparison of these two commonly used supply air temperature reset strategies for a single-duct constant air volume system is presented in this paper. It is shown that from either the building energy consumption or building comfort point of view, the reset strategy based on outside air temperature is inherently better than that based on return air temperature. Significant amount of heating energy savings can be achieved by switching from return air temperature based reset to outside air temperature based reset. The reset strategy can also benefit variable air volume (VAV) AHUs. An improved supply air temperature set point reset control strategy is proposed by combining and staging the outside air and return air temperature based resets.

Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sensors for environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship.  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the needs associated with environmental monitoring and long-term environmental stewardship. Emerging sensor technologies are reviewed to identify compatible technologies for various environmental monitoring applications. The contaminants that are considered in this report are grouped into the following categories: (1) metals, (2) radioisotopes, (3) volatile organic compounds, and (4) biological contaminants. Regulatory drivers are evaluated for different applications (e.g., drinking water, storm water, pretreatment, and air emissions), and sensor requirements are derived from these regulatory metrics. Sensor capabilities are then summarized according to contaminant type, and the applicability of the different sensors to various environmental monitoring applications is discussed.

Miller, David Russell; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Ho, Clifford Kuofei; Davis, Mary Jo (Science Applications International Corporation, Albuquerque, NM)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

438

NREL Provides Guidance to Improve Air Mixing and Thermal Comfort in Homes (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL research determines optimal HVAC system design for proper air mixing and thermal comfort in homes. As U.S. homes become more energy efficient, heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) systems will be downsized, and the air flow volumes required to meet heating and cooling loads may be too small to maintain uniform room air mixing-which can affect thermal comfort. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) evaluated the performance of high sidewall air supply inlets and confirmed that these systems can achieve good air mixing and provide suitable comfort levels for occupants. Using computational fluid dynamics modeling, NREL scientists tested the performance of high sidewall supply air jets over a wide range of parameters including supply air temperature, air velocity, and inlet size. This technique uses the model output to determine how well the supply air mixes with the room air. Thermal comfort is evaluated by monitoring air temperature and velocity in more than 600,000 control volumes that make up the occupied zone of a single room. The room has an acceptable comfort level when more than 70% of the control volumes meet the comfort criteria on both air temperature and velocity. The study shows that high sidewall supply air jets achieve uniform mixing in a room, which is essential for providing acceptable comfort levels. The study also provides information required to optimize overall space conditioning system design in both heating and cooling modes.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9 S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Humidity-resistant ambient-temperature solid-electrolyte amperometric sensing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting selected chemical compounds in air or other gas streams at room or ambient temperature includes a liquid-free humidity-resistant amperometric sensor comprising a sensing electrode and a counter and reference electrode separated by a solid electrolyte. The sensing electrode preferably contains a noble metal, such as Pt black. The electrolyte is water-free, non-hygroscopic, and substantially water-insoluble, and has a room temperature ionic conductivity .gtoreq.10.sup.-4 (ohm-cm).sup.-1, and preferably .gtoreq.0.01 (ohm-cm).sup.-1. The conductivity may be due predominantly to Ag+ ions, as in Ag.sub.2 WO.sub.4.4AgI, or to F- ions, as in Ce.sub.0.95 Ca.sub.0.05 F.sub.2.95. Electrical contacts serve to connect the electrodes to potentiostating and detecting circuitry which controls the potential of the sensing electrode relative to the reference electrode, detects the signal generated by the sensor, and indicates the detected signal.

Zaromb, Solomon (9S 706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ambient air monitoring" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions The water molecule, H2O, has deceptively simple structure, but contains all the prerequisites for building complexity. The oxygen atom has a greater affinity for electrons and pulls them away from the hydrogens making them slightly positive. On the back side of molecule oxygen has a lone pair - electrons that do not assist in binding the hydrogens in the molecule, but to which the hydrogens of another water molecule can be attracted to form a so-called hydrogen bond (H-bond). Hydrogen bond is much weaker than the bonding inside water molecule, but it is still strong enough with the possibility to make from one up to four H-bonds per water molecule. The network connected by H-bonds between water molecules makes liquid water so special compared to other normal liquids with about 66 anomalies, e.g. density maximum at 4 °C and large heat capacity. The anomalies of water become extreme in the supercooled region (below freezing point), whilst they are also present at ambient conditions where most of waters' physical, chemical and biological processes of importance occur. Water at ambient conditions has traditionally been considered as a homogeneous distribution of near- tetrahedral H-bonded structures with thermal fluctuations increasing with temperature. This picture has been challenged by recent studies based on x-ray Raman (XRS), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), suggesting two distinct local structures with tetrahedral as a minority and highly H-bond distorted asymmetrical as the majority. In particular, the proposed predominant asymmetrical structure has caused intense debate in the last years.

442

Hexane Air Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot surface ignition and subsequent flame propagation of premixed n-hexane air mixtures are shown in this fluid dynamics video. High speed schlieren photography revealed 3 distinct behaviors of ignition and propagation as a function of mixture composition and initial pressure.

Boettcher, Philipp A; Shepherd, Joseph E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Air-cleaning apparatus  

SciTech Connect

An air-cleaning, heat-exchange apparatus includes a main housing portion connected by means of an air inlet fan to the kitchen exhaust stack of a restaurant. The apparatus includes a plurality of heat exchangers through which a heat-absorptive fluid is circulated, simultaneously, by means of a suitable fluid pump. These heat exchangers absorb heat from the hot exhaust gas, out of the exhaust stack of the restaurant, which flows over and through these heat exchangers and transfers this heat to the circulating fluid which communicates with remote heat exchangers. These remote heat exchangers further transfer this heat to a stream of air, such as that from a cold-air return duct for supplementing the conventional heating system of the restaurant. Due to the fact that such hot exhaust gas is heavily grease laden , grease will be deposited on virtually all internal surfaces of the apparatus which this exhaust gas contacts. Consequently, means are provided for spraying these contacted internal surfaces , as well as the hot exhaust gas itself, with a detergent solution in which the grease is soluble, thereby removing grease buildup from these internal surfaces.

Howard, A.G.

1981-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Winter Morning Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of temperature measurements, which may be applied to inference of winter temperatures in data-sparse areas, are presented. The morning air temperatures during three winters were measured at 80 places in a 10 km × 30 km area along the ...

A. Hogan; M. Ferrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Air Proportional Counter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple wire counter utilizing air at atmospheric pressure as the ionizing medium and having a window of a nylon sheet of less than 0.5 mil thickness coated with graphite. The window is permeable to alpha particles so that the counter is well adapted to surveying sources of alpha radiation.

Simpson, J.A. Jr.

1950-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Condition Monitoring of Fans With Rolling Element Bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on high-frequency vibration caused by the impacts of bearing pits and spalls can help utilities schedule equipment maintenance. One data collection technique, developed through long-term monitoring of combustion air axial fans at the Pennsylvania Electric Company Homer City station, helps plant personnel anticipate failures of draft fan antifriction bearings by several months.

1988-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Potential air quality impact of geothermal power production in the Imperial Valley  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A regional assessment of the potential impact on air quality of developing the Imperial Valley's geothermal resources for power production is presented. A network of six stations was installed to characterize the air quality and atmospheric transport properties of the valley before development. These measured the ambient air concentrations of H/sub 2/S, SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, NO, NO/sub x/, CO/sub 2/, Hg, Rn, and particulates. Wind velocity and the directional variability of the winds were also measured to determine atmospheric stability. The geothermal fluids were analyzed chemically to estimate potential emission rates of H/sub 2/S, NH/sub 3/, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, Hg, and Rn from future power plants. Using these data and advanced air quality modeling led to the prediction of the potential valley-wide impact of a 3000 MW development scenario. The impact analysis reveals that H/sub 2/S is the principal gaseous pollutant of concern due to its noxious odor and the potential release rate. The ambient H/sub 2/S concentrations that would result from generating 3000 MW without emission controls exceed the California air quality standard (30 ppb) at least 1% of the time for an area in the northern part of the valley that is roughly 1500 km/sup 2/ in size. This compares with current ambient air concentrations that exceed the standard much less than 0.1% of the time. The population center most impacted is Calipatria, where the standard could be exceeded almost 10% of the time. In addition, the odor of H/sub 2/S will be noticeable at least 1% of the time for most of the valley if the 3000 MW are placed on-line without abatement systems.

Gudiksen, P.H.; Ermak, D.L.; Lamson, K.C.; Axelrod, M.C.; Nyholm, R.A.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ambient noise levels and reverberation times in Mississippi school rooms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine elementary school classrooms at three Mississippi public schools were selected at random for noise and reverberation time measures to monitor voluntary compliance with ANSI standard S12.60-2002 (Acoustical Performance Criteria

Edward L. Goshorn; Brett E. Kemker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Stibine/arsine monitoring during EV operation: summary report on preliminary tests at ANL and at LILCO  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of tests was performed to monitor the evolution and dispersal of stibine and arsine from the lead-acid propulsion batteries in three different Electra-Van Model 600 vehicles operated by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and by the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO). Ambient air was sampled at several locations inside the vehicles and in the garages where testing was done during charge, equalization charge, and on-the-road discharge operations. In addition, direct sampling of cell off-gases was performed with the ANL van. Interpretation of the individual test results was carried out in the context of vehicle characteristics, sampling protocol, and operating conditions. The test results demonstrated that under the test conditions only small concentrations of stibine and arsine accumulated in occupiable work areas. Measured concentrations in the vehicles and in the garages never exceeded 25% of the Threshold Limit Value-Time Weighted Average (TLV-TWA) standards. A threshold voltage for hydride production, at about 2.45 V per cell, was reflected in the results of the experiments performed during charging of the batteries. Hydride evolution rates were lower during equalization charge than during the overcharge portion of a charge cycle when the on-board charger was used in a normal operating mode. A delayed release of the metal hydrides from the battery cells was observed during on-the-road operation of the vehicles. The implications of these observations for electric vehicle (EV) operation are discussed. An engineering analysis of the generation and dispersal of the metal hydrides is presented, and equations are derived for estimating minimum ventilation requirements for the EV battery compartment and for garages housing EV operations. Recommendations are made regarding safe handling procedures for battery off-gases, procedures for conducting stibine/arsine monitoring tests and future work.

Loutfy, R.O.; Graczyk, D.G.; Varma, R.; Hayes, E.R.; Williams, F.L.; Yao, N.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 1, Operations  

SciTech Connect

The Monitoring division is primarily responsible for the coordination and direction of: Aerial measurements to delineate the footprint of radioactive contaminants that have been released into the environment. Monitoring of radiation levels in the environment; Sampling to determine the extent of contaminant deposition in soil, water, air and on vegetation; Preliminary field analyses to quantify soil concentrations or depositions; and Environmental and personal dosimetry for FRMAC field personnel, during a Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) and Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response. Monitoring and sampling techniques used during CM/FRMAC operations are specifically selected for use during radiological emergencies where large numbers of measurements and samples must be acquired, analyzed, and interpreted in the shortest amount of time possible. In addition, techniques and procedures are flexible so that they can be used during a variety of different scenarios; e.g., accidents involving releases from nuclear reactors, contamination by nuclear waste, nuclear weapon accidents, space vehicle reentries, or contamination from a radiological dispersal device. The Monitoring division also provides technicians to support specific Health and Safety Division activities including: The operation of the Hotline; FRMAC facility surveys; Assistance with Health and Safety at Check Points; and Assistance at population assembly areas which require support from the FRMAC. This volume covers deployment activities, initial FRMAC activities, development and implementation of the monitoring and assessment plan, the briefing of field teams, and the transfer of FRMAC to the EPA.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

452

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

454

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

455

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

Eberhart, Craig

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z