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Sample records for amber kinetics flywheel

  1. Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Amber Kinetics Product: Start-up company developing a novel flywheel energy storage system with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. References: Amber...

  2. Flywheels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bender, Donald Arthur

    2015-05-01

    In use since ancient times, the flywheel has smoothed the flow of energy in rotating machinery from small, hand held devices to the largest engines. Today, standalone flywheel systems are being developed to store electrical energy. These systems are deployed in applications as diverse as uninterruptible power supplies, gantry cranes, and large research facilities. This chapter presents the technical foundation of flywheel design, a comparison with other energy storage technologies, and a survey of applications where flywheel energy storage systems are currently in service.

  3. Sub-Area. 2.5 Demonstration of Promising Energy Storage Technologies Project Type. Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration Revision: V1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2015-12-30

    In this program, Amber Kinetics designed, built, and tested a sub-­scale 5 kWh engineering prototype flywheel system. Applying lessons learned from the engineering prototype, Amber Kinetics then designed, built and tested full-­size, commercial-­scale 25 kWh flywheel systems. The systems underwent basic functional qualification testing before being installed, sequentially, at the company’s outdoor test site in Alameda, CA for full-­speed field-testing. The primary considerations in testing the prototype units were to demonstrate the functionality of the system, verify the frequencies of resonant modes, and quantify spinning losses and motor/generator efficiency.

  4. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J.

    1995-12-31

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  5. High speed flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrath, Stephen V.

    1991-01-01

    A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

  6. RPM Flywheel Battery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RPM Flywheel Battery Jump to: navigation, search Name: RPM Flywheel Battery Place: California Product: Start-up planning to develop, produce, and market flywheel batteries for...

  7. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2004-06-29

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  8. Lightweight flywheel containment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, James R.

    2001-01-01

    A lightweight flywheel containment composed of a combination of layers of various material which absorb the energy of a flywheel structural failure. The various layers of material act as a vacuum barrier, momentum spreader, energy absorber, and reaction plate. The flywheel containment structure has been experimentally demonstrated to contain carbon fiber fragments with a velocity of 1,000 m/s and has an aerial density of less than 6.5 g/square centimeters. The flywheel containment, may for example, be composed of an inner high toughness structural layer, and energy absorbing layer, and an outer support layer. Optionally, a layer of impedance matching material may be utilized intermediate the flywheel rotor and the inner high toughness layer.

  9. Reactor coolant pump flywheel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finegan, John Raymond; Kreke, Francis Joseph; Casamassa, John Joseph

    2013-11-26

    A flywheel for a pump, and in particular a flywheel having a number of high density segments for use in a nuclear reactor coolant pump. The flywheel includes an inner member and an outer member. A number of high density segments are provided between the inner and outer members. The high density segments may be formed from a tungsten based alloy. A preselected gap is provided between each of the number of high density segments. The gap accommodates thermal expansion of each of the number of segments and resists the hoop stress effect/keystoning of the segments.

  10. Amber Passmore | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amber Passmore About Us Amber Passmore - Collegiate Wind Competition Manager Most Recent Penn State University Puts Collegiate Wind Competition-Winning Turbine on Display July 15 Counting Down to the Collegiate Wind Competition 2016 May 19

  11. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1998-01-01

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors.

  12. Separators for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.C.

    1998-07-07

    A separator forms a connection between the rotors of a concentric rotor assembly. This separator allows for the relatively free expansion of outer rotors away from inner rotors while providing a connection between the rotors that is strong enough to prevent disassembly. The rotor assembly includes at least two rotors referred to as inner and outer flywheel rings or rotors. This combination of inner flywheel ring, separator, and outer flywheel ring may be nested to include an arbitrary number of concentric rings. The separator may be a segmented or continuous ring that abuts the ends of the inner rotor and the inner bore of the outer rotor. It is supported against centrifugal loads by the outer rotor and is affixed to the outer rotor. The separator is allowed to slide with respect to the inner rotor. It is made of a material that has a modulus of elasticity that is lower than that of the rotors. 10 figs.

  13. Flywheel Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    K2H 8S1 Product: Focuses on design, fabrication, assembling and distributing flywheel energy storage systems and related components. References: Flywheel Energy Systems Inc1...

  14. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  15. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  16. AMBER User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vay, J.L.; Fawley, W.

    2000-11-08

    AMBER is a Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code which models the evolution of a representative slice of a relativistic electron beam in a linear accelerator. The beam is modeled as a steady flow and therefore no electromagnetic waves: all the fields (external and self-fields) are electrostatic and magnetostatic fields (for a complete description, see chapter 5). The possible elements describing the accelerator lattice are solenoids, accelerating gaps, pipes and apertures. Several kinds of beam distribution can be loaded: KV, gaussian, semi-gaussian, etc. Alternatively, the user can reconstruct (or load) a distribution from the output of another codefile, for example, an interface generating the beam distribution from output produced from EGUN or LSP codes is available as an option. This documentation first describes in detail the input files needed to run AMBER and the procedure to start the executable. The possible data files and graphical output are explained in the two following chapters. The last chapter describes the physics model and numerical techniques used. An example of input files and the result obtained with these inputs are also given in the Appendix.

  17. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1983-10-11

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability. 6 figs.

  18. Women @ Energy: Amber Hames | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amber Hames Women @ Energy: Amber Hames November 20, 2015 - 10:06am Addthis Amber Hames is a graduate fellow at Argonne National Laboratory. She's from Homer Glen, Illinois, and attended Lewis University, earning a bachelor's degree in chemistry. She is working on a doctorate in chemistry. Amber Hames is a graduate fellow at Argonne National Laboratory. She's from Homer Glen, Illinois, and attended Lewis University, earning a bachelor's degree in chemistry. She is working on a doctorate in

  19. Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

    2013-09-01

    As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

  20. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Stone, Richard G.

    1983-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body (15) composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel (10) body (15) is enclosed by a rim (50) of circumferentially wound fiber (2) embedded in resin (3). The rim (50) promotes flywheel (10) safety and survivability. The flywheel (10) has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

  1. Women @ Energy: Amber Boehnlein | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics directorate. Amber Boehnlein is a physicist and heads scientific-computing applications in SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics ...

  2. Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013) Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013) Beacon Power will design, ...

  3. Flywheel Project Escalates Grid Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a 43 million loan guarantee for Beacon Power Corporation's flywheel energy storage plant. ... Here's how it works: the Beacon Power's Gen 4 flywheel system is designed to perform ...

  4. Flywheel energy storage system focus of display

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flywheel Energy Storage System Focus of Display Demonstration to feature advanced, solar-powered replacement for batteries For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs ...

  5. Flywheel energy storage advances using HTS bearings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulcahy, T. M.

    1998-09-11

    High-Temperature-Superconducting (HT) bearings have the potential to reduce idling losses and make flywheel energy storage economical. Demonstration of large, high-speed flywheels is key to market penetration. Toward this goal, a flywheel system has been developed and tested with 5-kg to 15-kg disk-shaped rotors. Rlm speeds exceeded 400 mls and stored energies were >80 W-hr. Test implementation required technological advances in nearly all aspects of the flywheel system. Features and limitations of the design and tests are discussed, especially those related to achieving additional energy storage.

  6. CX-012512: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41848 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  7. CX-012519: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage Demonstration CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41848 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  8. Flywheel system using wire-wound rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiao, Edward Young; Bender, Donald Arthur; Means, Andrew E.; Snyder, Philip K.

    2016-06-07

    A flywheel is described having a rotor constructed of wire wound onto a central form. The wire is prestressed, thus mitigating stresses that occur during operation. In another aspect, the flywheel incorporates a low-loss motor using electrically non-conducting permanent magnets.

  9. AMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    --- usrcommonusgModulesmodulefilesamber10.0: module-whatis Molecular dynamics simulations setenv AMBERHOME usrcommonusgamber10.0 setenv...

  10. Rimmed and edge thickened stodola shaped flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Stone, R.G.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body composed of essentially planar isotropic high strength material. The flywheel body is enclosed by a rim of circumferentially wound fiber embedded in resin. The rim promotes flywheel safety and survivability. The flywheel has a truncated and edge thickened Stodola shape designed to optimize system mass and energy storage capability.

  11. Amber Boehnlein Becomes Jefferson Lab's Chief Information Officer; Takes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helm of IT Division | Jefferson Lab Amber Boehnlein Becomes Jefferson Lab's Chief Information Officer; Takes Helm of IT Division Amber Boehnlein Amber Boehnlein Amber Boehnlein Becomes Jefferson Lab's Chief Information Officer; Takes Helm of IT Division Amber Boehnlein can't remember a time when she didn't love science. As a child, growing up in the small Ohio village of Germantown, Boehnlein (pronounced "Bane Line") would often play math games with her grandmother. She taught

  12. Optimum rotationally symmetric shells for flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blake, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    A flywheel rim support formed from two shell halves. Each of the shell halves has a disc connected to the central shaft. A first shell element connects to the disc at an interface. A second shell element connects to the first shell element. The second shell element has a plurality of meridional slits. A cylindrical shell element connects to the second shell element. The cylindrical shell element connects to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim support having a disc connected an outer diameter of a shaft. Two optimally shaped shell elements connect to the optimally shaped disc at an interface. The interface defines a discontinuity in a meridional slope of said support. A cylindrical shell element connects to the two shell elements. The cylindrical shell element has an outer surface for connecting to the inner surface of the flywheel rim. A flywheel rim casing includes an annular shell connected to the central shaft. The annular shell connects to the flywheel rim. A composite shell surrounds the shaft, annular shell and flywheel rim.

  13. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, L.; Raimondi, A.A.

    1989-12-12

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid. 5 figs.

  14. Canned pump having a high inertia flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veronesi, Luciano; Raimondi, ALbert A.

    1989-01-01

    A canned pump is described which includes a motor, impeller, shaft, and high inertia flywheel mounted within a hermetically sealed casing. The flywheel comprises a heavy metal disk made preferably of a uranium alloy with a stainless steel shell sealably enclosing the heavy metal. The outside surfaces of the stainless steel comprise thrust runners and a journal for mating with, respectively, thrust bearing shoes and radial bearing segments. The bearings prevent vibration of the pump and, simultaneously, minimize power losses normally associated with the flywheel resulting from frictionally pumping surrounding fluid.

  15. Amber Plug-In for Protein Shop

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-05-10

    The Amber Plug-in for ProteinShop has two main components: an AmberEngine library to compute the protein energy models, and a module to solve the energy minimization problem using an optimization algorithm in the OPTI-+ library. Together, these components allow the visualization of the protein folding process in ProteinShop. AmberEngine is a object-oriented library to compute molecular energies based on the Amber model. The main class is called ProteinEnergy. Its main interface methods are (1) "init"more » to initialize internal variables needed to compute the energy. (2) "eval" to evaluate the total energy given a vector of coordinates. Additional methods allow the user to evaluate the individual components of the energy model (bond, angle, dihedral, non-bonded-1-4, and non-bonded energies) and to obtain the energy of each individual atom. The Amber Engine library source code includes examples and test routines that illustrate the use of the library in stand alone programs. The energy minimization module uses the AmberEngine library and the nonlinear optimization library OPT++. OPT++ is open source software available under the GNU Lesser General Public License. The minimization module currently makes use of the LBFGS optimization algorithm in OPT++ to perform the energy minimization. Future releases may give the user a choice of other algorithms available in OPT++.« less

  16. Layered flywheel with stress reducing construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedericy, Johan A.; Towgood, Dennis A.

    1984-11-13

    A flywheel having elastic spokes carrying an elastic rim; and a hub coupling the spokes to a shaft and deforming in response to centrifugal force to match the radial distortion of the spokes.

  17. Rimmed and edge thickened Stodola shaped flywheel (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The flywheel (10) body (15) is enclosed by a rim (50) of circumferentially wound fiber (2) embedded in resin (3). The rim (50) promotes flywheel (10) safety and survivability. The ...

  18. 'Recycling' Grid Energy with Flywheel Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    'Recycling' Grid Energy with Flywheel Technology 'Recycling' Grid Energy with Flywheel Technology September 30, 2010 - 5:03pm Addthis Seven-foot tall cylinders equipped with flywheel technology (shown above) will make up Beacon Power’s energy storage plant in Stephentown, N.Y. The company received a $43 million loan guarantee from the Energy Department to build the plant. | Photo courtesy of Beacon Power Corporation Seven-foot tall cylinders equipped with flywheel technology (shown above)

  19. Flywheel Energy Storage technology workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Howell, D.

    1993-12-31

    Advances in recent years of high strength/lightweight materials, high performance magnetic bearings, and power electronics technology has spurred a renewed interest by the transportation, utility, and manufacturing industries in Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) technologies. FES offers several advantages over conventional electro-chemical energy storage, such as high specific energy and specific power, fast charging time, long service life, high turnaround efficiency (energy out/energy in), and no hazardous/toxic materials or chemicals are involved. Potential applications of FES units include power supplies for hybrid and electric vehicles, electric vehicle charging stations, space systems, and pulsed power devices. Also, FES units can be used for utility load leveling, uninterruptable power supplies to protect electronic equipment and electrical machinery, and for intermittent wind or photovoltaic energy sources. The purpose of this workshop is to provide a forum to highlight technologies that offer a high potential to increase the performance of FES systems and to discuss potential solutions to overcome present FES application barriers. This document consists of viewgraphs from 27 presentations.

  20. REACTOR-FLASH BOILER-FLYWHEEL POWER PLANT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loeb, E.

    1961-01-17

    A power generator in the form of a flywheel with four reactors positioned about its rim is described. The reactors are so positioned that steam, produced in the reactor, exists tangentially to the flywheel, giving it a rotation. The reactors are incompletely moderated without water. The water enters the flywheel at its axis, under sufficient pressure to force it through the reactors, where it is converted to steam. The fuel consists of parallel twisted ribbons assembled to approximate a cylinder.

  1. Flywheel Energy Storage Device for Hybrid and Electric Vehicles...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Flywheel Energy Storage ... added without extra cost and without any system conflict * No special housing is required ...

  2. Reluctance apparatus for flywheel energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A motor generator for providing high efficiency, controlled voltage output or storage of energy in a flywheel system. A motor generator includes a stator of a soft ferromagnetic material, a motor coil and a generator coil, and a rotor has at least one embedded soft ferromagnetic piece. Control of voltage output is achieved by use of multiple stator pieces and multiple rotors with controllable gaps between the stator pieces and the soft ferromagnetic piece.

  3. Flywheel energy storage with superconductor magnetic bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberger, Bernard R.; Lynds, Jr., Lahmer; Hull, John R.

    1993-01-01

    A flywheel having superconductor bearings has a lower drag to lift ratio that translates to an improvement of a factor of ten in the rotational decay rate. The lower drag results from the lower dissipation of melt-processed YBCO, improved uniformity of the permanent magnet portion of the bearings, operation in a different range of vacuum pressure from that taught by the art, and greater separation distance from the rotating members of conductive materials.

  4. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion.

  5. Concentric ring flywheel without expansion separators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-08-24

    A concentric ring flywheel wherein the adjacent rings are configured to eliminate the need for differential expansion separators between the adjacent rings. This is accomplished by forming a circumferential step on an outer surface of an inner concentric ring and forming a matching circumferential step on the inner surface of an adjacent outer concentric ring. During operation the circumferential steps allow the rings to differentially expand due to the difference in the radius of the rings without the formation of gaps therebetween, thereby eliminating the need for expansion separators to take up the gaps formed by differential expansion. 3 figs.

  6. Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comments Cancel Submit Categories: Smart Grid Projects Smart Grid Projects in United States Smart Grid Demonstration Projects Smart Grid Projects - Energy Storage Demonstrations...

  7. FLYWHEEL ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS WITH SUPERCONDUCTING BEARINGS FOR UTILITY APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Michael Strasik; Mr. Arthur Day; Mr. Philip Johnson; Dr. John Hull

    2007-10-26

    This project’s mission was to achieve significant advances in the practical application of bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) materials to energy-storage systems. The ultimate product was planned as an operational prototype of a flywheel system on an HTS suspension. While the final prototype flywheel did not complete the final offsite demonstration phase of the program, invaluable lessons learned were captured on the laboratory demonstration units that will lead to the successful deployment of a future HTS-stabilized, composite-flywheel energy-storage system (FESS).

  8. Flywheel Energy Storage -- An Alternative to Batteries for UPS Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R.; Chvala, William D.

    2003-11-12

    Direct current (DC) system flywheel energy storage technology can be used as a substitute for batteries for providing backup power to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) system. Although the initial cost will usually be higher, flywheels offer a much longer life, reduced maintenance, a smaller footprint, and better reliability compared to a battery. The combination of these characteristics will generally result in a lower life-cycle cost for a flywheel compared to a battery. This paper describes the technology, its variations, and installation requirements, as well as provides application advice. One Federal application is highlighted as a “case study,” followed by an illustrative life-cycle cost comparison of batteries and flywheels. A list of manufacturers, with contact information is also provided.

  9. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, S.E.; Deteresa, S.J.

    1998-07-14

    An interlayer toughening mechanism is described to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0{degree} to 90{degree} to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles. 2 figs.

  10. Interlayer toughening of fiber composite flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groves, Scott E.; Deteresa, Steven J.

    1998-01-01

    An interlayer toughening mechanism to mitigate the growth of damage in fiber composite flywheel rotors for long application. The interlayer toughening mechanism may comprise one or more tough layers composed of high-elongation fibers, high-strength fibers arranged in a woven pattern at a range from 0.degree. to 90.degree. to the rotor axis and bound by a ductile matrix material which adheres to and is compatible with the materials used for the bulk of the rotor. The number and spacing of the tough interlayers is a function of the design requirements and expected lifetime of the rotor. The mechanism has particular application in uninterruptable power supplies, electrical power grid reservoirs, and compulsators for electric guns, as well as electromechanical batteries for vehicles.

  11. CX-000760: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Amber Kinetics Flywheel Energy Storage DemonstrationCX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 02/09/2010Location(s): Freemont, CaliforniaOffice(s): Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  12. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Satish V.; Christensen, Richard M.; Toland, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    A flywheel (10) is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel (10) has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel (10) may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel (10) makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  13. Matched metal die compression molded structural random fiber sheet molding compound flywheel. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, S.V.; Christensen, R.M.; Toland, R.H.

    1980-09-24

    A flywheel is described that is useful for energy storage in a hybrid vehicle automotive power system or in some stationary applications. The flywheel has a body of essentially planar isotropic high strength structural random fiber sheet molding compound (SMC-R). The flywheel may be economically produced by a matched metal die compression molding process. The flywheel makes energy intensive efficient use of a fiber/resin composite while having a shape designed by theory assuming planar isotropy.

  14. Dynamic voltage compensation on distribution feeders using flywheel energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissbach, R.S.; Karady, G.G.; Farmer, R.G.

    1999-04-01

    Advancements in power electronics bearings and materials have made flywheel energy storage systems a viable alternative to electrochemical batteries. A future application of such a device is as an uninterruptible power supply for critical loads on a distribution feeder. However, the same power electronics and flywheel system could also be used for dynamic voltage compensation. A comparison is made between series and parallel connection of such dynamic compensation techniques used to maintain rated load voltage on distribution feeders when there are momentary dips in the supply voltage. For each case a mathematical model is presented and analyzed. The two cases are compared and the series compensation technique is more effective.

  15. Evaluation of Demo 1C composite flywheel rotor burst test and containment design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.D.; McKeever, J.W.; Akerman, M.A.; Goranson, P.L.; Litherland, P.S.; O`Kain, D.U.

    1998-07-01

    Laboratory-Directed funds were provided in FY 1995 for research to develop flywheel containment specifications and to consider concepts that could satisfy these specifications and produce a prototype small, lightweight, inexpensive, mobile flywheel containment. Research activities have included an analytical and pictorial review of the Demo 1C flywheel failure test, which provided significant insight about radial and axial failure modes; calculations of the thickness of ultra-conservative pressure vessel containment; entertainment of advanced containment concepts using lightweight materials and armor literature; consideration of fabrication assembly procedures; and participation in a Flywheel Energy Storage Workshop during which additional flywheel failure experiences were discussed. Based on these activities, calculations, and results, a list of conclusions concerning flywheel containment and its relation to the flywheel are presented followed by recommendations for further research.

  16. The magnetic flywheel flow meter: Theoretical and experimental contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchenau, D. Galindo, V.; Eckert, S.

    2014-06-02

    The development of contactless flow meters is an important issue for monitoring and controlling of processes in different application fields, like metallurgy, liquid metal casting, or cooling systems for nuclear reactors and transmutation machines. Shercliff described in his book “The Theory of Electromagnetic Flow Measurement, Cambridge University Press, 1962” a simple and robust device for contact-less measurements of liquid metal flow rates which is known as magnetic flywheel. The sensor consists of several permanent magnets attached on a rotatable soft iron plate. This arrangement will be placed closely to the liquid metal flow to be measured, so that the field of the permanent magnets penetrates into the fluid volume. The flywheel will be accelerated by a Lorentz force arising from the interaction between the magnetic field and the moving liquid. Steady rotation rates of the flywheel can be taken as a measure for the mean flow rate inside the fluid channel. The present paper provides a detailed theoretical description of the sensor in order to gain a better insight into the functional principle of the magnetic flywheel. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by corresponding laboratory experiments. For that purpose, a laboratory model of such a flow meter was built and tested on a GaInSn-loop under various test conditions.

  17. Hazle Spindle, LLC Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hazle Spindle, LLC Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant Project Description Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20MW flywheel plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania for the plant owner/operator, Hazle Spindle LLC The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. The Beacon Power technology uses flywheels to recycle energy from the grid in response to changes in demand and grid

  18. AN ASSESSMENT OF FLYWHEEL HIGH POWER ENERGY STORAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR HYBRID VEHICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, James Gerald

    2012-02-01

    An assessment has been conducted for the DOE Vehicle Technologies Program to determine the state of the art of advanced flywheel high power energy storage systems to meet hybrid vehicle needs for high power energy storage and energy/power management. Flywheel systems can be implemented with either an electrical or a mechanical powertrain. The assessment elaborates upon flywheel rotor design issues of stress, materials and aspect ratio. Twelve organizations that produce flywheel systems submitted specifications for flywheel energy storage systems to meet minimum energy and power requirements for both light-duty and heavy-duty hybrid applications of interest to DOE. The most extensive experience operating flywheel high power energy storage systems in heavy-duty and light-duty hybrid vehicles is in Europe. Recent advances in Europe in a number of vehicle racing venues and also in road car advanced evaluations are discussed. As a frame of reference, nominal weight and specific power for non-energy storage components of Toyota hybrid electric vehicles are summarized. The most effective utilization of flywheels is in providing high power while providing just enough energy storage to accomplish the power assist mission effectively. Flywheels are shown to meet or exceed the USABC power related goals (discharge power, regenerative power, specific power, power density, weight and volume) for HEV and EV batteries and ultracapacitors. The greatest technical challenge facing the developer of vehicular flywheel systems remains the issue of safety and containment. Flywheel safety issues must be addressed during the design and testing phases to ensure that production flywheel systems can be operated with adequately low risk.

  19. Gravitational Waves Amber L. Stuver LIGO Livingston Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LIGO and the Detection of Gravitational Waves Amber L. Stuver LIGO Livingston Observatory July 27, 2016 4:00 p.m. - Wilson Hall, One West This colloquium will discuss what gravitational waves are and how they are used to observe the universe in a new way. The history of the search for gravitational waves will be reviewed leading up to today's advanced detectors and how they operate. Most sources of detectable gravitational waves are some of the most violent, energetic events in the universe from

  20. An Evaluation of the Flywheel Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde

    2010-07-26

    Flywheels can provide regulation and frequency response services to the power grids. This study presents the technical characteristics, modeling approach, methodologies, and results for providing regulation services in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market. Breakeven cost analyses were developed for two cases: 1) flywheel provides the regulation service alone; and 2) flywheel provides the regulation service together with a hydro power plant. For both cases, we evaluated two payment methods: pay-by-energy and pay-by-capacity. Based on the results of the technical and cost analyses, the opportunities for the flywheel providing regulation services are discussed; field test results for the flywheel’s physical characteristics are presented; and performance metrics of the flywheel to provide the regulation services are suggested.

  1. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Groves, Scott E.

    1998-06-02

    An interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45.degree. with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning.

  2. Interface structure for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, S.J.; Groves, S.E.

    1998-06-02

    An interface structure is described for hub and mass attachment in flywheel rotors. The interface structure efficiently transmits high radial compression forces and withstands both large circumferential elongation and local stresses generated by mass-loading and hub attachments. The interface structure is comprised of high-strength fiber, such as glass and carbon, woven into an angle pattern which is about 45{degree} with respect to the rotor axis. The woven fiber is bonded by a ductile matrix material which is compatible with and adheres to the rotor material. This woven fiber is able to elongate in the circumferential direction to match the rotor growth during spinning. 2 figs.

  3. Investigation of Synergy Between Electrochemical Capacitors, Flywheels, and Batteries in Hybrid Energy Storage for PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Sibley, Lewis, B.; Wohlgemuth, John

    1999-06-01

    This report describes the results of a study that investigated the synergy between electrochemical capacitors (ECs) and flywheels, in combination with each other and with batteries, as energy storage subsystems in photovoltaic (PV) systems. EC and flywheel technologies are described and the potential advantages and disadvantages of each in PV energy storage subsystems are discussed. Seven applications for PV energy storage subsystems are described along with the potential market for each of these applications. A spreadsheet model, which used the net present value method, was used to analyze and compare the costs over time of various system configurations based on flywheel models. It appears that a synergistic relationship exists between ECS and flywheels. Further investigation is recommended to quantify the performance and economic tradeoffs of this synergy and its effect on overall system costs.

  4. Fact Sheet: Beacon Power 20 MW Flywheel Frequency Regulation Plant (August 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beacon Power will design, build, and operate a utility-scale 20MW flywheel plant at the Humboldt Industrial Park in Hazle Township, Pennsylvania for the plant owner/operator, Hazle Spindle LLC. The plant will provide frequency regulation services to grid operator PJM Interconnection. The Beacon Power technology uses flywheels to recycle energy from the grid in response to changes in demand and grid frequency.

  5. Model and simulation of a flywheel energy storage system at a utility substation using electro-magnetic transients programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weissbach, R.S.; Karady, G.G.; Farmer, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    A flywheel energy storage system for use as an uninterruptible power supply at a utility substation to replace electrochemical batteries has been modeled. The model is developed using the Electro-Magnetic Transients Program (EMTP). Models for the flywheel, permanent magnet (synchronous) motor/generator, rectifiers and inverter have been included. Transient response for loss of power and clearing of a short circuit fault, as well as variation of load voltage due to the flywheel spinning down, is presented.

  6. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  7. Amber Waves of...Switchgrass? How about Sorghum? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Amber Waves of...Switchgrass? How about Sorghum? Amber Waves of...Switchgrass? How about Sorghum? October 28, 2011 - 5:09pm Addthis Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? For many counties, the expanding market for energy products made from biomass is a potential source of economic growth. Is your county one of them? As the fall harvest comes to an end in Marshall County, Kansas, farmers are already planning what crops

  8. Utilization of rotor kinetic energy storage for hybrid vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, John S.

    2011-05-03

    A power system for a motor vehicle having an internal combustion engine, the power system comprises an electric machine (12) further comprising a first excitation source (47), a permanent magnet rotor (28) and a magnetic coupling rotor (26) spaced from the permanent magnet rotor and at least one second excitation source (43), the magnetic coupling rotor (26) also including a flywheel having an inertial mass to store kinetic energy during an initial acceleration to an operating speed; and wherein the first excitation source is electrically connected to the second excitation source for power cycling such that the flywheel rotor (26) exerts torque on the permanent magnet rotor (28) to assist braking and acceleration of the permanent magnet rotor (28) and consequently, the vehicle. An axial gap machine and a radial gap machine are disclosed and methods of the invention are also disclosed.

  9. Design guide for composite-material flywheels: rotor dyamic considerations. Part I. System whirling and stability. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bert, C.W.; Ramunujam, G.

    1981-09-01

    Information to designers of flywheels is provided which will enable them to predict many aspects of the dynamic behavior of their flywheel systems when spin-tested with a quill-shaft support and driven by an air turbine. Computer programs are presented for the following dynamic analysis to obtain the results indicated: free whirling for natural frequencies versus rotational speed and the associated mode shapes; rough-type stability analysis for determining the stability limits; and forced whirling analysis for estimating the response of major components of the system to flywheel mass eccentricity and initial tilt. For the first and third kinds of analyses, two different mathematical models of the generic system are investigated. One is a seven-degree-of-freedom lumped-parameter analysis, while the other is a combined distributed- and lumped-parameter analysis. When applied to an existing flywheel system, the two models yielded numerical values for the lowest first-order forward critical speed in very close agreement with each other and with experimental results obtained in spin tests. Therefore, for the second kind of analysis, only the lumped-parameter model is implemented. Qualitative discussions as to why forced retrograde whirling is not as severe as forward whirling are also presented. The analyses are applied to the multi-material ring type flywheel systems, a constant-thickness-diskring type, and a tapered-thickness-disk type. In addition, the effects of the following flywheel design parameters on system dynamics were investigated: flywheel mass; diametral and polar mass moments of inertia; location of mass center from the lower end of the quill shaft; quill shaft length; lower turbine-bearing support stiffness; equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the external damper; flywheel dead weight; and torque applied at the turbine.

  10. Gyrodynamic effects of an energy storage flywheel on the handling of a hybrid-electric vehicle. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greer, J.L.

    1997-01-09

    This research presents the results of numerical simulation of the handling characteristics of a hybrid-electric vehicle which uses a flywheel for temporary energy storage. The work is presented in an effort to understand the potential interaction of the flywheel and the vehicle, and to predict what positive and negative outcomes may result. The vehicle is modeled with four wheels, and the roll, yaw, and sideslip-angle degrees of freedom. The simulation uses an empirical model of the nonlinear interface between the tire and the road. The results are presented graphically, and are analyzed on both quantitative and qualitative bases. The vehicle parameters used to define the baseline vehicle are based on the broad guidelines set forth by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles. The size and speed range of the flywheel is based on a compilation of results presented in the popular literature. Analyses of the results are based on alignment of the angular momentum vector of the flywheel along the three axes of the vehicle. The speed of the flywheel is varied from -100,000 rpm to +100,000 rpm. Negative speeds represent orientation of the angular momentum vector of the flywheel along the negative axes, and positive speeds represent orientation along the positive axes.

  11. Amber light-emitting diode comprising a group III-nitride nanowire active region

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, George T.; Li, Qiming; Wierer, Jr., Jonathan J.; Koleske, Daniel

    2014-07-22

    A temperature stable (color and efficiency) III-nitride based amber (585 nm) light-emitting diode is based on a novel hybrid nanowire-planar structure. The arrays of GaN nanowires enable radial InGaN/GaN quantum well LED structures with high indium content and high material quality. The high efficiency and temperature stable direct yellow and red phosphor-free emitters enable high efficiency white LEDs based on the RGYB color-mixing approach.

  12. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1999-07-20

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings. 2 figs.

  13. Concentric ring flywheel with hooked ring carbon fiber separator/torque coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1999-01-01

    A concentric ring flywheel with expandable separators, which function as torque couplers, between the rings to take up the gap formed between adjacent rings due to differential expansion between different radius rings during rotation of the flywheel. The expandable separators or torque couplers include a hook-like section at an upper end which is positioned over an inner ring and a shelf-like or flange section at a lower end onto which the next adjacent outer ring is positioned. As the concentric rings are rotated the gap formed by the differential expansion there between is partially taken up by the expandable separators or torque couplers to maintain torque and centering attachment of the concentric rings.

  14. Development of long life three phase uninterruptible power supply using flywheel energy storage unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Isao; Okita, Yoshihisa; Andoh, Itaru

    1995-12-31

    According to development of computer applications, uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) are indispensable to the industrial field. But the cost for maintaining the conventional UPS is very high, because frequent replacement of parts which have short life time is necessary. This paper describes the research and development of a new UPS which has long life parts for maintenance free. To lengthen the life time, the following techniques are introduced: (1) a flywheel energy storage unit having more than 20 years life time; (2) electrolytic capacitor less inverter and converter. By using these techniques, a three phase UPS rating 5kVA, 200V is developed, and excellent performance is obtained: input power factor is over 99.7%; output voltage distortion is under 1.5%; transformer less UPS achieves light weight system; the UPS have function of automatic output voltage balance using auxiliary diode rectifier; input current harmonic distortion is less than 1.2%, even if the single phase load is connected.

  15. Strong carrier localization effect in carrier dynamics of 585 nm InGaN amber light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Panpan; Li, Hongjian; Li, Zhi; Kang, Junjie; Yi, Xiaoyan; Li, Jinmin; Wang, Guohong

    2015-02-21

    Temperature dependence and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) have been carried out to study carrier dynamics for 585 nm InGaN amber light-emitting diodes (LEDs). It is found that in InGaN amber LEDs, peak emission energy only shows a slight blueshift from 588 to 575 nm, as temperature increased from 10 K to 300 K. Moreover, radiative recombination lifetime has demonstrated independent of temperature based TRPL results. These two features indicate that a strong carrier localization effect plays a dominant role in carrier dynamics for InGaN amber LEDs. Also, activation energy of 40.3 meV is obtained through Arrhenius plot of PL intensity versus temperature.

  16. Phase 1 STTR flywheel motor/alternator for hybrid electric vehicles. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Scudiere, M.B.; Ott, G.W. Jr.; White, C.P.; Kessinger, R.L. Jr.; Robinson, S.T.; Seymour, K.P.; Dockstadter, K.D.

    1997-12-31

    Visual Computing Systems (VCS) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have teamed, through a Phase 1 Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) grant from the US Department of Energy (DOE), to develop an advanced, low-cost motor/alternator drive system suitable for Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) applications. During Phase 1, system performance and design requirements were established, design concepts were generated, and preliminary motor/alternator designs were developed and analyzed. ORNL provided mechanical design and finite element collaboration and Lynx Motion Technology, a spin-off from VCS to commercialize their technology, constructed a proof-of-concept axial-gap permanent magnet motor/alternator that employed their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) with a survivable design speed potential of 10,000 rpm. The VCS motor/alternator was successfully tested in ORNL`s Motor Test Tank using an ORNL inverter and ORNL control electronics. It was first operated as an unloaded motor to 6,000 rpm and driven as an unloaded generator to 6,000 rpm. Output from the generator was then connected to a resistance bank, which caused the loaded generator to decelerate to 3,860 rpm where data was collected. After about 4-1/2 minutes, the test was terminated because of an impact noise. Subsequent inspection and operation at low speeds did not reveal the source of the noise. Electrical performance of the motor was excellent, encouraging continued development of this technology. Phase 2 efforts will focus on further design development and optimization, manufacturing development and prototype construction, testing, and evaluation.

  17. Design & development fo a 20-MW flywheel-based frequency regulation power plant : a study for the DOE Energy Storage Systems program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rounds, Robert; Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the successful efforts of Beacon Power to design and develop a 20-MW frequency regulation power plant based solely on flywheels. Beacon's Smart Matrix (Flywheel) Systems regulation power plant, unlike coal or natural gas generators, will not burn fossil fuel or directly produce particulates or other air emissions and will have the ability to ramp up or down in a matter of seconds. The report describes how data from the scaled Beacon system, deployed in California and New York, proved that the flywheel-based systems provided faster responding regulation services in terms of cost-performance and environmental impact. Included in the report is a description of Beacon's design package for a generic, multi-MW flywheel-based regulation power plant that allows accurate bids from a design/build contractor and Beacon's recommendations for site requirements that would ensure the fastest possible construction. The paper concludes with a statement about Beacon's plans for a lower cost, modular-style substation based on the 20-MW design.

  18. Inverse Kinetics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-03-20

    Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this prgram determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data.

  19. Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  20. Strain-compensated (Ga,In)N/(Al,Ga)N/GaN multiple quantum wells for improved yellow/amber light emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekhal, K.; Damilano, B. De Mierry, P.; Venngus, P.; Ngo, H. T.; Rosales, D.; Gil, B.; Hussain, S.

    2015-04-06

    Yellow/amber (570600?nm) emitting In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N/Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N/GaN multiple quantum wells (QWs) have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on GaN-on- sapphire templates. When the (Al,Ga)N thickness of the barrier increases, the room temperature photoluminescence is red-shifted while its yield increases. This is attributed to an increase of the QW internal electric field and an improvement of the material quality due to the compensation of the compressive strain of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N QWs by the Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1?y}N layers, respectively.

  1. CHARMM-GUI Input Generator for NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM Simulations Using the CHARMM36 Additive Force Field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jumin; Cheng, Xi; Swails, Jason M.; Yeom, Min Sun; Eastman, Peter K.; Lemkul, Justin A.; Wei, Shuai; Buckner, Joshua; Jeong, Jong Cheol; Qi, Yifei; et al

    2015-11-12

    Here we report that proper treatment of nonbonded interactions is essential for the accuracy of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, especially in studies of lipid bilayers. The use of the CHARMM36 force field (C36 FF) in different MD simulation programs can result in disagreements with published simulations performed with CHARMM due to differences in the protocols used to treat the long-range and 1-4 nonbonded interactions. In this study, we systematically test the use of the C36 lipid FF in NAMD, GROMACS, AMBER, OpenMM, and CHARMM/OpenMM. A wide range of Lennard-Jones (LJ) cutoff schemes and integrator algorithms were tested to find themore » optimal simulation protocol to best match bilayer properties of six lipids with varying acyl chain saturation and head groups. MD simulations of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were used to obtain the optimal protocol for each program. MD simulations with all programs were found to reasonably match the DPPC bilayer properties (surface area per lipid, chain order parameters, and area compressibility modulus) obtained using the standard protocol used in CHARMM as well as from experiments. The optimal simulation protocol was then applied to the other five lipid simulations and resulted in excellent agreement between results from most simulation programs as well as with experimental data. AMBER compared least favorably with the expected membrane properties, which appears to be due to its use of the hard-truncation in the LJ potential versus a force-based switching function used to smooth the LJ potential as it approaches the cutoff distance. The optimal simulation protocol for each program has been implemented in CHARMM-GUI. This protocol is expected to be applicable to the remainder of the additive C36 FF including the proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and small molecules.« less

  2. Chemical Kinetic Modelling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetic Modelling for Combustion Prof. Henry Curran 1 Copyright ©2016 by Prof Henry Curran. This material is not to be sold, reproduced or distributed without prior written permission of the owner, Prof Henry Curran. 2 Overview/Aims 5 days / 15 lectures Day 1 (1-3) Basic thermodynamic principles Day 2 (4) Basic kinetic principles (5,6) Experimental JSR, FR, RCM & ST contribution to kinetics Day 3 (7-9) Small species mechanism development 3 Overview/Aims 5 days /

  3. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kinetics Jump to: navigation, search Name: eco-Kinetics Place: Stapylton, Queensland, Australia Zip: 4207 Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Queensland-based renewable energy...

  4. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Lecture) Chung K. Law Robert H. Goddard Professor Princeton University Princeton-CEFRC-Combustion Institute Summer School on Combustion June 20-24, 2016 1 Day 1: Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics 1. Chemical Thermodynamics * Chemical equilibrium * Energy conservation & adiabatic flame temp., T ad 2. Chemical Kinetics * Reaction rates and approximations * Theories of reaction rates * Straight and branched chain reactions 3. Oxidation Mechanisms of Fuels * Hydrogen, CO, hydrocarbons 2 1.

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. Paint decontamination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1984-04-01

    Decontamination kinetics of a high-gloss polyurethane paint have been investigated using a novel flow cell experiment where the sample was counted in situ during decontamination. The /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Y decontaminations follow a rate law that can be predicted theoretically for contaminant ion desorption from weakly heterogeneous random surface adsorption sites. Paint surfaces show the same decontamination kinetics after damage by abrasion or ultraviolet irradiation prior to contamination. The systems investigated exhibit Freundlich adsorption isotherm behavior during contamination; this is also characteristic of weakly heterogeneous random surfaces and is very commonly observed in ion adsorption studies at low concentrations.

  7. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  8. 2. Chemical Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chung K. Law Robert H. Goddard Professor Princeton University Princeton-CEFRC-Combustion Institute Summer School on Combustion June 20-24, 2016 1 What is Combustion? * Study of chemically reacting flows with highly exothermic, temperature-sensitive reactions A Laminar Bunsen Flame A Turbulent Jet Flame Combustion is A Multi-physics & Multi-scale Science * Combustion is a multi- physics science, embodying two major branches of nonlinear science: - Chemical kinetics - Fluid mechanics *

  9. Amber_HEP-NERSC.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE HEP Program Perspective HEP/NERSC Workshop November 12, 2009 2 What is High Energy Physics? The High Energy Physics (HEP) program mission is to understand how the universe works at its most fundamental level. We do this by:  Discovering the most elementary constituents of matter and energy,  Probing the interactions between them,  And exploring the basic nature of space and time. 3 The Three Frontiers of HEP  At the Energy Frontier, powerful accelerators are used to create new

  10. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high ...

  11. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

  12. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  13. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data CLEERS Coordination & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts...

  15. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore » the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the

  16. Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-07-27

    Version 00 Dr. J.D. Lewins has now released the following legacy book for free distribution: Nuclear Reactor Kinetics and Control, Pergamon Press, London, 275 pages, 1978. 1. Introductory Review 2. Neutron and Precursor Equations 3. Elementary Solutions of the Kinetics Equations at Low Power 4. Linear Reactor Process Dynamics with Feedback 5. Power Reactor Control Systems 6. Fluctuations and Reactor Noise 7. Safety and Reliability 8. Non Linear Systems; Stability and Control 9. Analogue Computingmore » Addendum: Jay Basken and Jeffery D. Lewins: Power Series Solution of the Reactor Kinetics Equations, Nuclear Science and Engineering: 122, 407-436 (1996) (authorized for distribution with the book: courtesy of the American Nuclear Society)« less

  17. Stochastic Parallel PARticle Kinetic Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    SPPARKS is a kinetic Monte Carlo simulator which implements kinetic and Metropolis Monte Carlo solvers in a general way so that they can be hooked to applications of various kinds. Specific applications are implemented in SPPARKS as physical models which generate events (e.g. a diffusive hop or chemical reaction) and execute them one-by-one. Applications can run in paralle so long as the simulation domain can be partitoned spatially so that multiple events can be invokedmore » simultaneously. SPPARKS is used to model various kinds of mesoscale materials science scenarios such as grain growth, surface deposition and growth, and reaction kinetics. It can also be used to develop new Monte Carlo models that hook to the existing solver and paralle infrastructure provided by the code.« less

  18. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  19. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Presentation on the Kinetics, Mechanics and ...

  20. AER NY Kinetics LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AER NY Kinetics LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: AER NY Kinetics LLC Address: PO Box 585 21 Entrance Avenue Place: Ogdensburg Zip: 13669 Region: United States Sector: Marine...

  1. On fast reactor kinetics studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seleznev, E. F.; Belov, A. A.; Matveenko, I. P.; Zhukov, A. M.; Raskach, K. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results and the program of fast reactor core time and space kinetics experiments performed and planned to be performed at the IPPE critical facility is presented. The TIMER code was taken as computation support of the experimental work, which allows transient equations to be solved in 3-D geometry with multi-group diffusion approximation. The number of delayed neutron groups varies from 6 to 8. The code implements the solution of both transient neutron transfer problems: a direct one, where neutron flux density and its derivatives, such as reactor power, etc, are determined at each time step, and an inverse one for the point kinetics equation form, where such a parameter as reactivity is determined with a well-known reactor power time variation function. (authors)

  2. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  3. Multiflow approach to plasma kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatov, A. M.

    2015-10-15

    Instead of the commonly used Vlasov equation, one is able to treat kinetic phenomena in collisionless plasma with the help of the infinite set of hydrodynamic equations. The present paper deals with the linear approximation of multiflow hydrodynamics. It is shown that single-particle and collective excitations analogous to Van Kampen waves are explicitly separated. Expressions for the energy of all eigenmodes are obtained.

  4. Nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics and the possible breakdown of gyro-kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, R. E.; Deng Zhao

    2013-01-15

    A nonlinear theory of drift-cyclotron kinetics (termed cyclo-kinetics here) is formulated to test the breakdown of the gyro-kinetic approximations. Six dimensional cyclo-kinetics can be regarded as an extension of five dimensional gyro-kinetics to include high-frequency cyclotron waves, which can interrupt the low-frequency gyro-averaging in the (sixth velocity grid) gyro-phase angle. Nonlinear cyclo-kinetics has no limit on the amplitude of the perturbations. Formally, there is no gyro-averaging when all cyclotron (gyro-phase angle) harmonics of the perturbed distribution function (delta-f) are retained. Retaining only the (low frequency) zeroth cyclotron harmonic in cyclo-kinetics recovers both linear and nonlinear gyro-kinetics. Simple recipes are given for converting continuum nonlinear delta-f gyro-kinetic transport simulation codes to cyclo-kinetics codes by retaining (at least some) higher cyclotron harmonics.

  5. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  6. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinetic effects on interferometry, polarimetry and Thomson scattering measurements in burning plasmas (invited)a) V. V. Mirnov, D. L. Brower, D. J. Den Hartog, W. X. Ding, J. Duff, and E. Parke Citation: Review of Scientific Instruments 85, 11D302 (2014); doi: 10.1063/1.4891176 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4891176 View Table of Contents: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/rsi/85/11?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in First

  7. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W.

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  8. Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name: Kinetic Wave Power Address: 2861 N Tupelo St Place: Midland Zip: 48642 Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

  9. Spectral method for a kinetic swarming model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gamba, Irene M.; Haack, Jeffrey R.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2015-04-28

    Here we present the first numerical method for a kinetic description of the Vicsek swarming model. The kinetic model poses a unique challenge, as there is a distribution dependent collision invariant to satisfy when computing the interaction term. We use a spectral representation linked with a discrete constrained optimization to compute these interactions. To test the numerical scheme we investigate the kinetic model at different scales and compare the solution with the microscopic and macroscopic descriptions of the Vicsek model. Lastly, we observe that the kinetic model captures key features such as vortex formation and traveling waves.

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  11. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Joint Development of Benchmark Kinetics for LNT & SCR Measurement and Characterization of Lean NOx Adsorber Regeneration and Desulfation and Controlling NOx from Multi-mode

  12. Video:Ashley Anderson and Amber Stoesser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video: Watch the Open Data Google+ Hangout Video: Watch the Open Data Google+ Hangout February 21, 2013 - 5:10pm Addthis Did you miss our open data hangout? View it here. Matthew Loveless Matthew Loveless Data Integration Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Want more info? Check out these open data resources. Thank you to everyone who tuned in to our Google+ Hangout on the "Impact of Open Data." If you weren't able to attend, a recording of the discussion is available above. We hope

  13. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  14. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  15. UNLOCKING TAX EQUITY INVESTMENT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given by Amber Kinetics during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  16. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  17. Liquefaction chemistry and kinetics: Hydrogen utilization studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothenberger, K.S.; Warzinski, R.P.; Cugini, A.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objectives of this project are to investigate the chemistry and kinetics that occur in the initial stages of coal liquefaction and to determine the effects of hydrogen pressure, catalyst activity, and solvent type on the quantity and quality of the products produced. The project comprises three tasks: (1) preconversion chemistry and kinetics, (2) hydrogen utilization studies, and (3) assessment of kinetic models for liquefaction. The hydrogen utilization studies work will be the main topic of this report. However, the other tasks are briefly described.

  18. Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated at localized and extended defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large kinetic...

  19. Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow ...

  20. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons ...

  1. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric ... of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric ...

  2. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and Mechanical Modeling 2009 DOE ...

  3. Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetorecep...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spin-selective recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetoreceptor Authors: Maeda, ... recombination kinetics of a model chemical magnetoreceptor Source: Chemical ...

  4. Mechanism and Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogenation in The Organic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mechanism and Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogenation in The Organic GetterPd CatalystActivated Carbon Systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mechanism and Kinetic Modeling ...

  5. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore » state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ∂ ln v / ∂ ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration

  6. Kinetics of heavy oil/coal coprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szladow, A.J.; Chan, R.K. ); Foudu, S.; Kelly, J.F. )

    1988-06-01

    A number of studies have been reported on coprocessing of coal and oil sand bitumen, petroleum residues and distillate fractions in catalytic and non-catalytic processes. The studies described the effects of feedstock characteristics, process chemistry and operating variables on the product yield and distribution; however, very few kinetic data were reported in these investigations. This paper presents the kinetic data and modelling of the CANMET coal/heavy oil coprocessing process. CANMET has been conducting research and process development work on coprocessing of Canadian heavy oil/bitumen and coal since 1979 including studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of coprocessing. As a continuation of the program, CANMET and Lobbe Technologies undertook a project on mathematical modelling of coprocessing kinetics with emphasis on the development of reaction engineering models for improved process performance and operation.

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical

  8. Mechanisms and kinetics of coal hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, R M; Furlong, M W

    1981-05-01

    Colorado School of Mines is engaged in an experimental program to develop comprehensive models for the effects of coal composition upon the kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, for the effects of mineral matter additives (disposable catalysts) upon kinetics and mechanisms of coal hydrogenation, and for the kinetics and mechanisms of the hydrogenation of coal derived products such as preasphaltenes, and asphaltenes. Experimental work was completed on a suite of bituminous coals, thus completing the initial phase of the coal reactivity study. Eleven of the 14 coals of the suite were successfully run in duplicate. Conversion to THF solubles was correlated well by pseudo-second order kinetics. The resulting kinetic rate constants correlated with H/C ratio, mean-max vitrinite reflectance, and a specially-defined fraction of reactive macerals. The data did not correlate well with O/C ratios of the parent coals. Computer-derived statistical fits of various kinetic models were limited in their effectiveness at fitting the experimental data. Experimental work on the first phase of the disposal catalyst studies was completed. Statistical significance testing of the experimental data showed: fractional conversion and yield of light hydrocarbon products increased with time; and mineral properties of the additives were more significant in increasing overall conversion than the additive surface areas. The relative effects of the additives are given.

  9. Diffusion In Confinement: Kinetic Simulations of Self- andCollective...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diffusion In Confinement: Kinetic Simulations of Self- and Collective-Diffusion Behavior of Adsorbed Gases...

  10. An overview of flywheel energy systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolsky, A. M.; Energy Systems

    2002-05-01

    Passive magnetic bearings incorporating permanent magnets and ReBaCuO, together with carbon fibre, offer the possibility of increasing the stored, volumetric energy density of FES and unprecedentedly low idling loss of FES. Its stored energy need only satisfy customers needs for the time it takes to bring on conventional 'back-up'. The FES itself must come up to power quickly enough to avoid any disruption in the customer's operation (e.g., continuous industrial processes involving fragile materials, for example paper forming). Such customers do not care about the price of electricity nearly as much as they care about not ruining their product, damaging their machines or having 'clean ups' that stop or slow output. Firms that engage in electronic commerce and/or telecommunications also value uninterruptible power. Another set of potential customers (construction, electric railroads) may wish to avoid fluctuations in their electrical supply or they may wish to avoid causing harm to others who may hold them liable for poor power quality. Finally, real time prices (e.g., every 15 s) and real time commands, disseminated via internet, and distributed storage might enable reduced system generation costs. Generators and FES makers would have to cooperate to make this feasible. Now, the central techno-economic challenge is to build a high-power, low-loss motor generator that reaches full power in a very short time.

  11. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  12. Viral kinetic modeling: state of the art

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Canini, Laetitia; Perelson, Alan S.

    2014-06-25

    Viral kinetic modeling has led to increased understanding of the within host dynamics of viral infections and the effects of therapy. Here we review recent developments in the modeling of viral infection kinetics with emphasis on two infectious diseases: hepatitis C and influenza. We review how viral kinetic modeling has evolved from simple models of viral infections treated with a drug or drug cocktail with an assumed constant effectiveness to models that incorporate drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, as well as phenomenological models that simply assume drugs have time varying-effectiveness. We also discuss multiscale models that include intracellular events in viralmore » replication, models of drug-resistance, models that include innate and adaptive immune responses and models that incorporate cell-to-cell spread of infection. Overall, viral kinetic modeling has provided new insights into the understanding of the disease progression and the modes of action of several drugs. In conclusion, we expect that viral kinetic modeling will be increasingly used in the coming years to optimize drug regimens in order to improve therapeutic outcomes and treatment tolerability for infectious diseases.« less

  13. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  14. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  15. Kinetics of heavy oil/coal coprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szladow, A.J.; Chan, R.K.; Fouda, S.; Kelly, J.F. )

    1988-01-01

    A number of studies have been reported on coprocessing of coal and oil sand bitumen, petroleum residues and distillate fractions in catalytic and non-catalytic processes. The studies described the effects of feedstock characteristics, process chemistry and operating variables on the product yield and distribution; however, very few kinetic data were reported in these investigations. This paper presents the kinetic data and modeling of the CANMET coal/heavy oil coprocessing process. A number of reaction networks were evaluated for CANMET coprocessing. The final choice of model was a parallel model with some sequential characteristics. The model explained 90.0 percent of the total variance, which was considered satisfactory in view of the difficulties of modeling preasphaltenes. The models which were evaluated showed that the kinetic approach successfully applied to coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading can be also applied to coprocessing. The coal conversion networks and heavy oil upgrading networks are interrelated via the forward reaction paths of preasphaltenes, asphaltenes, and THFI and via the reverse kinetic paths of an adduct formation between preasphaltenes and heavy oil.

  16. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J.D. Savee, D.L. Osborn, S.S. Vasu, C.J. Percival, D.E. Shallcross, and C.A. Taatjes, "Direct Kinetic Measurements of Criegee Intermediate (CH2OO) Formed by Reaction of CH2I...

  17. From kinetic MHD in stellarators to a fully kinetic description of wave particle interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koenies, Axel; Mishchenko, Alexey; Hatzky, Roman

    2008-11-01

    We use a linearized model of kinetic MHD for the perturbative calculation of growth rates of Alfven eigenmodes.The numerical model, a code called CAS3D-K, is based on the three-dimensional ideal MHD stability code CAS3D and a numeric solution of the drift kinetic equation which avoids approximations to the magnetic geometry but neglects the drifts of the particles away from the flux surface.The approach is used to discuss stability boundaries in W7-X and W7-AS and considers both, passing and reflected particles. The limits of the applicability of the model will be discussed as well.It will be shown that gyro-kinetic PIC codes offer a very promising way to improve the model. The two-dimensional linear PIC code GYGLES is used to calculate gyro-kinetic counterparts of ideal MHD modes in cylindrical and in tokamak geometry.

  18. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  19. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An on-line version of the codes is available at http:aphysics2.lanl.govtempweb. ATOMIC kinetics modelling code uses the atomic data for LTE or NLTE population kinetics models ...

  20. Investigation of NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for Medium Duty Diesel Particulate: Contrasting O2 and NO2 Oxidation Investigation of NO2 Oxidation Kinetics and Burning Mode for Medium ...

  1. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms for complex hydrocarbon fuels and computationally efficiecnt, accurate methodologies for modeling advanced combustion strategies.

  2. Laboratory support for in situ gasification reaction kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHALCOGENIDES; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; IN-SITU PROCESSING; KINETICS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; REACTION ...

  3. Laboratory support for in situ gasification reaction kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    COMPOUNDS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHALCOGENIDES; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; IN-SITU PROCESSING; KINETICS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PROCESSING; REACTION ...

  4. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    efficiency clean combustion engines | Department of Energy Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Developing chemical kinetic mechanisms and applying them to simulating engine combustion processes. deer09_aceves.pdf (3.04 MB) More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical

  5. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  6. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  8. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  9. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  11. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type

  12. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  13. Kinetics of coal combustion: Part 2, Mechanisms and kinetics of coal volatiles combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Essenhigh, R.H.; Bailey, E.G.; Shaw, D.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Values of global kinetic constants for the combustion of coal volatiles have been determined for the first time for volatiles from three coals (two bituminous coals and a Texas lignite). Global kinetic constants for methane and propane were also measured in the same apparatus to allow comparison with reference gases. Comparisons have also been made with values of global kinetics for pure hydrocarbons from a range of experiments as found in the literature. The volatiles were pyrolyzed from crushed coal drawn on weighed trays through a gas-fired muffle furnace, and they were burned at the top of a tube in an intense back-mix volume treated theoretically as a stirred reactor. Two types of experiment were carried out: partial combustion measurements near the stoichiometric for all coals from which the global kinetics were determined; and extinction limits for the Pittsburgh {number sign}8 coal volatiles to determine the extinction loop. The near stoichiometric generated kinetic data were used to predict the extinction limits with substantial agreement. Extinction loops for methane, propane and carbon monoxide were also measured for comparison.

  14. Kinetic evidence for protein clustering at a surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, J.J. ); Bachmanova, G.I.; Archakov, A.I. )

    1994-12-01

    The molecules designated 1A2 and 2B4 belong to the cytochrome P450 protein superfamily. They can interact specifically with lipid bilayers via the penetration of part of their amino acid chains into the bilayer. The kinetics of their irreversible adsorption from solution to phospholipid bilayers, accurately measured in the low to intermediate coverage range using an integrated optics reflectance technique, differ significantly: at intermediate bulk solution concentrations, 2B4 shows typical random sequential adsorption (RSA) kinetics, whereas 1A2 shows Langmuir kinetics. At higher bulk concentration the behavior of 1[ital A]2 switches to RSA kinetics, and at very low concentrations 2[ital B]4 switches to Langmuir kinetics. The Langmuir kinetics provides strong evidence for clustering of the molecules at the bilayer surface, and the observed concentration dependence of the kinetics is consistent with the clusters arising through lateral diffusion of the proteins on the surface.

  15. Vlasov simulations of kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vásconez, C. L.; Valentini, F.; Veltri, P.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-11-15

    Kinetic Alfvén waves represent an important subject in space plasma physics, since they are thought to play a crucial role in the development of the turbulent energy cascade in the solar wind plasma at short wavelengths (of the order of the proton gyro radius ρ{sub p} and/or inertial length d{sub p} and beyond). A full understanding of the physical mechanisms which govern the kinetic plasma dynamics at these scales can provide important clues on the problem of the turbulent dissipation and heating in collisionless systems. In this paper, hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are employed to analyze in detail the features of the kinetic Alfvén waves at proton kinetic scales, in typical conditions of the solar wind environment (proton plasma beta β{sub p} = 1). In particular, linear and nonlinear regimes of propagation of these fluctuations have been investigated in a single-wave situation, focusing on the physical processes of collisionless Landau damping and wave-particle resonant interaction. Interestingly, since for wavelengths close to d{sub p} and β{sub p} ≃ 1 (for which ρ{sub p} ≃ d{sub p}) the kinetic Alfvén waves have small phase speed compared to the proton thermal velocity, wave-particle interaction processes produce significant deformations in the core of the particle velocity distribution, appearing as phase space vortices and resulting in flat-top velocity profiles. Moreover, as the Eulerian hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell algorithm allows for a clean almost noise-free description of the velocity space, three-dimensional plots of the proton velocity distribution help to emphasize how the plasma departs from the Maxwellian configuration of thermodynamic equilibrium due to nonlinear kinetic effects.

  16. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  17. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  18. Pyrolysis kinetics for the Bakken shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1992-01-01

    Pyrolysis kinetics are reported and compared for rapid open pyrolysis experiments: Py-TG-FTIR, Py-FID, and Py-MS. Where the type of information obtained overlapped, the results were very similar. The principal activation energy for total hydrocarbon generation using a parallel reaction model is 52 kcal/mol. As with most petroleum source rocks, carbon dioxide generation tends to lead oil formation while ethene and methane generation tend to lag oil generation. The midpoint of oil generation for a geological heating rate of 3 {degrees}C/m.y. is predicted to be between 130 and 140{degrees}C. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D.

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  20. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0

  1. Kinetics of iodine hydrolysis in unbuffered solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, D.A.; Lyons, L.J.

    1988-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrolysis or disproportionation of hypoiodite were studied spectrophotometrically in basic solution at an ionic strength of 0.2 M as a function of pH, iodide and total iodine concentration, and temperature. The existence of three independent pathways for this second-order process was confirmed. The pH-stat method was used to monitor the corresponding reaction of hypoiodous acid in weakly alkaline solution. The generalized rate law for the disproportionation is: /minus/d((HOI) + (OI/sup /minus//))dt = k /sub a/(HOI)/sup 2/ + k/sub b/(HOI) (OI/sup /minus//) + k/sub c/(OI/sup /minus//)/sup 2/ + k/sub d/(I/sub 2/OH/sup /minus//) (OI/sup /minus//). The values of k/sub a/ and k/sub b/ are substantially smaller than previously reported. However, an unexplained contribution to the rate law resulting from the pH-stat measurements was also obtained. The rapid recombination of iodide and iodate in HClO/sub 4/ solutions was followed by stopped-flow spectrophotometry at three ionic strengths, and over a range of iodide and hydrogen ion concentrations, and at eight temperatures. Fifth-order kinetics were observed with no detectable induction period. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  3. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Presentation on the Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. storage_theory_session_eiazab.pdf (1.21 MB) More Documents & Publications Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials Documentation of Hybrid

  4. Confined martensitic phase transformation kinetics and lattice dynamics in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ni-Co-Fe-Ga shape memory alloys (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Confined martensitic phase transformation kinetics and lattice dynamics in Ni-Co-Fe-Ga shape memory alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Confined martensitic phase transformation kinetics and lattice dynamics in Ni-Co-Fe-Ga shape memory alloys Here we describe insights into the phase transformation kinetics and lattice dynamics associated with the newly discovered confined martensitic transformation, which are

  5. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, ... and fate of radioactive material such as uranium (U) and strontium (Sr) in the environment ...

  6. Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple Collisionality Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caflisch, Russel E.

    2015-02-17

    This is the Final Technical Report on this grant. The subject of this grant is accelerated simulation for plasma kinetics, in particular for Coulomb collisions in a plasma.

  7. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra. Authors: Smith, R. Scott ; Matthiesen, Jesper ; Kay, Bruce D. Publication Date: 2014-09-18 OSTI...

  8. Micro Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Kinetic Turbines from Smart Hydro Power Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tauchturbine.jpg Technology Profile Project(s) where this...

  9. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock compression in an oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to shock compression in an oxygen-balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock ...

  10. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an ...

  11. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and...

  12. Kinetics of the Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Reactions from 1-Butanol...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theory Matches Experiment and More Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Kinetics of the Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Reactions from 1-Butanol by Hydroxyl Radical: Theory ...

  13. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Abruna, Hector Daniel Cornell University 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Our work is...

  14. A Comparison of HCCI Engine Performance Data and Kinetic Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kinetic models of fuels are needed to allow the simulation of engine performance for research, design, or verification purposes. PDF icon deer09bunting.pdf More Documents &...

  15. MHK Projects/Ogdensburg Kinetic Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Phase Phase 1 Main Overseeing Organization AER NY Kinetics LLC Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Chemical Kinetic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the ...

  17. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Transport Phenomena and ...

  18. Diffusion in confinement: kinetic simulations of self- and collective...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement: kinetic simulations of self- and collective diffusion behavior of adsorbed gases Previous Next List M. K. F. Abouelnasr and B. Smit, PCCP 14 (33), 11600 (2012) DOI:...

  19. Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on the Simulations of Kinetic Events at the Atomic Scale given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006.

  20. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Documents & Publications track 3: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined...

  1. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACCELERATION; DIAMONDS; KINETICS;...

  2. Incorporation of aqueous reaction and sorption kinetics andbiodegradat...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A 1-D reactive transport problem with kinetic biodegradation and sorption was investigated, which models the processes when a pulse of water containing NTA (nitrylotriacetate) and ...

  3. Kinetic performance of CO2 absorption into a potassium carbonate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Kinetic performance of CO2 absorption into a potassium carbonate solution ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Chemical Engineering Journal (Print) ...

  4. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  5. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  6. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ≈10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  7. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  8. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  9. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction

  10. Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Yangfang; Wu, D. J.; Morfill, G. E.

    2008-08-15

    Solitary kinetic Alfven waves in dusty plasmas are studied by considering the dust charge variation. The effect of the dust charge-to-mass ratio on the soliton solution is discussed. The Sagdeev potential is derived analytically with constant dust charge and then calculated numerically by taking the dust charge variation into account. We show that the dust charge-to-mass ratio plays an important role in the soliton properties. The soliton solutions are comprised of two branches. One branch is sub-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is obviously smaller than the Alfven speed. The other branch is super-Alfvenic and the soliton velocity is very close to or greater than the Alfven speed. Both compressive and rarefactive solitons can exist. For the sub-Alfvenic branch, the rarefactive soliton is bell-shaped and it is much narrower than the compressive one. However, for the super-Alfvenic branch, the compressive soliton is bell-shaped and narrower, and the rarefactive one is broadened. When the charge-to-mass ratio of the dust grains is sufficiently high, the width of the rarefactive soliton, in the super-Alfvenic branch, will broaden extremely and a electron depletion will be observed. It is also shown that the bell-shaped soliton can transition to a cusped structure when the velocity is sufficiently high.

  11. Advances in electron kinetics and theory of gas discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolobov, Vladimir I.; The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899

    2013-10-15

    “Electrons, like people, are fertile and infertile: high-energy electrons are fertile and able to reproduce.”—Lev TsendinModern physics of gas discharges increasingly uses physical kinetics for analysis of non-equilibrium plasmas. The description of underlying physics at the kinetic level appears to be important for plasma applications in modern technologies. In this paper, we attempt to grasp the legacy of Professor Lev Tsendin, who advocated the use of the kinetic approach for understanding fundamental problems of gas discharges. We outline the fundamentals of electron kinetics in low-temperature plasmas, describe elements of the modern kinetic theory of gas discharges, and show examples of the theoretical approach to gas discharge problems used by Lev Tsendin. Important connections between electron kinetics in gas discharges and semiconductors are also discussed. Using several examples, we illustrate how Tsendin's ideas and methods are currently being developed for the implementation of next generation computational tools for adaptive kinetic-fluid simulations of gas discharges used in modern technologies.

  12. Kinetic model for anaerobic digestion of biogas biological sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlostathis, S.G.; Gossett, J.M.

    1986-10-01

    The principal objective of this study was the development and evaluation of a comprehensive kinetic model capable of predicting digester performance when fed biological sludge. Preliminary conversion mechanisms such as cell deaths, lysis, and hydrolysis responsible for rendering viable biological sludge organisms to available substrate were studied in depth. The results of this study indicate that hydrolysis of the dead, particulate biomass - primarily consisting of protein - is the slowest step, and therefore kinetically controls the overall process of an anaerobic digestion of biological sludge. A kinetic model was developed which could accurately describe digester performance and predict effluent quality.

  13. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of triphenylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harthcock, Colin; Zhang, Jie; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-28

    We report vibrational information of both the first electronically excited state and the ground cationic state of jet-cooled triphenylene via the techniques of resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and zero kinetic energy (ZEKE) photoelectron spectroscopy. The first excited electronic state S{sub 1} of the neutral molecule is of A{sub 1}? symmetry and is therefore electric dipole forbidden in the D{sub 3h} group. Consequently, there are no observable Franck-Condon allowed totally symmetric a{sub 1}? vibrational bands in the REMPI spectrum. All observed vibrational transitions are due to Herzberg-Teller vibronic coupling to the E? third electronically excited state S{sub 3}. The assignment of all vibrational bands as e? symmetry is based on comparisons with calculations using the time dependent density functional theory and spectroscopic simulations. When an electron is eliminated, the molecular frame undergoes Jahn-Teller distortion, lowering the point group to C{sub 2v} and resulting in two nearly degenerate electronic states of A{sub 2} and B{sub 1} symmetry. Here we follow a crude treatment by assuming that all e? vibrational modes resolve into b{sub 2} and a{sub 1} modes in the C{sub 2v} molecular frame. Some observed ZEKE transitions are tentatively assigned, and the adiabatic ionization threshold is determined to be 63?365 7 cm{sup ?1}. The observed ZEKE spectra contain a consistent pattern, with a cluster of transitions centered near the same vibrational level of the cation as that of the intermediate state, roughly consistent with the propensity rule. However, complete assignment of the detailed vibrational structure due to Jahn-Teller coupling requires much more extensive calculations, which will be performed in the future.

  14. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and ...

  15. Elucidating Hydrogen Oxidation/Evolution Kinetics in Base and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidating Hydrogen OxidationEvolution Kinetics in Base and Acid by Enhanced Activities at the Optimized Pt Shell Thickness on the Ru Core Citation Details In-Document Search...

  16. Explicit integration with GPU acceleration for large kinetic networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brock, Benjamin; Belt, Andrew; Billings, Jay Jay; Guidry, Mike W.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate the first implementation of recently-developed fast explicit kinetic integration algorithms on modern graphics processing unit (GPU) accelerators. Taking as a generic test case a Type Ia supernova explosion with an extremely stiff thermonuclear network having 150 isotopic species and 1604 reactions coupled to hydrodynamics using operator splitting, we demonstrate the capability to solve of order 100 realistic kinetic networks in parallel in the same time that standard implicit methods can solve a single such network on a CPU. In addition, this orders-of-magnitude decrease in computation time for solving systems of realistic kinetic networks implies thatmore » important coupled, multiphysics problems in various scientific and technical fields that were intractable, or could be simulated only with highly schematic kinetic networks, are now computationally feasible.« less

  17. The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    effort and its application to W plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The LANL atomic kinetics modeling effort and its application to W plasmas This is the work of ...

  18. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon acep01larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx ...

  19. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kinetics of the Energetic Material HMX up to 3.6 GPa The effect of pressure on the thermal decomposition rate of the energetic material HMX was studied. HMX was...

  20. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    es093daniel2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes In-Situ Electron Microscopy of Electrical ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Chemical Kinetic Models for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Engine Combustion | Department of Energy Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Chemical Kinetic Models for Advanced Engine Combustion Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Combustion Engines ace013_pitz_2016_o_web.pdf (1.99 MB) More Documents &

  2. Exploring Competing Kinetic Processes in Quantum Dots Linked to Electrode

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surfaces | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Competing Kinetic Processes in Quantum Dots Linked to Electrode Surfaces March 14, 2012 at 2:30pm/4-349 Mark Hybertsen Brookhaven National Laboratory, Columbia University Mark_Hybertsen001_000 Abstract: Exploiting the unique properties of nanostructured chromophores for light harvesting applications relies on the balance between competing kinetic processes including energy transfer, carrier relaxation and carrier tunneling. In the first part of

  3. Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecule Force Spectroscopy Data Alex Noy is the Principal Investigator for the Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy Data. LLNL BES Programs Highlight Extraction of Equilibrium Energy and Kinetic Parameters from Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy Data Dynamic strength data for 10 different biological bonds fitted by the model R.W. Friddle, A. Noy, J.J. De Yoreo, Interpreting the widespread nonlinear force spectra of intermolecular

  4. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  5. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide (Conference) | SciTech Connect kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Authors: Armstrong, M R ; Zaug, J M ; Grant, C D ; Crowhurst, J C ; Bastea, S Publication Date: 2014-06-24 OSTI Identifier: 1149544 Report Number(s):

  6. Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Flow | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetic Theory of Turbulent Multiphase Flow FWP/Project Description: Project Leader(s): Rodney Fox It is proposed to further the present understanding of turbulent gas-solid fluidized-bed reactors from the conceptual standpoint of kinetic theory and turbulence modeling. The primary purpose is to provide a theoretical underpinning for the construction of computer codes to better understand and predict multiphase flow behavior in polydisperse gas-solid fluidized-bed reactors and risers. In

  7. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University Lviv Polytechnic, 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  8. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(140) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(140) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(140) fibril formation. ? At high A?(140) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (140) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(140) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleationpolymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(140) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  9. Amber Boehnlein Becomes Jefferson Lab's Chief Information Officer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    about while on a three-year assignment with the Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, where she managed the U.S. Large Hadron Collider Detector Operations program. ...

  10. Amber Boehnlein Becomes Jefferson Lab's Chief Information Officer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    She also oversaw the hardware computing systems for SLAC's High-Energy Physics (HEP) program. Recruited from Silicon Valley to the country's opposite shore in Virginia, Boehnlein ...

  11. The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-07-30

    The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and

  12. Chemical kinetic modeling of H{sub 2} applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinov, N.M.; Westbrook, C.K.; Cloutman, L.D.

    1995-09-01

    Work being carried out at LLNL has concentrated on studies of the role of chemical kinetics in a variety of problems related to hydrogen combustion in practical combustion systems, with an emphasis on vehicle propulsion. Use of hydrogen offers significant advantages over fossil fuels, and computer modeling provides advantages when used in concert with experimental studies. Many numerical {open_quotes}experiments{close_quotes} can be carried out quickly and efficiently, reducing the cost and time of system development, and many new and speculative concepts can be screened to identify those with sufficient promise to pursue experimentally. This project uses chemical kinetic and fluid dynamic computational modeling to examine the combustion characteristics of systems burning hydrogen, either as the only fuel or mixed with natural gas. Oxidation kinetics are combined with pollutant formation kinetics, including formation of oxides of nitrogen but also including air toxics in natural gas combustion. We have refined many of the elementary kinetic reaction steps in the detailed reaction mechanism for hydrogen oxidation. To extend the model to pressures characteristic of internal combustion engines, it was necessary to apply theoretical pressure falloff formalisms for several key steps in the reaction mechanism. We have continued development of simplified reaction mechanisms for hydrogen oxidation, we have implemented those mechanisms into multidimensional computational fluid dynamics models, and we have used models of chemistry and fluid dynamics to address selected application problems. At the present time, we are using computed high pressure flame, and auto-ignition data to further refine the simplified kinetics models that are then to be used in multidimensional fluid mechanics models. Detailed kinetics studies have investigated hydrogen flames and ignition of hydrogen behind shock waves, intended to refine the detailed reactions mechanisms.

  13. Performance of non-conventional factorization approaches for neutron kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulla, S.; Nervo, M.

    2013-07-01

    The use of factorization techniques provides a interesting option for the simulation of the time-dependent behavior of nuclear systems with a reduced computational effort. While point kinetics neglects all spatial and spectral effects, quasi-statics and multipoint kinetics allow to produce results with a higher accuracy for transients involving relevant modifications of the neutron distribution. However, in some conditions these methods can not work efficiently. In this paper, we discuss some possible alternative formulations for the factorization process for neutron kinetics, leading to mathematical models of reduced complications that can allow an accurate simulation of transients involving spatial and spectral effects. The performance of these innovative approaches are compared to standard techniques for some test cases, showing the benefits and shortcomings of the method proposed. (authors)

  14. Kinetics of the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction under microwave heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.L.; Katz, J.D.; Rees, D.; Paffett, M.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Datye, A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    915 MHz microwave heating has been used to drive the CO oxidation reaction over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with out significantly affecting the reaction kinetics. As compared to an identical conventionally heated system, the activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction order with respect to CO were unchanged. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple extrapolation technique. Microwave-induced thermal gradients were found to play a significant role in kinetic observations. The authors chose the CO oxidation reaction over a supported metal catalyst because the reaction kinetics are well known, and because of the diverse dielectric properties of the various elements in the system: CO is a polar molecule, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are non-polar, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a dielectric, and Pt and Pd are conductors.

  15. Global limits on kinetic Alfvenon speed in quasineutral plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M.

    2011-04-15

    Large-amplitude kinetic Alfvenon (exact Alfven soliton) matching condition is investigated in quasineutral electron-ion and electron-positron-ion plasmas immersed in a uniform magnetic field. Using the standard pseudopotential method, the magnetohydrodynamics equations are exactly solved, and a global allowed matching condition for propagation of kinetic solitary waves is derived. It is remarked that, depending on the plasma parameters, the kinetic solitons can be sub-Alfvenic or super-Alfvenic, in general. It is further revealed that, either upper or lower soliton speed-limit is independent of fractional plasma parameters. Furthermore, the soliton propagation angle with respect to that of the uniform magnetic field is found to play a fundamental role in controlling the soliton matching speed-range.

  16. Chemical Kinetic Models for HCCI and Diesel Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Sarathy, S M

    2010-11-15

    Predictive engine simulation models are needed to make rapid progress towards DOE's goals of increasing combustion engine efficiency and reducing pollutant emissions. These engine simulation models require chemical kinetic submodels to allow the prediction of the effect of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions. Chemical kinetic models for conventional and next-generation transportation fuels need to be developed so that engine simulation tools can predict fuel effects. The objectives are to: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic models for fuel components used in surrogate fuels for diesel and HCCI engines; (2) Develop surrogate fuel models to represent real fuels and model low temperature combustion strategies in HCCI and diesel engines that lead to low emissions and high efficiency; and (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on low temperature combustion modes of advanced combustion engines.

  17. Kinetics of high-conversion hydrocracking of bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaishi, H.; Gray, M.R.; Chan, E.W.; Sanford, E.C.

    1995-12-31

    Residues are complex mixtures of thousands of components. This mixture will change during hydrocracking, so that high conversion may result in a residue material with different characteristics from the starting material. Our objective is to determine the kinetics of residue conversion and yields of distillates at high conversions, and to relate these observations to the underlying chemical reactions. Athabasca bitumen was reacted in a 1-L CSTR in a multipass operation. Product from the first pass was collected, then run through the reactor again and so on, giving kinetic data under conditions that simulated a multi-reactor or packed-bed operation. Experiments were run both with hydrocracking catalyst and without added catalyst. Products were analyzed by distillation, elemental analysis, NMR, and GPC. These data will be used to derive a kinetic model for hydrocracking of bitumen residue covering a wide range of conversion (from 30% to 95%+), based on the underlying chemistry.

  18. Kinetic Alfvn wave turbulence and formation of localized structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Modi, K. V.; Mechanical Engineering Department, Government Engineering College Valsad, Gujarat 396001

    2013-08-15

    This work presents non-linear interaction of magnetosonic wave with kinetic Alfvn wave for intermediate ?-plasma (m{sub e}/m{sub i}???1). A set of dimensionless equations have been developed for analysis by considering ponderomotive force due to pump kinetic Alfvn wave in the dynamics of magnetosonic wave. Stability analysis has been done to study modulational instability or linear growth rate. Further, numerical simulation has been carried out to study the nonlinear stage of instability and resulting power spectrum applicable to solar wind around 1 AU. Due to the nonlinearity, background density of magnetosonic wave gets modified which results in localization of kinetic Alfvn wave. From the obtained results, we observed that spectral index follows k{sup ?3.0}, consistent with observation received by Cluster spacecraft for the solar wind around 1 AU. The result shows the steepening of power spectrum which may be responsible for heating and acceleration of plasma particles in solar wind.

  19. Computer-Aided Construction of Chemical Kinetic Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, William H.

    2014-12-31

    The combustion chemistry of even simple fuels can be extremely complex, involving hundreds or thousands of kinetically significant species. The most reasonable way to deal with this complexity is to use a computer not only to numerically solve the kinetic model, but also to construct the kinetic model in the first place. Because these large models contain so many numerical parameters (e.g. rate coefficients, thermochemistry) one never has sufficient data to uniquely determine them all experimentally. Instead one must work in predictive mode, using theoretical rather than experimental values for many of the numbers in the model, and as appropriate refining the most sensitive numbers through experiments. Predictive chemical kinetics is exactly what is needed for computer-aided design of combustion systems based on proposed alternative fuels, particularly for early assessment of the value and viability of proposed new fuels before those fuels are commercially available. This project was aimed at making accurate predictive chemical kinetics practical; this is a challenging goal which requires a range of science advances. The project spanned a wide range from quantum chemical calculations on individual molecules and elementary-step reactions, through the development of improved rate/thermo calculation procedures, the creation of algorithms and software for constructing and solving kinetic simulations, the invention of methods for model-reduction while maintaining error control, and finally comparisons with experiment. Many of the parameters in the models were derived from quantum chemistry calculations, and the models were compared with experimental data measured in our lab or in collaboration with others.

  20. Benchmarking kinetic calculations of resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkery, J. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Betti, R.

    2014-05-15

    Validating the calculations of kinetic resistive wall mode (RWM) stability is important for confidently predicting RWM stable operating regions in ITER and other high performance tokamaks for disruption avoidance. Benchmarking the calculations of the Magnetohydrodynamic Resistive SpectrumKinetic (MARS-K) [Y. Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)], Modification to Ideal Stability by Kinetic effects (MISK) [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 057301 (2005)], and Perturbed Equilibrium Nonambipolar Transport (PENT) [N. Logan et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 122507 (2013)] codes for two Solov'ev analytical equilibria and a projected ITER equilibrium has demonstrated good agreement between the codes. The important particle frequencies, the frequency resonance energy integral in which they are used, the marginally stable eigenfunctions, perturbed Lagrangians, and fluid growth rates are all generally consistent between the codes. The most important kinetic effect at low rotation is the resonance between the mode rotation and the trapped thermal particle's precession drift, and MARS-K, MISK, and PENT show good agreement in this term. The different ways the rational surface contribution was treated historically in the codes is identified as a source of disagreement in the bounce and transit resonance terms at higher plasma rotation. Calculations from all of the codes support the present understanding that RWM stability can be increased by kinetic effects at low rotation through precession drift resonance and at high rotation by bounce and transit resonances, while intermediate rotation can remain susceptible to instability. The applicability of benchmarked kinetic stability calculations to experimental results is demonstrated by the prediction of MISK calculations of near marginal growth rates for experimental marginal stability points from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)].

  1. Recent advances in the kinetics of oxygen reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adzic, R.

    1996-07-01

    Oxygen reduction is considered an important electrocatalytic reaction; the most notable need remains improvement of the catalytic activity of existing metal electrocatalysts and development of new ones. A review is given of new advances in the understanding of reaction kinetics and improvements of the electrocatalytic properties of some surfaces, with focus on recent studies of relationship of the surface properties to its activity and reaction kinetics. The urgent need is to improve catalytic activity of Pt and synthesize new, possibly non- noble metal catalysts. New experimental techniques for obtaining new level of information include various {ital in situ} spectroscopies and scanning probes, some involving synchrotron radiation. 138 refs, 18 figs, 2 tabs.

  2. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T.

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  3. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  4. General non-minimal kinetic coupling to gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granda, L.N.; Cardona, W. E-mail: wilalbca@univalle.edu.co

    2010-07-01

    We study a model of scalar field with a general non-minimal kinetic coupling to itself and to the curvature, as a source of dark energy, and analyze the cosmological dynamics of this model and the issue of accelerated expansion. Solutions giving rise to power-law expansion have been found. The dynamical equation of state is studied for the two cases, without and with free kinetic term . In the first case, a behavior very close to that of the cosmological constant was found. In the second case, a solution was found, which match the current phenomenology of the dark energy. The model shows a rich variety of dynamical scenarios.

  5. A coke oven model including thermal decomposition kinetics of tar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munekane, Fuminori; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Tanioka, Seiichi

    1997-12-31

    A new one-dimensional coke oven model has been developed for simulating the amount and the characteristics of by-products such as tar and gas as well as coke. This model consists of both heat transfer and chemical kinetics including thermal decomposition of coal and tar. The chemical kinetics constants are obtained by estimation based on the results of experiments conducted to investigate the thermal decomposition of both coal and tar. The calculation results using the new model are in good agreement with experimental ones.

  6. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beland, Laurent Karim; Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-02-07

    Here, we present a comparison of the Kinetic Activation–Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation–Relaxation Technique nouveau provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16,000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART’s treatment ofmore » geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC’s, while the later’s concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not accessible if not localizing calculations.« less

  7. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-02-15

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  8. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R. Scott; Matthiesen, Jesper; Kay, Bruce D.

    2014-09-18

    The desorption kinetics of methanol, ethanol, and water from graphene covered Pt(111) are investigated. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD) spectra for both methanol and ethanol have well-resolved first, second, third, and multilayer layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent with zero-order desorption kinetics from all layers. In contrast, for water the first and second layers are not resolved. At low water coverages (< 1 ML) the initial desorption leading edges are aligned but then fall out of alignment at higher temperatures. For thicker water layers (10 to 100 ML), the desorption leading edges are in alignment throughout the desorption of the film. The coverage dependence of the desorption behavoir suggests that at low water coverages the non-alignment of the desorption leading edges is due to water dewetting from the graphene substrate. Kinetic simulations reveal that the experimental results are consistent with zero-order desorption. The simulations also show that fractional order desorption kinetics would be readily apparent in the experimental TPD spectra.

  9. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-17

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  10. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2007-09-20

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran et al. for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  11. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbinet, Olivier; Pitz, William J.; Westbrook, Charles K.

    2008-08-15

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules established by Curran and co-workers for the oxidation of n-heptane and it includes all the reactions known to be pertinent to both low and high temperatures. Computed results have been compared with methyl decanoate experiments in an engine and oxidation of rapeseed oil methyl esters in a jet-stirred reactor. An important feature of this mechanism is its ability to reproduce the early formation of carbon dioxide that is unique to biofuels and due to the presence of the ester group in the reactant. The model also predicts ignition delay times and OH profiles very close to observed values in shock tube experiments fueled by n-decane. These model capabilities indicate that large n-alkanes can be good surrogates for large methyl esters and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO{sub 2} production from biodiesel fuels, can be predicted only by a detailed kinetic mechanism for a true methyl ester fuel. The present methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels. (author)

  12. KINETICS OF SLURRY PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH SYNTHESIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski

    2006-09-29

    This report covers the fourth year of a research project conducted under the University Coal Research Program. The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. The model will be able to predict molar flow rates and concentrations of all reactants and major product species (water, carbon dioxide, linear 1- and 2-olefins, and linear paraffins) as a function of reaction conditions in the STSR. During the fourth year of the project, an analysis of experimental data collected during the second year of this project was performed. Kinetic parameters were estimated utilizing product distributions from 27 mass balances. During the reporting period two kinetic models were employed: a comprehensive kinetic model of Dr. Li and co-workers (Yang et al., 2003) and a hydrocarbon selectivity model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) The kinetic model of Yang et al. (2003) has 24 parameters (20 parameters for hydrocarbon formation, and 4 parameters for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction). Kinetic parameters for the WGS reaction and FTS synthesis were estimated first separately, and then simultaneously. The estimation of these kinetic parameters employed the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) method and the trust-region reflective Newton large-scale (LS) method. A genetic algorithm (GA) was incorporated into estimation of parameters for FTS reaction to provide initial estimates of model parameters. All reaction rate constants and activation energies were found to be positive, but at the 95% confidence level the intervals were large. Agreement between predicted and experimental reaction rates has been fair to good. Light hydrocarbons are predicted fairly accurately, whereas the model underpredicts values of higher molecular weight

  13. Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in a degenerate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in a degenerate Tonks-Girardeau gas" Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in ...

  14. Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in a degenerate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in a degenerate Tonks-Girardeau gas" Title: Comment on "Kinetic theory for a mobile impurity in a degenerate Tonks-Girardeau gas" ...

  15. UCRL-JC-l20677 PREPRINT Detailed and Global Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    UCRL-JC-l20677 PREPRINT Detailed and Global Chemical Kinetics Model for Hydrogen N. M. ... Detailed and Global Chemical Kinetics Model For Hydrogen N.M. Marinov, C.K. Westbrook and ...

  16. Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense Plasma Focus Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fully Kinetic Simulations of MegaJoule-Scale Dense ...

  17. Kinetics of Slurry Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragomir B. Bukur; Gilbert F. Froment; Tomasz Olewski; Lech Nowicki; Madhav Nayapati

    2006-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive kinetic model for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) employing iron-based catalysts. This model will be validated with experimental data obtained in a stirred-tank slurry reactor (STSR) over a wide range of process conditions. Three STSR tests of the Ruhrchemie LP 33/81 catalyst were conducted to collect data on catalyst activity and selectivity under 25 different sets of process conditions. The observed decrease in 1-olefin content and increase in 2-olefin and n-paraffin contents with the increase in conversion are consistent with a concept that 1-olefins participate in secondary reactions (e.g. 1-olefin hydrogenation, isomerization and readsorption), whereas 2-olefins and n-paraffins are formed in these reactions. Carbon number product distribution showed an increase in chain growth probability with increase in chain length. Vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations were made to check validity of the assumption that the gas and liquid phases are in equilibrium during FTS in the STSR. Calculated vapor phase compositions were in excellent agreement with experimental values from the STSR under reaction conditions. Discrepancies between the calculated and experimental values for the liquid-phase composition (for some of the experimental data) are ascribed to experimental errors in the amount of wax collected from the reactor, and the relative amounts of hydrocarbon wax and Durasyn 164 oil (start-up fluid) in the liquid samples. Kinetic parameters of four kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003; Van der Laan and Beenackers, 1998, 1999; and an extended kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers) were estimated from experimental data in the STSR tests. Two of these kinetic models (Lox and Froment, 1993b; Yang et al., 2003) can predict a complete product distribution (inorganic species and hydrocarbons), whereas the kinetic model of Van der Laan and Beenackers (1998, 1999) can

  18. KINETIC MODELING OF FUEL EFFECTS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF CHEMISTRY...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methodologies needed for studying fuel effects include development of fuel kinetic ... Resource Relation: Conference: International Conference on Sustainable Automotive ...

  19. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. ace_13_pitz.pdf (1.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels Vehicle Technologies Office

  20. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek™ Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  1. Systems engineering analysis of kinetic energy weapon concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senglaub, M.

    1996-06-01

    This study examines, from a systems engineering design perspective, the potential of kinetic energy weapons being used in the role of a conventional strategic weapon. Within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, strategic weapon experience falls predominantly in the nuclear weapons arena. The techniques developed over the years may not be the most suitable methodologies for use in a new design/development arena. For this reason a more fundamental approach was pursued with the objective of developing an information base from which design decisions might be made concerning the conventional strategic weapon system concepts. The study examined (1) a number of generic missions, (2) the effects of a number of damage mechanisms from a physics perspective, (3) measures of effectiveness (MOE`s), and (4) a design envelope for kinetic energy weapon concepts. With the base of information a cut at developing a set of high-level system requirements was made, and a number of concepts were assessed against these requirements.

  2. Simulation of the kinetics of precipitation reactions in ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, A. . E-mail: schneider@mpie.de; Inden, G.

    2005-01-10

    Computer simulations of diffusion-controlled phase transformations in model alloys of Fe-Cr-C, Fe-Cr-W-C, Fe-Cr-Si-C, and Fe-Cr-Co-V-C are presented. The compositions considered are typical for ferritic steels. The simulations are performed using the software DICTRA and the thermodynamic calculations of phase equilibria are performed using Thermo-Calc. The thermodynamic driving forces and the kinetics of diffusion-controlled precipitation reactions of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, cementite and Laves-phase (Fe, Cr){sub 2}W are discussed. The simultaneous growth of stable and metastable phases is treated in a multi-cell approach. The results show remarkable effects on the growth kinetics due to the competition during simultaneous growth.

  3. PROTON KINETIC EFFECTS IN VLASOV AND SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Veltri, P.; Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S.; Califano, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2014-02-01

    Kinetic plasma processes are investigated in the framework of solar wind turbulence, employing hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) simulations. Statistical analysis of spacecraft observation data relates proton temperature anisotropy T /T {sub ∥} and parallel plasma beta β{sub ∥}, where subscripts refer to the ambient magnetic field direction. Here, this relationship is recovered using an ensemble of HVM simulations. By varying plasma parameters, such as plasma beta and fluctuation level, the simulations explore distinct regions of the parameter space given by T /T {sub ∥} and β{sub ∥}, similar to solar wind sub-datasets. Moreover, both simulation and solar wind data suggest that temperature anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. This connection between non-Maxwellian kinetic effects and various types of intermittency may be a key point for understanding the complex nature of plasma turbulence.

  4. Complexity reduction of collisional-radiative kinetics for atomic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Hai P.; Karagozian, Ann R.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-15

    Thermal non-equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional-radiative kinetics. This level of detail is required for an accurate prediction of the plasma. However, the resultant system of equations can be prohibitively large, making multi-dimensional and unsteady simulations of non-equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we present a scheme for model reduction of the collisional-radiative kinetics, by combining energy levels into groups and deriving the corresponding macroscopic rates for all transitions. Although level-grouping is a standard approach to this type of problem, we provide here a mechanism for achieving higher-order accuracy by accounting for the level distribution within a group. The accuracy and benefits of the scheme are demonstrated for the generic case of atomic hydrogen by comparison with the complete solution of the master rate equations and other methods.

  5. On consistent kinetic and derivative interactions for gravitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noller, Johannes

    2015-04-17

    The only known fully ghost-free and consistent Lorentz-invariant kinetic term for a graviton (or indeed for any spin-2 field) is the Einstein-Hilbert term. Here we propose and investigate a new candidate family of kinetic interactions and their extensions to derivative interactions involving several spin-2 fields. These new terms generically break diffeomorphism invariance(s) and as a result can lead to the propagation of 5 degrees of freedom for a single spin-2 field — analogous to ghost-free Massive Gravity. We discuss under what circumstances these new terms can be used to build healthy effective field theories and in the process establish the ‘Jordan’ and ‘Einstein’ frame pictures for Massive-, Bi- and Multi-Gravity.

  6. Elucidating the Complex Recombination Kinetics in Organic-Inorganic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trihalide Perovskites* | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Elucidating the Complex Recombination Kinetics in Organic-Inorganic Trihalide Perovskites* December 8, 2015 at 4:30pm/36-428 Dane de Quilettes University of Washington deQuilettes-2 Solution processed semiconductors are often plagued by performance limiting defects, surprisingly organometal trihalide perovskites (e.g. CH3NH3PbI3) have exhibited excellent photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies comparable to meticulously refined

  7. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels William J. Pitz (PI), Charles K. Westbrook, Marco Mehl, M. Lee Davisson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory May 12, 2009 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Washington, DC This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  8. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage DOE Hydrogen Program Review Crystal Gateway Marriott, Crystal City, VA May 18, 2006 Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media Anter El-Azab Tel: 850-410-6655, E-mail address: anter@eng.fsu.edu Materials Theory Group School of Computational science and Mechanical Engineering Department Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32310 Florida State University Materials Theory Group Objective The objective of this talk is to expose a number of

  9. Deflection by kinetic impact: Sensitivity to asteroid properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bruck Syal, Megan; Michael Owen, J.; Miller, Paul L.

    2016-05-01

    Impacting an asteroid with a spacecraft traveling at high speed delivers an impulsive change in velocity to the body. In certain circumstances, this strategy could be used to deflect a hazardous asteroid, moving its orbital path off of an Earth-impacting course. However, the efficacy of momentum delivery to asteroids by hypervelocity impact is sensitive to both the impact conditions (particularly velocity) and specific characteristics of the target asteroid. We numerically model asteroid response to kinetic impactors under a wide range of initial conditions, using an Adaptive Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics code. Impact velocities spanning 1–30 km/s were investigated, yielding, for amore » particular set of assumptions about the modeled target material, a power-law dependence consistent with a velocity-scaling exponent of μ = 0.44. Target characteristics including equation of state, strength model, porosity, rotational state, and shape were varied, and corresponding changes in asteroid response were documented. Moreover, the kinetic-impact momentum-multiplication factor, β, decreases with increasing asteroid cohesion and increasing porosity. Although increased porosity lowers β, larger porosities result in greater deflection velocities, as a consequence of reduced target masses for asteroids of fixed size. Porosity also lowers disruption risk for kinetic impacts near the threshold of disruption. Including fast (P = 2.5 h) and very fast (P = 100 s) rotation did not significantly alter β but did affect the risk of disruption by the impact event. Asteroid shape is found to influence the efficiency of momentum delivery, as local slope conditions can change the orientation of the crater ejecta momentum vector. Our results emphasize the need for asteroid characterization studies to bracket the range of target conditions expected at near-Earth asteroids while also highlighting some of the principal uncertainties associated with the kinetic-impact deflection

  10. Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Kinetic Simulations of Fusion Energy Dynamics at the Extreme Scale PI Name: William Tang PI Email: tang@pppl.gov Institution: Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 40 Million Year: 2013 Research Domain: Physics To build the scientific foundations needed to develop fusion power as a clean and sustainable energy source, the timely development of a high-physics-fidelity predictive simulation capability for