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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amazonia lba lba-eco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies A. J forest is good, above deforested areas (pasture) poor. The models' underestimate of the temperature Modelling studies with general circulation models have shown that large-scale deforestation of the Amazon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2

LBA-ECO Phase II: Measuring the effects of logging on the CO2 and energy exchange of a primary forest in Tapajos National Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of selective logging on the exchanges of CO2 and energy by a primary forest in the Tapajos the effects of selective logging on the exchanges of CO2 and energy by a forest in the Tapajos National Forest resulted in three submitted manuscripts that detail the exchanges of CO2 and energy by the intact forest

Goulden, Michael L.

3

The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia R.The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia. (Ais between sustainable and unsustainable development of the

Tobin, R. James

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Deforestation Deforestation predictions for Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amazon Deforestation Models Deforestation predictions for Amazonia presented by W. F. Laurance et deforestation. Much has already been said by the scientific community about their model--its apocalyptical ("Deforestation in Amazonia," 21 May 2004, p. 1109), blaming planned infrastructure and the land speculation

Camara, Gilberto

5

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences PHILIP M. FEARNSIDE Instituto of deforestation began with the inauguration of the Transamazon Highway in 1970. Amazonian deforestation rates have that make deforestation profitable. Forest degradation results from logging, ground fires (facilitated

Gottgens, Hans

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia reveals neotropical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

avoided deforestation, Brazil, carbon... , deforestation, global warming, Greenhouse effect, rainforest. INTRODUCTION AMAZONIA'S PRESENT ECONOMY... The present economy of...

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia brazil physical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: amazonia brazil physical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate Summary: in rainfall over large swathes of...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Amazon River; up... Brazil, and eastern Peru, east of Ro Ucayali, to northern Bolivia. LOCALITIES Amazonia National Park Source: Landweber, Laura - Department of Ecology...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia central amazonas- Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: amazonia central amazonas- Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Molecular Ecology Notes (2004) 4, 333335 doi: 10.1111j.1471-8286.2004.00687.x 2004 Blackwell...

10

Beta diversity of frogs in the forests of New Guinea, Amazonia and Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Beta diversity of frogs in the forests of New Guinea, Amazonia and Europe are characterized by low beta diversity, both in tropical and in temperate areas. Location Lowland forests tracking. The community data were analysed for alpha and beta diversity. Results Local (alpha) diversity

11

Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning Paulo Artaxo, Henrique M. J. Barbosa, Luciana V. Rizzo, Joel F. Brito, Elisa T. Sena, Glauber G. Cirino, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning impacts Paulo Particles and Large Scale Biomass Burning Impacts Paulo Artaxoa , Henrique M. J. Barbosa a , Luciana V visible: The natural biogenic emissions of aerosols and VOCs, and the biomass burning emissions. A large

Barbosa, Henrique

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - agrobacterium tumefaciens lba4404 Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

incorporating a plasmid into ... Source: Finer, John J. - Department of Horticulture and Crop Science, Ohio State University Collection: Biotechnology 26 Root-Secreted Malic Acid...

13

Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they develop over unconsolidated weathering materials ofthin soils derived from unconsolidated material and lacking

Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forests in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador andHypereutric, Rhodic) in Bolivia (HCC-22). reserve inHypereu- tric, Rhodic) in Bolivia (HCC-22), the only Nitisol

Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

February 2010 Pasture Nitrogen Balance Worksheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agronomy Guide ­ Table 1.2-14A N Recommendation (lb/A) 3 Planned Fertilizer (lb/A) 1 Residual Manure N 4 Residual Legume N (lb/A) 5 Net Nitrogen Requirement (lb/A) Calculation of Uncollected Manure Nitrogen Available N/A deposited at this stocking rate is under N balanced rate; may need

Guiltinan, Mark

16

Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and production of commodities such as soya and palm oil.production, including soya in Latin America [Morton et al. , 2006] and palm oil

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian and deforestation to explicitly quantify the seasonal patterns and relationships between these three variables per year for all variables analysed, except deforestation. For the annual cycle, we found correlations

Malhi, Yadvinder

18

Experimental harvesting of the non-timber forest product Ischnosiphon polyphyllus in central Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental harvesting of the non-timber forest product Ischnosiphon polyphyllus in central in revised form 24 August 2003; accepted 1 October 2003 Abstract The harvesting of non-timber forest products has been proposed as an alternative to timber harvesting that can increase rural income while having

Bruna, Emilio M.

19

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia central sua Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Databases and Resources ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 8 Amazonian biodiversity: assessing conservation priorities with taxonomic data Summary: are...

20

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia um desafio Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the potential Source: Camara, Gilberto - Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (Brasil) Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences ; Environmental Sciences...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amazonia lba lba-eco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

Knox, Ryan Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Charlatans, seekers, and shamans: the ayahuasca boom in western Peruvian Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ayahuasca, an entheogenic beverage endemic to the Amazon, has been utilized by indigenous peoples in the region for hundreds of years for a wide range of purposes. Recently however, this beverage has entered into the ...

Homan, Joshua

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

24

Increased dry-season length over southern Amazonia in recent decades and its implication for future  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and vulnerable to increasing conversion of native forests to cultivated crops (10­12). The extreme droughts South America and an increase of local convective inhibition energy in austral winter (June­August) seem

Myneni, Ranga B.

25

Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionscontribute to atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest2008), Fire-related carbon emissions from land use

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Habitat Specialization by Birds in Western Amazonian White-sand Forests Jose Alvarez Alonso1,4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 1990). In northern Amazonia, WSFs are known from Venezuela, Suriname, Guyana, Brazil, and Colombia

Fine, Paul V.A.

27

Seasonal differences in population-, ensemble-and community-level responses of bats to landscape structure in Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on time and energy as well as increased nutritional demands, foraging behavior and home range size may

Willig, Michael

28

Molecular Biology DNA: The Genetic Macromolecule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(LB-A) 2 LB/amicillin/arabinose plates (LB-A-A) #12;1 tube transformation solution (CaCl2) 1 tube LB

29

An Updated Typology of Causative Constructions: Form-Function Mappings in Hupa (California Athabaskan), Chungli Ao (Tibeto-Burman) and Beyond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Arawak language of Suriname. Ph.D. Dissertation, CornellBarbacoan Yagua Macro-G(? ) Suriname Brazil Peru Amazonia (

Escamilla, Ramon Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

APPLYING CASE-BASED REASONING IN THE EVOLUTION OF DEFORESTATION PATTERNS IN THE BRAZILIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLYING CASE-BASED REASONING IN THE EVOLUTION OF DEFORESTATION PATTERNS IN THE BRAZILIAN AMAZONIA, gilberto, leila, isabel, olga}@dpi.inpe.br ABSTRACT Patterns of deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia to establish rules and detect object deforestation evolution in an Amazonia region. The objects were analyzed

Camara, Gilberto

31

UPb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite-enriched granite at Pitinga (Amazonia, Brazil): Evolution of the A-type  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite- enriched granite at Pitinga of A-type magmatism and basin formation occurred. The albite-enriched granite emplacement occurred-enriched facies of Madeira granite (Madeira Suite) that is part of a NE­SW alignment of three granitic bodies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

Camara, Gilberto

33

Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - agroecology Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Medeiros, 2004). These alternatives are due to the development of local agro-ecological markets... and marketing their own agro-ecological production. In Amazonia (Mato Grosso...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - agroecological zones Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Medeiros, 2004). These alternatives are due to the development of local agro-ecological markets... and marketing their own agro-ecological production. In Amazonia (Mato Grosso...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian vegetation coupled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Amazonia L. R. Hutyra,1,2 Summary: and resilience of Amazonian vegetation to climate change by analyzing observed climate-vegetation relationships... coupled changes...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - angra brazil applications Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 45 Atualizado em 11052010. CURRICULUM VITAE Summary: Spaces". Summer School on Enviromental Modelling of Amazonia, Angra dos Reis, Brazil, Abril de 2005. 12......

38

Direct Comparison of Alfalfa Nitrogen Credits to Corn and Wheat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Station Ashland Ag Research Station #12;Alfalfa N credits to corn: · Infrequent fertilizer N responses Rate Aug Sep lb/a --------- bu/a --------- 15 48 48 35 55 43 55 52 51 75 62 49 Ashland, 2001

Balser, Teri C.

39

Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

54 Chapter IV Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns Through Satellites Marcelino Pereira to analyze satellite images and extract knowledge from this kind of data. The Amazonia deforestation problem of change on deforested areas of Amazonia. The purpose of the authors is to present relevant technologies

Camara, Gilberto

40

Pre-Columbian land use and human impact in the Bolivian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a polarised debate amongst Neotropical archaeologists and ecologists over the extent of Pre-Columbian (pre-AD 1492) anthropogenic environmental impacts in Amazonia. While some maintain the old paradigm of ...

Carson, John Francis

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amazonia lba lba-eco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - amarelo da zona Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sistemas de uso da terra na Amazonia. In Proceedings of the II Brazilian Congress... Geesthacht. pp. 855-858. Lehmann J, da Silva Jr JP, Rondon M, Cravo MS, Greenwood J, Nehls T,...

42

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian river water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

river water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amazonian river water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 CONTENTS OF AMAZONIA AND GLOBAL...

43

Phylogeography of the neotropical Anopheles triannulatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae) supports deep structure and complex patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amazonia + central Bolivia; Atlantic coastal lowland; ands.s. from southern Brazil, Bolivia and Argentina. In allAmazon, Paraguay and Bolivia [15,19,22,29,67]. Evidence of

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Nutrient Management Specialist or Broker Signature The following appendices need to accompany the Nutrient Balance Worksheets if applicable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/A)Planned Manure Rate2 See Notes Nutrient Balance @ Planned Rate (lb/A)1 Crop Group 1 Positive numbers = nutrient Nutrient balances for P2O5 and K2O are based Soil Test Recommendations. Fields 4 ­ 8 have a 150' manure application setback from the stream. If manure will be stacked in the field, an area has been designated

Guiltinan, Mark

45

Energy Accounting for District Heating and Cooling Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...2..?... St"""'. Pressure -psig Burner Pressure paig/B 2 0 Feed Water Temp _ Air temp. _ , Pull Load (.3) .(6. gf 7 Stack temp. __ lba. ata/ft 3 gas ..:.!i.QJ.6 7a/7b --L.1l!L Figure 11 '+/" COEFFIC.IEIlT OF PERFORMANCE CHILLER,L- 0 DATE...

Barrett, J. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SOUTHWEST COTTON HARVEST AID PERFORMANCE AND NARROW ROW OPTIONS Wayne Keeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOUTHWEST COTTON HARVEST AID PERFORMANCE AND NARROW ROW OPTIONS Wayne Keeling Texas Agricultural Experiment Station Lubbock, TX Abstract Cotton is produced in the Southwest (Texas and Oklahoma) under a wide in rainfall and availability of irrigation, yields may range from 1250 lb/A. Cotton is harvested

Mukhtar, Saqib

47

Spring 2008 Funding Cycle UFTC Awards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Services 4/23-4/24 08 Salt Lake City, Utah 575.50 Ipri Tom LIB Media and Computer Science 4/7-4/9 08 Kristin EDU Special Education 10/2-10/4 08 Kansas City, Missouri 752.00 Serafini Frank EDU Curriculum, Germany; St. Petersburg, Russia 1,000.00 Whitney Charles LBA English 6/29-7/4 08 Canterbury, England 900

Ahmad, Sajjad

48

Alfalfa Response to K at Various J.B. Peters, K.A. Kelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alfalfa Response to K at Various pH levels J.B. Peters, K.A. Kelling and P.E. Speth Soil Science lb/a K2O #12;Summary · Soil pH had a significant effect on alfalfa dry matter product in nearly all on alfalfa yield at near optimum pH levels ­ had a negative influence on yield at the very acid soil p

Balser, Teri C.

49

The Genetics of Some Polymorphic Forms of the Butterflies Heliconius melpomene (Linnaeus)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. erato (Linnaeus). II. The Hybridization of Subspecies of H. melpomene from Surinam and Trinidad.' (Plate between geographical races from Trinidad and central Suriname (South America). The differences between. The race from eastern Amazonia differs from that in central Suriname by an allele at the D locus

Mallet, James

50

The drought of 2010 in the context of historical droughts in the Amazon region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Amazonia during the wet and dry season. 2. Data and Methodology [5] The Global Precipitation Climatology in the previous wet season. Citation: Marengo, J. A., J. Tomasella, L. M. Alves, W. R. Soares, and D. A. Rodriguez CentreGPCC (orias.dwd.de/GPCC/) gaugebased gridded precipitation data set is available for the global

51

Evaluating climatic and soil water controls on evapotranspiration at two Amazonian rainforest sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demand and soil water availability between two sites; Manaus, in central Amazonia, where indicate that, in combination with other factors, heterogeneity in soil water retention capacity may exert strong controls on the spatial variation in forest responses to climatic change. # 2007 Elsevier B.V. All

52

Satellite Monitoring of the Brazilian Amazon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Symposium Foz do Iguaçu, November 4-7, 2008 #12;Context of Brazilian Amazonia Deforestation PRODES DETER PALSAR Amazon Deforestation Monitoring State of the Forest(logging and degradation) Summary #12;Context: The birth of a deforestation culture Brazilian original vegetation cover (IBGE) #12;Present population

53

ORIGINAL PAPER Ecophysiological traits of plant functional groups in forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from eastern Amazo^nia, Brazil Tomas F. Domingues ? Luiz A. Martinelli ? James R. Ehleringer Received pathway species) showed high instantaneous water use efficiency (Amax/gs@Amax), high photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (Amax/Narea), and high ratio of Amax to dark respiration (Amax/Rd). Among

Ehleringer, Jim

54

doi: 10.1098/rstb.2011.0053 , 3177-31953662011Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

over a tropical rainforest and over a nearby oil palm plantation in Sabah, Borneo. The primary to those measured previouslyover Amazonia. Compared with the Bornean rainforest, air over the oil palm, estragole, is prominent. Concentrations of nitrogen oxides are greater above the agro- industrial oil palm

55

Cross-Species Pathogen Transmission and Disease Emergence in Primates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their rapidly growing human populations, close proximity to apes, and population centers with high density and Ebola, are zoonotic, having shifted from wildlife populations. Critical questions for predicting disease is greatest. We find that central Africa and Amazonia are hotspots for cross-species transmission events

Pedersen, Amy B.

56

Phylogeny of the orchid bees (Hymenoptera: Apinae: Euglossini): DNA and morphology yield equivalent patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, USA b Coordenac?~ao de Pesquisas em Entomologia, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amaz^onia, Av supported phylogeny of Euglossini. ? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Corbiculate bees Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France. 1055-7903/$ - see front matter ? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights

Cameron, Sydney A.

57

doi: 10.1130/G30014A.1 2009;37;827-830Geology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an inferred Miocene marine incursion affecting areas from Colombia through Peru and Bolivia and into Argentina is essential to delineate the South American Seaway. In Bolivia, cor- responding strata of inferred marine Colombia through Peru (Amazonia) and Bolivia into Argentina (Paranan) during the Miocene. Several authors

58

The World of Dark Shadows Issue 27  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ok., 74145 . I'd also li ke to thank Ralph Snare and Karl Gri ff in for their research into the SPN rumor, as well. The episodes are still available, but the only place in the entire United States (to my knowl edQe ) to show any episodes dre... f ollowinQ sta tions and reQues tinq they put on DS : WBTS Channel 17, At la nta, Georqia, the ' suoerst ati on' (so cal l ed because bv cabl e it reaches ma ny par ts of the U. S. ) . Ma1lbaQ , 1018 W. Peacht ree. Atlanta, Ga . 303 09. Mike...

Multiple Contributors

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Alumni Council Membership List (June 1, 2011 May 31, 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adderton, A.B. '79, B.S.N. '05, M.S.N. '10 Joyce G. Rios, B.S.N. '05, D.N.P. '10 Representatives Terrance L.B.A. '95 John Clough, J.D. '99 TBD Kelly Sciba, B.S.C. '92 Larry King, Jr., A.B. '83, M.B.A. '93 Michael B. Waldron, B.S.I.T. '05 Representatives Phyllis E. Tyler, B.B.A. '80 Randy Cash, B.S. '81 Walter DiMarko, B

Miami, University of

60

Interview with Peter riviere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; part of that time spent in Brazil working on ranching communities of North Brazil; after this spent a year in Harvard as a visiting lecturer; then replaced Audrey Coulson for a year, during which time was appointed as an assistant lecturer in the social... really focus on? Unfortunately the only way one can get funding to work in Amazonia asking fundamental question is to dress it up as being something else; how does one feed Amazonian material into the wider anthropology? On the whole British...

Riviere, Peter

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "amazonia lba lba-eco" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DiFX: A software correlator for very long baseline interferometry using multi-processor computing environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the development of an FX style correlator for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), implemented in software and intended to run in multi-processor computing environments, such as large clusters of commodity machines (Beowulf clusters) or computers specifically designed for high performance computing, such as multi-processor shared-memory machines. We outline the scientific and practical benefits for VLBI correlation, these chiefly being due to the inherent flexibility of software and the fact that the highly parallel and scalable nature of the correlation task is well suited to a multi-processor computing environment. We suggest scientific applications where such an approach to VLBI correlation is most suited and will give the best returns. We report detailed results from the Distributed FX (DiFX) software correlator, running on the Swinburne supercomputer (a Beowulf cluster of approximately 300 commodity processors), including measures of the performance of the system. For example, to correlate all Stokes products for a 10 antenna array, with an aggregate bandwidth of 64 MHz per station and using typical time and frequency resolution presently requires of order 100 desktop-class compute nodes. Due to the effect of Moore's Law on commodity computing performance, the total number and cost of compute nodes required to meet a given correlation task continues to decrease rapidly with time. We show detailed comparisons between DiFX and two existing hardware-based correlators: the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) S2 correlator, and the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) correlator. In both cases, excellent agreement was found between the correlators. Finally, we describe plans for the future operation of DiFX on the Swinburne supercomputer, for both astrophysical and geodetic science.

A. T. Deller; S. J. Tingay; M. Bailes; C. West

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

62

LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS: THE IMPACT OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING CLUMPS ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND THE GLOBAL STRUCTURE OF YOUNG, FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the results of Hubble Space Telescope optical and UV imaging, Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and optical spectroscopy of a sample of 30 low-redshift (z approx 0.1 to 0.3) galaxies chosen from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer surveys to be accurate local analogs of the high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. The Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are similar in stellar mass, metallicity, dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), physical size, and gas velocity dispersion, thus enabling a detailed investigation of many processes that are important in star-forming galaxies at high redshift. The main optical emission-line properties of LBAs, including evidence for outflows, are also similar to those typically found at high redshift. This indicates that the conditions in their interstellar medium are comparable. In the UV, LBAs are characterized by complexes of massive clumps of star formation, while in the optical they most often show evidence for (post-)mergers and interactions. In six cases, we find a single extremely massive (up to several x10{sup 9} M{sub sun}) compact (radius approx10{sup 2} pc) dominant central object (DCO). The DCOs are preferentially found in LBAs with the highest mid-IR luminosities (L{sub 24m}u{sub m} = 10{sup 10.3}-10{sup 11.2} L{sub sun}) and correspondingly high SFRs (15-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}). We show that the massive star-forming clumps (including the DCOs) have masses much larger than the nuclear super star clusters seen in normal late-type galaxies. However, the DCOs do have masses, sizes, and densities similar to the excess light/central cusps seen in typical elliptical galaxies with masses similar to the LBA galaxies. We suggest that the DCOs form in the present-day examples of the dissipative mergers at high redshift that are believed to have produced the central cusps in local ellipticals (consistent with the disturbed optical morphologies of the LBAs). More generally, the properties of the LBAs are consistent with the idea that instabilities in a gas-rich disk lead to very massive star-forming clumps that eventually coalesce to form a spheroid. Finally, we comment on the apparent lack of energetically significant active galactic nuclei in the DCOs. We speculate that the DCOs are too young at present to grow a supermassive black hole because they are still in a supernova-dominated outflow phase (age less than 50 Myr).

Overzier, Roderik A. [Max-Planck-Institut for Astrophysics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heckman, Timothy M.; Ptak, Andy; Ford, Holland C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tremonti, Christy [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Basu-Zych, Antara [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago; Martin, D. Christopher [California Institute of Technology, MC 405-47, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, R. Michael [Deptartment of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, MC 2457, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Madore, Barry; Seibert, Mark, E-mail: overzier@mpa-garching.mpg.d [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z