Sample records for amazonia lba lba-eco

  1. Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Meso-scale eects of tropical deforestation in Amazonia: preparatory LBA modelling studies A. J forest is good, above deforested areas (pasture) poor. The models' underestimate of the temperature Modelling studies with general circulation models have shown that large-scale deforestation of the Amazon

  2. The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, R. James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia R.The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia. (Ais between sustainable and unsustainable development of the

  3. Deforestation Deforestation predictions for Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Amazon Deforestation Models Deforestation predictions for Amazonia presented by W. F. Laurance et deforestation. Much has already been said by the scientific community about their model--its apocalyptical ("Deforestation in Amazonia," 21 May 2004, p. 1109), blaming planned infrastructure and the land speculation

  4. Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia: History, Rates, and Consequences PHILIP M. FEARNSIDE Instituto of deforestation began with the inauguration of the Transamazon Highway in 1970. Amazonian deforestation rates have that make deforestation profitable. Forest degradation results from logging, ground fires (facilitated

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonia reveals neotropical Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    avoided deforestation, Brazil, carbon... , deforestation, global warming, Greenhouse effect, rainforest. INTRODUCTION AMAZONIA'S PRESENT ECONOMY... The present economy of...

  6. Beta diversity of frogs in the forests of New Guinea, Amazonia and Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Beta diversity of frogs in the forests of New Guinea, Amazonia and Europe are characterized by low beta diversity, both in tropical and in temperate areas. Location Lowland forests tracking. The community data were analysed for alpha and beta diversity. Results Local (alpha) diversity

  7. Do the recent severe droughts in the Amazonia have the same period of length?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Yong; Sampaio, Gilvan; Mário, Antônio; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new measure based on drought period length to assess the temporal difference between the recent two severe droughts of 2005 and 2010 in the Amazonia. The sensitivity of the measure is demonstrated by disclosing the distinct spatial responding mechanisms of the Northeastern and Southwestern Amazon (NA, SA) to the surrounding sea surface temperature (SST) variabilities. The Pacific and Atlantic oceans have different roles on the precipitation patterns in Amazonia. More specifically, the very dry periods in the NA are influenced by El Ni\\~no events, while the very dry periods in the SA are affected by the anomalously warming of the SST in the North Atlantic. We show convincingly that the drought 2005 hit SA, which is caused by the North Atlantic only. There are two phases in the drought 2010: (i) it was started in the NA in August 2009 affected by the El Ni\\~no event, and (ii) later shifted the center of action to SA resulted from anomalously high SST in North Atlantic, which further intensifies the...

  8. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 65236543, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/6523/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    de La Atmósfera, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria at the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experi- ment in Amazonia (LBA) flux towers. Two sites were stud- ied tower (located in a preserved region in the central Amazon). Anal- ysis was performed continuously from

  9. agrobacterium tumefaciens lba4404: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and an essential tool for plant research and transgenic crop production. Derek W. Wood; Joao C. Setubal; Rajinder Kaul; Dave E. Monks; Joao P. Kitajima; Vagner K. Okura; Yang...

  10. Improving Simulations of Convective Systems from TRMM LBA: Easterly and Westerly Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    ) experiment in Brazil. These two events epitomized the type of convective systems that formed in two a sheared low-level easterly wind flow. On 23 February 1999, convection developed in weak low-level westerly-scale models. A central objective of the Global Energy and Water-Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study

  11. Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    size analysis, in: Meth- ods in Soil Analysis, Part 1.and Mineralogical Meth- ods, American Society of Agronomysampling and laboratory meth- ods are given in Quesada et

  12. Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron/aluminium oxides as goethite, hematite and gibbsite (along with hematite, goethite and gibbsite. These soils areeventually turning into goethite. Eventually, Andosols may

  13. amazonia central amazonas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Walker, Robert T. 6 Four New Hypancistrus (Siluriformes: Loricariidae) from Amazonas, Venezuela Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Four New Hypancistrus...

  14. Soils of Amazonia with particular reference to the RAINFOR sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quesada, C. A; Lloyd, J.; Anderson, L. O; Fyllas, N. M; Schwarz, M.; Czimczik, C. I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    forests in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Peru, Ecuador andHypereutric, Rhodic) in Bolivia (HCC-22). reserve inHypereu- tric, Rhodic) in Bolivia (HCC-22), the only Nitisol

  15. Atmospheric aerosols in Amazonia and land use change: from natural biogenic to biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conditions Paulo Artaxo,*a Luciana V. Rizzo,b Joel F. Brito,a Henrique M. J. Barbosa,a Andrea Arana,a Elisa T

  16. Will Amazonia Dry Out? Magnitude and Causes of Change from IPCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    drying under global warming when the dry season southern Amazon basin is under the control of subtropical as a result of deforestation and land-use change. Should this direct human impact continue at present rates

  17. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  18. Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    Interactions between rainfall, deforestation and fires during recent years in the Brazilian and deforestation to explicitly quantify the seasonal patterns and relationships between these three variables per year for all variables analysed, except deforestation. For the annual cycle, we found correlations

  19. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008 Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitionsto atmospheric carbon emissions, including forest conversionthe major sources of emissions from fires in this region.

  20. Fire-related carbon emissions from land use transitions in southern Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and production of commodities such as soya and palm oil.production, including soya in Latin America [Morton et al. , 2006] and palm oil

  1. Seasonal differences in population-, ensemble-and community-level responses of bats to landscape structure in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    on time and energy as well as increased nutritional demands, foraging behavior and home range size may

  2. APPLYING CASE-BASED REASONING IN THE EVOLUTION OF DEFORESTATION PATTERNS IN THE BRAZILIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    APPLYING CASE-BASED REASONING IN THE EVOLUTION OF DEFORESTATION PATTERNS IN THE BRAZILIAN AMAZONIA, gilberto, leila, isabel, olga}@dpi.inpe.br ABSTRACT Patterns of deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia to establish rules and detect object deforestation evolution in an Amazonia region. The objects were analyzed

  3. UPb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite-enriched granite at Pitinga (Amazonia, Brazil): Evolution of the A-type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    U­Pb dating of the Madeira Suite and structural control of the albite- enriched granite at Pitinga of A-type magmatism and basin formation occurred. The albite-enriched granite emplacement occurred-enriched facies of Madeira granite (Madeira Suite) that is part of a NE­SW alignment of three granitic bodies

  4. Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of carbon from land-use change in Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    Wood density in forests of Brazil's `arc of deforestation': Implications for biomass and flux of deforestation'', where most of the carbon flux from land-use change takes place. This paper presents new wood of deforestation, using locally collected species weighted by their volume in large local inventories. Mean wood

  5. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and 0.6 m in diameter. The concentrations of OC and BC{sub e} varied diurnally during the dry period, and this variation is related to diurnal changes in boundary layer thickness and in fire frequency.

  6. Direct Comparison of Alfalfa Nitrogen Credits to Corn and Wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Station Ashland Ag Research Station #12;Alfalfa N credits to corn: · Infrequent fertilizer N responses Rate Aug Sep lb/a --------- bu/a --------- 15 48 48 35 55 43 55 52 51 75 62 49 Ashland, 2001

  7. Sic et non en el Libro de buen amor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinton, Melvin

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies the concept of sic et non (the paradox of systematically acting in a way which contradicts one's beliefs or of simultaneously holding two contradictory beliefs) in the LBA and its cultural milieu, ...

  8. adjacent amazonian flooded: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    38 Reducing uncertainty in predictions of the response of Amazonian forests to climate change Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Amazonia contains the largest...

  9. amazonian endemic area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Reducing uncertainty in predictions of the response of Amazonian forests to climate change Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Amazonia contains the largest...

  10. amazon basin peru: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric circulation across continents and hemispheres, and storing substantial reserves of biomass and soil carbon. Hence, the ongoing degradation of Amazonia is a...

  11. amazon sites exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric circulation across continents and hemispheres, and storing substantial reserves of biomass and soil carbon. Hence, the ongoing degradation of Amazonia is a...

  12. amazon basin brazil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric circulation across continents and hemispheres, and storing substantial reserves of biomass and soil carbon. Hence, the ongoing degradation of Amazonia is a...

  13. amazon central brazil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmospheric circulation across continents and hemispheres, and storing substantial reserves of biomass and soil carbon. Hence, the ongoing degradation of Amazonia is a...

  14. Aerosols in Amazonia: Natural biogenic particles and large scale biomass burning Paulo Artaxo, Henrique M. J. Barbosa, Luciana V. Rizzo, Joel F. Brito, Elisa T. Sena, Glauber G. Cirino, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Henrique

    , and Andrea Arana Citation: AIP Conference Proceedings 1527, 487 (2013); doi: 10.1063/1.4803311 View online

  15. Population growth, distribution, and size in Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    timber harvesting oil exploration/extraction population growth? degradation of lands in source areas history in Amazonia · Early extractive uses Rubber Forestry #12;Development history in Amazonia forests in the world 2) 45% of all the fresh water on the Earth 3) the planet's largest carbon sink 4

  16. Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    54 Chapter IV Image Mining: Detecting Deforestation Patterns Through Satellites Marcelino Pereira to analyze satellite images and extract knowledge from this kind of data. The Amazonia deforestation problem of change on deforested areas of Amazonia. The purpose of the authors is to present relevant technologies

  17. First VLBI observations of methanol maser polarisation, in G339.88-1.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Dodson

    2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate class II methanol masers and the environment in which they form with the Long Baseline Array (LBA). Using full polarisation VLBI, we're able to measure the magnetic field directions so as to distinguish between the two main models of the environment in which methanol masers form: disks or shocks. We present polarised images of the methanol maser source G339.88-1.2, made with the LBA at 6.7-GHz. With these first polarisation maps made with the LBA, which successfully reproduce observations with the ATCA confirming the new AIPS code, a new technique for Southern VLBI is opened. The magnetic field directions found are inconstant with methanol masers arising in disks for the majority of the emission.

  18. Amazonian Dark Earths: a case study in the Central Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebellato, Lilian

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation derives from research conducted over several years and contributes to the understanding of the differential occupational dynamics and use of space in pre-Colonial Amazonia. The goal of this study is to ...

  19. Pre-Columbian land use and human impact in the Bolivian Amazon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carson, John Francis

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a polarised debate amongst Neotropical archaeologists and ecologists over the extent of Pre-Columbian (pre-AD 1492) anthropogenic environmental impacts in Amazonia. While some maintain the old paradigm of ...

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as well as coarse particles such as fragments of plants and insects, pollen grains, algae, fern spores, and fungal spores in Amazonia and near Manaus; 2) develop new TEM...

  1. Phylogeny and comparative phylogeography of Sclerurus (Aves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuervo, Andrés

    constant and cryptic diversification in an old radiation of rain forest understorey specialists Fernando M (e.g. Nicaragua Depression, Isthmus of Panama, Andean Cordillera, great rivers of Amazonia

  2. Published online 11 February 2004 Concerted changes in tropical forest structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chave, Jérôme

    del Ecuador, Casilla 17-21-1787, Quito, Ecuador 9 CIFOR, Tapajos, Brazil 10 EMBRAPA Amazonia Oriental in incoming solar radiation, and increases in atmospheric concentrations of CO2 and air temperatures may have

  3. Phylogeography of the neotropical Anopheles triannulatus complex (Diptera: Culicidae) supports deep structure and complex patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amazonia + central Bolivia; Atlantic coastal lowland; ands.s. from southern Brazil, Bolivia and Argentina. In allAmazon, Paraguay and Bolivia [15,19,22,29,67]. Evidence of

  4. A regional climate model study of how biomass burning aerosol impacts land-atmosphere interactions over the Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Mian

    wind divergence in the southern Amazon and anomalous wind convergence over the equatorial western radiation, consequently changing the surface energy and water fluxes, the atmospheric thermo- dynamic, Rainfall, and Climate (LBA-SMOCC), Smoke/Sulfates, Clouds and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B), ground based

  5. Energy Accounting for District Heating and Cooling Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, J. A.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...2..?... St"""'. Pressure -psig Burner Pressure paig/B 2 0 Feed Water Temp _ Air temp. _ , Pull Load (.3) .(6. gf 7 Stack temp. __ lba. ata/ft 3 gas ..:.!i.QJ.6 7a/7b --L.1l!L Figure 11 '+/" COEFFIC.IEIlT OF PERFORMANCE CHILLER,L- 0 DATE...

  6. Parker, C. (2006) "Arkadian Landscapes". Rosetta 1: 10-21 http://www.rosetta.bham.ac.uk/Issue_01/Parker.htm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miall, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the LBA and EIA, although the 1990s saw a plethora of surveys take place which, due to their diachronic was the use of intensive, systematic and diachronic archaeological field survey, the use of which was readily survey undertaken by Roger Howell in the eastern plains6 (), but the majority of surveys in Arkadia were

  7. Hydrometeorology of the Amazon in ERA-40 ALAN K. BETTS AND JOHN H. BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    MARENGO CPTEC-INPE, Cachoeira Paulista, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil (Manuscript received 24 November 2004, in final and to quantify the energy and water cycle. LBA is a component of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), which has the aim of improving our ability to simulate both water and energy exchange processes

  8. MULTI-SCIENCE PUBLISHING CO. LTD. 5 Wates Way, Brentwood, Essex CM15 9TB, United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Edinburgh, EH9 3JN, UK ABSTRACT Biochar is the solid remains of organic material that has been heated to > 350°C in an oxygen-limited environment, frequently intended to be mixed with soils. Biochar usually-rich terra preta soils from Amazonia dating back #12;to the middle part of the 20th Century and earlier (e

  9. A STUDENT NEWSLETTER SPRING 2007VISIONS of Latin America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Infrastructure in South America: economic Development vs. Environment integration? 8 Un lustro sin Roberto Bolaño: The Articulation of Time, Space and Otherness 6 Amazonia and the Initiative for Integration of Regional at the University of Pittsburgh. The journal, sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS), is a venue

  10. Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajos National Forest, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of yield regulation options for primary forest in Tapajo´s National Forest, Brazil PaulJN, Scotland b Instituto do Homem e Meio Ambiente da Amazo^nia (IMAZON), CEP 66060-160 Bele´m, Brazil c Projeto Dendrogene, EMBRAPA, CEP 66095-100 Bele´m, Brazil Received 23 November 2005; received

  11. Satellite Monitoring of the Brazilian Amazon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symposium Foz do Iguaçu, November 4-7, 2008 #12;Context of Brazilian Amazonia Deforestation PRODES DETER PALSAR Amazon Deforestation Monitoring State of the Forest(logging and degradation) Summary #12;Context: The birth of a deforestation culture Brazilian original vegetation cover (IBGE) #12;Present population

  12. Advances in Geosciences, 6, 189193, 2006 SRef-ID: 1680-7359/adgeo/2006-6-189

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as the Brazilian Northeast, Amazonia, South of Brazil and Uruguay. Over 80% of Brazil's energy comes from America. More than 80% of Brazil's energy is provided from hydropower generation. Decisions relating, South of Brazil, Uruguay and northeastern Argentina. Sea surface temperature (SST) positive anoma- lies

  13. doi: 10.1130/G30014A.1 2009;37;827-830Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an inferred Miocene marine incursion affecting areas from Colombia through Peru and Bolivia and into Argentina is essential to delineate the South American Seaway. In Bolivia, cor- responding strata of inferred marine Colombia through Peru (Amazonia) and Bolivia into Argentina (Paranan) during the Miocene. Several authors

  14. Salvia sp.? 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Wilson

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    de analisis para Ilegar al fondo de las discusiones teologicas. Dando por supuesta la fe corno sine qua non de la condicion cristiana, Abelardo cree necesario que el hombre vea apoyada su fe por la razon humana (McCallum 104, 105); Quiere conciliar... de Cristo" y la volveremos a encontrar en el LBA. A partir del siglo doce y durante los siglos trece y catorce observamos una intelectualidad que lucha entre su apego a la fe recibida y el deseo de algunos de cumplir con el mandato de San Pablo de...

  15. Alumni Council Membership List (June 1, 2011 May 31, 2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Adderton, A.B. '79, B.S.N. '05, M.S.N. '10 Joyce G. Rios, B.S.N. '05, D.N.P. '10 Representatives Terrance L.B.A. '95 John Clough, J.D. '99 TBD Kelly Sciba, B.S.C. '92 Larry King, Jr., A.B. '83, M.B.A. '93 Michael B. Waldron, B.S.I.T. '05 Representatives Phyllis E. Tyler, B.B.A. '80 Randy Cash, B.S. '81 Walter DiMarko, B

  16. i i 'i i WWW--i i http://www.icmp.lviv.ua/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    + KAB (0) cos A cos B , ( = ) . (5) i i i, x,y,z l , i x lA|x lA = iEA y lA|x lA - i z A n JAB ln + JBA nl y nB|x lA , y lA|x lA = -i 2 ll z A - iEA y lA|x lA + i z A n LAB ln + LBA nl x nB|x l

  17. The World of Dark Shadows Issue 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Ok., 74145 . I'd also li ke to thank Ralph Snare and Karl Gri ff in for their research into the SPN rumor, as well. The episodes are still available, but the only place in the entire United States (to my knowl edQe ) to show any episodes dre... f ollowinQ sta tions and reQues tinq they put on DS : WBTS Channel 17, At la nta, Georqia, the ' suoerst ati on' (so cal l ed because bv cabl e it reaches ma ny par ts of the U. S. ) . Ma1lbaQ , 1018 W. Peacht ree. Atlanta, Ga .• 303 09. Mike...

  18. The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

  19. First Parallax Measurements Towards a 6.7 GHz Methanol Maser with the Australian Long Baseline Array - Distance to G339.884-1.259

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, V; Reid, M J; Brunthaler, A; Sanna, A; McCallum, J; Reynolds, C; Bignall, H E; Phillips, C J; Dodson, R; Rioja, M; Caswell, J L; Chen, X; Dawson, J R; Fujisawa, K; Goedhart, S; Green, J A; Hachisuka, K; Honma, M; Menten, K; Shen, Z Q; Voronkov, M A; Walsh, A J; Xu, Y; Zhang, B; Zheng, X W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted the first parallax and proper motion measurements of 6.7 GHz methanol maser emission using the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA). The parallax of G339.884$-$1.259 measured from five epochs of observations is 0.48$\\pm $0.08 mas, corresponding to a distance of $2.1^{+0.4}_{-0.3}$ kpc, placing it in the Scutum spiral arm. This is consistent (within the combined uncertainty) with the kinematic distance estimate for this source at 2.5$\\pm $0.5 kpc using the latest Solar and Galactic rotation parameters. We find from the Lyman continuum photon flux that the embedded core of the young star is of spectral type B1, demonstrating that luminous 6.7 GHz methanol masers can be associated with high-mass stars towards the lower end of the mass range.

  20. DiFX: A software correlator for very long baseline interferometry using multi-processor computing environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Deller; S. J. Tingay; M. Bailes; C. West

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the development of an FX style correlator for Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), implemented in software and intended to run in multi-processor computing environments, such as large clusters of commodity machines (Beowulf clusters) or computers specifically designed for high performance computing, such as multi-processor shared-memory machines. We outline the scientific and practical benefits for VLBI correlation, these chiefly being due to the inherent flexibility of software and the fact that the highly parallel and scalable nature of the correlation task is well suited to a multi-processor computing environment. We suggest scientific applications where such an approach to VLBI correlation is most suited and will give the best returns. We report detailed results from the Distributed FX (DiFX) software correlator, running on the Swinburne supercomputer (a Beowulf cluster of approximately 300 commodity processors), including measures of the performance of the system. For example, to correlate all Stokes products for a 10 antenna array, with an aggregate bandwidth of 64 MHz per station and using typical time and frequency resolution presently requires of order 100 desktop-class compute nodes. Due to the effect of Moore's Law on commodity computing performance, the total number and cost of compute nodes required to meet a given correlation task continues to decrease rapidly with time. We show detailed comparisons between DiFX and two existing hardware-based correlators: the Australian Long Baseline Array (LBA) S2 correlator, and the NRAO Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) correlator. In both cases, excellent agreement was found between the correlators. Finally, we describe plans for the future operation of DiFX on the Swinburne supercomputer, for both astrophysical and geodetic science.

  1. LOCAL LYMAN BREAK GALAXY ANALOGS: THE IMPACT OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING CLUMPS ON THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM AND THE GLOBAL STRUCTURE OF YOUNG, FORMING GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overzier, Roderik A. [Max-Planck-Institut for Astrophysics, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Heckman, Timothy M.; Ptak, Andy; Ford, Holland C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tremonti, Christy [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Armus, Lee [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Basu-Zych, Antara [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goncalves, Thiago; Martin, D. Christopher [California Institute of Technology, MC 405-47, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, R. Michael [Deptartment of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States); Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, MC 2457, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Madore, Barry; Seibert, Mark, E-mail: overzier@mpa-garching.mpg.d [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the results of Hubble Space Telescope optical and UV imaging, Spitzer mid-IR photometry, and optical spectroscopy of a sample of 30 low-redshift (z approx 0.1 to 0.3) galaxies chosen from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Galaxy Evolution Explorer surveys to be accurate local analogs of the high-redshift Lyman break galaxies. The Lyman break analogs (LBAs) are similar in stellar mass, metallicity, dust extinction, star formation rate (SFR), physical size, and gas velocity dispersion, thus enabling a detailed investigation of many processes that are important in star-forming galaxies at high redshift. The main optical emission-line properties of LBAs, including evidence for outflows, are also similar to those typically found at high redshift. This indicates that the conditions in their interstellar medium are comparable. In the UV, LBAs are characterized by complexes of massive clumps of star formation, while in the optical they most often show evidence for (post-)mergers and interactions. In six cases, we find a single extremely massive (up to several x10{sup 9} M{sub sun}) compact (radius approx10{sup 2} pc) dominant central object (DCO). The DCOs are preferentially found in LBAs with the highest mid-IR luminosities (L{sub 24m}u{sub m} = 10{sup 10.3}-10{sup 11.2} L{sub sun}) and correspondingly high SFRs (15-100 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}). We show that the massive star-forming clumps (including the DCOs) have masses much larger than the nuclear super star clusters seen in normal late-type galaxies. However, the DCOs do have masses, sizes, and densities similar to the excess light/central cusps seen in typical elliptical galaxies with masses similar to the LBA galaxies. We suggest that the DCOs form in the present-day examples of the dissipative mergers at high redshift that are believed to have produced the central cusps in local ellipticals (consistent with the disturbed optical morphologies of the LBAs). More generally, the properties of the LBAs are consistent with the idea that instabilities in a gas-rich disk lead to very massive star-forming clumps that eventually coalesce to form a spheroid. Finally, we comment on the apparent lack of energetically significant active galactic nuclei in the DCOs. We speculate that the DCOs are too young at present to grow a supermassive black hole because they are still in a supernova-dominated outflow phase (age less than 50 Myr).

  2. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  3. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries. Volume 2, Greenhouse gas emissions from deforestration in the Brazilian Amazon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. [eds.] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fearnside, P.M. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as ``committed carbon,`` or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil`s use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  4. Primary and secondary organics in tropical Amazonian rainforest aerosols: Chiral analysis of 2-methyltetrols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, Nelida; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Artaxo, Paulo; Guenther, Alex B.; Krejci, R.; Noziere, Barbara; Noone, Kevin

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the application of a newly developed method to facilitate the distinction between primary and secondary organic compounds in ambient aerosols based on their chiral analysis. The organic constituents chosen for chiral analysis are the four stereomers of the 2-methyltetrols, (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol. Ambient PM10 aerosol samples were collected between June 2008 and June 2009 near Manaus, Brazil, in a remote tropical rainforest environment of central Amazonia. The samples were analyzed for the presence of these four stereomers because qualitatively, in a previous study, they have been demonstrated to have partly primary origins. Thus the origin of these compounds may be primary and secondary from the biosynthesis and oxidation processes of isoprene within plants and also in the atmosphere. Using authentic standards, the quantified concentrations were in average 78.2 and 72.8 ng m-3 for (2R,3S)- and (2S,3R)- methylerythritol and 3.1 and 3.3 ng m-3 for (2S,3S)- and (2R,3R)- methylthreitol during the dry season and 7.1, 6.5, 2.0, and 2.2 ng m-3 during the wet season, respectively. Furthermore, these compounds were found to be outside the confidence interval for racemic mixtures (enantiomeric fraction, Ef = 0.5 -0.01) in nearly all the samples, with deviations of up to 32 % (Ef = 0.61) for (2R,3S)-methylerythritol and 47 % (Ef = 0.65) for (2S,3S)-methylthreitol indicating (99% confidence level) biologically-produced 2-methyltetrols. The minimum primary origin contribution ranged between 0.19 and 29.67 ng m-3 for the 2-methylerythritols and between 0.15 and 1.2 ng m-3 for the 2-methylthreitols. The strong correlation of the diatereomers (racemic 2-methylerythritol and 2-methylthreitol) in the wet season implied a secondary origin. Assuming the maximum secondary contribution in the dry season, the secondary fraction in the wet season was 81-99 % and in the dry season, 10 - 95 %. Nevertheless, from the total 2-methyltetrol mass, the secondary mass represented 31 % whereas the primary 69 %. These results could have been expected for PM10 aerosols and might be different for fine particles at the same site. In addition, correlations with isoprene emission estimates for this site only showed an anti-correlation with 2-methylthreitol suggesting their direct emission from biological activity. The present study reinforces the importance of the analysis of chiral organic compounds to correctly assess the contribution of primary biogenic emissions and isoprene oxidation products to biogenic secondary organic aerosol.