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Sample records for amar mann phyllis

  1. Phyllis Yoshida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dr. Phyllis Yoshida is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Asia and the Americas in the Office of International Affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). She is responsible for implementing...

  2. Mann 3600 Pattern Generator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mann 3600 Pattern Generator Description: The GCA Mann 3600 pattern generator is designed for patterning standard 5" x 5" mask plates for use in optical lithography. Pattern designs are created in AutoCAD. The AutoCAD file is then converted into binary format, which can be fractured into data read by the pattern generator. The illumination source for exposures is a high pressure Hg arc lamp. The light is filtered and projected onto a shutter, which controls the exposure dose. A set of

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Margaret Mann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Hydrogen Production from Renewable Electricity Sources: Preprint. 9 pp.; NREL Report No. CP-560-37612. Curran, M. A.; Mann, M.; Norris, G. (2005). "International ...

  4. Mann Naturenergie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biofuels, Renewable Energy Product: Mann Naturenergie is engaged in renewable energy production and distribution. It offers biofuels like wood chips, wood briquettes or...

  5. Murray Gell-Mann, the Eightfold Way, Quarks, and Quantum Chromodynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interview with Murray Gell-Mann, Caltech Murray Gell-Mann On Emergence (video) 2005 Albert Einstein Medal Murray Gell-Mann 1929 - , PBS Murray Gell-Mann, Emory University...

  6. Gregory Mann | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gregory Mann Previous Next List Mann Formerly: PhD Student Presently: Distributed Systems Engineer at Mesosphere, San Francisco BA in Music & English, Oberlin College, USA EFRC...

  7. David Amaral

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    David is the DOE Facility Chairperson for the Eisenhower School for National Security and Resource Strategy. David has over 25 years of human resources experience and has served in a variety of...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - mann2004session2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology April 20, 2004 2004 High Performance Computing Conference Salishan Lodge, Oregon Reinhold Mann Associate Laboratory Director, Biological and Environmental Sciences Oak Ridge National Laboratory The Computing Barometer GTL Facilities Planning Initiated 2003 Initiated GTL Program 2002 Joint Genome Institute formed 1999 Started Microbial Genome Program 1994 First complete microbe (M. genitalium) 1994 Initiated the Human Genome Project 1986 Created first DNA sequence database 1979 Computing

  9. Murray Gell-Mann, the Eightfold Way, Quarks, and Quantum Chromodynamic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Michael Riordan, "The Hunting of the Quark" Although he is a theoretical physicist, ... Murray Gell-Mann is author of the popular science book, The Quark and the Jaguar, ...

  10. Murry Gell-Mann, 1966 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Murry Gell-Mann, 1966 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1960's Murry Gell-Mann, 1966 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physic: For his contributions

  11. Dilaton field minimally coupled to 2+1 gravity; uniqueness of the static Chan-Mann black hole and new dilaton stationary metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    García-Diaz, Alberto A.

    2014-01-14

    Using the Schwarzschild coordinate frame for a static cyclic symmetric metric in 2+1 gravity coupled minimally to a dilaton logarithmically depending on the radial coordinate in the presence of an exponential potential, by solving first order linear Einstein equations, the general solution is derived and it is identified with the Chan–Mann dilaton solution. In these coordinates, a new stationary dilaton solution is obtained; it does not allow for a de Sitter–Anti-de Sitter limit at spatial infinity, where its structural functions increase indefinitely. On the other hand, it is horizonless and allows for a naked singularity at the origin of coordinates; moreover, one can identify at a large radial coordinate a (quasi-local) mass parameter and in the whole space a constant angular momentum. Via a general SL(2,R)–transformation, applied on the static cyclic symmetric metric, a family of stationary dilaton solutions has been generated. A particular SL(2,R)–transformation is identified, which gives rise to the rotating Chan–Mann dilaton solution. All the exhibited solutions have been characterized by their quasi-local energy, mass, and momentum through their series expansions at spatial infinity. The algebraic structure of the Ricci–energy-momentum, and Cotton tensors is given explicitly.

  12. Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paula Carmody Maryland People's Council Paul Centolella Centolella and Associates LLC Carlos Coe Millennium Energy Phyllis Currie Pasadena Water and Power Clark Gellings Electric ...

  13. Pieridae Energy (USA) Ltd. FE Dkt. No. 14-179-LNG | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Comment 129 292015 Laura Kaye Comment 130 292015 Marion Wheeler Comment 131 292015 Phyllis Campbell Comment 132 292015 Warren Ondras Comment 133 292015 Robert Douglas, ...

  14. Doe's Race to the top initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Sonny Popowsky * Vice-Chair: Bob Curry * Working Group Members: Ralph Cavanagh, Sue Kelly, Paul Centolella, Dian Grueneich, Val Jensen, Paul Hudson, Phyllis Reha, Ralph...

  15. Manufacturing Process Modeling of 100-400 kWe Combined Heat and Power Stationary Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Joshua A; Das, Sujit; Zhang, Wei

    2012-07-01

    Both technical reviewers are external and Phyllis Daley is serving as proxy. A non-disclosure form is not needed for this report.

  16. NW Aluminum Industry Study (contracts/subscription)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (44 kb) MSWord Version (74 kb) Archive of content originally provided by: Phyllis Dowty, BPA Power Business Line. Content currently provided by: PBL Requirements Marketing - PS...

  17. EERE Success Story-Expanding Solar Access to Nonprofits | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Expanding Solar Access to Nonprofits EERE Success Story-Expanding Solar Access to Nonprofits April 28, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser kicks off the redevelopment of the Phyllis Wheatley YWCA at a “wall-breaking” ceremony. | Photo courtesy of The Solar Foundation Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser kicks off the redevelopment of the Phyllis Wheatley YWCA at a "wall-breaking" ceremony. | Photo courtesy of The Solar Foundation The Phyllis

  18. 2014 Annual Merit Review, Vehicle Technologies Office - Appendix...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charles Alsup U.S. Department of Energy Delgermaa Altantuya Securing America's Future Energy Pascal Amar Volvo Group North America Ruhul Amin Massachusetts Institute of...

  19. RR Participacoes SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    company formed by Ricardo Delneri and Renato Amaral, controller of the Renova Energia company. References: RR Participacoes SA1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  20. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SuperTruck Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle Vehicle Systems DOE Contract: DE-EE0004232 P.I.: Pascal Amar, Volvo Technology of America 2012 ...

  1. Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency Improvement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon ace060amar2013o.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  2. https://bluedart.phe.com/owa/?ae=Item&t=IPM.Note&id=RgAAAAA%2f3

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Phyllis Radack Manager, Regulatory Services 702-295-6582 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 ...idRgAAAAA%2f3mOqqZ%2bfSq... 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 (fax) From: Morris, Patrick ...

  3. Researchers | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feng Jie Feng Flaig Robinson W. Flaig Fordham Stephen ... Alices Koniges Krishna Krishna David Luebke David Luebke ... Yangyang Liu Mann Gregory Mann Martin Richard Luis Martin ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Idle Reduction Grants The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources Division of Air Quality provides grants for the incremental cost of original equipment manufacturer alternative fuel vehicles, vehicle conversions, and implementing idle reduction programs. Funding is not currently available for this incentive (verified August 2016). For more information see the Diesel Emission Reductions Grants website. Point of Contact Phyllis Jones Environmental Engineer North

  5. Overview of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Dr. Phyllis Yoshida, Director FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership A prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable. Specifically, an energy future where: ... Our cars and trucks will be more efficient and will be powered by a variety of clean domestic fuels and technologies that free us from dependence on foreign supplies of energy. The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vision EERE'S # 1 Priority Dramatically reduce

  6. 1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Trend analysis was conducted using the Mann-Kendall test; however, it is not clear that ... The Mann Kendall test does not consider seasonal variability, but an analysis using the ...

  7. PPL Electric Alternative Energy Credit RFP | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PPL Electric Alternative Energy Credit RFP Home > Groups > Renewable Energy RFPs Whitney.mann's picture Submitted by Whitney.mann(5) Member 6 March, 2015 - 08:05 PPL Electric RFP...

  8. Volvo Super Truck Overview and Approach | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volvo Super Truck Overview and Approach Volvo Super Truck Overview and Approach Provides overview and discusses approach of the Volvo Super Truck Team to develop a number of advanced technologies to significantly improve freight efficiency of long-haul trucks deer11_amar.pdf (936.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Impact of Vehicle Efficiency Improvements on Powertrain Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Volvo SuperTruck - Powertrain Technologies for Efficiency

  9. LA-13859-MS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13859-MS Issued: September 2001 Nevada Test Site Radionuclide Inventory, 1951-1992 Scott M. Bowen David L. Finnegan Joseph L. Thompson Charles M. Miller (Deceased) Phyllis L. Baca Loretta F. Olivas Carmen G. Geoffrion David K. Smith* Wataru Goishi* Bradley K. Esser* Jesse W. Meadows* Neil Namboodiri* John F. Wild* *Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550-9234 Los Alamos N A T I O N A L L A B O R A T O R Y Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 Nevada Test Site

  10. Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies EGS presentation by Caroline Mann on May 7, 2012 PDF icon gtpegstechanalysis05-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  11. The Columbia River System Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Agency Valley) Juntura (Warmsprings) Mahon s Reservoir Harper Bully Creek Deadwood Harry Nelson Mann Creek Mason Dam (Phillips Lake) Thief Valley Non-Federal with Power Owyhee...

  12. The Columbia River System: Inside Story

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Agency Valley) Juntura (Warmsprings) Mahon's Reservoir Harper Bully Creek Deadwood Harry Nelson Mann Creek Mason Dam (Phillips Lake) Thief Valley Non-Federal with Power Owyhee...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    I. ; Duda, A. ; Glick, S. ; Kanevce, A. June 2013 Reflection Optimization for Alternative Thin-Film Photovoltaics Mann, J. ; Li, J. ; Repins, I. ; Ramanathan, K. ; Glynn, S. ;...

  14. Institute for Advanced Study Christine Di Bella Institute for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    driven research in the sciences and humanities. Diverse schol- ars including Albert Einstein, Erwin Panofsky, John von Neu- mann, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Freeman Dyson,...

  15. Hydrogen Resource Assessment: Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60-42773 February 2009 Hydrogen Resource Assessment Hydrogen Potential from Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, and Hydro Power Anelia Milbrandt and Margaret Mann National Renewable Energy...

  16. Clouds, Aerosols, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Stemmler, Jayson ; de Szoeke, Simone ; Yuter, Sandra ; Miller, Matthew ; Mechem, David ; Tselioudis, George ; Chiu, J. Christine ; Mann, Julian A. L. ; O'Connor, Ewan J. ; ...

  17. Clouds, aerosol, and precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jayson 1 ; deSzoeke, S. 5 ; Yuter, Sandra 6 ; Miller, Matthew 6 ; Mechem, David 7 ; Tselioudis, George 3 ; Chiu, Christine 8 ; Mann, Julia 8 ; O Connor, ...

  18. Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Jin, M. ; Krauss, C. B. ; Lafrenire, M. ; Laurin, M. ; Lawson, I. ; Leblanc, A. ; Levine, I. ; Lippincott, W. H. ; Mann, E. ; Martin, J. P. ; Maurya, D. ; Mitra, P. ; Olson, ...

  19. Dark matter search results from the PICO-60 CF 3 I bubble chamber...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Harris, O. ; Jin, M. ; Krauss, C. B. ; Lafrenire, M. ; Laurin, M. ; Lawson, I. ; Levine, I. ; Lippincott, W. H. ; Mann, E. ; Maurya, D. ; Mitra, P. ; Neilson, R. ; Noble, A. ...

  20. Dark matter search results from the PICO-60 CF3I bubble chamber...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C. ; Harris, O. ; Jin, M. ; Krauss, C. B. ; Lafreniere, M. ; Laurin, M. ; Lawson, I. ; Levine, I. ; Lippincott, W. H. ; Mann, E. ; Maurya, D. ; Mitra, Pitam ; Neilson, R. ; Noble, ...

  1. PICASSO, COUPP and PICO - Search for dark matter with bubble...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Jackson, C. M. ; Jin, M. ; Krauss, C. ; Lafrenire, M. ; Laurin, M. ; Lawson, I. ; Levine, I. ; Lippincott, W. H. ; Mann, E. ; Martin, J. P. ; Maurya, D. ; Mitra, P. ; Neilson, ...

  2. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting vss081_amar_2012_o.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Volvo SuperTruck Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Volvo SuperTruck SuperTruck

  3. Ventilation System to Improve Savannah River Site's Liquid Waste Operations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Volvo SuperTruck Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: Volvo SuperTruck Presentation given by Volvo Trucks at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle Systems vs081_amar_2016_o_web.pdf (1.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Volvo SuperTruck Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: SuperTruck Program: Engine

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Volvo SuperTruck |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy SuperTruck Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Volvo SuperTruck Presentation given by Volvo Trucks at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Volvo SuperTruck. vss081_amar_2015_o.pdf (2.12 MB) More Documents & Publications SuperTruck … Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Tractor & Trailer Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Volvo

  5. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... to develop these pieces, 5 we'll want to test that out to make a 6 determination at that ... -- it just doesn't pass the laugh 6 test is what Alan Mann would say. 7 So what ...

  6. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for: All records 1 results for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Miller, ... Luke, Ed (1) Mann, Julia (1) Mechem, David (1) Miller, Mark (1) Miller, Matthew (1) Min, ...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kollias, Pavlos (1) Lin, Yanluan (1) Luke, Ed (1) Mann, Julia (1) Mechem, David (1) Miller, Mark (1) Miller, Matthew (1) Min, Qilong (1) Minnis, Patrick (1) O Connor, Ewan (1) ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lin, Yanluan (1) Luke, Ed (1) Mann, Julia (1) Mechem, David (1) Mechem, David B. (1) Miller, Mark (1) Miller, Matthew (1) Min, Qilong (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit ...

  9. March 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to Synthesis Gas Steven F. Rice; David P. Mann (2007) 38 Geothermal Well Stimulation Campbell, D. A.; Morris, C. W.; Sinclair, A. R.; Hanold, R. J.; Vetter, O. J. (1981) 33 Life ...

  10. Microsoft Word - S07699_VMR

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... using the Visual Sampling Plan (VSP) software developed by the U.S. Department of ... was performed using the Mann-Kendall test and DOE's VSP software (http:vsp.pnl.gov). ...

  11. September 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Renewable Energy Sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    F. Rice; David P. Mann (2007) 102 Development of the helical reaction hydraulic turbine. ... T.F. (1977) 54 ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND ...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chin, M. (2) Diehl, T. (2) Ghan, S. J. (2) Iversen, T. (2) Kirkevg, A. (2) Koch, D. (2) Liu, X. (2) Mann, G. W. (2) Penner, J. E. (2) Schulz, M. (2) Seland, . (2) Skeie, R. B. ...

  13. Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential for Hydrogen Production from Key Renewable Resources in the United States A. Milbrandt and M. Mann Technical Report NRELTP-640-41134 February 2007 NREL is operated by...

  14. Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Leblanc, A. ; Levine, I. ; Lippincott, W. H. ; Mann, E. ; Martin, J. P. ; Maurya, D. ; Mitra, P. ; Olson, S. ; Neilson, R. ; Noble, A. J. ; Plante, A. ; Podviianiuk, R. B. ; Priya, ...

  15. Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels: September 2014 | OSTI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Explosions Nordyke, M.D. (2000) 27 Life Cycle Assessment of Coal-fired Power Production Spath, P. L.; Mann, M. K.; Kerr, D. R. (1999) 25 Evaluation of ...

  16. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (1994) 29 Life Cycle Assessment of Coal-fired Power Production Spath, P. L.; Mann, ... AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja (1997) 23 ...

  17. Abstract

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SAND2007-2331 Unlimited Release Printed April 2007 Autothermal Reforming of Natural Gas to Synthesis Gas Reference: KBR Paper 2031 Steven F. Rice and David P. Mann Prepared by ...

  18. Flash Updates of GSC projects (GSC8 Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glockner, Frank Oliver; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cole, James

    2009-09-09

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. In quick succession Frank Oliver Glockner (MPI-Bremen), Victor Markowitz (LBNL), Nikos Kyripides (JGI), Folker Meyer (ANL), Linda Amaral-Zettler (Marine Biology Lab), and James Cole (Michigan State University) provide updates on a number of topics related to GSC projects at the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  19. Flash Updates of GSC projects (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Glockner, Frank Oliver; Markowitz, Victor; Kyrpides, Nikos; Meyer, Folker; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Cole, James

    2011-04-29

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding Research Coordination Network from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. In quick succession Frank Oliver Glockner (MPI-Bremen), Victor Markowitz (LBNL), Nikos Kyripides (JGI), Folker Meyer (ANL), Linda Amaral-Zettler (Marine Biology Lab), and James Cole (Michigan State University) provide updates on a number of topics related to GSC projects at the Genomic Standards Consortium 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009.

  20. Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Analysis Activities at National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presentation on NREL's analysis activities to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004. 12_nrel_mann.pdf (2.09 MB) More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Analysis Planning, Budget, and Analysis Analysis Activities at Lawrence Livermore

  1. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. NREL: Energy Analysis - Technology Systems Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Systems Analysis NREL's Technology Systems Analysis examines RD&D areas in terms of potential costs, benefits, risks, uncertainties, and timeframes. The following pages provide information on specific technology areas: Biomass Building Electric Infrastructure Systems Energy Sciences Geothermal Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Solar Vehicles and Fuels Research Wind Key staff analyst Summary bios of staff expertise and interests Team Lead: Margaret Mann Administrative Support: Catherine

  3. ANNUAL SUMMARY OF THE INTEGRATED DISPOSAL FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F M

    2005-02-09

    As required by the US. Department of Energy (DOE) order on radioactive waste management (DOE 1999a) and as implemented by the ''Maintenance Plan for the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment'' (Mann 2004), an annual summary of the adequacy of the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste Performance Assessment (ILAW PA) is necessary in each year in which a performance assessment is not issued. A draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA was sent to the DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ) in April 2001 for review and approval. The DOE approved (DOE 2001) the draft version of the 2001 ILAW PA and issued a new version of the Hanford Site waste disposal authorization statement (DAS). Based on comments raised during the review, the draft version was revised and the 2001 ILAW PA was formally issued (Mann et al. 2001). The DOE (DOE 2003a) has reviewed the final 2001 ILAW PA and concluded that no changes to the DAS were necessary. Also as required by the DOE order, annual summaries have been generated and approved. The previous annual summary (Mann 2003b) noted the change of mission from ILAW disposal to the disposal of a range of solid waste types, including ILAW. DOE approved the annual summary (DOE 2003c), noting the expanded mission. Considering the results of data collection and analysis, the conclusions of the 2001 ILAW PA remain valid as they pertain to ILAW disposal. The new data also suggest that impacts from the disposal of the other solid waste will be lower than initially estimated in the ''Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment'' (Mann 2003a). A performance assessment for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) will be issued in the summer of 2005.

  4. Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies EGS presentation by Caroline Mann on May 7, 2012 gtp_egs_tech_analysis05-2012.pdf (327.3 KB) More Documents & Publications Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Water Use in the Development and Operations of Geothermal Power Plants Seismicity Protocol

  5. Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    www.energy.gov Preliminary Environmental Assessment and Analysis of EGS Technologies May 7, 2012 - Westminster, CO Caroline Mann Environmental Stewardship Group EERE-HQ 2 www.energy.gov Agenda * Environmental Strategic Plan * Phased approach * Phase 1 results to date * Induced seismicity mitigation measures * Request for feedback * Contacts 3 www.energy.gov * National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance has the potential to be a critical path activity for EGS implementation * DOE

  6. Hydrogenation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogenation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes A. Nikitin1), H. Ogasawara1) D. Mann2), R. Denecke1)*, Z. Zhang3), H. Dai2), KJ Cho3), A. Nilsson1,4) 1Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA 2Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 3Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 4FYSIKUM, Stockholm University, Albanova University Center, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden In the next 20

  7. Surprise Valley Electrification Corp. Recovery Act: Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric &

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Surprise Valley Electrification Corp. Recovery Act: Rural Cooperative Geothermal Development Electric & Agriculture DE-EE0003006 Final Scientific Report Principal Investigator: E. Lynn Culp Team Members: Brad Kresge, General Manager Jane Eaton, Finance Manager SVEC Board of Directors Jeff Mann & Chun Chin, POWER Engineers Roy Mink, Geologist Silvio Pezzopane, Geologist January 12, 2016 Table of Contents Executive Summary 4 Project Objectives 6 Sustainable and Reliable Competitively

  8. Conjecture on the physical implications of the scale anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Christopher T.; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Murray Gell-Mann, after co-inventing QCD, recognized the interplay of the scale anomaly, the renormalization group, and the origin of the strong scale, {Lambda}{sub QCD}. I tell a story, then elaborate this concept, and for the sake of discussion, propose a conjecture that the physical world is scale invariant in the classical, {h_bar}, limit. This principle has implications for the dimensionality of space-time, the cosmological constant, the weak scale, and Planck scale.

  9. Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels: September 2014 | OSTI, US Dept of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels: September 2014 Generalized displacement correlation method for estimating stress intensity factors Fu, P; Johnson, S M; Settgast, R R; Carrigan, C R (2011) 138 Autothermal Reforming of Natural Gas to Synthesis Gas Steven F. Rice; David P. Mann (2007) 51 Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United

  10. S A V A N N A H R I V E R S I T E

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excerpts from "Strengthening Energy Security through Federal Partnerships" 67 ENE RGY The Military Engineer * No. 676 The need to shrink depen dence on fos- sil fuels is not a new conce pt in the na- tion's energy discus sion, nor is the need to invest in clean, renew able energy . But the challe nge of how to deliver solar, bioma ss, wind, wave, geothe rmal and other power genera tion techno logies in a cost effecti ve, large-s cale mann er-an d meet the chang - ing energy deman ds of

  11. BCC: S. R. Sapirle, OROO, w/en-d.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :L tYf f ra-j' ,.... "!(.. *, :., :: :-: i. .,.,I ,.I: --i r - ..- BCC: S. R. Sapirle, OROO, w/en-d. M. hf. Mann, ms, w/end.. D. F. Ituser, NMM, w/end. J. C. Eym, FIN, w/end.. (2) L. Hyxiema~, CGC, w/end,. H. Steele, CA, w/ad. Docket File, w/encl. Dlvieion of Civflien Application SPECIAL NUCLEAA MATEAIAL LICENSE Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 70, "Special Nuclear Material Regulations," 0. license is hereby

  12. Review of cost estimates for reducing CO2 emissions. Final report, Task 9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    Since the ground breaking work of William Nordhaus in 1977, cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions have been developed by numerous groups. The various studies have reported sometimes widely divergent cost estimates for reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. Some recent analyses have indicated that large reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions could be achieved at zero or negative costs (e.g. Rocky Mountain Institute 1989). In contrast, a recent study by Alan Manne of Stanford and Richard Richels of the Electric Power Research Institute (Manne-Richels 1989) concluded that in the US the total discounted costs of reducing CO{sub 2} emissions by 20 percent below the 1990 level could be as much as 3.6 trillion dollars over the period from 1990 to 2100. Costs of this order of magnitude would represent about 5 percent of US GNP. The purpose of this briefing paper is to summarize the different cost estimates for CO{sub 2} emission reduction and to identify the key issues and assumptions that underlie these cost estimates.

  13. The analysis of climate variability at local and regional scales in the global warming context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mares, I.; Mares, C.

    1996-12-31

    The time series of the seasonal and annual temperatures and precipitation amounts from two stations with observations for more than 100 years and from one mountain station (data since 1928), in Romania have been analyzed. For the entire territory of Romania, 33 stations have also been studied using EOF components, for the 1950--1993 period. In order to find climate change-points, nonparametric tests Pettitt and Mann-Kendall have been used. Quantification of the significant change-points was made estimating the signal-to-noise ratio. Some of the change-points in the temperature and precipitation fields could be associated with the changes in the geopotential field at 500hPa, represented by EOFs and blocking index calculated for the Atlantic-European region. The comparison with other results obtained from the European stations or from the entire Northern Hemisphere shows several common points, but also some differences in the climate jumps, reflecting the local peculiarities.

  14. Three-Triplet Model with Double SU(3) Symmetry

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Han, M. Y.; Nambu, Y.

    1965-01-01

    With a view to avoiding some of the kinematical and dynamical difficulties involved in the single triplet quark model, a model for the low lying baryons and mesons based on three triplets with integral charges is proposed, somewhat similar to the two-triplet model introduced earlier by one of us (Y. N.). It is shown that in a U(3) scheme of triplets with integral charges, one is naturally led to three triplets located symmetrically about the origin of I{sub 3} - Y diagram under the constraint that Nishijima-Gell-Mann relation remains intact. A double SU(3) symmetry scheme is proposed in which the large mass splittings between different representations are ascribed to one of the SU(3), while the other SU(3) is the usual one for the mass splittings within a representation of the first SU(3).

  15. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  16. Some Comments on the Decays of eta (550)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Veltman, M.; Yellin, J.

    1966-07-01

    Various decay modes of the {eta}(500) are discussed. The relations, through SU{sub 3} and the Gell-Mann, Sharp, Wagner model, between the {eta}-decay modes and the modes {eta} {yields} {pi}{pi}{gamma), {pi}{sup 0} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} are investigated taking into account {eta}-{eta}{sup *} mixing. The present experimental values for the neutral branching ratios plus the shape of the {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} Dalitz plot are shown to require a 25% {vert_bar}{Delta}{rvec I}{vert_bar} = 3 contribution to the {eta} {yields} 3{pi} amplitude. The connection between a possible charge asymmetry in {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} and the branching ratio {Gamma}{sub {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}}/{Gamma}{sub {eta}}{sup all} is investigated in the framework of a model proposed earlier by several authors. It is shown that there is no conflict between the existing data and this model. The Dalitz plot distribution of {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} is discussed under various assumptions about the properties of the interaction responsible for the decay. (auth)

  17. Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5-cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; David H. Meikrantz; Nick R. Mann; Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-09-01

    Hydraulic and Clean-in-Place Evaluations for a 12.5 cm Annular Centrifugal Contactor at the INL Troy G. Garn, Dave H. Meikrantz, Nick R. Mann, Jack D. Law, Terry A. Todd Idaho National Laboratory Commercially available, Annular Centrifugal Contactors (ACC) are currently being evaluated for processing dissolved nuclear fuel solutions to selectively partition integrated elements using solvent extraction technologies. These evaluations include hydraulic and clean-in-place (CIP) testing of a commercially available 12.5 cm unit. Data from these evaluations is used to support design of future nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities. Hydraulic testing provides contactor throughput performance data on two-phase systems for a wide range of operating conditions. Hydraulic testing results on a simple two-phase oil and water system followed by a 30 % Tributyl phosphate in N-dodecane / nitric acid pair are reported. Maximum total throughputs for this size contactor ranged from 20 to 32 liters per minute without significant other phase carryover. A relatively new contactor design enhancement providing Clean-in-Place capability for ACCs was also investigated. Spray nozzles installed into the central rotor shaft allow the rotor internals to be cleaned, offline. Testing of the solids capture of a diatomaceous earth/water slurry feed followed by CIP testing was performed. Solids capture efficiencies of >95% were observed for all tests and short cold water cleaning pulses proved successful at removing solids from the rotor.

  18. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-07

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  19. Spectroscopy of tetraquark states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santopinto, Elena; Galata, Giuseppe

    2007-04-15

    A complete classification of qqqq tetraquark states in terms of the spin-flavor, color, and spatial degrees of freedom was constructed. The permutation symmetry properties of both the spin-flavor and orbital parts of the qq and qq subsystems are discussed. This complete classification is general and model independent and it is useful both for model builders and experimentalists. The total wave functions are also explicitly constructed in the hypothesis of ideal mixing; this basis for tetraquark states will enable the eigenvalue problem to be solved for a definite dynamical model. An evaluation of the tetraquark spectrum was obtained from the Iachello mass formula for normal mesons, here generalized to tetraquark systems. This mass formula is a generalization of the Gell-Mann Okubo mass formula, whose coefficients have been upgraded by a study of the latest PDG data. The ground-state tetraquark nonet was identified with f{sub 0}(600),{kappa}(800),f{sub 0}(980),a{sub 0}(980). The diquark-antidiquark limit was also studied.

  20. Performance objectives for the Hanford immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    1999-09-09

    Before low-level waste may be disposed of, a performance assessment must be written and then approved by the DOE (DOE 1988a DOE 1999a). The performance assessment is to determine whether ''reasonable assurance'' exists that the performance objectives of the disposal facility will be met. The DOE requirements for waste disposal (DOE 1988a DOE 1999a) require the protection of public health and safety; and the protection of the environment. Although quantitative limits are sometimes stated (for example, the all-pathways exposure limit is 25 mrem/year), usually the requirements are stated in a general nature. Quantitative limits were established by: investigating all potentially applicable regulations as well as interpretations of the review panels which DOE has established to review performance assessments, interacting with program management to establish the additional requirements of the program, and interacting with the public (i.e., the Hanford Advisory Board members; as well as affected Tribal Governments) to understand the values of residents in the Pacific Northwest. Because of space considerations, not all radionuclides and dangerous chemicals are listed in this document. The radionuclides listed here are those which were explicitly treated in the ILAW PA (Mann 1998). The dangerous chemicals listed here are those most often detected in Hanford tank waste as documented in the Regulatory Data Quality Objectives Supporting Tank Waste Remediation System Privatization Project (Wiemers 1998).

  1. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-04

    The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

  2. Reduction of aspirin-induced fecal blood loss with low-dose misoprostol tablets in man

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, M.M.; Clark, L.; Armstrong, L.; D'Souza, J.

    1985-07-01

    Misoprostol (SC-29333), a synthetic prostaglandin E1 methyl ester analog, was given simultaneously with acetylsalicylic acid in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized prospective study of 32 healthy human male subjects. Fecal blood loss was measured for eight days using the /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell technique. Aspirin (650 mg qid) and misoprostol (25 micrograms qid) or placebo were given during days 3, 4, and 5. There was a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in median blood loss (modified Friedman test) from 0.81 to 6.05 ml/day in the aspirin with placebo group (N = 16). Median blood loss was increased (from 0.75 to 3.75 ml/day) in the aspirin with misoprostol group (N = 16), but this was significantly less (Mann-Whitney U test, P less than 0.01) than the placebo group. Mean serum salicylate concentrations in the placebo and misoprostol groups were similar (7.8 and 6.8 micrograms/ml, respectively). There were no significant changes in laboratory values in any of the subjects studied, nor were any major side-effects encountered. This study demonstrates that oral misoprostol reduces aspirin-induced gastrointestinal bleeding even when administered simultaneously and at a dose level below its threshold for significant acid inhibition. This indicates a potential role for misoprostol in the prevention of gastric mucosal damage in selected patients.

  3. Comparison study of the partial-breast irradiation techniques: Dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, electron beam therapy, and helical tomotherapy depending on various tumor locations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Park, So-Hyun; Son, Seok-Hyun; Cheon, Keum-Seong; Choi, Byung-Ock; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2013-10-01

    The partial-breast irradiation (PBI) technique, an alternative to whole-breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume. The present study was designed to determine the optimal PBI treatment modalities for 8 different tumor locations. Treatment planning was performed on computed tomography (CT) data sets of 6 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Tumor locations were classified into 8 subsections according to breast quadrant and depth. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron beam therapy (ET), and helical tomotherapy (H-TOMO) were utilized to evaluate the dosimetric effect for each tumor location. Conformation number (CN), radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and dose delivered to healthy tissue were estimated. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. The ET approach showed good sparing effects and acceptable target coverage for the lower inner quadrant—superficial (LIQ-S) and lower inner quadrant—deep (LIQ-D) locations. The H-TOMO method was the least effective technique as no evaluation index achieved superiority for all tumor locations except CN. The ET method is advisable for treating LIQ-S and LIQ-D tumors, as opposed to 3D-CRT or H-TOMO, because of acceptable target coverage and much lower dose applied to surrounding tissue.

  4. Analysis of climate variability at local and regional scales in the global warming context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mares, I.; Mares, C.

    1996-12-01

    The time series of the seasonal and annual temperatures and precipitation amounts from two stations with observations for more than 100 years and from one mountain station (data since 1928), have been analyzed. For the entire territory of Romania, 33 stations have also been studied using EOFs components, for the 1950--1993 period. In order to find climate change-points, nonparametric tests Pettitt and Mann-Kendall have been used. Quantification of the significant change-points was made estimating the signal-to-noise ratio. Some of the change-points in the temperature and precipitation fields could be associated with the changes in the geopotential field at 500 hPa, represented by EOFs and blocking index calculated for the Atlantic-European region. Results are different, depending on the season and some of these are in accordance with the results obtained for the data defined at the hemispherical level or in certain regions of Europe. Other results reflect local characteristics.

  5. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  6. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 2. The Quark

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 2. The Quark "Three Quarks for Master Mark! Sure he hasn't got much of a bark." James Joyce's Finnegans Wake left its mark on modern physics when physicist Murray Gell Mann proposed this name for a group of hypothetical subatomic particles that were revealed in 1960 as the fundamental units of matter. Basic particles it seems are made up of even more basic units called quarks that make up 99.9% of visible material in the universe.. But why do we know so little about them? Quarks have never been seen as free particles but instead, inextricably bound together by the Strong Force that in turn holds the atomic nucleus together. This is the hardest of Nature's fundamental forces to crack, but recent theoretical advances, mean that the properties of the quark are at last being revealed.

  7. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernando, I.?P.; Goity, J.?L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0?] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  8. Yakima River Species Interactions Study; Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project Monitoring and Evaluation Report 7 of 7, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearsons, Todd N.; Fritts, Anthony L.; Temple, Gabriel M.

    2004-05-01

    This report is intended to satisfy two concurrent needs: (1) provide a contract deliverable from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), with emphasis on identification of salient results of value to ongoing Yakima/Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP) planning, and (2) summarize results of research that have broader scientific relevance. This is the twelfth of a series of progress reports that address species interactions research and supplementation monitoring of fishes in response to supplementation of salmon and steelhead in the upper Yakima River basin (Hindman et al. 1991; McMichael et al. 1992; Pearsons et al. 1993; Pearsons et al. 1994; Pearsons et al. 1996; Pearsons et al. 1998, Pearsons et al. 1999, Pearsons et al. 2001a, Pearsons et al. 2001b, Pearsons et al. 2002, Pearsons et al. 2003). Journal articles and book chapters have also been published from our work (McMichael 1993; Martin et al. 1995; McMichael et al. 1997; McMichael and Pearsons 1998; McMichael et al. 1998; Pearsons and Fritts 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; McMichael et al. 1999; Pearsons and Hopley 1999; Ham and Pearsons 2000; Ham and Pearsons 2001; Amaral et al. 2001; McMichael and Pearsons 2001; Pearsons 2002, Fritts and Pearsons 2004, Pearsons et al. in press, Major et al. in press). This progress report summarizes data collected between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2003. These data were compared to findings from previous years to identify general trends and make preliminary comparisons. Interactions between fish produced as part of the YKFP, termed target species or stocks, and other species or stocks (non-target taxa) may alter the population status of non-target species or stocks. This may occur through a variety of mechanisms, such as competition, predation, and interbreeding (Pearsons et al. 1994; Busack et al. 1997; Pearsons and Hopley 1999). Furthermore, the success of a supplementation program may be limited by strong

  9. Callan-Symanzik equation and asymptotic freedom in the Marr-Shimamoto model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarfone, Leonard M.

    2010-05-15

    The exactly soluble nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto model was introduced in 1964 as an example of the Lee model with a propagator and a nontrivial vertex function. An exactly soluble relativistic version of this model, known as the Zachariasen model, has been found to be asymptotically free in terms of coupling constant renormalization at an arbitrary spacelike momentum and on the basis of exact solutions of the Gell-Mann-Low equations. This is accomplished with conventional cut-off regularization by setting up the Yukawa and Fermi coupling constants at Euclidean momenta in terms of on mass-shell couplings and then taking the asymptotic limit. In view of this background, it may be expected that an investigation of the nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto theory may also exhibit asymptotic freedom in view of its manifest mathematical similarity to that of the Zachariasen model. To prove this point, the present paper prefers to examine asymptotic freedom in the nonrelativistic Marr-Shimamoto theory using the powerful concepts of the renormalization group and the Callan-Symanzik equation, in conjunction with the specificity of dimensional regularization and on-shell renormalization. This approach is based on calculations of the Callan-Symanzik coefficients and determinations of the effective coupling constants. It is shown that the Marr-Shimamoto theory is asymptotically free for dimensions D<3 and for values of D>3 occurring in periodic intervals over the range of 0

  10. Emergence of Integrated Urology-Radiation Oncology Practices in the State of Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jhaveri, Pavan M. [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Section of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas (United States); Sun Zhuyi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Ballas, Leslie [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States)] [Valley Radiotherapy Associates Medical Group, Manhattan Beach, California (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jiang Jing [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Division of Quantitative Sciences, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Smith, Benjamin D., E-mail: BSmith3@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Integrated urology-radiation oncology (RO) practices have been advocated as a means to improve community-based prostate cancer care by joining urologic and radiation care in a single-practice environment. However, little is known regarding the scope and actual physical integration of such practices. We sought to characterize the emergence of such practices in Texas, their extent of physical integration, and their potential effect on patient travel times for radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A telephone survey identified integrated urology-RO practices, defined as practices owned by urologists that offer RO services. Geographic information software was used to determine the proximity of integrated urology-RO clinic sites with respect to the state's population. We calculated patient travel time and distance from each integrated urology-RO clinic offering urologic services to the RO treatment facility owned by the integrated practice and to the nearest nonintegrated (independent) RO facility. We compared these times and distances using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 229 urology practices identified, 12 (5%) offered integrated RO services, and 182 (28%) of 640 Texas urologists worked in such practices. Approximately 53% of the state population resides within 10 miles of an integrated urology-RO clinic site. Patients with a diagnosis of prostate cancer at an integrated urology-RO clinic site travel a mean of 19.7 miles (26.1 min) from the clinic to reach the RO facility owned by the integrated urology-RO practice vs 5.9 miles (9.2 min) to reach the nearest nonintegrated RO facility (P<.001). Conclusions: Integrated urology-RO practices are common in Texas and are generally clustered in urban areas. In most integrated practices, the urology clinics and the integrated RO facilities are not at the same location, and driving times and distances from the clinic to the integrated RO facility exceed those from the clinic to the nearest

  11. Optimization of Direct Current-Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation: An Ex Vivo Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Toshihiro Isfort, Peter; Bruners, Philipp; Penzkofer, Tobias; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the optimal setting for radiofrequency (RF) ablation combined with direct electrical current (DC) ablation in ex vivo bovine liver. An electrical circuit combining a commercially available RF ablation system with DC was developed. The negative electrode of a rectifier that provides DC was connected to a 3-cm multitined expandable RF probe. A 100-mH inductor was used to prevent electrical leakage from the RF generator. DC was applied for 15 min and followed by RF ablation in freshly excised bovine livers. Electric current was measured by an ammeter. Coagulation volume, ablation duration, and mean amperage were assessed for various DC voltages (no DC, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 V) and different RF ablation protocols (stepwise increase from 40 to 80 W, 40 W fixed, and 80 W fixed). Results were compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Applying DC with 4.5 or 9.0 V, in combination with 40 W fixed or a stepwise increase of RF energy, resulted in significantly increased zone of ablation size compared with 2.2 V or no DC (P = 0.009). At 4.5 V DC, the stepwise increase of RF energy resulted in the same necrosis size as a 40 W fixed protocol (26.6 {+-} 3.9 vs. 26.5 {+-} 4.0 ml), but ablation duration was significantly decreased (296 {+-} 85 s vs. 423 {+-} 104 s; P = 0.028). Mean amperage was significantly lower at 4.5 V compared with 9.0 V (P = 0.028). Combining a stepwise increase of RF energy with a DC voltage of 4.5 V is most appropriate to increase coagulation volume and to minimize procedure time.

  12. Osteoradionecrosis and Radiation Dose to the Mandible in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Chiaojung Jillian; Hofstede, Theresa M.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Garden, Adam S.; Lindberg, Mary E.; Wei Qingyi; Tucker, Susan L.; Dong Lei

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the association between radiation doses delivered to the mandible and the occurrence of osteoradionecrosis (ORN). Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 402 oropharyngeal cancer patients with stage T1 or T2 disease treated with definitive radiation between January 2000 and October 2008 for the occurrence of ORN. Demographic and treatment variables were compared between patients with ORN and those without. To examine the dosimetric relationship further, a nested case-control comparison was performed. One to 2 ORN-free patients were selected to match each ORN patient by age, sex, radiation type, treatment year, and cancer subsite. Detailed radiation treatment plans for the ORN cases and matched controls were reviewed. Mann-Whitney test and conditional logistic regression were used to compare relative volumes of the mandible exposed to doses ranging from 10 Gy-60 Gy in 10-Gy increments. Results: In 30 patients (7.5%), ORN developed during a median follow-up time of 31 months, including 6 patients with grade 4 ORN that required major surgery. The median time to develop ORN was 8 months (range, 0-71 months). Detailed radiation treatment plans were available for 25 of the 30 ORN patients and 40 matched ORN-free patients. In the matched case-control analysis, there was a statistically significant difference between the volumes of mandible in the 2 groups receiving doses between 50 Gy (V50) and 60 Gy (V60). The most notable difference was seen at V50, with a P value of .02 in the multivariate model after adjustment for the matching variables and dental status (dentate or with extraction). Conclusions: V50 and V60 saw the most significant differences between the ORN group and the comparison group. Minimizing the percent mandibular volume exposed to 50 Gy may reduce ORN risk.

  13. SU-E-T-426: Dose Delivery Accuracy in Breast Field Junction for Free Breath and Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Epstein, D; Shekel, E; Levin, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to verify the accuracy of the dose distribution along the field junction in a half beam irradiation technique for breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast or chest wall (CW) and the supraclavicular LN region for both free breathing and deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) technique. Methods: We performed in vivo measurements for nine breast cancer patients receiving radiation to the breast/CW and to the supraclavicular LN region. Six patients were treated to the left breast/CW using DIBH technique and three patients were treated to the right breast/CW in free breath. We used five microMOSFET dosimeters: three located along the field junction, one located 1 cm above the junction and the fifth microMOSFET located 1 cm below the junction. We performed consecutive measurements over several days for each patient and compared the measurements to the TPS calculation (Eclipse, Varian). Results: The calculated and measured doses along the junction were 0.970.08 Gy and 1.020.14 Gy, respectively. Above the junction calculated and measured doses were 0.910.08 Gy and 0.980.09 Gy respectively, and below the junction calculated and measured doses were 1.700.15 Gy and 1.610.09 Gy, respectively. All differences were not statistically significant. When comparing calculated and measured doses for DIBH patients only, there was still no statistically significant difference between values for all dosimeter locations. Analysis was done using the Mann-Whitney Rank-Sum Test. Conclusion: We found excellent correlation between calculated doses from the TPS and measured skin doses at the junction of several half beam fields. Even for the DIBH technique, where there is more potential for variance due to depth of breath, there is no over or underdose along the field junction. This correlation validates the TPS, as well an accurate, reproducible patient setup.

  14. Life cycle assessment of a biomass gasification combined-cycle power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.K.; Spath, P.L.

    1997-12-01

    The potential environmental benefits from biomass power are numerous. However, biomass power may also have some negative effects on the environment. Although the environmental benefits and drawbacks of biomass power have been debated for some time, the total significance has not been assessed. This study serves to answer some of the questions most often raised in regard to biomass power: What are the net CO{sub 2} emissions? What is the energy balance of the integrated system? Which substances are emitted at the highest rates? What parts of the system are responsible for these emissions? To provide answers to these questions, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of a hypothetical biomass power plant located in the Midwest United States was performed. LCA is an analytical tool for quantifying the emissions, resource consumption, and energy use, collectively known as environmental stressors, that are associated with converting a raw material to a final product. Performed in conjunction with a technoeconomic feasibility study, the total economic and environmental benefits and drawbacks of a process can be quantified. This study complements a technoeconomic analysis of the same process, reported in Craig and Mann (1996) and updated here. The process studied is based on the concept of power Generation in a biomass integrated gasification combined cycle (BIGCC) plant. Broadly speaking, the overall system consists of biomass production, its transportation to the power plant, electricity generation, and any upstream processes required for system operation. The biomass is assumed to be supplied to the plant as wood chips from a biomass plantation, which would produce energy crops in a manner similar to the way food and fiber crops are produced today. Transportation of the biomass and other materials is by both rail and truck. The IGCC plant is sized at 113 MW, and integrates an indirectly-heated gasifier with an industrial gas turbine and steam cycle. 63 refs., 34 figs., 32 tabs.

  15. Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging Finding of Discrepant Fractional Anisotropy Between the Frontal and Parietal Lobes After Whole-Brain Irradiation in Childhood Medulloblastoma Survivors: Reflection of Regional White Matter Radiosensitivity?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu Deqiang; Kwong, Dora; Chan, Godfrey; Leung, Lucullus; Khong, P.-L.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that fractional anisotropy (FA) is more severely reduced in white matter of the frontal lobe compared with the parietal lobe after receiving the same whole-brain irradiation dose in a cohort of childhood medulloblastoma survivors. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two medulloblastoma survivors (15 male, mean [{+-} SD] age = 12.1 {+-} 4.6 years) and the same number of control subjects (15 male, aged 12.0 {+-} 4.2 years) were recruited for diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging scans. Using an automated tissue classification method and the Talairach Daemon atlas, FA values of frontal and parietal lobes receiving the same radiation dose, and the ratio between them were quantified and denoted as FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p}, respectively. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significant differences of FFA, PFA, and FA{sub f/p} between medulloblastoma survivors and control subjects. Results: Frontal lobe and parietal lobe white matter FA were found to be significantly less in medulloblastoma survivors compared with control subjects (frontal p = 0.001, parietal p = 0.026). Moreover, these differences were found to be discrepant, with the frontal lobe having a significantly larger difference in FA compared with the parietal lobe. The FA{sub f/p} of control and medulloblastoma survivors was 1.110 and 1.082, respectively (p = 0.029). Conclusion: Discrepant FA changes after the same irradiation dose suggest radiosensitivity of the frontal lobe white matter compared with the parietal lobe. Special efforts to address the potentially vulnerable frontal lobe after treatment with whole-brain radiation may be needed so as to balance disease control and treatment-related morbidity.

  16. Influence of NaCl Concentrations on Coagulation, Temperature, and Electrical Conductivity Using a Perfusion Radiofrequency Ablation System: An Ex Vivo Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aube, Christophe Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Method. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. Results. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 {+-} 3.8 cm{sup 3}, with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 {+-} 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 {+-} 12.8 deg. C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. Conclusion. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  17. Importance of proper renormalization scale-setting for QCD testing at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing-Gang; Wang, Sheng-Quan; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-22

    A primary problem affecting perturbative quantum chromodynamic (pQCD) analyses is the lack of a method for setting the QCD running-coupling renormalization scale such that maximally precise fixed-order predictions for physical observables are obtained. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the ambiguities associated with the conventional renormalization scale-setting procedure, yielding predictions that are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme. The QCD coupling scales and the effective number of quark flavors are set order-by-order in the pQCD series. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, satisfying the standard renormalization group invariance condition and all of the self-consistency conditions derived from the renormalization group. The PMC scales at each order are obtained by shifting the arguments of the strong force coupling constant αs to eliminate all non-conformal {βi} terms in the pQCD series. The {βi} terms are determined from renormalization group equations without ambiguity. The correct behavior of the running coupling at each order and at each phase-space point can then be obtained. The PMC reduces in the NC → 0 Abelian limit to the Gell-Mann-Low method. In this brief report, we summarize the results of our recent application of the PMC to a number of collider processes, emphasizing the generality and applicability of this approach. A discussion of hadronic Z decays shows that, by applying the PMC, one can achieve accurate predictions for the total and separate decay widths at each order without scale ambiguities. We also show that, if one employs the PMC to determine the top-quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the next-to-next-to-leading order level, one obtains a comprehensive, self-consistent pQCD explanation for the Tevatron measurements of the asymmetry. This accounts for the “increasing-decreasing” behavior observed by the D0 collaboration for increasing tt invariant mass. At lower energies

  18. Importance of proper renormalization scale-setting for QCD testing at colliders

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Xing -Gang; Wang, Sheng -Quan; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-22

    A primary problem affecting perturbative quantum chromodynamic (pQCD) analyses is the lack of a method for setting the QCD running-coupling renormalization scale such that maximally precise fixed-order predictions for physical observables are obtained. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the ambiguities associated with the conventional renormalization scale-setting procedure, yielding predictions that are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme. The QCD coupling scales and the effective number of quark flavors are set order-by-order in the pQCD series. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, satisfying the standard renormalization group invariance condition and all of the self-consistency conditions derived frommore » the renormalization group. The PMC scales at each order are obtained by shifting the arguments of the strong force coupling constant αs to eliminate all non-conformal {βi} terms in the pQCD series. The {βi} terms are determined from renormalization group equations without ambiguity. The correct behavior of the running coupling at each order and at each phase-space point can then be obtained. The PMC reduces in the NC → 0 Abelian limit to the Gell-Mann-Low method. In this brief report, we summarize the results of our recent application of the PMC to a number of collider processes, emphasizing the generality and applicability of this approach. A discussion of hadronic Z decays shows that, by applying the PMC, one can achieve accurate predictions for the total and separate decay widths at each order without scale ambiguities. We also show that, if one employs the PMC to determine the top-quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the next-to-next-to-leading order level, one obtains a comprehensive, self-consistent pQCD explanation for the Tevatron measurements of the asymmetry. This accounts for the “increasing-decreasing” behavior observed by the D0 collaboration for increasing tt¯ invariant mass. At lower

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  20. Technical Note: Skin thickness measurements using high-resolution flat-panel cone-beam dedicated breast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi Linxi; Vedantham, Srinivasan; Karellas, Andrew; O'Connell, Avice M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the mean and range of location-averaged breast skin thickness using high-resolution dedicated breast CT for use in Monte Carlo-based estimation of normalized glandular dose coefficients. Methods: This study retrospectively analyzed image data from a clinical study investigating dedicated breast CT. An algorithm similar to that described by Huang et al.['The effect of skin thickness determined using breast CT on mammographic dosimetry,' Med. Phys. 35(4), 1199-1206 (2008)] was used to determine the skin thickness in 137 dedicated breast CT volumes from 136 women. The location-averaged mean breast skin thickness for each breast was estimated and the study population mean and range were determined. Pathology results were available for 132 women, and were used to investigate if the distribution of location-averaged mean breast skin thickness varied with pathology. The effect of surface fitting to account for breast curvature was also studied. Results: The study mean ({+-} interbreast SD) for breast skin thickness was 1.44 {+-} 0.25 mm (range: 0.87-2.34 mm), which was in excellent agreement with Huang et al. Based on pathology, pair-wise statistical analysis (Mann-Whitney test) indicated that at the 0.05 significance level, there were no significant difference in the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness distributions between the groups: benign vs malignant (p= 0.223), benign vs hyperplasia (p= 0.651), hyperplasia vs malignant (p= 0.229), and malignant vs nonmalignant (p= 0.172). Conclusions: Considering this study used a different clinical prototype system, and the study participants were from a different geographical location, the observed agreement between the two studies suggests that the choice of 1.45 mm thick skin layer comprising the epidermis and the dermis for breast dosimetry is appropriate. While some benign and malignant conditions could cause skin thickening, in this study cohort the location-averaged mean breast skin thickness

  1. Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

    2010-06-16

    This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporation’s Econamine Plus™ carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOE’s Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately

  2. Radionuclide Migration through Sediment and Concrete: 16 Years of Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Snyder, Michelle MV; Powers, Laura; Whyatt, Greg A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-11-06

    The Waste Management Project provides safe, compliant, and cost-effective waste management services for the Hanford Site and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Part of these services includes safe disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Low-Level Waste Burial Grounds in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. To partially satisfy these requirements, performance assessment analyses were completed and approved. DOE Order 435.1 also requires continuing data collection to increase confidence in the critical assumptions used in these analyses to characterize the operational features of the disposal facility that are relied on to satisfy the performance objectives identified in the order. Cement-based solidification and stabilization is considered for hazardous waste disposal because it is easily done and cost-efficient. One critical assumption is that concrete will be used as a waste form or container material at the Hanford Site to control and minimize the release of radionuclide constituents in waste into the surrounding environment. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The radionuclides iodine-129, selenium-75, technetium-99, and uranium-238 have been identified as long-term dose contributors (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, these constituents of potential concern may be released from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and migrate into the surrounding subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989; 1992; 1993a, b; 1995). Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. Each of the

  3. Fractionated External Beam Radiotherapy as a Suitable Preparative Regimen for Hepatocyte Transplantation After Partial Hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, Petra; Wolff, Hendrik A.; Rave-Frank, Margret; Schmidberger, Heinz; Becker, Heinz; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans; Koenig, Sarah

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Hepatocyte transplantation is strongly considered to be a promising option to correct chronic liver failure through repopulation of the diseased organ. We already reported on extensive liver repopulation by hepatocytes transplanted into rats preconditioned with 25-Gy single dose selective external beam irradiation (IR). Herein, we tested lower radiation doses and fractionated protocols, which would be applicable in clinical use. Methods and Material: Livers of dipeptidylpeptidase IV (DPPIV)-deficient rats were preconditioned with partial liver external beam single dose IR at 25 Gy, 8 Gy, or 5 Gy, or fractionated IR at 5 x 5 Gy or 5 x 2 Gy. Four days after completion of IR, a partial hepatectomy (PH) was performed to resect the untreated liver section. Subsequently, 12 million wild-type (DPPIV{sup +}) hepatocytes were transplanted via the spleen into the recipient livers. The degree of donor cell integration and liver repopulation was studied 16 weeks after transplantation by means of immunofluorescence and DPPIV-luminescence assay. Results: Donor hepatocyte integration and liver repopulation were more effective in the irradiated livers following pretreatment with the IR doses 1 x 25 Gy and 5 x 5 Gy (formation of large DPPIV-positive cell clusters) than single-dose irradiation at 8 Gy or 5 Gy (DPPIV-positive clusters noticeably smaller and less frequent). Quantitative analysis of extracted DPPIV revealed signals exceeding the control level in all transplanted animals treated with IR and PH. Compared with the standard treatment of 1 x 25 Gy, fractionation with 5 x 5 Gy was equally efficacious, the Mann-Whitney U test disclosing no statistically significant difference (p = 0.146). The lower doses of 1 x 5 Gy, 1 x 8 Gy, and 5 x 2 Gy were significantly less effective with p < 0.05. Conclusion: This study suggests that fractionated radiotherapy in combination with PH is a conceivable pretreatment approach to prime the host liver for hepatocyte transplantation

  4. Importance of proper renormalization scale-setting for QCD testing at colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xing -Gang; Wang, Sheng -Quan; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-12-22

    A primary problem affecting perturbative quantum chromodynamic (pQCD) analyses is the lack of a method for setting the QCD running-coupling renormalization scale such that maximally precise fixed-order predictions for physical observables are obtained. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the ambiguities associated with the conventional renormalization scale-setting procedure, yielding predictions that are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme. The QCD coupling scales and the effective number of quark flavors are set order-by-order in the pQCD series. The PMC has a solid theoretical foundation, satisfying the standard renormalization group invariance condition and all of the self-consistency conditions derived from the renormalization group. The PMC scales at each order are obtained by shifting the arguments of the strong force coupling constant αs to eliminate all non-conformal {βi} terms in the pQCD series. The {βi} terms are determined from renormalization group equations without ambiguity. The correct behavior of the running coupling at each order and at each phase-space point can then be obtained. The PMC reduces in the NC → 0 Abelian limit to the Gell-Mann-Low method. In this brief report, we summarize the results of our recent application of the PMC to a number of collider processes, emphasizing the generality and applicability of this approach. A discussion of hadronic Z decays shows that, by applying the PMC, one can achieve accurate predictions for the total and separate decay widths at each order without scale ambiguities. We also show that, if one employs the PMC to determine the top-quark pair forward-backward asymmetry at the next-to-next-to-leading order level, one obtains a comprehensive, self-consistent pQCD explanation for the Tevatron measurements of the asymmetry. This accounts for the “increasing-decreasing” behavior observed by the D0 collaboration for increasing tt¯ invariant mass. At lower

  5. TH-A-BRF-11: Image Intensity Non-Uniformities Between MRI Simulation and Diagnostic MRI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, E

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: MRI simulation for MRI-based radiotherapy demands that patients be setup in treatment position, which frequently involves use of alternative radiofrequency (RF) coil configurations to accommodate immobilized patients. However, alternative RF coil geometries may exacerbate image intensity non-uniformities (IINU) beyond those observed in diagnostic MRI, which may challenge image segmentation and registration accuracy as well as confound studies assessing radiotherapy response when MR simulation images are used as baselines for evaluation. The goal of this work was to determine whether differences in IINU exist between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 3T using a spin-echo sequence (TE/TR:20/500ms, rBW:62.5kHz, TH/skip:5/5mm). MR simulation images were obtained by wrapping two flexible phased-array RF coils around the phantom. Diagnostic MR images were obtained by placing the phantom into a commercial phased-array head coil. Pre-scan normalization was enabled in both cases. Images were transferred offline and corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) were calculated for each slice. Wilcoxon matched-pairs and Mann-Whitney tests compared CV values between original and N3 images and between MR simulation and diagnostic MR images. Results: Significant differences in CV were detected between original and N3 images in both MRI simulation and diagnostic MRI groups (p=0.010, p=0.010). In addition, significant differences in CV were detected between original MR simulation and original and N3 diagnostic MR images (p=0.0256, p=0.0016). However, no significant differences in CV were detected between N3 MR simulation images and original or N3 diagnostic MR images, demonstrating the importance of correcting MR simulation images beyond pre-scan normalization prior to use in radiotherapy. Conclusions: Alternative RF coil configurations used in MRI simulation can Result in

  6. Diffusion and Leaching Behavior of Radionuclides in Category 3 Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Powers, Laura; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-08-31

    diffusion of radionuclides may be affected by the formation of structural cracks in concrete, the carbonation of the buried waste form, and any potential effect of metallic iron (in the form of rebars) on the mobility of radionuclides. The radionuclides iodine-129 ({sup 129}I), technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), and uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) are identified as long-term dose contributors in Category 3 waste (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, and carbonate-complexed {sup 238}U may readily leach into the subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989, 1992a, b, 1993, and 1995). The leachability and/or diffusion of radionuclide species must be measured to assess the long-term performance of waste grouts when contacted with vadose-zone pore water or groundwater. Although significant research has been conducted on the design and performance of cementitious waste forms, the current protocol conducted to assess radionuclide stability within these waste forms has been limited to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Method 1311 Federal Registry (EPA 1992) and ANSI/ANS-16.1 leach test (ANSI 1986). These tests evaluate the performance under water-saturated conditions and do not evaluate the performance of cementitious waste forms within the context of waste repositories which are located within water-deficient vadose zones. Moreover, these tests assess only the diffusion of radionuclides from concrete waste forms and neglect evaluating the mechanisms of retention, stability of the waste form, and formation of secondary phases during weathering, which may serve as long-term secondary hosts for immobilization of radionuclides. The results of recent investigations conducted under arid and semi-arid conditions (Al-Khayat et al. 2002; Garrabrants et al. 2002; Garrabrants and Kosson 2003; Garrabrants et al. 2004; Gervais et al. 2004; Sanchez et al. 2002; Sanchez et al. 2003) provide valuable information suggesting

  7. SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2010-08-19

    ) was found to be comparable to immobilized low-activity waste glass waste form in the initial supplemental LAW treatment technology risk assessment (Mann 2003). To confirm this hypothesis, DOE is funding a treatability study where three actual Hanford tank waste samples (containing both {sup 99}Tc and {sup 125}I) will be processed in Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) to form the mineral product, similar to the granular NAS waste form, that will then be subject to a number of waste form qualification tests. In previous tests, SRNL have demonstrated that the BSR product is chemically and physically equivalent to the FBSR product (Janzen 2005). The objective of this paper is to describe the sample selection, sample preparation, and environmental and regulatory considerations for treatability studies of the FBSR process using Hanford tank waste samples at the SNRL. The SNRL will process samples in its BSR. These samples will be decontaminated in the 222-S Laboratory to remove undissolved solids and selected radioisotopes to comply with Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping regulations and to ensure worker safety by limiting radiation exposure to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). These decontamination levels will also meet the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) definition of low activity waste (LAW). After the SNRL has processed the tank samples to a granular mineral form, SRNL and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) will conduct waste form testing on both the granular material and monoliths prepared from the granular material. The tests being performed are outlined in Appendix A.

  8. Progress Report on the Laboratory Testing of the Bulk Vitrification Cast Refractory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B PETER.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Crum, J V.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.

    2004-11-15

    The Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the U. S. strategic defense arsenal by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 single- and double-shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pre-treated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Currently, the DOE Office of River Protection (ORP) is evaluating several options for immobilization of low-activity tank wastes for eventual disposal in a shallow subsurface facility at the Hanford Site. A significant portion of the waste will be converted into immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass with a conventional Joule-heated ceramic melter. In addition to ILAW glass, supplemental treatment technologies are under consideration by the DOE to treat a portion of the low activity waste. The reason for using this alternative treatment technology is to accelerate the overall cleanup mission at the Hanford site. The ORP selected Bulk Vitrification (BV) for further development and testing. Work in FY03 on engineered and large scale tests of the BV process suggested that approximately 0.3 to as much as 3 wt% of the waste stream 99Tc inventory would end up in a soluble form deposited in a vesicular layer located at the top of the BV melt and in the sand used as an insulator after vitrification. In the FY03 risk assessment (RA) (Mann et al., 2003), the soluble Tc salt in the BV waste packages creates a 99Tc concentration peak at early times in the groundwater extracted from a 100-meter down-gradient well. This peak differs from the presently predicted baseline WTP glass performance, which shows an asymptotic rise to a constant release rate. Because of the desire by regulatory agencies to achieve essentially equivalent performance to WTP glass with supplemental treatment technologies, the BV process was modified in FY04 in an attempt to

  9. Extended-soft-core baryon-baryon model. II. Hyperon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rijken, Th.A.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-04-15

    The YN results are presented from the extended soft-core (ESC) interactions. They consist of local and nonlocal potentials because of (i) one-boson exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of pseudoscalar, vector, scalar, and axial mesons; (ii) diffractive exchanges; (iii) two-pseudoscalar exchange; and (iv) meson-pair exchange (MPE). Both the OBE and pair vertices are regulated by Gaussian form factors producing potentials with a soft behavior near the origin. The assignment of the cutoff masses for the baryon-baryon-meson (BBM) vertices is dependent on the SU(3) classification of the exchanged mesons for OBE and a similar scheme for MPE. The particular version of the ESC model, called ESC04 [T. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 73, 044007 (2006)], describes nucleon-nucleon (NN) and hyperon-nucleon (YN) interactions in a unified way using broken SU(3) symmetry. Novel ingredients are the inclusion of (i) the axial-vector meson potentials and (ii) a zero in the scalar- and axial-vector meson form factors. These innovations made it possible for the first time to keep the parameters of the model close to the predictions of the {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark creation model. This is also the case for the F/(F+D) ratios. Furthermore, the introduction of the zero helped to avoid the occurrence of unwanted bound states. Broken SU(3) symmetry serves to connect the NN and the YN channels, which leaves after fitting NN only a few free parameters for the determination of the YN interactions. In particular, the meson-baryon coupling constants are calculated via SU(3) using the coupling constants of the NN analysis as input. Here, as a novel feature, medium-strong flavor-symmetry breaking (FSB) of the coupling constants was allowed, using the {sup 3}P{sub 0} model with a Gell-Mann-Okubo hypercharge breaking for the BBM coupling. Very good fits for ESC model with and without FSB were obtained. The charge-symmetry breaking in the {lambda}p and {lambda}n channels, which is an SU(2