Sample records for aluminum process flow

  1. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  2. Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys M welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process

  3. Process simulation of aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabsh, I. [CompuSIM Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dupuis, M. [GeniSim, Jonquiere, Quebec (Canada); Gomes, A. [Alcan Aluminio do Brasil S.A., Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was developed to model the dynamic behavior of an aluminum reduction cell. The program simulates the physical process by solving the heat and mass balance equations that characterize the behavior of eleven chemical species in the system. It also models operational events (such as metal tapping, anode change, etc.) and the process control logic including various alumina feeding policies and anode effect quenching. The program is a PC based Windows{reg_sign} application that takes full advantage of the Windows user interface. This paper describes the implementation of the process model and the control logic. Various results using the simulation are compared to measured data.

  4. Process for the synthesis of nanophase dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbour, John C. (Albuquerque, NM); Knapp, James Arthur (Albuquerque, NM); Follstaedt, David Martin (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, Samuel Maxwell (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for fabricating dispersion-strengthened ceramic-metal composites is claimed. The process comprises in-situ interaction and chemical reaction of a metal in gaseous form with a ceramic producer in plasma form. Such composites can be fabricated with macroscopic dimensions. Special emphasis is placed on fabrication of dispersion-strengthened aluminum oxide-aluminum composites, which can exhibit flow stresses more characteristic of high strength steel.

  5. Network model of fluid flow in semi-solid aluminum alloys W.O. Dijkstra a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Network model of fluid flow in semi-solid aluminum alloys W.O. Dijkstra a , C. Vuik b , L within a semi-solid aluminum alloy. The model consists of a set of connected channels representing; Fluid flow; Aluminum alloys; Permeability; Macrosegregation 1. Introduction Early simulations

  6. Process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN); Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Seoul, KR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics is provided. A gaseous atmosphere consisting essentially of silicon monoxide gas is formed by exposing a source of silicon to an atmosphere consisting essentially of hydrogen and a sufficient amount of water vapor. The aluminum based ceramic is exposed to the gaseous silicon monoxide atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to produce a continuous, stable silicon-containing film on the surface of the aluminum based ceramic that increases the strength of the ceramic.

  7. A perturbation analysis of the unstable plastic flow pattern evolution in an aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Wei

    A perturbation analysis of the unstable plastic flow pattern evolution in an aluminum alloy Seung Abstract In the tensile loading of sheet metals made from some polycrystalline aluminum alloys, a single in the uniaxial tension of polycrystalline aluminum alloys with periodic stress relaxations depends

  8. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition and process for electrolysis thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandegrift, George F. (Bolingbrook, Naperville, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Hinsdale, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  9. The Significance of Cavitation in a Superplastic Aluminum Alloy Processed by ECAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    The Significance of Cavitation in a Superplastic Aluminum Alloy Processed by ECAP Megumi Kawasaki spray-cast aluminum 7034 alloy having an initial grain size of ~2.1 m to produce an ultrafine grain size

  10. Energy Conservation Design Features of the ARCO Metals Logan County Aluminum Process Complex 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speer, J. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ARCO Metals Company (Formerly Anaconda Aluminum Company) is proceeding as scheduled with the construction of a $400 Million aluminum processing complex in Logan County, Kentucky. When the initial construction phase is completed in the Fall 1983...

  11. Welding aluminum alloys 6061 with the opposing dual-torch GTAW process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.M.; Zhang, S.B. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cracking is a major concern in welding aluminum alloys. Although weld solidification cracks can be eliminated through the addition of filler metal, the additives modify the alloy or base metal constituents and may not always be desirable. High-energy beam processes, such as electron beam welding, that result in minimal heat input reduce crack sensitivity, but their high cost limits their applications. In this study, the conventional gas tungsten arc welding process is modified by disconnecting the workpiece form the power supply and placing a second torch on the opposite side of the workpiece. Such a modification changes the direction of the current flow, improves the weld penetration and reduces the heat input. Using this modified process, 6061-T651 alloy was welded without filler metals. Analysis suggested the reduced heat input, the changed direction of the current flow and the symmetric heating were responsible for the observed reduction of the cracking sensitivity.

  12. aluminum alloy processed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  13. Documenting Organizational Process Flow Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    1 Documenting Organizational Processes or Process Flow Modeling Analysis Phase ­ Three Steps that describes (1) the current, and (2) the future structure of an organizational process ·"Natural language ­ An overview of an organizational system showing · system boundaries, · external entities that interact

  14. Removal of Chloride from Wastewater by Advanced Softening Process Using Electrochemically Generated Aluminum Hydroxide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Syed Faisal

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    solubility. Chloride can be removed from water and wastewater by precipitation as calcium chloroaluminate using advanced softening process. This research was conducted to evaluate chloride removal using electrochemically generated aluminum hydroxide and lime...

  15. Continuous flow photocatalysis enhanced using an aluminum mirror: rapid and selective synthesis of 2?-deoxy and 2?,3?-dideoxynucleosides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Bo

    A unique photochemical flow reactor featuring quartz tubing, an aluminum mirror and temperature control has been developed for the photo-induced electron-transfer deoxygenation reaction to produce 2?-deoxy and 2?,3?-dide ...

  16. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan Srinivasan (PI); Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Metals with grain sizes smaller than 1-micrometer have received much attention in the past decade. These materials have been classified as ultra fine grain (UFG) materials (grain sizes in the range of 100 to 1000-nm) and nano-materials (grain size <100-nm) depending on the grain size. This report addresses the production of bulk UFG metals through the use of severe plastic deformation processing, and their subsequent use as stock material for further thermomechanical processing, such as forging. A number of severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods for producing bulk UFG metals have been developed since the early 1990s. The most promising of these processes for producing large size stock that is suitable for forging is the equal channel angular extrusion or pressing (ECAE/P) process. This process involves introducing large shear strain in the work-piece by pushing it through a die that consists of two channels with the same cross-sectional shape that meet at an angle to each other. Since the cross-sections of the two channels are the same, the extruded product can be re-inserted into the entrance channel and pushed again through the die. Repeated extrusion through the ECAE/P die accumulates sufficient strain to breakdown the microstructure and produce ultra fine grain size. It is well known that metals with very fine grain sizes (< 10-micrometer) have higher strain rate sensitivity and greater elongation to failure at elevated temperature, exhibiting superplastic behavior. However, this superplastic behavior is usually manifest at high temperature (> half the melting temperature on the absolute scale) and very low strain rates (< 0.0001/s). UFG metals have been shown to exhibit superplastic characteristics at lower temperature and higher strain rates, making this phenomenon more practical for manufacturing. This enables part unitization and forging more complex and net shape parts. Laboratory studies have shown that this is particularly true for UFG metals produced by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging temperatures can also be reduced by over 150ºC, resulting in energy savings in the ope

  17. Ni-coated SiC{sub p} reinforced aluminum composites processed by vacuum infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, W.S.; Lin, S.J. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum infiltration process has been developed to process aluminum-base composites reinforced with particulate SiC{sub p}. Electroless nickel coating of SiC{sub p} was used to improve wetting by molten aluminum. Experimental results showed that composites of aluminum with 5.9 wt % Si and 0.23 wt % Mg containing about 50 vol % Ni-coated SiC{sub p} were completely infiltrated at a temperature above 700 C. The effects of nickel coating thickness and infiltration temperature on infiltration behavior were investigated. The infiltration rate increased and the infiltration incubation time decreased with increasing infiltration temperature or nickel coating thickness. The microstructure, nickel distribution, bending strength and fracture were also examined. Nonuniformity bending strength and fracture morphology were attributed to nickel macrosegregation.

  18. The effects of process variations on residual stress in laser peened 7049 T73 aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Jon E; Hill, Michael R; Hackel, Lloyd A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys, ASM International,the Fatigue Life of 7050 Aluminum Alloy, Defence Science &in laser peened 7049 T73 aluminum alloy Jon E. Rankin and

  19. Process for retarding fluid flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandford, B.B.; Zillmer, R.C.

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for retarding the flow of fluid in a subterranean formation, comprising: (a) introducing an effective amount of a gel-forming composition into a subterranean formation, the gel-forming composition being operable when gelled in the formation for retarding the flow of fluid therein. The gel-forming composition consists of: i. a first substance dissolved in water to form an aqueous solution, the first substance being selected from the group consisting of polyvivyl alcohols, and mixtures thereof, wherein the gel-forming composition contains an amount of the first substance of from about 0.5 to about 5 weight percent of the gel-forming composition, and ii. an effective amount of glutaraldehyde which is operable for forming a weakly acidic condition having a pH from about 5.5 to less than 7 in the gel-forming composition and also operable for promoting crosslinking of the first substance and glutaraldehyde and for forming a gel from the gel-forming composition under the weakly acidic condition within a period of time no greater than about 5 days without adding an acidic catalyst to the gel-forming composition to lower the pH of the gel-forming composition below about 5.5.

  20. Secured Information Flow for Asynchronous Sequential Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Secured Information Flow for Asynchronous Sequential Processes Isabelle Attali, Denis Caromel for unauthorized information flows. As a final result, all authorized communication paths are secure: no disclosure a new issue in data confidentiality: authorization of secured information flow transiting (by the mean

  1. The ultra-high lime with aluminum process for removing chloride from recirculating cooling water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdel-wahab, Ahmed Ibraheem Ali

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE ULTRA-HIGH LIME WITH ALUMINUM PROCESS FOR REMOVING CHLORIDE FROM RECIRCULATING COOLING WATER A Dissertation by AHMED IBRAHEEM ALI ABDEL-WAHAB Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...-WAHAB Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Committee) Robin L. Autenrieth (Member...

  2. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  3. Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Arora, Ravi; Kilanowski, David

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention describes features that can be used to control flow to an array of microchannels. The invention also describes methods in which a process stream is distributed to plural microchannels.

  4. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode arc furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, William K.; Turner, Paul C.; Addison, G.W. (AJT Enterprises, Inc.)

    2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spend aluminum pot liner is crushed, iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine, and CO.

  5. Method for processing aluminum spent potliner in a graphite electrode ARC furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, William K. (Lebanon, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Independence, OR); Addison, Gerald W. (St. Stephen, SC)

    2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of processing spent aluminum pot liner containing carbon, cyanide compositions, fluorides and inorganic oxides. The spent aluminum pot liner is crushed iron oxide is added to form an agglomerated material. The agglomerated material is melted in an electric arc furnace having the electrodes submerged in the molten material to provide a reducing environment during the furnace operation. In the reducing environment, pot liner is oxidized while the iron oxides are reduced to produce iron and a slag substantially free of cyanide compositions and fluorides. An off-gas including carbon oxides and fluorine is treated in an air pollution control system with an afterburner and a scrubber to produce NaF, water and a gas vented to the atmosphere free of cyanide compositions, fluorine and CO.

  6. aluminum-lithium alloys processed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deformation, simulation, flow stress model, I. Sambhunath. P. S; Sijo. M. T 36 Advance Digital Imaging Process for Tungsten Alloys Liquid-Phase Sintered in Microgravity W. B...

  7. Mercury-free dissolution of aluminum-clad fuel in nitric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christian, J.D.; Anderson, P.A.

    1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mercury-free dissolution process for aluminum involves placing the aluminum in a dissolver vessel in contact with nitric acid-fluoboric acid mixture at an elevated temperature. By maintaining a continuous flow of the acid mixture through the dissolver vessel, an effluent containing aluminum nitrate, nitric acid, fluoboric acid and other dissolved components are removed. 5 figs.

  8. Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Xiang-Dong (Allentown, PA); Parris, Gene E. (Coopersburg, PA); Toseland, Bernard A. (Allentown, PA); Battavio, Paula J. (Allentown, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

  9. Effect of laser shock processing (LSP) on the fatigue resistance of an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaxin, T.; Yongkang, Z.; Hong, Z.; Chengye, Y.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser shock induced stress wave is described and measured with a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) transducer. A principle for selecting laser parameters is proposed. A small sized laser with a high power is used for Laser Shock Processing (LSP). The fatigue life of the aluminum alloy 2024T62 is greatly improved after LSP. With 95% confidence, the mean fatigue life of LSP specimens is 4.5--9.8 times that of unshocked ones. The fatigue and fracture resistance mechanisms of LSP such as the variation of the surface hardness, the microstructure and the fracture section of specimens before and after LSP are analyzed.

  10. Simulations of ductile flow in brittle material processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luh, M.H.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is continuing on the effects of thermal properties of the cutting tool and workpiece on the overall temperature distribution. Using an Eulerian finite element model, diamond and steel tools cutting aluminum have been simulated at various, speeds, and depths of cut. The relative magnitude of the thermal conductivity of the tool and the workpiece is believed to be a primary factor in the resulting temperature distribution in the workpiece. This effect is demonstrated in the change of maximum surface temperatures for diamond on aluminum vs. steel on aluminum. As a preliminary step toward the study of ductile flow in brittle materials, the relative thermal conductivities of diamond on polycarbonate is simulated. In this case, the maximum temperature shifts from the rake face of the tool to the surface of the machined workpiece, thus promoting ductile flow in the workpiece surface.

  11. A coupled thermomechanical, thermal transport and segregation analysis of the solidification of Aluminum alloys on molds of uneven topographies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    of Aluminum alloys on molds of uneven topographies Deep Samantaa and Nicholas Zabarasa a Materials Process and segregation analysis of Aluminum alloys solidifying on uneven surfaces is presented here. Uneven surfaces of solidification of an Aluminum alloy. The role of inverse segregation, arising from shrinkage driven flow

  12. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xiuli, E-mail: feng.97@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Huijie, E-mail: liuhj@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lippold, John C., E-mail: lippold.1@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium ? precipitates from the base metal ?? precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: • SZ grain size (? 1 ?m) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. • Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. • Metastable ?? in the base metal transforms to equilibrium ? in the stir zone. • Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  13. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  14. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic

  15. Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor Closed reactor Active Zone -- chemical quasi- equilibria, similarity principles and macroscopic kinetics", in: Lectures on Plasma Physics

  16. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  17. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  18. Energy Conservation Design Features of the ARCO Metals Logan County Aluminum Process Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speer, J. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Annealing of aluminum coils will be accomplished in radiant tube furnaces with variable speed fan drives in an inert atmosphere produced by an electric powered air separation plant. These furnaces will use recuperative burners. The HVAC system incorporates...

  19. Two-dimensional Ricci flow as a stochastic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Frasca

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that, for a two-dimensional Riemannian manifold, the Ricci flow is obtained by a Wiener process.

  20. Removal of Chloride from Wastewater by Advanced Softening Process Using Electrochemically Generated Aluminum Hydroxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustafa, Syed Faisal

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    produced mass of aluminum and theoretical mass as predicted by Faraday’s law vs time during electrolysis of 30 mM NaCl electrolyte solution. ........................................................................................... 35 Figure 8 Change... of pH versus time during electrolysis performed at different current values of 30mM NaCl electrolyte solution. ...................................................... 36 Figure 9 Removal of chloride during advanced softening experiment performed after...

  1. An evaluation of direct pressure sensors for monitoring the aluminum die casting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted as part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored project Die Cavity Instrumentation. One objective of that project was to evaluate thermal, pressure, and gas flow process monitoring sensors in or near the die cavity as a means of securing improved process monitoring and control and better resultant part quality. The objectives of this thesis are to (1) evaluate a direct cavity pressure sensor in a controlled production campaign at the GM Casting Advanced Development Center (CADC) at Bedford, Indiana; and (2) develop correlations between sensor responses and product quality in terms of the casting weight, volume, and density. A direct quartz-based pressure sensor developed and marked by Kistler Instrument Corp. was acquired for evaluating as an in-cavity liquid metal pressure sensor. This pressure sensor is designed for use up to 700 C and 2,000 bars (29,000 psi). It has a pressure overload capacity up to 2,500 bars (36,250 psi).

  2. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) Improving Process Heating System...

  3. Process for mitigating corrosion and increasing the conductivity of steel studs in soderberg anodes of aluminum reduction cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Ramsey, James A. (The Dalles, OR)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion resistant electrically conductive coating on steel anode studs used in the production of aluminum by electrolysis.

  4. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, Daniel M. (Livermore, CA); Ramsey, Philip B. (Livermore, CA); Juntz, Robert S. (Hayward, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite's high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding.

  5. Process for the fabrication of aluminum metallized pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Ramsey, P.B.; Juntz, R.S.

    1995-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is disclosed for fabricating pyrolytic graphite sputtering targets with superior heat transfer ability, longer life, and maximum energy transmission. Anisotropic pyrolytic graphite is contoured and/or segmented to match the erosion profile of the sputter target and then oriented such that the graphite`s high thermal conductivity planes are in maximum contact with a thermally conductive metal backing. The graphite contact surface is metallized, using high rate physical vapor deposition (HRPVD), with an aluminum coating and the thermally conductive metal backing is joined to the metallized graphite target by one of four low-temperature bonding methods; liquid-metal casting, powder metallurgy compaction, eutectic brazing, and laser welding. 11 figs.

  6. Quantum Processes and Energy-Momentum Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Hiley; D. Robson

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we focus on energy flows in simple quantum systems. This is achieved by concentrating on the quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. We show how this equation appears in the standard quantum formalism in essentially three different but related ways, from the standard Schr\\"{o}dingier equation, from Lagrangian field theory and from the von Neumann-Moyal algebra. This equation allows us to track the energy flow using the energy-momentum tensor, the components of which are related to weak values of the four-momentum operator. This opens up a new way to explore these components empirically. The algebraic approach enables us to discuss the physical significance of the underlying non-commutative symplectic geometry, raising questions as to the structure of particles in quantum systems.

  7. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

  8. Solar thermal aerosol flow reaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Pitts, J. Roland; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Tamburini, Joseph R.

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an environmentally beneficial process using concentrated sunlight to heat radiation absorbing particles to carry out highly endothermic gas phase chemical reactions ultimately resulting in the production of hydrogen or hydrogen synthesis gases.

  9. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

    2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful exploitation of the vast amount of heat stored beneath the earth’s surface in hydrothermal and fluid-limited, low permeability geothermal resources would greatly expand the Nation’s domestic energy inventory and thereby promote a more secure energy supply, a stronger economy and a cleaner environment. However, a major factor limiting the expanded development of current hydrothermal resources as well as the production of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is insufficient knowledge about the chemical processes controlling subsurface fluid flow. With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350°C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350°C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earth’s crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300°C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

  10. Analysis of Transient Processes in a Radiophysical Flow System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. N. Egorov; A. A. Koronovskii; A. E. Hramov

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Transient processes in a third-order radiophysical flow system are studied and a map of the transient process duration versus initial conditions is constructed and analyzed. The results are compared to the arrangement of submanifolds of the stable and unstable cycles in the Poincare section of the system studied.

  11. Multiphase Flow Modeling of Biofuel Production Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Gaston; D. P. Guillen; J. Tester

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Secure Energy Initiative, the INL is performing research in areas that are vital to ensuring clean, secure energy supplies for the future. The INL Hybrid Energy Systems Testing (HYTEST) Laboratory is being established to develop and test hybrid energy systems with the principal objective to safeguard U.S. Energy Security by reducing dependence on foreign petroleum. HYTEST involves producing liquid fuels in a Hybrid Energy System (HES) by integrating carbon-based (i.e., bio-mass, oil-shale, etc.) with non-carbon based energy sources (i.e., wind energy, hydro, geothermal, nuclear, etc.). Advances in process development, control and modeling are the unifying vision for HES. This paper describes new modeling tools and methodologies to simulate advanced energy processes. Needs are emerging that require advanced computational modeling of multiphase reacting systems in the energy arena, driven by the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act, which requires production of 36 billion gal/yr of biofuels by 2022, with 21 billion gal of this as advanced biofuels. Advanced biofuels derived from microalgal biomass have the potential to help achieve the 21 billion gal mandate, as well as reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Production of biofuels from microalgae is receiving considerable interest due to their potentially high oil yields (around 600 gal/acre). Microalgae have a high lipid content (up to 50%) and grow 10 to 100 times faster than terrestrial plants. The use of environmentally friendly alternatives to solvents and reagents commonly employed in reaction and phase separation processes is being explored. This is accomplished through the use of hydrothermal technologies, which are chemical and physical transformations in high-temperature (200-600 C), high-pressure (5-40 MPa) liquid or supercritical water. Figure 1 shows a simplified diagram of the production of biofuels from algae. Hydrothermal processing has significant advantages over other biomass processing methods with respect to separations. These 'green' alternatives employ a hybrid medium that, when operated supercritically, offers the prospect of tunable physicochemical properties. Solubility can be rapidly altered and phases partitioned selectively to precipitate or dissolve certain components by altering temperature or pressure in the near-critical region. The ability to tune the solvation properties of water in the highly compressible near-critical region facilitates partitioning of products or by-products into separate phases to separate and purify products. Since most challenges related to lipid extraction are associated with the industrial scale-up of integrated extraction systems, the new modeling capability offers the prospect of addressing previously untenable scaling issues.

  12. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  13. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial-purity aluminum by the direct-reduction process. Third annual technical report, 1980 January 1-1980 December 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, M.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress on the program to demonstrate the technical feasibility of a pilot-sized Direct Reduction Process for producing aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy is reported for Phase C. Progress is reported on reduction including the following tasks: supply burden material; burden beneficiation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot modifications; reactor scale-up design; calculating heat and mass balance; processing mathematical modeling; effects of process variables; information on supportive analytical, phase identification, and mechanical engineering data. Progress on alloy purification is reported in the following tasks: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; and supportive mechanical engineering. Progress on purification to commercial grade aluminum is reported on: pilot unit installation; effects of pilot operating parameters; pilot unit modifications; support pilot operations; and supportive expended man-hours. Plans for Phase D are noted. (MCW)

  14. Plasma enhanced atomic layer batch processing of aluminum doped titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehnert, Wolfgang; Ruhl, Guenther; Gschwandtner, Alexander [Infineon Technologies AG, Wernerwerkstrasse 2, Regensburg, 93049 (Germany); R3T GmbH, Hochstrasse 1, Taufkirchen, 82024 (Germany)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among many promising high-k dielectrics, TiO{sub 2} is an interesting candidate because of its relatively high k value of over 40 and its easy integration into existing semiconductor manufacturing schemes. The most critical issues of TiO{sub 2} are its low electrical stability and its high leakage current density. However, doping TiO{sub 2} with Al has shown to yield significant improvement of layer quality on Ru electrodes [S. K. Kim et al., Adv. Mater. 20, 1429 (2008)]. In this work we investigated if atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible in a batch system. Electrical characterizations were done using common electrode materials like TiN, TaN, or W. Additionally, the effect of plasma enhanced processing in this reactor was studied. For this investigation a production batch ALD furnace has been retrofitted with a plasma source which can be used for post deposition anneals with oxygen radicals as well as for directly plasma enhanced ALD. After evaluation of several Ti precursors a deposition process for AlTiO{sub x} with excellent film thickness and composition uniformity was developed. The effects of post deposition anneals, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interlayers between electrode and TiO{sub 2}, Al doping concentration, plasma enhanced deposition and electrode material type on leakage current density are shown. An optimized AlTiO{sub x} deposition process on TaN electrodes yields to leakage current density of 5 x 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at 2 V and k values of about 35. Thus, it could be demonstrated that a plasma enhanced batch ALD process for Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible with acceptable leakage current density on a standard electrode material.

  15. Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David A.

    Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity Problem Presenter Ram Ramanan Bloom Energy: Introduction Bloom Energy manufactures power modules based on fuel cell technology. These are built up their possible placement within a cell assembly. Currently, these rules for assembling the basic components

  16. Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    .. ) Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys Welds made with sharp bevel-groove weld aluminum and by aluminum alloy 5456 have been studied. The results indicate that initial absorption varies, many aluminum alloys contain magnesium or zinc, which are easily vaporized and thereby form a plasma

  17. MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

  18. Microstructure-strength relationship of a deformation processed aluminum-titanium composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, T.

    1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanical properties, electrical properties and microstructures have been evaluated for an Al-20 wt % Ti deformation processed metal metal matrix composite (DMMC). The strength of the swaged, extruded and wire drawn composite increases several-fold with increasing deformation up to a true strain of 12.1, the maximum investigated. At this point the Ti was elongated and SEM and TEM analysis of the transverse direction of the wire showed the ribbon-like filaments that are common for this type of material. Texture development was also characterized to explain the deformation characteristics of the composite materials. The Ti filaments acquired a <10{bar 1}0> fiber texture during deformation, and the Al filaments acquired a dual texture of (111) and (100). Resistivity measurements of the composite showed that for the highest deformed sample ({eta} = 12.1), the resistivity increased linearly with temperature up to the temperature where Al{sub 3}Ti formed. At this point the slope increased. Beyond this point, the resistivity of the sample never returned to its original value. The temperature where Al{sub 3}Ti forms was investigated using DTA and XRD analysis. The reaction temperature decreases with increasing deformation true strain ({eta}) and filament spacing.

  19. Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Houseworth

    2001-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and radionuclide transport is a component of the natural barriers that affects potential repository performance. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) model, and underlying process models, of this natural barrier component capture some, but not all, of the associated features, events, and processes (FEPs) as identified in the FEPs Database (Freeze, et al. 2001 [154365]). This analysis and model report (AMR) discusses all FEPs identified as associated with UZ flow and radionuclide transport. The purpose of this analysis is to give a comprehensive summary of all UZ flow and radionuclide transport FEPs and their treatment in, or exclusion from, TSPA models. The scope of this analysis is to provide a summary of the FEPs associated with the UZ flow and radionuclide transport and to provide a reference roadmap to other documentation where detailed discussions of these FEPs, treated explicitly in TSPA models, are offered. Other FEPs may be screened out from treatment in TSPA by direct regulatory exclusion or through arguments concerning low probability and/or low consequence of the FEPs on potential repository performance. Arguments for exclusion of FEPs are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from the UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which the FEPs are included in the UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document. This report has been prepared in accordance with the technical work plan for the unsaturated zone subproduct element (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). The purpose of this report is to document that all FEPs are either included in UZ flow and transport models for TSPA, or can be excluded from UZ flow and transport models for TSPA on the basis of low probability or low consequence. Arguments for exclusion are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which FEPs are included in UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document.

  20. Event-Processing Middleware with Information Flow Control Event processing systems have seen a recent surge in popularity and applicability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietzuch, Peter

    Event-Processing Middleware with Information Flow Control Motivation · Event processing systems · There is a strong case for collaboration between these organisations ... · ... however strict access control policy must be maintained · Policy enforcement that controls the information flow between components allows

  1. A simple segregated flow model for a WAG process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Christopher Wright

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    integration, a volumetric balance of the injectants and the initial reservoir fluids is obtained. The model was developed with several simplifying assumptions including immiscible water and gas phases, incompressible fluid f'low, no trapped oil volumes... with the process are the relatively higher sweep efficiencies of water floods and the low residual oil saturations of miscible gas injection. The mechanism oP water flooding is generally well understood. Many Pields have been and still are being waterflooded...

  2. Nondestructive detection of an undesirable metallic phase, T.sub.1, during processing of aluminum-lithium alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buck, Otto (Ames, IA); Bracci, David J. (Maryland Heights, MO); Jiles, David C. (Ames, IA); Brasche, Lisa J. H. (Nevada, IA); Shield, Jeffrey E. (Ames, IA); Chumbley, Leonard S. (Ames, IA)

    1990-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for detecting the T.sub.1 phase in aluminum-lithium alloys through simultaneous measurement of conductivity and hardness. In employing eddy current to measure conductivity, when the eddy current decreases with aging of the alloy, while the hardness of the material continues to increase, the presence of the T.sub.1 phase may be detected.

  3. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  4. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  5. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  6. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  7. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Transportation Process & Flow

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06)Pipeline UtilizationProcess and Flow

  8. www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 12011, Vol. 10 Flow Processes in the Dry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    www.VadoseZoneJournal.org | 12011, Vol. 10 Flow Processes in the Dry Regime: The Effect believe that noncontinuum processes such as vapor diffusion and film flow contribute to the observed vadose zone processes in general. Using a theoreti- cal film flow equation that incorporates the surface

  9. Aluminum Leaching of ''Archived'' Sludge from Tanks 8F, 11H, and 12H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FONDEUR, FERNANDOF.

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum can promote formation or dissolution of networks in hydroxide solid solutions. When present in large amounts it will act as a network former increasing both the viscosity and the surface tension of melts. This translates into poor free flow properties that affect pour rate of glass production in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To mitigate this situation, DWPF operations limit the amount of aluminum contained in sludge. This study investigated the leaching of aluminum compounds from archived sludge samples. The conclusions found boehmite present as the predominant aluminum compound in sludge from two tanks. We did not identify an aluminum compound in sludge from the third tank. We did not detect any amorphous aluminum hydroxide in the samples. The amount of goethite measured 4.2 percentage weight while hematite measured 3.7 percentage weight in Tank 11H sludge. The recommended recipe for removing gibbsite in sludge proved inefficient for digesting boehmite, removing less than 50 per cent of the compound within 48 hours. The recipe did remove boehmite when the test ran for 10 days (i.e., 7 more days than the recommended baseline leaching period). Additions of fluoride and phosphate to Tank 12H archived sludge did not improve the aluminum leaching efficiency of the baseline recipe.

  10. Features, Events and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Persoff

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the unsaturated zone (UZ) features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling that supports the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A screening decision, either Included or Excluded, is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for the screening decision. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 10 CFR 63.114 (d, e, and f) [DIRS 173273]. The FEPs deal with UZ flow and radionuclide transport, including climate, surface water infiltration, percolation, drift seepage, and thermally coupled processes. This analysis summarizes the implementation of each FEP in TSPA-LA (that is, how the FEP is included) and also provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (that is, why the FEP is excluded). This report supports TSPA-LA.

  11. The Use of Aluminum Process Reject Heat as the Source of Energy for a District Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, J.; Olszewski, M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the highway next to the Bellingh~~ airport and about 2 miles north of the city, where the hot water storage tanks are located. Supply water for the city and return water from the city are routed to separate storage tanks at this point. Aluminum production... for constructing the transmission line from [ntalco and the installation of equipment at Intalco. Cost optimization studies will also define the size of the hot water storage tanks, and when this size has been determined, alternate sites for locating...

  12. Fabrication and applications of nanocomposite structures using anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gapin, Andrew Isaac

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hall, Process of Reducing Aluminum from its Fluoride SaltsFrary and Z. Jeffries, Aluminum and its Production, McGraw-1 (1948). J. E. Hatch, Aluminum Properties and Physical

  13. Influence of transient flow and solder bump resistance on underfill process , W.J. Zhangb,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, WJ "Chris"

    . In the study for a capillary flow within a tube reported by Newman [12], for a horizontal capillary flowU N C O R R EC TED PR O O F Influence of transient flow and solder bump resistance on underfill The underfill flow process is one of the important steps in Microsystems technology. One of the best known

  14. Enabling Process Support for Advanced Applications with the AristaFlow BPM Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Enabling Process Support for Advanced Applications with the AristaFlow BPM Suite Andreas Lanz1. In this software demonstration we show how the AristaFlow BPM Suite ­ an adaptive process management system) as offered by AristaFlow. 1 Introduction In many domains IT support can benefit from BPM technologies

  15. HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modelling Groundwater flow Solute transport INTRODUCTION Predicting any natural process is a very difficultHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE MODELLING Scales of heterogeneity, REV, dispersion and measurement scale groundwater flow and convection

  16. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major accomplishments for the program include definition of the system thermo-chemistry, demonstration of reactor stage 1, development of reactor stage 2 critical components in a 500 kW module, experimental determination of the vapor recovery reactor fundamentals, detailed design and installation of an advanced stage 1/vapor recovery reactor, feasibility of efficient separation of Al-C metal alloy product, updated capital and operating cost estimates, and development of computer models for all steps of the Advanced Reactor Process.

  17. New, More Efficient Technology for Remelting Aluminum Chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, D.

    step. Lastly, a new more efficient technology for stirring the molten aluminum during the recycling process will be introduce. A molten metal pump will be employed to stir the molten aluminum more completely....

  18. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yorstos, Yannis C.

    2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes progress made in the various thrust areas of the project, which include internal drives for oil recovery, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes and the flow of fluids with yield stress.

  19. Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Pajarito Plateau Groundwater Flow and Transport Modeling 1 Process-Level and Systems Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport Beneath the Pajarito Plateau: Migration of High Explosives from Technical Area Groundwater Modeling Project Systems Model Vadose Zone Model Regional Aquifer Model #12;Pajarito Plateau

  20. RIS-M-2357 MULTILEVEL FLOW MODELLING OF PROCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of complex systems. A model of a nuclear power plant (PWR) is presented in the paper for illustration. Due SPECIFICATIONS 19 A MULTILEVEL FLOW MODEL OF A PWR 22 APPLICATIONS OF MULTILEVEL FLOW MODELS 24 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

  1. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  2. Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Process Flow Diagram Mass Balance Calculations for K West Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REED, A.V.

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to develop the rational for the material balances that are documented in the KW Basin water system Level 1 process flow diagrams.

  3. Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT): Development of Elevated Temperature Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) Alloy and Its Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, David C. [Eck Industreis, Inc.] [Eck Industreis, Inc.; Gegal, Gerald A.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide a production capable cast aluminum metal matrix composite (MMC) alloy with an operating temperature capability of 250-300°C. Important industrial sectors as well as the military now seek lightweight aluminum alloy castings that can operate in temperature ranges of 250-300°C. Current needs in this temperature range are being satisfied by the use of titanium alloy castings. These have the desired strength properties but the end components are heavier and significantly more costly. Also, the energy requirements for production of titanium alloy castings are significantly higher than those required for production of aluminum alloys and aluminum alloy castings.

  4. Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum Oxide Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum to hydroxylation of the aluminum terminated surface, the two water process was found to be the most exothermic, occurring within 10-2 s. I. Introduction As one of the most important ceramic materials, R-aluminum oxide

  5. Coarse-scale Modeling of Flow in Gas-injection Processes for Enhanced Oil Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambers, James

    Coarse-scale Modeling of Flow in Gas-injection Processes for Enhanced Oil Recovery James V. Lambers of gas-injection processes for enhanced oil recovery may exhibit geometrically complex features

  6. Genealogy of flows of continuous-state branching processes via flows of partitions and the Eve property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labbé, Cyril

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We encode the genealogy of a continuous-state branching process associated with a branching mechanism $\\Psi$ - or $\\Psi$-CSBP in short - using a stochastic flow of partitions. This encoding holds for all branching mechanisms and appears as a very tractable object to deal with asymptotic behaviours and convergences. In particular we study the so-called Eve property - the existence of an ancestor from which the entire population descends asymptotically - and give a necessary and sufficient condition on the $\\Psi$-CSBP for this property to hold. Finally, we show that the flow of partitions unifies the lookdown representation and the flow of subordinators when the Eve property holds.

  7. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  8. Fabrication of nickel microbump on aluminum using electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, H.; Honma, H. [Kanto Gakuin Univ., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of nickel microbumps on an aluminum electrode using a nickel displacement and a direct nickel plating process was investigated. Electroless nickel plating reaction with hypophosphite as a reducing agent was not initiated on the aluminum substrate, because aluminum does not have catalytic action on the oxidation of hypophosphite. Accordingly, nickel was initially deposited on the aluminum using nickel displacement plating for the initiation of the electroless plating. Nickel bumps on the aluminum electrode were fabricated by treatment of the nickel displacement plating followed by electroless nickel plating. Nickel microbumps also can be formed on the aluminum electrode without the displacement plating process. Activation of the aluminum surface is an indispensable process to initiate electroless nickel plating. Uniform bumps 20 {micro}m wide and 15 {micro}m high with good configuration were obtained by direct nickel plating after being activated with dimethyl amine borane.

  9. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  10. The Use of Aluminum Process Reject Heat as the Source of Energy for a District Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCabe, J.; Olszewski, M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rocket Research Company (RRC) is investigating the use of industrial process reject heat as a source of energy for large scale district heating. The District heating System is a network of closed-loop hot water pipes that recover energy from...

  11. aluminum alloy aa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For a wide Grujicic, Mica 2 Processing and Properties of Environmentally-Friendly Corrosion Resistant Hybrid Nanocomposite Coatings for Aluminum Alloy AA2024. Open Access...

  12. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Aluminum Association The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum...

  13. Flow Decomposition Reveals Dynamical Structure of Markov Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianghong Shi; Tianqi Chen; Bo Yuan; Ping Ao

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Markov process is widely applied in almost all aspects of literature, especially important for understanding non-equilibrium processes. We introduce a decomposition to general Markov process in this paper. This decomposition decomposes the process into 3 independent parts: stationary distribution, symmetric detailed-balance part and anti-symmetric breaking detailed-balance part. This complete decomposition captures the steady state as well as the dynamics of the process, providing an elegant perspective for construction or analyzing problems. In light of the decomposition, a unique definition of relative entropy is found to formally separate the effect of detailed-balance part and breaking detailed-balance part. We find that the relative Gini entropy production introduced in the paper is not affected by the non-detailed balance part of the process. This property do not holds for other entropy definition in general discrete case.

  14. Strengthening behavior of chopped multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, S.E.; Bae, D.H., E-mail: donghyun@yonsei.ac.kr

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Strengthening behavior of the aluminum composites reinforced with chopped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or aluminum carbide formed during annealing at 500 °C has been investigated. The composites were fabricated by hot-rolling the powders which were ball-milled under various conditions. During the early annealing process, aluminum atoms can cluster inside the tube due to the diffusional flow of aluminum atoms into the tube, providing an increase of the strength of the composite. Further annealing induces the formation of the aluminum carbide phase, leading to an overall drop in the strength of the composites. While the strength of the composites can be evaluated according to the rule of mixture, a particle spacing effect can be additionally imparted on the strength of the composites reinforced with the chopped MWCNTs or the corresponding carbides since the reinforcing agents are smaller than the submicron matrix grains. - Highlights: • Strengthening behavior of chopped CNT reinforced Al-based composites is investigated. • Chopped CNTs have influenced the strength and microstructures of the composites. • Chopped CNTs are created under Ar- 3% H2 atmosphere during mechanical milling. • Strength can be evaluated by the rule of the mixture and a particle spacing effect.

  15. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

  16. Comparison of constitutive laws on the modeling of thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of an aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .guines@insa-rennes.fr, d email: shdgj@sdu.edu.cn Keywords: Hardening law; Aluminum alloy; Flow stress; Temperature; Strain, the innovative lightweight materials, such as aluminum alloys, have been widely adopted in the automotive published to model the thermo-viscoplastic behaviour of the aluminum alloys. A modified Bergström model

  17. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the thrust areas include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  18. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  19. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) autoroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle...

  20. Aluminum-Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination of Aminoalkenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koller, Juergen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination ofgroup 13 metals such as aluminum are exceedingly inexpensive

  1. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Anton (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  2. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

  3. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  4. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-based fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willit, J. L.

    1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully demonstrated aluminum electrorefining from a U-Al-Si alloy that simulates spent aluminum-based reactor fuel. The aluminum product contains less than 200 ppm uranium. All the results obtained have been in agreement with predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. We have also demonstrated the need for adequate stirring to achieve a low-uranium product. Most of the other process steps have been demonstrated in other programs. These include uranium electrorefining, transuranic fission product scrubbing, fission product oxidation, and product consolidation by melting. Future work will focus on the extraction of active metal and rare earth fission products by a molten flux salt and scale-up of the aluminum electrorefining.

  5. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  6. High thermal conductivity aluminum nitride ceramic body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseby, I. C.; Bobik, C. F.

    1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a polycrystalline aluminum nitride ceramic body having a porosity of less than about 10% by volume of said body and a thermal conductivity greater than 1.0 W/cm-K at 22/sup 0/ C., which comprises forming a mixture comprised of aluminum nitride powder and an yttrium additive selected from the group consisting of yttrium, yttrium hydride, yttrium nitride and mixtures thereof, said aluminum nitride and yttrium additive having a predetermined oxygen content, said mixture having a composition wherein the equivalent % of yttrium, aluminum, nitrogen and oxygen shapping said mixture into a compact and sintering said compact at a temperature ranging from about 1850/sup 0/ C. to about 2170/sup 0/ C. in an atmosphere selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, argon, hydrogen and mixtures thereof to produce said polycrystalline body.

  7. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Yanis C.

    2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  8. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yortsos, Y.C.

    2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an investigation of various multi-phase and multiscale transport and reaction processes associated with heavy oil recovery. The thrust areas of the project include the following: Internal drives, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes, fluid displacements and the effect of instabilities and heterogeneities and the flow of fluids with yield stress. These find respective applications in foamy oils, the evolution of dissolved gas, internal steam drives, the mechanics of concurrent and countercurrent vapor-liquid flows, associated with thermal methods and steam injection, such as SAGD, the in-situ combustion, the upscaling of displacements in heterogeneous media and the flow of foams, Bingham plastics and heavy oils in porous media and the development of wormholes during cold production.

  9. Neural Network Modeling of Abrasive Flow Machining Alice E. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Alice E.

    -line controller for abrasive flow machining of automotive engine intake manifolds. The process is only observable of critical components. It has been applied in the aerospace, automotive, electronic and die-making industries that the Ford Contour SVT intake manifold will be an #12;aluminum alloy. An optimal intake manifold would

  10. Static scheduling of synchronous data flow programs for digital signal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.A.; Messerschmitt, D.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large grain data flow (LGDF) programming is natural and convenient for describing digital signal processing (DSP) systems, but its runtime overhead is costly in real time or cost-sensitive applications. In some situations, designers are not willing to squander computing resources for the sake of programmer convenience. This is particularly true when the target machine is a programmable DSP chip. However, the runtime overhead inherent in most LGDF implementations is not required for most signal processing systems because such systems are mostly synchronous (in the DSP sense). Synchronous data flow (SDF) differs from traditional data flow in that the amount of data produced and consumed by a data flow node is specified a priori for each input and output. This is equivalent to specifying the relative sample rates in signal processing system. This means that the scheduling of SDF nodes need not be done at runtime, but can be done at compile time (statically), so the runtime overhead evaporates. The sample rates can all be different, which is not true of most current data-driven digital signal processing programming methodologies. Synchronous data flow is closely related to computation graphs, a special case of Petri nets. This self-contained paper develops the theory necessary to statically schedule SDF programs on single or multiple processors. A class of static (compile time) scheduling algorithms is proven valid, and specific algorithms are given for scheduling SDF systems onto single or multiple processors.

  11. Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a) T. Daniel Crawford,b) Justin of the aluminum monocarbonyl species AlCO and AlOC have been performed to predict the geometries, fragmentation, Ogden, and Oswald6 first isolated aluminum dicarbonyls in solid krypton and identified the species

  12. Study of an ammonia-based wet scrubbing process in a continuous flow system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, James X.; Lee, Anita S.; Kitchin, John R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B.; Luebke, David R.; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous gas and liquid flow, regenerative scrubbing process for CO{sub 2} capture was demonstrated at the bench-scale level. An aqueous ammonia-based solution captures CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in an absorber and releases a nearly pure stream of CO{sub 2} in the regenerator. After the regeneration, the solution of ammonium compounds is recycled to the absorber. The design of a continuous flow unit was based on earlier exploratory results from a semi-batch reactor, where a CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} simulated flue gas mixture flowed through a well-mixed batch of ammonia-based solution. During the semi-batch tests, the solution was cycled between absorption and regeneration steps to measure the carrying capacity of the solution at various initial ammonia concentrations and temperatures. Consequentially, a series of tests were conducted on the continuous unit to observe the effect of various parameters on CO{sub 2} removal efficiency and regenerator effectiveness within the flow system. The parameters that were studied included absorber temperature, regenerator temperature, initial NH{sub 3} concentration, simulated flue gas flow rate, liquid solvent inventory in the flow system, and height of the packed-bed absorber. From this testing and subsequent testing, ammonia losses from both the absorption and regeneration steps were quantified, and attempts were made to maintain steady state during operations. Implications of experimental results with respect to process design are discussed.

  13. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  14. Aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials. 4 figs.

  15. Aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1984-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent discloses an aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  16. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving formulations. Disposal of the resulting aluminum and chromium-rich streams are different at the two sites, with vitrification into Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass at Hanford, and solidification in Saltstone at SRS. Prior to disposal, the leachate solutions must be treated to remove radionuclides, resulting in increased operating costs and extended facility processing schedules. Interim storage of leachate can also add costs and delay tank closure. Recent projections at Hanford indicate that up to 40,000 metric tons of sodium would be needed to dissolve the aluminum and maintain it in solution, which nearly doubles the amount of sodium in the entire current waste tank inventory. This underscores the dramatic impact that the aluminum leaching can have on the entire system. A comprehensive view of leaching and the downstream impacts must therefore be considered prior to implementation. Many laboratory scale tests for aluminum and chromium dissolution have been run on Hanford wastes, with samples from 46 tanks tested. Three samples from SRS tanks have been tested, out of seven tanks containing high aluminum sludge. One full-scale aluminum dissolution was successfully performed on waste at SRS in 1982, but generated a very large quantity of liquid waste ({approx}3,000,000 gallons). No large-scale tests have been done on Hanford wastes. Although the data to date give a generally positive indication that aluminum dissolution will work, many issues remain, predominantly because of variable waste compositions and changes in process conditions, downstream processing, or storage limitations. Better approaches are needed to deal with the waste volumes and limitations on disposal methods. To develop a better approach requires a more extensive understanding of the kinetics of dissolution, as well as the factors that effect rates, effectiveness, and secondary species. Models of the dissolution rate that have been developed are useful, but suffer from limitations on applicable compositional ranges, mineral phases, and particle properties that are difficult to measure. The experimental

  17. Flow analysis and nozzle-shape optimization for the cold-gas dynamic-spray process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Flow analysis and nozzle-shape optimization for the cold-gas dynamic-spray process M Grujicic1*, W, maximizes the acceleration of the particles. Furthermore, it is found that if the cold-spray nozzle, a significant increase in the average velocity of the particles at the nozzle exit can be obtained

  18. Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA Citation for published version: Loewe, L, Moodie, S & Hillston, J 2009, 'Quantifying & Hillston This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution License. Quantifying the implicit

  19. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA); DiMilia, Robert A. (Baton Rouge, LA); Dynys, Joseph M. (New Kensington, PA); Phelps, Frankie E. (Apollo, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  20. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  1. Aluminum ion batteries: electrolytes and cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Luke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes for Aluminum-Air Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.Anodes for Aluminum-Air Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.ALLOYS FOR ALUMINUM AIR BATTERIES. J. Electrochem. Soc.

  2. DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· C. Peters LawrenceMEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS" C. Peters Lawrenceinch thick 7075- T6 aluminum alloy plate. Inside corners

  3. Creating a GPS for aluminum ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Released: August 14, 2014 New approach pinpoints locations in simple zeolite catalysts Aluminum EXAFS and zeolite...

  4. ITP Aluminum: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Aluminum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    aluminum.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Aluminum: Technical Working Group on Inert Anode Technologies...

  5. Understanding the Role Water-cooling Plays during Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    Understanding the Role Water-cooling Plays during Continuous Casting of Steel and Aluminum Alloys J the mold and solidifying metal during the continuous casting of steel and aluminum alloys for the control of cooling in casting processes for both steel and aluminum alloys are evaluated. Introduction

  6. INVESTIGATION OF MULTISCALE AND MULTIPHASE FLOW, TRANSPORT AND REACTION IN HEAVY OIL RECOVERY PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yannis C. Yortsos

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is final report for contract DE-AC26-99BC15211. The report describes progress made in the various thrust areas of the project, which include internal drives for oil recovery, vapor-liquid flows, combustion and reaction processes and the flow of fluids with yield stress. The report consists mainly of a compilation of various topical reports, technical papers and research reports published produced during the three-year project, which ended on May 6, 2002 and was no-cost extended to January 5, 2003. Advances in multiple processes and at various scales are described. In the area of internal drives, significant research accomplishments were made in the modeling of gas-phase growth driven by mass transfer, as in solution-gas drive, and by heat transfer, as in internal steam drives. In the area of vapor-liquid flows, we studied various aspects of concurrent and countercurrent flows, including stability analyses of vapor-liquid counterflow, and the development of novel methods for the pore-network modeling of the mobilization of trapped phases and liquid-vapor phase changes. In the area of combustion, we developed new methods for the modeling of these processes at the continuum and pore-network scales. These models allow us to understand a number of important aspects of in-situ combustion, including steady-state front propagation, multiple steady-states, effects of heterogeneity and modes of combustion (forward or reverse). Additional aspects of reactive transport in porous media were also studied. Finally, significant advances were made in the flow and displacement of non-Newtonian fluids with Bingham plastic rheology, which is characteristic of various heavy oil processes. Various accomplishments in generic displacements in porous media and corresponding effects of reservoir heterogeneity are also cited.

  7. Investigation of Multiscale and Multiphase Flow, Transport and Reaction in Heavy Oil Recovery Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yorstos, Yanis C.

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The emphasis of this work was on investigating the mechanisms and factors that control the recovery of heavy oil with the objective to improve recovery efficiencies. For this purpose the interaction of flow transport and reaction at various scales from the pore network to the field scales were studied. Particular mechanisms to be investigated included the onset of gas flow in foamy oil production and in in-situ steam drive, gravity drainage in steam processes, the development of sustained combustion fronts and the propagation of foams in porous media. Analytical, computational and experimental methods were utilized to advance the state of the art in heavy oil recovery. Successful completion of this research was expected to lead to improvements in the Recovery efficiency of various heavy oil processes.

  8. Production of aluminum-silicon alloy and ferrosilicon and commercial purity aluminum by the direct reduction process. Second annual technical report for the period 1978 September 1-1979 December 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, M.J.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computer program was developed for simultaneously solving heat and mass balance at steady state for a flowing one-dimensional chemical reactor. Bench scale reactor results confirmed that minimum final stage reaction temperature is 1950 to 2000/sup 0/C, depending on the Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ concentration in the burden. Additions of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to the charge produced significant increase in metallic yield. A new bench reactor was designed, built, and operated to facilitate semi-continuous operation, using O/sub 2/ injection to burn coke supporting the burden, resulting in burden movement. Validity of the equipment and test procedures was demonstrated by successfully operating the reactor as an iron blast furnace at 1500/sup 0/C. Bench scale fractional crystallizer runs were continued to determine the impurity effects of Fe up to 6.9% and Ti up to 1.25% on alloy product purity and yield. High initial impurity concentrations resulted in less pure Al-Si product and product yield below 50% due to Al and Si losses as Fe-Si-Al and Ti-Si-Al intermetallics. Long term testing was continued in the large bench scale membrane cell to evaluate woven cloth membrane and other construction materials, operating procedures, and effects of operating parameters on cell performance. Included in the latter were starting alloy composition, current density, anode-cathode spacing, and electrolyte composition.

  9. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Don't worry, that beer can you're holding is not going to spontaneously burst into flames. June 30, 2014...

  10. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason Allan (Mastic, NY); Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  11. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  12. Overview of Aluminum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreach to MultifamilyAluminum Overview of Aluminum

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information The primary aluminum industry emits PFCs and CO2 directly from the production process and indirectly emits CO2 from its energy consumption. In 2001, the U.S....

  14. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Aluminum-Alumina Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudlur, Pradeep

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary goal of this study is to determine the effects of processing conditions, compositions and microstructural morphologies of the constituents on the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of alumina (Al_2O_3) reinforced aluminum (Al...

  15. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  16. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  17. Development of an entrained flow gasifier model for process optimization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biagini, E.; Bardi, A.; Pannocchia, G.; Tognotti, L. [Consorzio Pisa Ric, Pisa (Italy). Div Energia Ambiente

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal gasification is a versatile process to convert a solid fuel in syngas, which can be further converted and separated in hydrogen, which is a valuable and environmentally acceptable energy carrier. Different technologies (fixed beds, fluidized beds, entrained flow reactors) are used, operating under different conditions of temperature, pressure, and residence time. Process studies should be performed for defining the best plant configurations and operating conditions. Although 'gasification models' can be found in the literature simulating equilibrium reactors, a more detailed approach is required for process analysis and optimization procedures. In this work, a gasifier model is developed by using AspenPlus as a tool to be implemented in a comprehensive process model for the production of hydrogen via coal gasification. It is developed as a multizonal model by interconnecting each step of gasification (preheating, devolatilization, combustion, gasification, quench) according to the reactor configuration, that is in entrained flow reactor. The model removes the hypothesis of equilibrium by introducing the kinetics of all steps and solves the heat balance by relating the gasification temperature to the operating conditions. The model allows to predict the syngas composition as well as quantity the heat recovery (for calculating the plant efficiency), 'byproducts', and residual char. Finally, in view of future works, the development of a 'gasifier model' instead of a 'gasification model' will allow different reactor configurations to be compared.

  18. Differences of growth response to aluminum excess of two Melaleuca trees differing in aluminum resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houman, Yoshifumi; Tahara, Ko; Shinmachi, Fumie; Noguchi, Akira; Satohiko, Sasaki; Hasegawa, Isao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M, Yamanoshita T, Kojima K. , Role of aluminum-bindingligands in aluminum resistance of Eucalyptus camaldulensissoils, low pH and excess aluminum are the primary factors

  19. Observation of pressure gradient and related flow rate effect on the plasma parameters in plasma processing reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Aram; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn [Solar Energy Group, LG Electronics Advanced Research Institute, 16 Woomyeon-Dong, Seocho-Gu, Seoul 137-724 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In industrial plasma processes, flow rate has been known to a key to control plasma processing results and has been discussed with reactive radical density, gas residence time, and surface reaction. In this study, it was observed that the increase in the flow rate can also change plasma parameters (electron temperature and plasma density) and electron energy distribution function in plasma processing reactor. Based on the measurement of gas pressure between the discharge region and the pumping port region, the considerable differences in the gas pressure between the two regions were found with increasing flow rate. It was also observed that even in the discharge region, the pressure gradient occurs at the high gas flow rate. This result shows that increasing the flow rate results in the pressure gradient and causes the changes in the plasma parameters.

  20. Investigation of Opportunities for High-Temperature Solar Energy in the Aluminum Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, J.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives the conclusions drawn from a study of the potential application of high-temperature solar process heat for production of aluminum.

  1. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processing and Powder Metallurgy…………………. 1.4 – Non-Powdercommonly created by powder metallurgy are being implementedbeen achieved with powder metallurgy involving an aluminum

  2. aluminum matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ... 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods Eagar, Thomas W. 2...

  3. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load.

  4. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  5. Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Chen, Zizhong; Kazemi, Hossein; Yin, Xiaolong; Pruess, Karsten; Oldenburg, Curt; Winterfeld, Philip; Zhang, Ronglei

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the final scientific one for the award DE- FE0000988 entitled “Simulation of Coupled Processes of Flow, Transport, and Storage of CO2 in Saline Aquifers.” The work has been divided into six tasks. In task, “Development of a Three-Phase Non-Isothermal CO2 Flow Module,” we developed a fluid property module for brine-CO2 mixtures designed to handle all possible phase combinations of aqueous phase, sub-critical liquid and gaseous CO2, supercritical CO2, and solid salt. The thermodynamic and thermophysical properties of brine-CO2 mixtures (density, viscosity, and specific enthalpy of fluid phases; partitioning of mass components among the different phases) use the same correlations as an earlier fluid property module that does not distinguish between gaseous and liquid CO2-rich phases. We verified the fluid property module using two leakage scenarios, one that involves CO2 migration up a blind fault and subsequent accumulation in a secondary “parasitic” reservoir at shallower depth, and another investigating leakage of CO2 from a deep storage reservoir along a vertical fault zone. In task, “Development of a Rock Mechanical Module,” we developed a massively parallel reservoir simulator for modeling THM processes in porous media brine aquifers. We derived, from the fundamental equations describing deformation of porous elastic media, a momentum conservation equation relating mean stress, pressure, and temperature, and incorporated it alongside the mass and energy conservation equations from the TOUGH2 formulation, the starting point for the simulator. In addition, rock properties, namely permeability and porosity, are functions of effective stress and other variables that are obtained from the literature. We verified the simulator formulation and numerical implementation using analytical solutions and example problems from the literature. For the former, we matched a one-dimensional consolidation problem and a two-dimensional simulation of the Mandel-Cryer effect. For the latter, we obtained a good match of temperature and gas saturation profiles, and surface uplift, after injection of hot fluid into a model of a caldera structure. In task, “Incorporation of Geochemical Reactions of Selected Important Species,” we developed a novel mathematical model of THMC processes in porous and fractured saline aquifers, simulating geo-chemical reactions associated with CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers. Two computational frameworks, sequentially coupled and fully coupled, were used to simulate the reactions and transport. We verified capabilities of the THMC model to treat complex THMC processes during CO2 sequestration by analytical solutions and we constructed reactive transport models to analyze the THMC process quantitatively. Three of these are 1D reactive transport under chemical equilibrium, a batch reaction model with equilibrium chemical reactions, and a THMC model with CO2 dissolution. In task “Study of Instability in CO2 Dissolution-Diffusion-Convection Processes,” We reviewed literature related to the study of density driven convective flows and on the instability of CO2 dissolution-diffusion-convection processes. We ran simulations that model the density-driven flow instability that would occur during CO2 sequestration. CO2 diffused through the top of the system and dissolved in the aqueous phase there, increasing its density. Density fingers formed along the top boundary, and coalesced into a few prominent ones, causing convective flow that forced the fluid to the system bottom. These simulations were in two and three dimensions. We ran additional simulations of convective mixing with density contrast caused by variable dissolved CO2 concentration in saline water, modeled after laboratory experiments in which supercritical CO2 was circulated in the headspace above a brine saturated packed sand in a pressure vessel. As CO2 dissolved into the upper part of the saturated sand, liquid phase density increases causing instability and setting off convective mixing. We obtained good agreement

  6. Aluminum Solubility in Complex Electrolytes - 13011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, S.F. [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., 1806 Terminal Dr., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., 1806 Terminal Dr., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Johnston, C.T. [Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting aluminum solubility for Hanford and Savannah River waste liquids is very important for their disposition. It is a key mission goal at each Site to leach as much aluminum as practical from sludges in order to minimize the amount of vitrified high level waste. And it is correspondingly important to assure that any soluble aluminum does not precipitate during subsequent decontamination of the liquid leachates with ion exchange. This report shows a very simple and yet thermodynamic model for aluminum solubility that is consistent with a wide range of Al liquors, from simple mixtures of hydroxide and aluminate to over 300 Hanford concentrates and to a set of 19 Bayer liquors for temperatures from 20-100 deg. C. This dimer-dS{sub mix} (DDS) model incorporates an ideal entropy of mixing along with previous reports for the Al dimer, water activities, gibbsite, and bayerite thermodynamics. We expect this model will have broad application for nuclear wastes as well as the Bayer gibbsite process industry. (authors)

  7. Possible Reasons Why Aluminum is a Beneficial Element for Melastoma malabathricum, an Aluminum Accumulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of adaptation to high aluminum condition in native plantit has been well known that aluminum (Al) toxicity restricts

  8. Automation of process accountability flow diagrams at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knepper, P.; Whiteson, R.; Strittmatter, R.; Mousseau, K.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many industrial processes (including reprocessing activities; nuclear fuel fabrication; and material storage, measurement and transfer) make use of process flow diagrams. These flows can be used for material accountancy and for data analysis. At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Technical Area (TA)-55 Plutonium Facility is home to various research and development activities involving the use of special nuclear material (SNM). A facility conducting research and development (R and D) activities using SNM must satisfy material accountability guidelines. All processes involving SNM or tritium processing, at LANL, require a process accountability flow diagram (PAFD). At LANL a technique was developed to generate PAFDs that can be coupled to a relational database for use in material accountancy. These techniques could also be used for propagation of variance, measurement control, and inventory difference analysis. The PAFD is a graphical representation of the material flow during a specific process. PAFDs are currently stored as PowerPoint files. In the PowerPoint format, the data captured by the PAFD are not easily accessible. Converting the PAFDs to an accessible electronic format is desirable for several reasons. Any program will be able to access the data contained in the PAFD. For the PAFD data to be useful in applications such as an expert system for data checking, SNM accountability, inventory difference evaluation, measurement control, and other kinds of analysis, it is necessary to interface directly with the information contained within the PAFD. The PAFDs can be approved and distributed electronically, eliminating the paper copies of the PAFDs and ensuring that material handlers have the current PAFDs. Modifications to the PAFDs are often global. Storing the data in an accessible format would eliminate the need to manually update each of the PAFDs when a global change has occurred. The goal was to determine a software package that would store the PAFDs in an accessible format that could be interfaced by various programs. After evaluating several commercial relational database and graphing software packages, VISIO Enterprise was selected. LANL is in the process of completing conversion of the existing PAFDs into VISIO Enterprise. A number of the PAFDs have been converted to VISIO Enterprise, and the data from the drawings have been exported to an ACCESS database. After the conversion has taken place, the data contained in the PAFDs will be accessible for various programs. The data that was once stored in PowerPoint will now be available for tools, including expert analysis, propagation of a variance, SNM accountability, inventory difference analysis, measurement control, and other analysis tools that have yet to be identified. Converting from the PowerPoint format to a drawing stored as a relational database will improve the ability of plant personnel to interface with the PAFD.

  9. Assessment of Controlling Processes for Field-Scale Uranium Reactive Transport under Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan; Greskowiak, Janek; Prommer, Henning; Zachara, John M.

    2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a comprehensive model-based analysis of a uranium tracer test conducted at the U.S Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300A) IFRC site. A three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport model was employed to assess the key factors and processes that control the field-scale uranium reactive transport. Taking into consideration of relevant physical and chemical processes, the selected conceptual/numerical model replicates the spatial and temporal variations of the observed U(VI) concentrations reasonably well in spite of the highly complex field conditions. A sensitivity analysis was performed to interrogate the relative importance of various processes and factors for reactive transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorption/desorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations were the most important processes and factors controlling U(VI) migration. On the other hand, cation exchange reactions, the choice of the surface complexation model, and dual-domain mass transfer processes, which were previously identified to be important in laboratory experiments, played less important roles under the field-scale experimental condition at the 300A site. However, the model simulations also revealed that the groundwater chemistry was relatively stable during the uranium tracer experiment and therefore presumably not dynamic enough to appropriately assess the effects of ion exchange reaction and the choice of surface complexation models on U(VI) sorption and desorption. Furthermore, it also showed that the field experimental duration (16 days) was not sufficiently long to precisely assess the role of a majority of the sorption sites that were accessed by slow kinetic processes within the dual domain model. The sensitivity analysis revealed the crucial role of the intraborehole flow that occurred within the long-screened monitoring wells and thus significantly affected both field-scale measurements and simulated U(VI) concentrations as a combined effect of aquifer heterogeneity and highly dynamic flow conditions. Overall, this study, which provides one of the few detailed and highly data-constrained uranium transport simulations, highlights the difference in controlling processes between laboratory and field scale that prevent a simple direct upscaling of laboratory-scale models.

  10. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  11. Efficient indium-tin-oxide free inverted organic solar cells based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide cathode and low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide electron extraction layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Dazheng; Zhang, Chunfu, E-mail: cfzhang@xidian.edu.cn; Wang, Zhizhe; Zhang, Jincheng; Tang, Shi; Wei, Wei; Sun, Li; Hao, Yue, E-mail: yhao@xidian.edu.cn [State Key Discipline Laboratory of Wide Band Gap Semiconductor Technology, School of Microelectronics, Xidian University, No. 2 South Taibai Road, Xi'an 710071 (China)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Indium-tin-oxide (ITO) free inverted organic solar cells (IOSCs) based on aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) cathode, low-temperature aqueous solution processed zinc oxide (ZnO) electron extraction layer, and poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl):[6, 6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester blend were realized in this work. The resulted IOSC with ZnO annealed at 150?°C shows the superior power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.01%, if decreasing the ZnO annealing temperature to 100?°C, the obtained IOSC also shows a PCE of 2.76%, and no light soaking issue is observed. It is found that this ZnO film not only acts as an effective buffer layer but also slightly improves the optical transmittance of AZO substrates. Further, despite the relatively inferior air-stability, these un-encapsulated AZO/ZnO IOSCs show comparable PCEs to the referenced ITO/ZnO IOSCs, which demonstrates that the AZO cathode is a potential alternative to ITO in IOSCs. Meanwhile, this simple ZnO process is compatible with large area deposition and plastic substrates, and is promising to be widely used in IOSCs and other relative fields.

  12. Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollett, Anthony D.

    Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum Abhijit Brahme1,2 , Joseph Fridy3, Aluminum, Grain Boundary Mobility, Nucleation, Oriented Growth, Oriented Nucleation, Stored Energy, Monte Carlo Modeling. #12;Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum 2 1. Introduction

  13. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peletier, Mark A., E-mail: m.a.peletier@tue.nl [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Redig, Frank, E-mail: f.h.j.redig@tudelft.nl [Delft Institute of Applied Mathematics, Technische Universiteit Delft, Mekelweg 4, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Vafayi, Kiamars, E-mail: k.vafayi@tue.nl [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Postbus 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ?; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ?² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ? for the nonlinear heat equation.

  14. A Markov Decision Process based Flow Assignment Framework for Heterogeneous Network Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA Varun Sharma Lehman Brothers Inc., India Abstract an optimal policy for allocation of flows to different networks. The optimal policy maximizes, under of the flow utilities. The flow assignment policy is periodically updated and is consulted by the flows

  15. Aluminum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat PumpAllegations ofAlumina and Aluminum

  16. Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loewe, Laurence; Hillston, Jane

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a long time biologists have used visual representations of biochemical networks to gain a quick overview of important structural properties. Recently SBGN, the Systems Biology Graphical Notation, has been developed to standardise the way in which such graphical maps are drawn in order to facilitate the exchange of information. Its qualitative Process Diagrams (SBGN-PD) are based on an implicit Process Flow Abstraction (PFA) that can also be used to construct quantitative representations, which can be used for automated analyses of the system. Here we explicitly describe the PFA that underpins SBGN-PD and define attributes for SBGN-PD glyphs that make it possible to capture the quantitative details of a biochemical reaction network. We implemented SBGNtext2BioPEPA, a tool that demonstrates how such quantitative details can be used to automatically generate working Bio-PEPA code from a textual representation of SBGN-PD that we developed. Bio-PEPA is a process algebra that was designed for implementing quant...

  17. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Voluntary Aluminum Industry Partnership (VAIP), representing 98% of primary aluminum production in the United States, have committed under the Climate VISION program to a direct...

  18. High adherence copper plating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nignardot, Henry (Tesuque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  19. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum……………………………………………………………………… Aluminum Alloy 6061-Figure 30 - Aluminum alloy 6061 tubes used to assembleencapsulated within the aluminum alloy 6061 matrix………………..

  20. Investigation of an isotopically tailored boron-aluminum alloy's neutronic properties for application in neutron shielding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleyer, William Charles

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    innovative processes, has developed an aluminum base-metal, boron alloy possessing excellent neutronic properties in addition to the malleability, welding and cutting properties of aluminum. Of greater importance, boron enrichment techniques allow... properties of aluminum, is readily molded and extruded providing a considerable advantage over Boral and borated stainless steel for uses requiring specialized shapes. Ease in shaping, welding, forming, pressing, and milling are features making Alboron...

  1. Fluorescence energy transfer enhancement in aluminum nanoapertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Torres, Juan; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérome

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) are confining light into attoliter volumes, enabling single molecule fluorescence experiments at physiological micromolar concentrations. Among the fluorescence spectroscopy techniques that can be enhanced by ZMWs, F\\"{o}rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used in life sciences. Combining zero-mode waveguides with FRET provides new opportunities to investigate biochemical structures or follow interaction dynamics at micromolar concentration with single molecule resolution. However, prior to any quantitative FRET analysis on biological samples, it is crucial to establish first the influence of the ZMW on the FRET process. Here, we quantify the FRET rates and efficiencies between individual donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs diffusing in aluminum zero-mode waveguides. Aluminum ZMWs are important structures thanks to their commercial availability and the large literature describing their use for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. We also compare the ...

  2. Examination of the corrosion behavior of aluminum current collectors in lithium/polymer batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Devine, T.M.; Evans, J.W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Div.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technology Div.; [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Monteiro, O.R.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.] [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Accelerator and Fusion Research Div.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of aluminum, a candidate material for the current collectors of the positive electrodes of lithium-polymer batteries, in contact with a lithium polymer electrolyte was examined in both batteries and three-electrode electrochemical cells. The results indicate aluminum is resistant to uniform corrosion in the polymer electrolyte: poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2} but can be susceptible to pitting corrosion. Localized pitting corrosion occurs on the aluminum current collector during overcharging of the battery. Pitting corrosion only occurred in the electrochemical cells when the aluminum electrode was anodically polarized to potentials that were considerably greater than those that resulted in pitting corrosion in batteries. The greater susceptibility of the aluminum current collectors of batteries to pitting corrosion is attributed to inhomogeneous current flow through the current collector. This results in local breakdown of the passive film on aluminum at sites of locally high current density. The inhomogeneous current density that flows through the aluminum/cathode interface is caused by the presence of discrete paths through the cathode with low electrical resistance. In an effort to improve the localized corrosion behavior of aluminum electrodes, it was found that surfaces impregnated by ion implantation with {approximately}20 atom % tungsten exhibited enhanced resistance to pitting corrosion in poly(ethylene oxide)-LiN(CF{sub 3}SO{sub 2}){sub 2}.

  3. A plane stress anisotropic plastic flow theory for orthotropic sheet metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Wei

    such as automotive aluminum sheets. As textured sheet metals produced by hot and cold rolling exhibit significant for describing the anisotropic plastic flow of ortho- tropic polycrystalline aluminum sheet metals under plane are applied successfully to describe the anisotropic plastic flow behavior of 10 commercial aluminum alloy

  4. Coupled modeling of groundwater flow solute transport, chemical reactions and microbial processes in the 'SP' island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samper, Javier; Molinero, Jorg; Changbing, Yang; Zhang, Guoxiang

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Redox Zone Experiment was carried out at the Aespoe HRL in order to study the redox behavior and the hydrochemistry of an isolated vertical fracture zone disturbed by the excavation of an access tunnel. Overall results and interpretation of the Redox Zone Project were reported by /Banwart et al, 1995/. Later, /Banwart et al, 1999/ presented a summary of the hydrochemistry of the Redox Zone Experiment. Coupled groundwater flow and reactive transport models of this experiment were carried out by /Molinero, 2000/ who proposed a revised conceptual model for the hydrogeology of the Redox Zone Experiment which could explain simultaneously measured drawdown and salinity data. The numerical model was found useful to understand the natural system. Several conclusions were drawn about the redox conditions of recharge waters, cation exchange capacity of the fracture zone and the role of mineral phases such as pyrite, calcite, hematite and goethite. This model could reproduce the measured trends of dissolved species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate which are affected by microbially-mediated processes. In order to explore the role of microbial processes, a coupled numerical model has been constructed which accounts for water flow, reactive transport and microbial processes. The results of this model is presented in this report. This model accounts for groundwater flow and reactive transport in a manner similar to that of /Molinero, 2000/ and extends the preliminary microbial model of /Zhang, 2001/ by accounting for microbially-driven organic matter fermentation and organic matter oxidation. This updated microbial model considers simultaneously the fermentation of particulate organic matter by yeast and the oxidation of dissolved organic matter, a product of fermentation. Dissolved organic matter is produced by yeast and serves also as a substrate for iron-reducing bacteria. Model results reproduce the observed increase in bicarbonate and sulfate concentration, thus adding additional evidence for the possibility of organic matter oxidation as the main source of bicarbonate. Model results indicate that pH and Eh are relatively stable. The dissolution-precipitation trends of hematite, pyrite and calcite also coincide with those indicated by the conceptual model. A thorough sensitivity analysis has been performed for the most relevant microbial parameters as well as for initial and boundary POC and DOC concentrations. The results of such analysis indicate that computed concentrations of bicarbonate, sulfate and DOC are sensitive to most of the microbial parameters, including specific growth rates, half-saturation constants, proportionality coefficients and yield coefficients. Model results, however, are less sensitive to the yield coefficient of DOC to iron-reducer bacteria. The sensitivity analysis indicates that changes in fermentation microbial parameters affect the growth of the iron-reducer, thus confirming the interconnection of both microbial processes. Computed concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate are found to be sensitive to changes in the initial concentration of POC and the boundary concentration of DOC, but they lack sensitivity to the initial concentration of DOC and the boundary concentration of POC. The explanation for such result is related to the fact that POC has a low mobility due to its large molecular weight. DOC, however, can migrate downwards. Although a coupled hydro-bio-geochemical 1-D model can reproduce the observed ''unexpected'' increase of concentrations of bicarbonate and sulfate at a depth of 70 m, further modeling work is required in order to obtain a similar conclusion under the more realistic two dimensional conditions of the fracture zone.

  5. Energy Efficient Process Heating: Managing Air Flow Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    temperature and decreased combustion gas mass flow rate. The method for calculating savings from preheating flow include minimizing combustion air, preheating combustion air, minimizing ventilation air from minimizing combustion air accounts for improvement in efficiency from increased combustion

  6. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  7. 12.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 4. Refrigeration process comparison;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    . Refrigeration process comparison; process equipment Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Themal and Flow") Refrigeration course # 424503.0 v. 2014 ÅA 424503 Refrigeration / Kylteknik 12.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/32 4.1 Refrigeration process comparison #12;12.11.2014Åbo

  8. EUROSPF Conference APPLICATION TECHNOLOGY OF ALUMINUM BLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    6th EUROSPF Conference APPLICATION TECHNOLOGY OF ALUMINUM BLOW FORMING FOR AUTOMOTIVE CLOSURE PANEL Replacement by aluminum for the closure panels is one of the common methods for lightening car body. However. As a solution to cover the low stamping formability of aluminum, Blow forming technology of aluminum which

  9. Validation of Flow Sheet for Dissolution and Downstream Processing of Mark 42 Compacts and Sweepings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crooks, W.J. III

    2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Unirradiated Mark 42 compact material was successfully dissolved in various laboratory tests. Assuming a dissolver charge of 10,000 grams of plutonium added to 8000 liters, the dissolver solution optimized with the lowest fluoride concentration was 0.25 molar fluoride-2.0 g/L boron-8 molar nitric acid. This 0.25 molar fluoride achieved a successful codissolution of plutonium oxide and aluminum in less than 15 hours. Based on a 30 minute dissolution of aluminum and measured corrosion rates using this dissolver solution, MTS assessed that the impact on the dissolver integrity due to corrosion from this campaign should be small. All dissolution tests in this work were achieved in the absence of a mercury catalyst, and therefore, to minimize waste and reduce chemical exposure to workers, the use of mercury for the dissolution of Mark 42 compact material is not recommended. The purpose of this report is determine an appropriate dissolver solution composition that will dissolve unirradiated Mark 42 compacts and sweepings in an F-Canyon dissolver within a 24 hour heating period

  10. Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Forster, George A. (Westmont, IL)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

  11. Fast and Informative Flow Simulations in a Building by Using Fast Fluid Dynamics Model on Graphics Processing Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Fast and Informative Flow Simulations in a Building by Using Fast Fluid Dynamics Model on Graphics solve Navier-Stokes equations and other transportation equations for energy and species at a speed of 50 it in parallel on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). This study validated the FFD on the GPU by simulating

  12. New Nuclear Reaction Flow during r-Process Nucleosynthesis in Supernovae: Critical Role of Light Neutron-Rich Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Terasawa; K. Sumiyoshi; T. Kajino; G. J. Mathews; I. Tanihata

    2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the role of light neutron-rich nuclei during r-process nucleosynthesis in supernovae. Most previous studies of the r-process have concentrated on the reaction flow of heavy unstable nuclei. Although the nuclear reaction network includes a few thousand heavy nuclei, only limited reaction flow through light-mass nuclei near the stability line has been used in those studies. However, in a viable scenario of the r-process in neutrino-driven winds, the initial condition is a high-entropy hot plasma consisting of neutrons, protons, and electron-positron pairs experiencing an intense flux of neutrinos. In such environments light-mass nuclei as well as heavy nuclei are expected to play important roles in the production of seed nuclei and r-process elements. Thus, we have extended our fully implicit nuclear reaction network so that it includes all nuclei up to the neutron drip line for Z $ \\leq 10$, in addition to a larger network for Z $ \\geq 10$. In the present nucleosynthesis study, we utilize a wind model of massive SNeII explosions to study the effects of this extended network. We find that a new nuclear-reaction flow path opens in the very light neutron-rich region. This new nuclear reaction flow can change the final heavy-element abundances by as much as an order of magnitude.

  13. Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins in the Northern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    Groundwater availability and flow processes in the Williston and Powder River basins Center, Cheyenne, WY 4 Office of Groundwater, Denver, CO 5 Oklahoma Water Science Center, Oklahoma City in Montana and Wyoming, provides an opportunity to study the water-energy nexus within a groundwater context

  14. Rapid substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasopoulos, A.V. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Li, J.; Josowicz, M.; Janata, J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid procedure for substitution of gold for aluminum metallization on integrated solid-state circuits, such as solid-state chemical multisensor chips, has been developed. The final product consists of original aluminum overlaid with nickel and gold, both deposited by an electroless process. The final metallization is chemically inert and the resistance of the contacts remains ohmic and unchanged from the original value. The substitution can be performed either at the wafer or at the chip level. After the plasma etching, the metallization process takes only 25 min.

  15. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  16. A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    mold surfaces for the control of cast surface morphologies. Keywords: Solidification; Aluminum alloys1 A thermomechanical study of the effects of mold topography on the solidification of Aluminum alloys Lijian Tana and Nicholas Zabarasa a Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory, Sibley School

  17. High-Efficiency Low-Dross Combustion System for Aluminum Remelting Reverberatory Furnaces, Project Final Report, July 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soupos, V.; Zelepouga, S.; Rue, D.

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    GTI, and its commercial partners, have developed a high-efficiency low-dross combustion system that offers environmental and energy efficiency benefits at lower capital costs for the secondary aluminum industry users of reverberatory furnaces. The high-efficiency low-dross combustion system, also called Self-Optimizing Combustion System (SOCS), includes the flex-flame burner firing an air or oxygen-enriched natural gas flame, a non-contact optical flame sensor, and a combustion control system. The flex-flame burner, developed and tested by GTI, provides an innovative firing process in which the flame shape and velocity can be controlled. The burner produces a flame that keeps oxygen away from the bath surface by including an O2-enriched fuel-rich zone on the bottom and an air-fired fuel-lean zone on the top. Flame shape and velocity can be changed at constant firing rate or held constant over a range of firing conditions. A non-intrusive optical sensor is used to monitor the flame at all times. Information from the optical sensor(s) and thermocouples can be used to control the flow of natural gas, air, and oxygen to the burner as needed to maintain desired flame characteristics. This type of control is particularly important to keep oxygen away from the melt surface and thus reduce dross formation. This retrofit technology decreases fuel usage, increases furnace production rate, lowers gaseous emissions, and reduces dross formation. The highest priority research need listed under Recycled Materials is to turn aluminum process waste into usable materials which this technology accomplishes directly by decreasing dross formation and therefore increasing aluminum yield from a gas-fired reverberatory furnace. Emissions of NOx will be reduced to approximately 0.3 lb/ton of aluminum, in compliance with air emission regulations.

  18. aluminum alloy produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries. Domestic secondary aluminum production--the primary materials source for aluminum-silicon alloys--was...

  19. aluminum metal matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Solidification of metal aluminum and aluminum alloys is modeled on uneven surfaces char- acterized by sinusoidal curves Zabaras, Nicholas J. 108 Aluminum-tungsten...

  20. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Jamaica in the World Aluminum Industry, 1838–1973, Vol.2007. Doordan, Dennis. “Promoting Aluminum: Designers andthe American Aluminum Industry. ” Design Issues 9, no. 2 (

  1. Aluminum-detoxifying compounds in roots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tahara, Ko; Hashida, Koh; Ohara, Seiji; Kojima, Katsumi; Shinohara, Kenji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M, Yamanoshita T, Kojima K, Role of aluminum-bindingligands in aluminum resistance of Eucalyptus camaldulensisH, Sasaki S, Kojima K. Aluminum distribution and reactive

  2. Electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium for research reactor spent nuclear fuel applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, S. A.; Willit, J. L.; Gay, E. C.; Chemical Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are developing an electrorefining process to treat aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel by electrochemically separating aluminum from uranium. The aluminum electrorefiner is modeled after the high-throughput electrorefiner developed at ANL. Aluminum is electrorefined, using a fluoride salt electrolyte, in a potential range of -0.1 V to -0.2 V, while uranium is electrorefined in a potential range of -0.3 V to -0.4 V; therefore, aluminum can be selectively separated electrochemically from uranium. A series of laboratory-scale experiments was performed to demonstrate the aluminum electrorefining concept. These experiments involved selecting an electrolyte (determining a suitable fluoride salt composition); selecting a crucible material for the electrochemical cell; optimizing the operating conditions; determining the effect of adding alkaline and rare earth elements to the electrolyte; and demonstrating the electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium, using a U-Al-Si alloy as a simulant for aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel. Results of the laboratory-scale experiments indicate that aluminum can be selectively electrotransported from the anode to the cathode, while uranium remains in the anode basket.

  3. Aluminum Formability Extension through Superior Blank Processing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  4. Post processing large integer programming problems in air traffic flow management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangadharan, Rajesh

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Aviation Administration is keen to develop new strategies for air traffic control, in order to better tackle the numerous problems arising due to increasing traffic in the national air space. The Traffic Flow Management (TFM) problem...

  5. The material and energy flow through the abrasive waterjet machining and recycling processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurd, Michael Omar, 1982-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the material and energy flow through the abrasive waterjet machine and the WARD recycling machine. The goal was to track all of the material, water, abrasive, energy, air, and ...

  6. Direct match data flow machine apparatus and process for data driven computing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, George S. (Albuquerque, NM); Grafe, Victor Gerald (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data flow computer and method of computing is disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information form an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status but to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a "fire" signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor.

  7. Direct match data flow machine apparatus and process for data driven computing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, G.S.; Grafe, V.G.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A data flow computer and method of computing are disclosed which utilizes a data driven processor node architecture. The apparatus in a preferred embodiment includes a plurality of First-In-First-Out (FIFO) registers, a plurality of related data flow memories, and a processor. The processor makes the necessary calculations and includes a control unit to generate signals to enable the appropriate FIFO register receiving the result. In a particular embodiment, there are three FIFO registers per node: an input FIFO register to receive input information form an outside source and provide it to the data flow memories; an output FIFO register to provide output information from the processor to an outside recipient; and an internal FIFO register to provide information from the processor back to the data flow memories. The data flow memories are comprised of four commonly addressed memories. A parameter memory holds the A and B parameters used in the calculations; an opcode memory holds the instruction; a target memory holds the output address; and a tag memory contains status bits for each parameter. One status bit indicates whether the corresponding parameter is in the parameter memory and one status but to indicate whether the stored information in the corresponding data parameter is to be reused. The tag memory outputs a ``fire`` signal (signal R VALID) when all of the necessary information has been stored in the data flow memories, and thus when the instruction is ready to be fired to the processor. 11 figs.

  8. Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites by R. Kiehn and T. W................... .. ....... ... ... 3 Literature Review ......... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ........ 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ........... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods

  9. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks at Superplastic Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, Richard W.; Vetrano, John S.; Smith, Mark T.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2002-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an investigation of the mechanical properties of weld material in aluminum tailor welded blanks (TWB) at superplastic temperatures and discusses the potential application of TWBs in superplastic forming operations. Aluminum TWBs consist of multiple sheet materials of different thickness or alloy that are butt-welded together into a single, variable thickness blank. To evaluate the performance of the weld material in TWBs, a series of tensile tests were conducted at superplastic temperatures with specimens that contained weld material in the gage area. The sheet material used in the study was Sky 5083 aluminum alloy, which was joined to produce the TWBs by gas tungsten arc welding using an AA5356 filler wire. The experimental results show that, in the temperature range of 500?C to 550?C and at strain rates ranging from 10-4 sec-1 to 10-2 sec-1, the weld material has a higher flow stress and lower ductility than the monolithic sheet material. The weld material exhibited elongations of 40% to 60% under these conditions, whereas the monolithic sheet achieved 220% to 360% elongation. At the same temperatures and strain rates, the weld material exhibited flow stresses 1.3 to 4 times greater than the flow stress in the monolithic sheet. However, the weld material did show a substantial increase in the strain rate sensitivity and ductility when compared to the same material formed at room temperature.

  10. aluminum extrusion technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum extrusion technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A process planning system...

  11. The effect of fluoride and aluminum on the anion exchange of plutonium from nitric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, S.F.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anion exchange in nitric acid is a prominent aqueous process used to recover and purify plutonium from impure nuclear materials. This process is sensitive to fluoride ion, which complexes plutonium in competition with the anionic nitrato complex that is strongly sorbed on the anion exchange column. Fluoride interference traditionally has been counteracted by adding a masking agent, such as aluminum, that forms competing complexes with fluoride. The interfering effect of fluoride is known to be a function not only of the fluoride-to-aluminum ratio but also of the fluoride-to-plutonium ratio. This report summarizes a Los Alamos study of the effect of 25 fluoride-aluminum-plutonium conmbinations on the anion exchange sorption of plutonium. Five aluminum-to-plutonium ratios ranging from 0.10 to 10 were each evaluated at five fluoride-to-aluminum ratios that ranged from 0 to 6. The fluoride-to-plutonium ratio has a greater influence on plutonium sorption than does the fluoride-to-aluminum ratio. Aluminum was less effective as a masking agent than had been assumed, because measurable fluoride interference occurred at all levels of added aluminum.

  12. ORNL ADV POST-PROCESSING GUIDE AND MATLAB ALGORITHMS FOR MHK SITE FLOW AND TURBULENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; McNutt, James R [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details standard protocols for post-processing acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) measurements, including guidance on using a MATLAB code for such processing.

  13. Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum From Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradford, Donald R (Underwood, WA); Barnett, Robert J. (Goldendale, WA); Mezner, Michael B. (Sandy, OR)

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic cell for producing aluminum from alumina having a reservoir for collecting molten aluminum remote from the electrolysis.

  14. Current technologies and trends of aluminum design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of current aluminum technology in the building and construction industry was carried out. Aluminum is an ideal material for building in corrosive environments and for building structures where small ...

  15. Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velamati, Manasa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due to directional properties...

  16. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Alloys PROPERTIES OF THE ALUMINUM-WATER REACTIONS RELATIVE ........... 14 TO ON-BOARD SYSTEM aluminum alloys such as aluminum-lithium and aluminum-gallium has been studied. In this case, the molten nature of the alloy prevents the development of a coherent and adherent aluminum oxide layer. However

  17. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  18. Aluminum Tape Evaluation for Sealable Aluminum Tubes Containing Mark 22 Fuel Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RHODES, WILLIAM

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the HEU Blend Down project, aluminum tape is required to seal aluminum tubes that will hold contaminated Mark 22 fuel tubes for dissolution. From a large field of candidate tapes, Avery Dennison's Fasson 0802 tape (synthetic rubber adhesive system) was found to be acceptable for this application. This tape will disentangle in the normal H-Canyon dissolver solution and have no detrimental effect on the H-Canyon process. Upon placement of Fasson 0802 tape into the dissolver solution, nitric acid will attack and disentangle the block copolymer network and destroy the adhesive nature of the material, resulting in insoluble particles that can be removed via centrifuge operations (cake weight increase of no more than 1 percent). The addition of the tape will not generate off-gas products and the resultant solution characteristics (surface tension, viscosity, density, and disengagement time) will be unaffected. Further, the potential effect on the down-stream evaporation system is negligible. Since the tape will not be placed in a high radiation environment, radiation stability is not an issue. Through detailed discussions with Avery Dennison chemists and based on analytical tests, a fairly detailed understanding of the constituents comprising the proprietary adhesive system has been assembled. Most importantly, chlorine was not detected in the aluminum tape (neutron activation analysis detection limit is 16 ppm). Finally, application of this tape will not impact LEU specifications.

  19. Aluminum in Superconducting Magnets Robert J. Weggel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    is aluminum, either ultrapure, as quenchstabilization matrix metal, and/or alloyed and coldworked and heat for magnets in which the stresses and strains are modest. The strongest aluminum alloy commercially available., "Mechanical properties of commercial aluminum alloys at 253o C (­423o F)," NATO ARW, Kiev 713 Sept. 2003

  20. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Daniel J.

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J. We present Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios

  1. Aluminum--2004 5. Areferencethatincludesasectionmark()isfoundintheinternet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum--2004 5. Areferencethatincludesasectionmark(§)isfoundintheinternet ReferenceCitedsection. Aluminum ByPatriciaA.Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Benjamin S. Goff.S.GeologicalSurvey(uSGS)requestforproductiondata. CommercialDevelopmentCo.(CDC)ofSt.louis,mO, boughtKaiserAluminumCorp.'s200,000-metric-ton-per-year (t

  2. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthi, Shriram

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios and backtracking. It also

  3. TiN coated aluminum electrodes for DC high voltage electron guns

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah A.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.; Taus, Rhys; Forman, Eric; Poelker, Matthew

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preparing electrodes made of metals like stainless steel, for use inside DC high voltage electron guns, is a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In this paper, the authors report the exceptional high voltage performance of aluminum electrodes coated with hard titanium nitride (TiN). The aluminum electrodes were comparatively easy to manufacture and required only hours of mechanical polishing using silicon carbide paper, prior to coating with TiN by a commercial vendor. The high voltage performance of three TiN-coated aluminum electrodes, before and after gas conditioning with helium, was compared to that of bare aluminum electrodes, and electrodes manufactured from titanium alloymore »(Ti-6Al-4V). Following gas conditioning, each TiN-coated aluminum electrode reached ?225?kV bias voltage while generating less than 100?pA of field emission (« less

  4. Robust processing of optical flow of fluids Ashish Doshi and Adrian G. Bors, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bors, Adrian

    the computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Navier-Stokes equations have been extensively studied in fluid mechanics Terms--Optical flow of fluids, computational fluid dy- namics, diffusion, vortex detection I displaying fluid movement. Velocity fields, characterizing the motion of fluids can be modelled using

  5. Process Flow Chart for Immobilizing of Radioactive High Concentration Sodium Hydroxide Product from the Sodium Processing Facility at the BN-350 Nuclear power plant in Aktau, Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkitbayev, M.; Omarova, K.; Tolebayev, T. [Ai-Farabi Kazakh National University, Chemical Faculty, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Galkin, A. [KATEP Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Bachilova, N. [NIISTROMPROEKT Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Blynskiy, A. [Nuclear Technology Safety Centre, Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Maev, V. [MAEK-Kazatomprom Ltd., Republic of Kazakhstan (Kazakhstan); Wells, D. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom); Herrick, A. [NUKEM Limited- a member of the Freyssinet Group, Caithness (United Kingdom); Michelbacher, J. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a joint research investigations carried out by the group of Kazakhstan, British and American specialists in development of a new material for immobilization of radioactive 35% sodium hydroxide solutions from the sodium coolant processing facility of the BN-350 nuclear power plant. The resulting solid matrix product, termed geo-cement stone, is capable of isolating long lived radionuclides from the environment. The physico-mechanical properties of geo-cement stone have been investigated and the flow chart for its production verified in a full scale experiments. (author)

  6. Laser removal of Aluminum links for applications in wafer scale integrated circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Harshavadan B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the operating data for each link processing This software would be tried on numerous wafers with test structures to establish operating laser power levels for Aluminum links. With the selected laser power levels, links on a test wafer would be processed. Then... LASER REMOVAL OF ALUMINUM LINKS FOR APPLICATIONS IN WAFER SCALE INTEGRATED CIRCUITS A Thesis by HARSHAVADAN B. PARIKH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  7. Characterizatin of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, M. M. (Mary M.); Jorgensen, B. S. (Betty S.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Smith, B. L. (Bettina L.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from {approx}25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  8. Reduction of Annealing Times for Energy Conservation in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony D. Rollett; Hasso Weiland; Mohammed Alvi; Abhijit Brahme

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Carnegie Mellon University was teamed with the Alcoa Technical Center with support from the US Dept. of Energy (Office of Industrial Technology) and the Pennsylvania Technology Investment Authority (PTIA) to make processing of aluminum less costly and more energy efficient. Researchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering have investigated how annealing processes in the early stages of aluminum processing affect the structure and properties of the material. Annealing at high temperatures consumes significant amounts of time and energy. By making detailed measurements of the crystallography and morphology of internal structural changes they have generated new information that will provide a scientific basis for shortening processing times and consuming less energy during annealing.

  9. Control tools for flow chemistry processing and their application to the synthesis of bromodomain inhibitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingham, Richard Jeremy

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    which are used within our own laboratory (Figure 1). These systems contain pumps, switching valves and heaters within a conveniently integrated unit, and provide software tools to run computer-controlled experiments. Automation in Flow Chemistry Using... to generate acyl azides, which were then subjected to high temperature reactor coil to perform a Curtius rearrangement reaction. The drying agent cartridge (sodium sulfate) ensured that any water present in the acetonitrile solvent was removed to prevent...

  10. EVALUATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION IN TANK 51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days, which became the baseline aluminum dissolution process. LWO initiated a project to modify a waste tank to meet these requirements. Subsequent to an alternative evaluation, LWO management identified an opportunity to perform aluminum dissolution on sludge destined for Sludge Batch 5, but within a limited window that would not allow time for any modifications for tank heating. A variation of the baseline process, dubbed Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), was developed based on the constraint of available energy input in Tank 51 and the window of opportunity, but was not constrained to a minimum extent of dissolution, i.e. dissolve as much aluminum as possible within the time available. This process was intended to operate between 55 and 70 C, but for a significantly longer time than the baseline process. LTAD proceeded in parallel with the baseline project. The preliminary evaluation at the completion of LTAD focused on the material balance and extent of the aluminum dissolved. The range of values of extent of dissolution, 56% to 64%, resulted from the variation in liquid phase sample data available at the time. Additional solid phase data is available from a sample taken after LTAD to refine this range. This report provides additional detailed evaluation of the LTAD process based on analytical and field data and includes: a summary of the process chronology; a determination of an acceptable blending strategy for the aluminum-laden supernate stored in Tank 11; an update to the determination of aluminum dissolved using more complete sample results; a determination of the effect of LTAD on uranium, plutonium, and other metals; a determination of the rate of heat loss from a quiescent tank; and an evaluation of the aluminum dissolution rate model and actual dissolution rate. LTAD was successfully completed in Tank 51 with minimal waste tank changes. The following general conclusions may be drawn about the LTAD process: (1) Dissolution at about 60 C for 46 days dissolved 64% of the aluminum from the sludge slurry. (2) The aluminum-laden leach solution decanted to Tank 11 can be blended with a wide variety of supernates without risk of precipitating the dissolved aluminum based on thermodynamic chemical equilibrium models. (3) Uranium and plutonium leached into solution without corresponding leaching of iron or metal other than aluminum, but the total mass leached was a small fraction of the total uranium and plutonium in the sludge. (4) The concentration of uranium and plutonium in the leach solution was indistinguishable from other tank farm supernates, thus, the leach solutions can be managed relative to the risk of criticality like any other supernate. (5) A small amount of mercury leached into solution from the sludge causing the liquid phase concentration to increase 6 to 10 fold, which is consistent with the 4 to 14 fold increase observed during the 1982 aluminum dissolution demonstration. (6) Chromium did not dissolve during LTAD. (7) Chloride concentration increased in the liquid phase during LTAD due to chloride contamination in the 50% sodium hydroxide solution. (8) The rate of heat loss from Tank 51 at temperatures above 45 C appeared linear and predictable at 8E+7 cal/hr. (9) The rate of heat transfer from Tank 51 did not follow a simplified bulk heat transfer model. (10) Prediction of the aluminum dissolution rate was prone to error due to a lack of active specific surface area data of sludge particles. (11) The higher than expected dissolution rate during LTAD was likely due to smaller than expected particle sizes of most of the sludge particles. While evaluating the LTAD process, the dissolved salt solution from Tank 41 that was stored and sampled in Tank 49 was determined to be supersaturated relative to alu

  11. Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment We consider coupled subsurface flow and transport within a vertical cross section of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Transport Processes in a Salt-Dome Environment ­ B ­ We consider coupled subsurface flow). (1) How is the conductive temperature distribution affected by the thermal conductivity of the salt in the simulation? In particular, compare the flow direction along the salt flanks. #12;Model domain No vertical

  12. Catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive in a continuous flow reactor: Process optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111, Iran d Imperial Oil Limited, Supply additive, and the process was optimized in this study using response surface methodology. A model biodiesel process [1,2]. Hence a huge amount of glycerol is expected on the market in near future. Due

  13. TANK 12 SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S; Michael Hay, M; Kristine Zeigler, K; Michael Stone, M

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  14. Tank 12 Sludge Characterization and Aluminum Dissolution Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Hay, M.; Zeigler, K; Stone, M.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  15. Characterization and application of vortex flow adsorption for simplification of biochemical product downstream processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Junfen, 1972-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to reduce costs in manufacturing a biochemical product is simplification of downstream processing. Biochemical product recovery often starts from fermentation broth or cell culture. In conventional downstream ...

  16. Modeling electrospinning process and a numerical scheme using Lattice Boltzmann method to simulate viscoelastic fluid flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karra, Satish

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of secondary electric field on electrospinning process and whipping instability. It is observed that the external secondary field unwinds the jet spirals, reduces the whipping instability and increases the tension in the fiber. Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM...

  17. Exciton-phonon information flow in the energy transfer process of photosynthetic complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebentrost, Patrick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-Markovian and non-equilibrium phonon effects are believed to be key ingredients in the energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes, especially in complexes which exhibit a regime of intermediate exciton-phonon coupling. In this work, we harness a recently developed measure for non-Markovianity to elucidate the information flow between electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. We study the measure in the hierarchical equation of motion approach which captures strong system-bath coupling effects and non-equilibrium molecular reorganization. We find that, for a model dimer system and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, non-Markovianity is significant under realistic physiological conditions. A first step towards experimental quantification is provided by the study of four-wave mixing initial states.

  18. [Unsegmented continuous-flow sample processing and electrochemical detection of gaseous species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, H.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goals were a continuous-flow, unsegmented, all-gas carrier and/or a segmented liquid/gas interface system for sample introduction and transport to detection/determination point; a regenerable electrode probe base on redox reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with 1, 10-phenanthroline and related ligands; and amperometric/coulometric current measurements providing analyte signals. Gases to be detected included NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2]. This report is divided into 3 parts: preparation of new ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline family; glassy carbon surfaces coated with polymeric films prepared from monomeric units of tris[5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline]iron(II); and sulfite oxidase/hexacyanoferrate modified C paste electrode.

  19. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Alloys PROPERTIES OF THE ALUMINUM-WATER REACTIONS RELATIVE ........... 14 TO ON-BOARD SYSTEM metal. In addition, the reaction of water with molten aluminum alloys such as aluminum-lithium and aluminum-gallium has been studied. In this case, the molten nature of the alloy prevents the development

  20. Time cycle analysis and simulation of material flow in MOX process layout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Saraswat, A.; Danny, K.M.; Somayajulu, P.S.; Kumar, A. [Nuclear Fuels Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The (U,Pu)O{sub 2} MOX fuel is the driver fuel for the upcoming PFBR (Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor). The fuel has around 30% PuO{sub 2}. The presence of high percentages of reprocessed PuO{sub 2} necessitates the design of optimized fuel fabrication process line which will address both production need as well as meet regulatory norms regarding radiological safety criteria. The powder pellet route has highly unbalanced time cycle. This difficulty can be overcome by optimizing process layout in terms of equipment redundancy and scheduling of input powder batches. Different schemes are tested before implementing in the process line with the help of a software. This software simulates the material movement through the optimized process layout. The different material processing schemes have been devised and validity of the schemes are tested with the software. Schemes in which production batches are meeting at any glove box location are considered invalid. A valid scheme ensures adequate spacing between the production batches and at the same time it meets the production target. This software can be further improved by accurately calculating material movement time through glove box train. One important factor is considering material handling time with automation systems in place.

  1. Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Magnesium Silicate, Magnesium Trisilicate, Sodium Magnesium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Lithium Magnesium Silicate, Lithium Magnesium

  2. ORNL ADCP POST-PROCESSING GUIDE AND MATLAB ALGORITHMS FOR MHK SITE FLOW AND TURBULENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard methods, along with guidance for post-processing the ADCP stationary measurements using MATLAB algorithms that were evaluated and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), are presented following an overview of the ADCP operating principles, deployment methods, error sources and recommended protocols for removing and replacing spurious data.

  3. High resistivity aluminum antimonide radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick H. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystal materials have been prepared for use as ambient (room) temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray radiation detection.

  4. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise Auto Aluminum...

  5. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Partnership The Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) is an innovative pollution prevention program developed jointly by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  6. High resistivity aluminum antimonide radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W.; Coombs, III, Arthur W.; Yee, Jick H.

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystal materials have been prepared for use as ambient (room) temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray radiation detection.

  7. aluminum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  8. Pressure change and transport process on flames formed in a stretched, rotating flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [Toyohashi Univ. of Technology, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flame characteristics in a stretched, rotating flow have been investigated by numerical simulation of tubular laminar flames for lean hydrogen, methane, and propane/air mixtures. Twin planar flames in counterflow have been also simulated for comparison. A fixed inlet velocity at the porous wall of the burner was assumed in all cases, and the cylindrical containing tube (radius R = 9.5 mm) was either maintained stationary or rotated. Results showed that, within the range studied, the flame temperatures always increase monotonically with increasing fuel concentration, and at the same time the reaction zones move outwards. However, while the introduction of rotation also causes a monotonic temperature increase of hydrogen and methane air mixtures, that of a propane/air mixture decreases. The temperature change with rotation becomes smaller with an increase of the fuel concentration. As a consequence of the centrifugal force, {rho}{nu}{sub {theta}}{sup 2}/r, induced by the rotation, a pressure gradient is formed in the cylindrical containing tube, with low pressure along the axis. The pressure gradient at the outer, unburnt edge of the flame reaction zone becomes smaller as the fuel concentration increases. The resultant decreased mass transport by pressure diffusion provides an explanation for part of the above-mentioned temperature change associated with rotation. The remainder of the effect is associated with changed stretch characteristics of the flames.

  9. The Pricing of Electricity to Aluminum Smelters in the Northwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, T. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    major industrial firms, primarily aluminum companies operating aluminum smelters in the region. These direct service industries (DSIs) have a contractual right to purchase up to 3.500 average megawatts annually from Bonneville. Because the aluminum...

  10. iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    © iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan Handouts to explore mechanistic link between Alzheimer's and aluminum 5. Brief proposal expanding Points to Aluminum's Link With Alzheimer's Disease" from 1989. Provide handout

  11. Precursor detonation wave development in ANFO due to aluminum confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klyanda, Charles B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Short, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detonations in explosive mixtures of ammonium-nitrate-fuel-oil (ANFO) confined by aluminum allow for transport of detonation energy ahead of the detonation front due to the aluminum sound speed exceeding the detonation velocity. The net effect of this energy transport on the detonation is unclear. It could enhance the detonation by precompressing the explosive near the wall. Alternatively, it could decrease the explosive performance by crushing porosity required for initiation by shock compression or destroying confinement ahead of the detonation. At present, these phenomena are not well understood. But with slowly detonating, non-ideal high explosive (NIHE) systems becoming increasing prevalent, proper understanding and prediction of the performance of these metal-confined NIHE systems is desirable. Experiments are discussed that measured the effect of this ANFO detonation energy transported upstream of the front by a 76-mm-inner-diameter aluminum confining tube. Detonation velocity, detonation-front shape, and aluminum response are recorded as a function of confiner wall thickness and length. Detonation shape profiles display little curvature near the confining surface, which is attributed to energy transported upstream modifying the flow. Average detonation velocities were seen to increase with increasing confiner thickness, while wavefront curvature decreased due to the stiffer, subsonic confinement. Significant radial sidewall tube motion was observed immediately ahead of the detonation. Axial motion was also detected, which interfered with the front shape measurements in some cases. It was concluded that the confiner was able to transport energy ahead of the detonation and that this transport has a definite effect on the detonation by modifying its characteristic shape.

  12. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter PrincipalfuelTorus ExperimentScientists ignite aluminum

  13. A novel powder metallurgy-based method for the recycling of aluminum adapted to a small island developing state in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 A novel powder metallurgy-based method for the recycling of aluminum adapted to a small island volume scrap aluminum, the application of the powder metallurgy process is proposed. Its methodology of the advantages of the powder metallurgy process. The properties of the recycled parts make them competitive

  14. aluminum oxide layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  15. aluminum oleate layered: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  16. aluminum oxide layers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  17. aluminum matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites Materials Science Websites Summary: ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle...

  18. Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity This case study describes how a DOE energy...

  19. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed countries aluminum smelters consume up to 1/3 ordam to power an aluminum smelter in the 1960s, displacing

  20. aluminum alloy matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: ccsd-00002835,version2-14Sep2004 Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces Damien experimental light scattering measurements from aluminum surfaces obtained...

  1. aluminum automotive components: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    set of the pn junction with self-assembled, anodic aluminum Anlage, Steven 375 EFFECT OF ENCAPSULANT ON HIGH-TEMPERATURE RELIABILITY OF THE GOLD WIREBOND ALUMINUM BONDPAD...

  2. aluminum high pressure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR...

  3. aluminum hydride reduction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 300 A...

  4. aluminum reduction plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 226 A...

  5. activated aluminum oxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 323 A...

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hunter Douglas Aluminum...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hunter Douglas Aluminum Plant Div of Bridgeport Brass Co - CA 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: HUNTER DOUGLAS ALUMINUM PLANT, DIV. OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS CO. (CA.11 ) Eliminated from...

  7. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  8. Aluminum recycling from reactor walls: A source of contamination in a-Si:H thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longeaud, C.; Ray, P. P.; Bhaduri, A.; Daineka, D.; Johnson, E. V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique de Paris (UMR 8507 CNRS), Supelec, Universites Paris VI and XI, 11 Rue Joliot-Curie, Plateau de Moulon, 91190 Gif sur Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et des Couches Minces (UMR 7647 CNRS), Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, the authors investigate the contamination of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films with aluminum recycled from the walls and electrodes of the deposition reactor. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon were prepared under various conditions by a standard radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process in two reactors, the chambers of which were constructed of either aluminum or stainless steel. The authors have studied the electronic properties of these thin films and have found that when using an aluminum reactor chamber, the layers are contaminated with aluminum recycled from the chamber walls and electrode. This phenomenon is observed almost independently of the deposition conditions. The authors show that this contamination results in slightly p-doped films and could be detrimental to the deposition of device grade films. The authors also propose a simple way to control and eventually suppress this contamination.

  9. Aluminum industry energy conservation workshop V papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers given at a recent meeting sponsored by The Aluminum Association. The focus of the meeting is on energy conservation in the aluminum industry. Topics include recovery of waste heat, more energy efficient design of plants, and government policies.

  10. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA)

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  11. Extended Sleeve Products Allow Control and Monitoring of Process Fluid Flows Inside Shielding, Behind Walls and Beneath Floors - 13041

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Mark W. [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)] [Flowserve Corporation, 1978 Foreman Drive Cookeville, TN 38506 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout power generation, delivery and waste remediation, the ability to control process streams in difficult or impossible locations becomes increasingly necessary as the complexity of processes increases. Example applications include radioactive environments, inside concrete installations, buried in dirt, or inside a shielded or insulated pipe. In these situations, it is necessary to implement innovative solutions to tackle such issues as valve maintenance, valve control from remote locations, equipment cleaning in hazardous environments, and flow stream analysis. The Extended Sleeve family of products provides a scalable solution to tackle some of the most challenging applications in hazardous environments which require flow stream control and monitoring. The Extended Sleeve family of products is defined in three groups: Extended Sleeve (ESV), Extended Bonnet (EBV) and Instrument Enclosure (IE). Each of the products provides a variation on the same requirements: to provide access to the internals of a valve, or to monitor the fluid passing through the pipeline through shielding around the process pipe. The shielding can be as simple as a grout filled pipe covering a process pipe or as complex as a concrete deck protecting a room in which the valves and pipes pass through at varying elevations. Extended Sleeves are available between roughly 30 inches and 18 feet of distance between the pipeline centerline and the top of the surface to which it mounts. The Extended Sleeve provides features such as ± 1.5 inches of adjustment between the pipeline and deck location, internal flush capabilities, automatic alignment of the internal components during assembly and integrated actuator mounting pads. The Extended Bonnet is a shorter fixed height version of the Extended Sleeve which has a removable deck flange to facilitate installation through walls, and is delivered fully assembled. The Instrument Enclosure utilizes many of the same components as an Extended Sleeve, yet allows the installation of process monitoring instruments, such as a turbidity meter to be placed in the flow stream. The basis of the design is a valve body, which, rather than having a directly mounted bonnet has lengths of concentric pipe added, which move the bonnet away from the valve body. The pipe is conceptually similar to an oil field well, with the various strings of casing, and tubing installed. Each concentric pipe provides a required function, such as the outermost pipes, the valve sleeve and penetration sleeve, which provide structural support to the deck flange. For plug valve based designs, the next inner pipe provides compression on the environmental seals at the top of the body to bonnet joint, followed by the innermost pipe which provides rotation of the plug, in the same manner as an extended stem. Ball valve ESVs have an additional pipe to provide compressive loading on the stem packing. Due to the availability of standard pipe grades and weights, the product can be configured to fit a wide array of valve sizes, and application lengths, with current designs as short as seven inches and as tall as 18 feet. Central to the design is the requirement for no special tools or downhole tools to remove parts or configure the product. Off the shelf wrenches, sockets or other hand tools are all that is required. Compared to other products historically available, this design offers a lightweight option, which, while not as rigidly stiff, can deflect compliantly under extreme seismic loading, rather than break. Application conditions vary widely, as the base product is 316 and 304 stainless steel, but utilizes 17-4PH, and other allows as needed based on the temperature range and mechanical requirements. Existing designs are installed in applications as hot as 1400 deg. F, at low pressure, and separately in highly radioactive environments. The selection of plug versus ball valve, metal versus soft seats, and the material of the seals and seats is all dependent on the application requirements. The design of the Extended Sleeve family of products provid

  12. A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Hassan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

  13. PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.crack propagation r aluminum alloys, 2024~T3 at low and

  14. PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low-cycle fatigue life of Aluminum sheet alloys by acoustictoughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.

  15. Drying studies for corroded DOE aluminum plate fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W. [Idaho Univ., Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) currently stores a wide variety of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel was originally intended to be stored underwater for a short period of thermal cooling, then removed and reprocessed. However, it has been stored underwater for much longer thank originally anticipated. During this time dust and airborne desert soil have entered the oldest INEL pool, accumulating on the fuel. Also, the aluminum fuel cladding has corroded compromising the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Plans are now underway to move some the the more vulnerable aluminum plate type fuels into dry storage in an existing vented and filtered fuel storage facility. In preparation for dry storage of the fuel a drying and canning station is being built at the INEL. The two primary objectives of this facility are to determine the influence of corrosion products on the drying process and to establish temperature distribution inside the canister during heating.

  16. A Flow Time Model for Melt-Cast Insensitive Explosive Process Guillemin Jean-Philippe*, Brunet Luc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and inserted in our flow time equations. De Larrard's model for the calculation of the maximum packing density The purpose of this article is to propose a predictive model of the flow time necessary for emptying a reactor

  17. Characterization of porous GASAR aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonenberger, R.J. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Kee, A.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Everett, R.K.; Matic, P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed on porous aluminum samples to evaluate microstructure and mechanical properties. Experiments considered of tensile tests on dog-bone specimens containing 9 to 17% porosity, which were instrumented with axial and transverse extensometers. Properties measured included Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio remained constant with porosity., For the numerical simulations, 3-D, mesoscale, multilayer models were constructed to evaluate the effects of pore morphology and interactions on material properties. The models allowed systematic spatial positioning of the pore within the cell and the ability to form solid zones. Pore arrangement, the effect of constraint, and gradients on the stress state were investigated. By using different combinations of hex cells as building blocks, several complicated microstructural arrangements were simulated.

  18. Clean and cost-effective dry boundary lubricants for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary research in our laboratory has demonstrated that boric acid is an effective lubricant with an unusual capacity to reduce sliding fiction (providing friction coefficients as low as 0.02) and wear of metallic and ceramic materials. More recent studies have revealed that water or methanol solutions of boric acid can be used to prepare strongly bonded layers of boric acid on aluminum surfaces. It appears that boric acid molecules have a strong tendency to bond chemically to the naturally oxidized surfaces of aluminum and its alloys and to make these surfaces very slippery. Recent metal formability tests indicated that the boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by spraying or dipping worked quite well; improving draw scale performance by 58 to 75%. These findings have increased the prospect that boric acid can be formulated and optimized as an effective boundary lubricant and used to solve the friction, galling, and severe wear problems currently encountered in cold-forming of aluminum products. Accordingly, the major goal of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness and lubrication capacity of thin boric acid films formed on aluminum surfaces by simple dipping or spraying processes and to describe the lubrication mechanisms under typical metal forming conditions. We will also examine the nature of chemical bonding between boric acid and aluminum surfaces and develop new ways to optimize its performance as an effective boundary lubricant.

  19. TIG welding of aluminum alloys for the APS storage ring - a UHV application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1996-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) incorporates a 7-GeV positron storage ring 1104 meters in circumference. The storage ring vacuum system is designed to maintain a pressure of 1 nTorr or less with a circulating current of 300 mA to enable beam lifetimes of greater than 10 hours. The vacuum chamber is an aluminum extrusion of 6063T5 alloy. There are 235 separate aluminum vacuum chambers in the storage ring connected by stainless steel bellows assemblies. Aluminum was chosen for the vacuum chamber because it can be economically extruded and machined, has good thermal conductivity, low thermal emissivity, a low outgassing rate, low residual radioactivity, and is non-magnetic. The 6063 aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloy provides high strength combined with good machining and weldability characteristics. The extrusion process provides the interior surface finish needed for the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environments There are six different vacuum chambers with the same extrusion cross section. The average vacuum chamber length is 171.6 inches. The extruded vacuum chambers are welded to flange assemblies made up of machined 2219 aluminum alloy pieces and 2219 aluminum vacuum flanges from a commercial source.

  20. ALUMINUM--2003 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal and alloys held by the London Metal Exchange Ltd. (LME) also increased. Primary aluminumALUMINUM--2003 5.1 ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 2003, 7 domestic companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants

  1. Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum American Society of Civil Engineers. CE Database subject headings: Solid wastes; Leaching; Aluminum

  2. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  3. ALUMINUM--1998 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALUMINUM--1998 5.1 ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 1998, 13 domestic companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants to be $5.4 billion. Aluminum recovered from purchased scrap decreased to approximately 3.4 million tons

  4. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

  5. Synthesis of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforced with in situ devitrified Al-Ni-La amorphous particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhihui H; Han, B Q; Witkin, D; Ajdelsztajn, L; Laverna, E J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforcedAbstract Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites wereamount of nanoscale aluminum oxide, nitride and carbide

  6. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  7. High adherence copper plating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nignardot, H.

    1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing the surface of an aluminum or steel substrate for the electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to either substrate.

  8. High adherence copper plating process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mignardot, H.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for applying copper to a substrate of aluminum or steel by electrodeposition and for preparing an aluminum or steel substrate for electrodeposition of copper. Practice of the invention provides good adhesion of the copper layer to the substrate.

  9. The Dissolution and Characterization of Aluminum Clad Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory dissolution studies of aluminum clad mixed oxide fuel rods have been conducted using two different F-Canyon decladding and dissolving flowsheets. During the first phase of the experimental program, materials from three different color coded fuel rods were dissolved in caustic and nitric acid solutions. The final phase of the laboratory program involved the dissolution and characterization of materials from three cracked pellet fuel rods using a selected caustic/ nitric acid flowsheet.Laboratory results obtained from the initial dissolution studies identified several inconsistencies and potential problem issues with the behavior of materials from the color coded fuel rods. Based on these findings and influenced by the difficulties introduced by using the RCRA listed mercury during processing, the flowsheet selected for dissolving these aluminum clad fuel rods in F-Canyon dissolvers was the two- step caustic decladding/ nitric acid dissolution flowsheet.The final phase of the experimental program involved testing materials from three cracked pellet fuel rods using the selected flowsheet. Again all aluminum fuel rod components dissolved during the decladding step. However, some uranium and plutonium bearing solids remained with the caustic decladding solution which could be sent to waste. The quantities of uranium and plutonium expected to remain with the caustic solutions are small.Fluoride ions will need to be present in the nitric acid dissolver solution to dissolve all solids. At 0.05 molar fluoride concentration, no plutonium bearing solids remained in the product solutions.

  10. Identification of aluminum scale with the aid of synthetically produced basic aluminum fluoride complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuchart, C.E. (Halliburton Services, Duncan, OK (United States)); Ali, S.A. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum scaling can be a problem following HF acidizing. In this paper, a series of synthetic aluminum scales was prepared and identified. The aluminum compounds of a field scale were identified with similar procedures. Recent field work showed that the use of acetic acid in the HF acidizing sequences significantly decreased scaling. The role of acetic acid is discussed on the basis of laboratory support of these field data.

  11. Optimization of Squeeze Casting for Aluminum Alloy Parts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Qingming Chang; Yulong Zhu

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated with the installation of a new production size UBE 350 Ton VSC Squeeze Casting system in the Metal Casting Laboratory at Case Western University. A Lindberg 75k W electrical melting furnace was installed alongside. The challenge of installation and operation of such industrial-size equipment in an academic environment was met successfully. Subsequently, a Sterling oil die heater and a Visi-Track shot monitoring system were added. A significant number of inserts were designed and fabricated over the span of the project, primarily for squeeze casting different configurations of test bars and plates. A spiral ''ribbon insert'' for evaluation of molten metal fluidity was also fabricated. These inserts were used to generate a broad range of processing conditions and determine their effect on the quality of the squeeze cast parts. This investigation has studied the influence of the various casting variables on the quality of indirect squeeze castings primarily of aluminum alloys. The variables studied include gating design, fill time and fill patter, metal pressure and die temperature variations. The quality of the die casting was assessed by an analysis of both their surface condition and internal soundness. The primary metal tested was an aluminum 356 alloy. In addition to determining the effect of these casting variables on casting quality as measured by a flat plate die of various thickness, a number of test bar inserts with different gating designs have been inserted in the squeeze casting machine. The mechanical properties of these test bars produced under different squeeze casting conditions were measured and reported. The investigation of the resulting properties also included an analysis of the microstructure of the squeeze castings and the effect of the various structural constituents on the resulting properties. The main conclusions from this investigation are as follows: The ingate size and shape are very important since it must remain open until the casting is solidified and pressure is maintained on the solidifying casting. Fanned gates, particularly on the smaller section castings avoid jetting effects at the ingate end. The fan type ingate helps accomplish a rapid fill without high velocities. The molten metal has to fill the cavity before localized solidification occurs. This is best accomplished with a larger ingate to attain rapid filling without excessive velocity or jetting that occurs at high metal velocities. Straight gates are prone to case jetting of the metal stream even a low velocities. Fanned gates allow use of higher fill velocity without excessive jetting. A higher metal pressure provides a more complete fill of the die including improved compensation for solidification shrinkage. With the proper filling pattern, ingates, overflows and die temperature for a given die, very good tensile properties can be attained in squeeze casting. In general, the smaller squeeze castings require higher die temperatures. Computer models using the UES Procast and MagmaSoft finite element software can, after suitable adjustments, predict the flow pattern in the die cavity.

  12. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  13. (Polyfluoroaryl) fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interfere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  14. Aluminum (Al) Etch Instructions The CEPSR cleanroom stores Aluminum Etchant Type A, a pre-made product used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    Aluminum (Al) Etch Instructions The CEPSR cleanroom stores Aluminum Etchant Type A, a pre-made product used for removing or etching away aluminum. This etchant is stored inside the acid or corrosive a specific thickness of aluminum that is desired. Note: Once the bottle is empty or you find that it's etch

  15. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular hydrogen. The change in free energy is reduced by providing Al in a state of high entropy...

  16. UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donhowe, E. T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975, and therefore has had the opportunity to evaluate practical operations of the UV technology...

  17. Aluminum-lithium alloys -- the next generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webster, D. (Advanced Material Development, Saratoga, CA (United States))

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advantages of aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys, such as low density and high modulus, have been well documented in the last 15 years, but their impact on the aerospace market has fallen short of initial expectations. However, vacuum refining processes have now been developed at Comalco Aluminium Ltd., Melbourne, Australia, that provide improved mechanical properties. In addition, the patented technology allows higher levels of lithium, which results in higher stiffness and lower densities. For example, alloys with 3.3% lithium and very low amounts of hydrogen and alkali metal impurities demonstrate good mechanical properties. It also exhibits good weldability, as shown in results of varestraint'' testing, which evaluates the tendency to crack during welding. The high purity of these VacLite alloys ensures that grain boundary fracture is minimized, and cleavage fracture is reduced almost to the limit of detectability. Furthermore, advanced vacuum techniques using electron beam melting at 10[sup [minus]5] torr may eventually reduce impurities to a level at which fracture occurs only in a ductile, transgranular manner.

  18. An optimal replacement problem in aluminum production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spanks, Lisa Marie

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN OPTIMAL REPLACEMENT PROBLEM IN ALUMINUM PRODUCTION Thesis by LISA MARIE SPANKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN OPTIMAL REPLACEMENT PROBLEM IN ALUMINUM PRODUCTION Thesis by LISA MARIE SPANKS Approved as to style and content by: Richard M. Feldman (Chair of Committee) James H. Matis (Member) ryan L. Deuermey r...

  19. Oxidation/corrosion of metallic and ceramic materials in an aluminum remelt furnace. [For fluidized bed waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federer, J.I.; Jones, P.J.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both metallic alloys and ceramic materials are candidates for the distributor plate and other components of fluidized bed waste heat recovery (FBWHR) systems. Eleven Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys were exposed to air at elevated temperatures in laboratory furnaces and to flue gases in an aluminum remelt furnace to assess their resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Four SiC ceramics and two oxide ceramics were also tested in the aluminum remelt furnace. Some alloys were coated with aluminum or SiO2 by commercial processes in an effort to enhance their oxidation and corrosion resistance.

  20. Aluminum Microfoams for Reduced Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions of Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the foamability of Aluminum alloy . Journal of Materialthe more conventional aluminum alloy, would have a higheraerospace technologies, aluminum alloys are the materials of

  1. SUBTHRESHOLD DISPLACEMENT DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drosd, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONDAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONby irradiating copper-aluminum alloys at high tempera­ tures

  2. EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON THE ACOUSTIC EMISSION GENERATED DURING PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORYDURING PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM J. Baram Materialsof polycrystalline aluminum, of different grain sizes and at

  3. Aluminum Microfoams for Reduced Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions of Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the foamability of Aluminum alloy . Journal of MaterialFoamability of particle reinforced Aluminum Melt. Ma. -wiss.particle-stabilised Aluminum foams . Advanced Engineering

  4. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of iron and aluminum on stress-related genelopathy syndrome. Possible aluminum intoxication. N. Engl.Chronic exposure to aluminum in drinking water increases

  5. IMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTIC COMPOSITIONS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF SUPERPLASTICITY PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pech, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTICIMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTICAl-Ge) wire. Al-Ge «00F Aluminum-Germanium Atomic Percentage

  6. Transcriptomic analysis reveals differential gene expression in common bean (Phaseoulus vulgaris) for aluminum resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eticha, Dejene; Zahn, Marc; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Horst, Walter J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition zone is the most aluminum-sensitive apical rootsoils is mainly limited by aluminum toxicity. In addition,L. under conditions of aluminum stress. Plant Physiol 104:

  7. A NEW A15 MULTIFILAMENTARY SUPERCONDUCTOR BASED ON THE NIOBIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, G.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BASED ON THE NIOBIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON SYSTEM Gary C. Quinnpsi. Photomicrograph of an Aluminum-Silicon eutectic filledmultifilimentary niobium-aluminum-silicon wire, a) sample #

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE GASEOUS AND SOLID PRODUCTS OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutsen, G.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Gary F. Knutsen (M. S.OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Contents Abstract . .OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Gary F. Knutsen

  9. Mechanical properties and microstructures of dual phase steels containing silicon, aluminum and molybdenum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill, Thomas John O'

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEELS CONTAINING SILICON, ALUMINUM AND MOLYBDENUM Thomasdeoxidizing action of aluminum results in grain refinementquench martensite, Both (a) and Aluminum particle within the

  10. A Study of Aluminum Dependent Root Growth Inhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nezames, Cynthia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    symptom triggered by aluminum, but not the primary cause ofRI (1986) Characterization of hydroxy-aluminum solutionsby aluminum-27 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Soil

  11. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Jena, Puru [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of Mg{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?} (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg{sub 3}Al{sub 11} and Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 12}{sup ?}, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  12. Fluoride, aluminum, and phosphate kinetics in cryolite workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandjean, P.; Horder, M.; Thomassen, Y. (Odense Univ. (Denmark))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to cryolite (Na3AlF6) dust may result in skeletal fluorosis. Eight male workers at a cryolite concentrator participated in a 4-day study after 5 days of vacation. Dust exposures were 0.16 to 21.2 mg/m3. Urine was collected before work began and during two 4-hour periods. Preshift urine fluoride concentrations increased during the week. Fluoride concentrations in postshift urine and serum both correlated with the dust exposures. Serum fluoride concentrations decreased with a half-life of 3.3 to 6.9 hours after work. Fluoride clearance was 40.5 to 76.5 mL/min at urinary flow rates of 0.89 to 2.21 mL/min. Serum aluminum concentrations varied without relation to the exposure, but the urinary aluminum excretion correlated with the fluoride levels. Preshift serum-phosphate concentrations increased significantly during the week, possibly indicating changes in mineral metabolism. For monitoring of individual uptake of cryolite dust, serum fluoride measurements are most useful.

  13. Manufacturability of lab on chip devices : reagent-filled reservoirs bonding process and its effect on reagents flow pattern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saber, Aabed (Aabed Saud)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In its lab-on-a-chip product, Daktari Diagnostics utilizes "reagent-filled reservoirs" as a means of storing and delivering the liquid reagent. During the clinical trials of the product, undesired reagent flow patterns ...

  14. A three-dimensional analysis of the flow and heat transfer for the modified chemical vapor deposition process including buoyancy, variable properties, and tube rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Y.T.; Choi, M.; Greif, R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of the heat transfer, flow, and particle deposition relative to the modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD) process. The effects of variable properties, buoyancy, and tube rotation have been included in the study. The resulting three-dimensional temperature and velocity fields have been obtained for a range of conditions. The effects of buoyancy result in asymmetric temperature and axial velocity profiles with respect to the tube axis. Variable properties cause significant variations in the axial velocity along the tube and in the secondary flow in the region near the torch. Particle trajectories are shown to be strongly dependent on the tube rotation and are helices for large rotational speeds. The component of secondary flow in the radial direction is compared to the thermophoretic velocity, which is the primary cause of particle deposition in the MCVD process. Over the central portion of the tube the radial component of the secondary flow is most important in determining the motion of the particles.

  15. Numerical simulation of the fluid flow and heat transfer processes during scavenging in a two-stroke engine under steady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro Gouveia, M. de; Reis Parise, J.A. dos; Nieckele, A.O. (Pontificia Univ. Catolica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of the scavenging process in a two-stroke flat-piston model engine has been developed. Air enters the cylinder circumferentially, inducting a three-dimensional turbulent swirling flow. The problem was modeled as a steady-state axisymmetric flow through a cylinder with uniform wall temperature. The steady-state regime was simulated by assuming the piston head fixed at the bottom dead center. The calculation was performed employing the {kappa}-{epsilon} model of turbulence. A comparison of the results obtained for the flow field with available experimental data showed very good agreement, and a comparison with an available numerical solution revealed superior results. The effects of the Reynolds number, inlet port angles, and engine geometry on the flow and in-cylinder heat transfer characteristics were investigated. The Nusselt number substantially increases with larger Reynolds numbers and a smaller bore-to-stroke ratio. It is shown that the positioning of the exhaust value(s) is the main parameter to control the scavenging process.

  16. Relative radiant heat absorption characteristics of two types of mirror shields and a polished aluminum shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herron, Steven Douglas

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compared. The relative absorptivities of two types of rear?silvered safety plate mirrors and a polished aluminum sheet will be compared in this research. LITERATURE REVIEW Modes of Heat Transmission It is well understood that heat may flow only... of vasomotor tone, peripheral venous blood pooling, hypotension, and cerebral anoxia. This instability results in nausea, giddi- 19 ness, universal discomfort, acute physical fatigue, and sometimes fainting. Salt deficiency from any of several possible...

  17. Improved Microstructure and Properties of 6061 Aluminum Alloy Weldments Using a Double-Sided Arc Welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, YuMing

    Welding Process Y.M. ZHANG, C. PAN, and A.T. MALE Due to its popularity and high crack sensitivity, 6061 aluminum alloy was selected as a test material for the newly developed double-sided arc welding (DSAW systematically. The percentage of fine equiaxed grains in the fully penetrated welds is greatly increased

  18. Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howlader, Matiar R

    ], spark welding [3], explosive bonding [4], and diffusion bonding [5,6]. However, the processing such as diffusion bonding [5,6], friction welding [7e11], vacuum roll bonding [12] and hot roll bonding [13Investigation of bonding strength and sealing behavior of aluminum/stainless steel bonded at room

  19. Characterization of mechanical properties of aluminum 3003, 6061 and 7075 subjected to equal channel angular extrusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirmira, Srinivas Rangarao

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "xl"x6" billets of aluminum alloys 3003, 6061 and 7075 and copper 101, and the effects of processing parameters (number of passes, route. deformation temperature and strain rate) on the mechanical properties (and resistivity for copper 101) has been...

  20. Unexpected behaviour of one Pb monolayer deposited on aluminum oxide thin film grown on Ag(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vizzini, Sébastien, E-mail: sebastien.vizzini@im2np.fr; Bertoglio, M. [IM2NP CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, F-13397 Marseille (France)] [IM2NP CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, F-13397 Marseille (France); Oughaddou, Hamid [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay, ISMO CNRS, Université de Paris, F-91405 Orsay, France and Deptartamento de Physique, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France)] [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d'Orsay, ISMO CNRS, Université de Paris, F-91405 Orsay, France and Deptartamento de Physique, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Hoarau, J. Y.; Biberian, J. P.; Aufray, B. [CINaM CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, F-13288 Marseille (France)] [CINaM CNRS, Aix Marseille Université, F-13288 Marseille (France)

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), Auger electron spectroscopy, and low energy electron diffraction, we have observed a surprising complete dissolution at room temperature of one lead monolayer deposited by evaporation on an aluminum oxide thin film (?0.8?nm thick) previously grown on Ag (111). We have observed the quasi-instantaneous diffusion of the lead deposit through the oxide layer to the silver/oxide interface. After the diffusion process, lead atoms form a Moiré superstructure, which is characterized by STM through the oxide layer. This unexpected behavior puts in light the very weak interaction between the aluminum oxide and the silver substrate.

  1. Changes in close-range order in amorphous island films of aluminum during heating and melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhukova, L.A.; Popel', S.I.; Razikova, N.A.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By sputtering in vacuum on collodion substrates at room temperature, amorphous films of aluminum are obtained, consisting of particles up to 10 nm in diameter. Their structure is investigated by electron diffraction. By analysis of difference functions of the radial atomic distribution the authors elucidate the changes in the ordering of the atoms during crystallization and melting of the amorphous film of aluminum. They establish the sequence of changes in close-range order in the process of crystallization under the electron beam on the basis of the structures sc ..-->.. bcc ..-->.. fcc (hcp).

  2. Microsoft Word - MPR-3181 Survey of HTGR Process Energy Applications...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process, coal gasification, electricity and steam for steel mills and aluminum refining, district heating and desalination. 3. For the longer term, GA has studied methanol...

  3. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850��������C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys���¢�������� weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in t

  4. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL DISCONTINUITIES ON THE STRENGTH OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, J.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE STRENGTH OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALUMINUM OXIDE S. Wallace ofThe variables and number of aluminum oxide (almnina). size~

  5. Excimer laser interactions with an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsomichalis, A.; Kefalidou, A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An AlCuMg alloy was irradiated using a KrF pulsed excimer laser. A microstructural study showed the presence of a laser treated zone having a uniform depth of approximately 20 {micro}m. The surface layer of the laser treated aluminum alloy exhibited a wavy topography and its surface roughness was found to depend on the number of laser pulses per step. A X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of aluminum oxides and nitrides on the surface of the laser irradiated specimens. Corrosion measurements showed that the laser treated aluminum alloy exhibited a higher corrosion resistance. The corrosion behavior of the irradiated specimens is related to the energy density of the incident laser pulses.

  6. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Naperville, IL); Keller, Rudolf (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  7. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen - 2010 Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage The purpose of this White Paper is to describe and evaluate the potential of aluminum-water reactions for the

  8. aluminum pressure vessels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angular region on the surface Stokes, Yvonne 204 iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan Chemistry Websites Summary: iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan...

  9. aluminum silicon titanium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  10. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Produce Hydrogen: A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage. Version 2, 2010. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A...

  11. Development of a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody Panels AMD 309 Development of a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody Panels AMD 309 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office...

  12. Characterizing Microalgae (Nannochloris oculata) Harvesting by Aluminum Flocculation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ryan T.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    oculata by aluminum chloride. N. oculata flocculation was studied by manipulating the culture pH and ionic strength before the addition of aluminum chloride. The removal efficiency, concentration factor, settling rate, and zeta potential of the culture...

  13. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  14. ALUMINUM--1997 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aluminum smelter by February 1998 at an annual rate of 27,000 tons. The Troutdale smelter, which has at its 204,000-ton- per-year Longview, WA, primary aluminum smelter. The restart was expected

  15. aluminum phosphate catalyst: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 213 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  16. aluminum sodium sulfate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 232 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  17. aluminum inorganic compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 211 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  18. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  19. Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6...

  20. Measurements of electrical and mechanical properties of aluminum composite cryoconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundby, Paul C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of annealing on the residual resistance ratio (RRR) of five (5) composite aluminum cryoconductor wires and mechanical properties on fifteen (15) aluminum cryoconductor wires are presented. The independent variables of the study include...

  1. THE APPLICATION OF A STATISTICAL DOWNSCALING PROCESS TO DERIVE 21{sup ST} CENTURY RIVER FLOW PREDICTIONS USING A GLOBAL CLIMATE SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werth, D.; Chen, K. F.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in coming decades depends, in part, on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to alter river flows from their current values, possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. Reliable climate projections are therefore critical to predicting the future water supply for the United States. These projections cannot be provided solely by global climate models (GCMs), however, as their resolution is too coarse to resolve the small-scale climate changes that can affect hydrology, and hence water supply, at regional to local scales. A process is needed to ‘downscale’ the GCM results to the smaller scales and feed this into a surface hydrology model to help determine the ability of rivers to provide adequate flow to meet future needs. We apply a statistical downscaling to GCM projections of precipitation and temperature through the use of a scaling method. This technique involves the correction of the cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of the GCM-derived temperature and precipitation results for the 20{sup th} century, and the application of the same correction to 21{sup st} century GCM projections. This is done for three meteorological stations located within the Coosa River basin in northern Georgia, and is used to calculate future river flow statistics for the upper Coosa River. Results are compared to the historical Coosa River flow upstream from Georgia Power Company’s Hammond coal-fired power plant and to flows calculated with the original, unscaled GCM results to determine the impact of potential changes in meteorology on future flows.

  2. Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

  3. Method And Reactor For Production Of Aluminum By Carbothermic Reduction Of Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aune, Jan Arthur (Ytre Enebakk, NO); Johansen, Kai (Kristiansand, NO)

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow partition wall is employed to feed carbon material to an underflow of a carbothermic reduction furnace used to make aluminum. The partition wall divides a low temperature reaction zone where aluminum oxide is reacted with carbon to form aluminum carbide and a high temperature reaction zone where the aluminum carbide and remaining aluminum oxide are reacted to form aluminum and carbon monoxide.

  4. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus under-added. Although the sludge was rheologically thick throughout the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles, this may have been due to the under addition of acid. Aluminum dissolution did, however, impact analyses of the SRAT receipt material. Two methods for determining total base yielded significantly different results. The high hydroxide content and the relatively high soluble aluminum content of the washed post aluminum dissolution sludge likely contributed to this difference and the ultimate under addition of acid. It should be noted that the simulant used to provide input for the SRAT cycle was an inadequate representation of the waste in terms of acid demand, likely due to the differences in the form of aluminum and hydroxide in the simulant and actual waste. Based on the results of this task, it is recommended that: (1) Sludge settling and rheology during washing of the forthcoming Sludge Batch 5 qualification sample be monitored closely and communicated to the Tank Farm. (2) SRNL receive a sample of Tank 51 after all chemical additions have been made and prior to the final Sludge Batch 5 decant for rheological assessment. Rheology versus wt% insoluble solids will be performed to determine the maximum amount of decant prior to the Tank 51 to Tank 40 transfer. (3) As a result of the problem with measuring total base and subsequently under-calculating acid for the DWPF CPC processing of the post aluminum dissolution sludge; (4) Studies to develop understanding of how the sludge titrates (i.e., why different titration methods yield different results) should be performed. (5) Simulants that better match the properties of post aluminum dissolution sludge should be developed. (6) Work on developing an acid calculation less dependant on the total base measurement should be continued.

  5. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zinc, bauxite, and the hydroelectric power needed to smeltthe Afobaka hydroelectric dam to power an aluminum smelter

  6. The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Henry Kinsolving

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions was made. The total immersion, continuous agitation method of testing was used. Commercially pure aluminum and two aluminum alloys were exposed to various concentrations of boric acid...THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN BORIC ACID SOLUTIONS A Thesis By HENRI KINSOLVING BASS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College oi' Texas' in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  7. Cathode Connector For Aluminum Low Temperature Smelting Cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA)

    2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathode connector means for low temperature aluminum smelting cell for connecting titanium diboride cathode or the like to bus bars.

  8. An experimental study of flow boiling characteristics of carbon dioxide in multiport mini channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    & Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China d Aluminum Technology Center, Showa Denko K.K. Oyama of CO2 flowing in a multi-port extruded aluminum test section, which had 10 circular channels, each. The promising applications of CO2 refrigeration systems include automotive air conditioning, heat pumps

  9. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  10. Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from: Solid wastes; Aluminum; Chemicals; Waste disposal; Landfills. Author keywords: Solid waste; Leachate

  11. Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions W. M. Itano, J. C. Bergquist, A-16 . Keywords: aluminum, atomic clocks, frequency standards, ion traps, mercury 1. INTRODUCTION Optical frequency standards based on the mercury ion and, more recently, the aluminum ion are under devel- opment

  12. Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and mantle fluids Craig E. Manning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and mantle fluids Craig E. Manning Department of Earth and Space December 2005 Available online 9 March 2006 Abstract Aluminum is a major rock-forming element, but its low by formation of polynuclear Na­Al­Si­O clusters and/or polymers. Aluminum should not be assumed to be immobile

  13. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

  14. POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1 , S. T. Stewart2 , M. R. Furlanetto1 concurrent VISAR measurements in the same optical path, validation experiments on aluminum have been-shock temperature of 495 K ± 30 K was recorded from a polished free surface of aluminum 2024-T4 subject to a peak

  15. The Effects of Fe3+ Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    The Effects of Fe3+ and Mn3+ on Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in North-Central New Mexico, U, New Mexico 87131 (Received 28 November 1983; in revised form 2 October 1984) ABSTRACT Aluminum, then their equilibrium coexistence is invariant. However, the aluminum silicate minerals are not pure in highly oxidized

  16. Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

  17. ccsd00002835, Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00002835, version 2 ­ 14 Sep 2004 Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces Damien Camille Soula , 31400 Toulouse, France We present experimental light scattering measurements from aluminum scattering measurements of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave (632.8 nanometers) from a rough aluminum alloy

  18. Review Article Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneff, Stephanie

    Review Article Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living of the Al toxicants to which we are being exposed. 1. Introduction Aluminum (Al) is the most common metal

  19. CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment.14 Keywords: Landfills, aluminum, hydrogen, salt cake, dross, calorimeter, waste disposal15 16 17CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE Navid H. Jafari Student Member and Reactivity of Secondary Aluminum Production Waste1 Navid H. Jafari1 , Timothy D. Stark2 and Ralph Roper3 2 3

  20. Uranium Sequestration by Aluminum Phosphate Minerals in Unsaturated Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerden, James L. Jr. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mineralogical and geochemical study of soils developed from the unmined Coles Hill uranium deposit (Virginia) was undertaken to determine how phosphorous influences the speciation of uranium in an oxidizing soil/saprolite system typical of the eastern United States. This paper presents mineralogical and geochemical results that identify and quantify the processes by which uranium has been sequestered in these soils. It was found that uranium is not leached from the saturated soil zone (saprolites) overlying the deposit due to the formation of a sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate mineral of the meta-autunite group. The concentration of uranium in the saprolites is approximately 1000 mg uranium per kg of saprolite. It was also found that a significant amount of uranium was retained in the unsaturated soil zone overlying uranium-rich saprolites. The uranium concentration in the unsaturated soils is approximately 200 mg uranium per kg of soil (20 times higher than uranium concentrations in similar soils adjacent to the deposit). Mineralogical evidence indicates that uranium in this zone is sequestered by a barium-strontium-calcium aluminum phosphate mineral of the crandallite group (gorceixite). This mineral is intimately inter-grown with iron and manganese oxides that also contain uranium. The amount of uranium associated with both the aluminum phosphates (as much as 1.4 weight percent) has been measured by electron microprobe micro-analyses and the geochemical conditions under which these minerals formed has been studied using thermodynamic reaction path modeling. The geochemical data and modeling results suggest the meta-autunite group minerals present in the saprolites overlying the deposit are unstable in the unsaturated zone soils overlying the deposit due to a decrease in soil pH (down to a pH of 4.5) at depths less than 5 meters below the surface. Mineralogical observations suggest that, once exposed to the unsaturated environment, the meta-autunite group minerals react to form U(VI)- bearing aluminum phosphates. (author)

  1. Study of integration issues to realize the market potential of OTEC energy in the aluminum industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Jr., M. S.; Thiagarajan, V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Markel, A. L.; Snyder, III, J. E.; Sprouse, A. M.; Leshaw, D.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The various integration issues are studied which must be considered to realize the market potential for the use of OTEC by the aluminum industry. The chloride reduction process has been identified as an attractive candidate for use with OTEC systems, and drained-cathode Hall cells and two alternative chloride reduction processes are considered. OTEC power system and plantships for the different processes are described. Aluminum industry characteristics important for OTEC considerations are given, including economic models and case history analyses. Appended are supporting cost estimates and energy bridge concepts for getting OTEC energy to shore. (LEW)

  2. Extensible packet processing architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Perry J.; Hamlet, Jason R.; Pierson, Lyndon G.; Olsberg, Ronald R.; Chun, Guy D.

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for distributed packet processing includes sequentially passing packets associated with packet flows between a plurality of processing engines along a flow through data bus linking the plurality of processing engines in series. At least one packet within a given packet flow is marked by a given processing engine to signify by the given processing engine to the other processing engines that the given processing engine has claimed the given packet flow for processing. A processing function is applied to each of the packet flows within the processing engines and the processed packets are output on a time-shared, arbitered data bus coupled to the plurality of processing engines.

  3. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF WEST VIRGINIA, INC. By Randall A. Childs Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia more than 660 employees with a production capacity of 170,000 tonnes per year. The economic impact

  4. Flash threshold of shocked aluminum silicofluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, G.H.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a 0.5-mm polycarbonate flier striking a 0.5-mm polycarbonate target, we found that a velocity of 1.42 km/s was necessary to cause aluminum silicofluoride sprayed on the far surface to flash. We calculated that the pressure in the polycarbonate was 2.93 GPa. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Cleveland, OH); Liu, Xinye (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

  6. Solid electrolyte based sensor for monitoring the magnesium level during reclamation of aluminum scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fergus, J.W.; Hui, S. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Materials Research and Education Center

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloy scrap often contains excess magnesium which must be removed during recycling by a process referred to as demagging. The efficiency of this process could be improved with an in-situ magnesium sensor, which could be used to optimize the process parameters to the changing magnesium content. The sensor developed in this work consists of a galvanic cell with a magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) solid electrolyte and a molten magnesium reference electrode. The voltage output of the sensor changes by about 100 mV for the change in magnesium content which occurs during the demagging process (5 wt% to 0.1 wt%) and is in excellent agreement with thermodynamic measurements using molten chloride electrolytes. This paper focuses on the effect of silicon, which is a common alloying element in aluminum alloys, on the output of an electrochemical magnesium sensor.

  7. Advanced manufacturing by spray forming: Aluminum strip and microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHugh, K.M.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray forming is an advanced materials processing technology that converts a bulk liquid metal to a near-net-shape solid by depositing atomized droplets onto a suitably shaped substrate. By combining rapid solidification processing with product shape control, spray forming can reduce manufacturing costs while improving product quality. INEL is developing a unique spray-forming method based on de Laval (converging/diverging) nozzle designs to produce near-net-shape solids and coatings of metals, polymers, and composite materials. Properties of the spray-formed material are tailored by controlling the characteristics of the spray plume and substrate. Two examples are described: high-volume production of aluminum alloy strip, and the replication of micron-scale features in micropatterned polymers during the production of microelectromechanical systems.

  8. Microarray Analysis on Human Neuroblastoma Cells Exposed to Aluminum, Beta1–42-Amyloid or the Beta1–42-Amyloid Aluminum Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J (1992) Selective accumulation of aluminum and iron in theB, Tognon G, Zatta P (2005) Aluminum-triggered structuralrole of beta-amyloid(1-42)-aluminum complex in Alzheimer’s

  9. Cu--Ni--Fe anode for use in aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergsma, S. Craig; Brown, Craig W.; Bradford, Donald R; Barnett, Robert J.; Mezner, Michael B.

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte, the method comprising the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte at a temperature of less than 900.degree. C. having alumina dissolved therein in an electrolytic cell having a liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having a bottom and walls extending upwardly from said bottom. A plurality of non-consumable Cu--Ni--Fe anodes and cathodes are disposed in a vertical direction in the electrolyte, the cathodes having a plate configuration and the anodes having a flat configuration to compliment the cathodes. The anodes contain apertures therethrough to permit flow of electrolyte through the apertures to provide alumina-enriched electrolyte between the anodes and the cathodes. Electrical current is passed through the anodes and through the electrolyte to the cathodes, depositing aluminum at the cathodes and producing gas at the anodes.

  10. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of enhanced utility, uses thereof, and products based thereon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Chen, You-Xian (Midland, MI)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium are novel weakly coordinating anions which are are highly fluorinated. (Polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of one such type contain at least one ring substituent other than fluorine. These (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium have greater solubility in organic solvents, or have a coordinative ability essentially equal to or less than that of the corresponding (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, or indium in which the substituent is replaced by fluorine. Another type of new (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanion of aluminum, gallium, and indium have 1-3 perfluorinated fused ring groups and 2-0 perfluorophenyl groups. When used as a cocatalyst in the formation of novel catalytic complexes with d- or f-block metal compounds having at least one leaving group such as a methyl group, these anions, because of their weak coordination to the metal center, do not interefere in the ethylene polymerization process, while affecting the the propylene process favorably, if highly isotactic polypropylene is desired. Thus, the (polyfluoroaryl)fluoroanions of aluminum, gallium, and indium of this invention are useful in various polymerization processes such as are described.

  11. Two temperature accretion around rotating black holes: Description of general advective flow paradigm in presence of various cooling processes to explain low to high luminous sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Rajesh; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the viscous two temperature accretion discs around rotating black holes. We describe the global solution of accretion flows with a sub-Keplerian angular momentum profile, by solving the underlying conservation equations including explicit cooling processes selfconsistently. Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron and inverse Comptonization of soft photons are considered as possible cooling mechanisms, for sub-Eddington, Eddington and super-Eddington mass accretion rates around Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes with a Kerr parameter 0.998. It is found that the flow, during its infall from the Keplerian to sub-Keplerian transition region to the black hole event horizon, passes through various phases of advection -- general advective paradigm to radiatively inefficient phase and vice versa. Hence the flow governs much lower electron temperature ~10^8-10^{9.5} K, in the range of accretion rate in Eddington units 0.01 luminous X-ray sources (e.g. SS433), at different combinations of input parameters such as mass accretion rate, ratio of specific heats. The set of solutions also predicts appropriately the luminosity observed in the highly luminous AGNs and ultra-luminous quasars (e.g. PKS 0743-67).

  12. Waste Minimization Study on Pyrochemical Reprocessing Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boussier, H.; Conocar, O.; Lacquement, J. [CEA/DEN Valrho Marcoule/DRCP/SCPS/Pyrochemical Processes Laboratory, BP 17171 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ideally a new pyro-process should not generate more waste, and should be at least as safe and cost effective as the hydrometallurgical processes currently implemented at industrial scale. This paper describes the thought process, the methodology and some results obtained by process integration studies to devise potential pyro-processes and to assess their capability of achieving this challenging objective. As example the assessment of a process based on salt/metal reductive extraction, designed for the reprocessing of Generation IV carbide spent fuels, is developed. Salt/metal reductive extraction uses the capability of some metals, aluminum in this case, to selectively reduce actinide fluorides previously dissolved in a fluoride salt bath. The reduced actinides enter the metal phase from which they are subsequently recovered; the fission products remain in the salt phase. In fact, the process is not so simple, as it requires upstream and downstream subsidiary steps. All these process steps generate secondary waste flows representing sources of actinide leakage and/or FP discharge. In aqueous processes the main solvent (nitric acid solution) has a low boiling point and evaporate easily or can be removed by distillation, thereby leaving limited flow containing the dissolved substance behind to be incorporated in a confinement matrix. From the point of view of waste generation, one main handicap of molten salt processes, is that the saline phase (fluoride in our case) used as solvent is of same nature than the solutes (radionuclides fluorides) and has a quite high boiling point. So it is not so easy, than it is with aqueous solutions, to separate solvent and solutes in order to confine only radioactive material and limit the final waste flows. Starting from the initial block diagram devised two years ago, the paper shows how process integration studies were able to propose process fittings which lead to a reduction of the waste variety and flows leading at an 'ideal' new block diagram allowing internal solvent recycling, and self eliminating reactants. This new flowsheet minimizes the quantity of inactive inlet flows that would have inevitably to be incorporated in a final waste form. The study identifies all knowledge gaps to be filled and suggest some possible R and D issues to confirm or infirm the feasibility of the proposed process fittings. (authors)

  13. Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

  14. Generation and structural characterization of aluminum cyanoacetylide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L., E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén 5, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus Miguel Delibes, Paseo de Belén 7, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Guillemin, Jean-Claude [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Cernicharo, José [Group of Molecular Astrophysics, ICMM C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz N3 Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations bring to light a first investigation of a metallic cyanoacetylide, AlC{sub 3}N, using laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. This molecule was synthesized in a supersonic expansion by the reaction of aluminum vapour with C{sub 3}N, produced from solid aluminum rods and BrCCCN in a newly constructed ablation-heating nozzle device. A set of accurate rotational and {sup 27}Al and {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of the rotational spectrum and compared with those predicted in a high-level ab initio study, conducting to the assignment of the observed species to linear AlCCCN. We have searched for this species towards the carbon-rich evolved star IRC + 10216 but only an upper limit to its abundance has been obtained.

  15. Inert anodes and advanced smelting of aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ASME Technical Working Group on Inert Anode Technologies

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issued associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint. It discusses the outlook for the direct retrofit of advanced reduction technologies to existing aluminum smelters, and compares retrofits to ''brown field'' usage and ''green field'' adoption of the technologies. A number of observations and recommendations are offered for consideration concerning further research and development efforts that may be directed toward these advanced technologies. The opportunities are discussed in the context of incremental progress that is being made in conventional Hall-Heroult cell systems.

  16. Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

  17. Experimental superplastic characterization of advanced aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Christopher Carl

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of America Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. E. Goforth An investigation into the experimental superplastic characterization of advanced aluminum alloys consisted of the design and assembly of an experimental test facility for measuring the effects... of strain-rate, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The experimental apparatus was designed to accurately monitor these parameters while allowing for active control of the strain-rate and hydrostatic pressure. The results obtained from...

  18. Dissolved aluminum in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myre, Peggy Lynne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in areas of minimum sediment resuspension. With limited data available it appears that the boundary of the sediment/water interface does release dissolved Al, but kinetically Al should decrease with depth in the sediment during authigenesis. The Al... DISSOLVED ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by PEGGY LYNNE MYRE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Majo...

  19. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs Johanna Roséndistributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmasfor vacuum arc plasmas. Aluminum plasma, for example,

  20. THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three prototype Table II. aluminum-carbon bonds and theirPhysics THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, ANDLBL-l0871 The Prototype Aluminum - Carbon Single, Double.

  1. [Unsegmented continuous-flow sample processing and electrochemical detection of gaseous species]. Final report, March 1, 1985--February 28, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mottola, H.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Goals were a continuous-flow, unsegmented, all-gas carrier and/or a segmented liquid/gas interface system for sample introduction and transport to detection/determination point; a regenerable electrode probe base on redox reactions of Fe(II) and Fe(III) complexes with 1, 10-phenanthroline and related ligands; and amperometric/coulometric current measurements providing analyte signals. Gases to be detected included NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2}. This report is divided into 3 parts: preparation of new ligands of 1,10-phenanthroline family; glassy carbon surfaces coated with polymeric films prepared from monomeric units of tris[5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline]iron(II); and sulfite oxidase/hexacyanoferrate modified C paste electrode.

  2. Glow discharge cleaning and vacuum deposition of copper on 6061-T6 aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasofsky, R.W.; Corbett, W.D. Jr.

    1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to plating electroless nickel onto a part made of 6061-T6 aluminum, several aqueous pretreatment steps are required which end with the deposition of a thin copper layer covering the part. In an effort to minimize the quantity and type of wastes generated during this pretreatment process, vacuum deposition methods are under evaluation as an alternative. Six vacuum cleaning/copper deposition experiments have been conducted on 6061-T6 aluminum coupons. The coupons were glow discharge cleaned at 1500, 2000 and 2500 volts and a copper coating was either sputtered deposited or ion plated onto the aluminum substrate. The results showed that the adhesive strength of the copper coating was greatest for those coupons cleaned at 2500 volts and ion plated. Glow discharge cleaning was greatest for those coupons cleaned at 2500 volts and ion plated. Glow discharge cleaning at 1500 and 2000 volts resulted in copper films that were porous while those cleaned at 2500 volts were not. The results further showed that ion plated copper films of appropriate thickness can be produced while the aluminum alloy is precipitation hardened. 3 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    fracture in aluminum alloys at short time scales (10-8 s) · Role of PMMA backing material window -Changing. (2006) * Advised by Yoshi Toyoda and Y. M. Gupta Aluminum Thickness (m) Aluminum Alloy AluminumINSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements

  4. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    in armor structures made of high-performance aluminum alloys (including solution-strengthened and age-hardenable aluminum alloy grades). It is argued that due to the large width of FSW joints found in thick aluminum-solution strengthened and cold-worked aluminum alloy armor FSW-weld test structure. Keywords aluminum armor, ballistic

  5. A new continuous-flow process for catalytic conversion of glycerol to oxygenated fuel additive: Catalyst screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Wensheng

    . This process offers an attractive route for converting glycerol, the main by-product of biodiesel, to solketal: www.elsevier.com/locate/apenergy #12;1. Introduction The booming of biodiesel industry all over for the sustainability of biodiesel industry. In this regard, the fuel industry seems to be a suitable market where

  6. Fluid flow in the earth's crust plays an important role in a number of geologic processes. In carbonate reservoirs, fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the first order). The dynamic elastic properties of the rock are determined by adding the com- pliance steps, and thus the elastic properties of the rock, for the seismic modeling. The simulation allows us processes--hydraulic frac- turing or induced seismicity--depending on the fluid and rock properties

  7. Numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic data from fractured reservoirs including fluid flow and geochemical processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shekhar, Ravi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and amplitude variation with offset (AVO) results for our example model predicts that CO2 is easier to detect than brine in the fractured reservoirs. The effects of geochemical processes on seismics are simulated by time-lapse modeling for t = 1000 years. My...

  8. Process for production of an aluminum hydride compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Miller, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl substituted by at least one of: (i) an alkoxy group having from one to six carbon atoms; and (ii) an alkyl group having from three to twelve carbon atoms; wherein M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two.

  9. ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION - LABORATORY SCALE VALIDATION ON WASTE SIMULANTS TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SAMS T; HAGERTY K

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To reduce the additional sodium hydroxide and ease processing of aluminum bearing sludge, the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process has been invented by AREV A and demonstrated on a laboratory scale to remove alumina and regenerate/recycle sodium hydroxide prior to processing in the WTP. The method uses lithium hydroxide (LiOH) to precipitate sodium aluminate (NaAI(OH){sub 4}) as lithium hydrotalcite (Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.4Al(OH){sub 3}.3H{sub 2}O) while generating sodium hydroxide (NaOH). In addition, phosphate substitutes in the reaction to a high degree, also as a filterable solid. The sodium hydroxide enriched leachate is depleted in aluminum and phosphate, and is recycled to double-shell tanks (DSTs) to leach aluminum bearing sludges. This method eliminates importing sodium hydroxide to leach alumina sludge and eliminates a large fraction of the total sludge mass to be treated by the WTP. Plugging of process equipment is reduced by removal of both aluminum and phosphate in the tank wastes. Laboratory tests were conducted to verify the efficacy of the process and confirm the results of previous tests. These tests used both single-shell tank (SST) and DST simulants.

  10. Transverse transport of solutes between co-flowing pressure-driven streams for microfluidic studies of diffusion/reaction processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Baptiste Salmon; Armand Ajdari

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a situation commonly encountered in microfluidics: two streams of miscible liquids are brought at a junction to flow side by side within a microchannel, allowing solutes to diffuse from one stream to the other and possibly react. We focus on two model problems: (i) the transverse transport of a single solute from a stream into the adjacent one, (ii) the transport of the product of a diffusion-controlled chemical reaction between solutes originating from the two streams. Our description is made general through a non-dimensionalized formulation that incorporates both the parabolic Poiseuille velocity profile along the channel and thermal diffusion in the transverse direction. Numerical analysis over a wide range of the streamwise coordinate $x$ reveal different regimes. Close to the top and the bottom walls of the microchannel, the extent of the diffusive zone follows three distinct power law regimes as $x$ is increased, characterized respectively by the exponents 1/2, 1/3 and 1/2. Simple analytical arguments are proposed to account for these results.

  11. aluminum equivalent approximation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975,...

  12. aluminum composites final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living of the Al...

  13. aluminum calcium sodium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pores Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 380 2009 SIMULIA Customer Conference 1 Aluminum Bottle Forming Simulation with Abaqus Engineering Websites Summary: 2009 SIMULIA Customer...

  14. aluminum alloy pressure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pores Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 349 2009 SIMULIA Customer Conference 1 Aluminum Bottle Forming Simulation with Abaqus Engineering Websites Summary: 2009 SIMULIA Customer...

  15. aluminum microstructural features: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on aluminum. Fig: Prototype (direct machining- fluidic devices Metals can be used for tooling Mass and batch production of thermoplastic LOC devices Bone, Gary 9 Refinement of the...

  16. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  17. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It is never found free in nature and is found in most rocks, primarily in stable silicate mineral phases such as feldspars and phylosilicates. Aluminum enters environmental...

  19. Aluminum fluoride inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor inactivation and transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Housley, P.R. (Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia (USA))

    1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride, in the presence of aluminum ions, reversibly inhibits the temperature-mediated inactivation of unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors in cytosol preparations from mouse L cells. The effect is concentration-dependent, with virtually complete stabilization of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity at 2 mM fluoride and 100 microM aluminum. These concentrations of aluminum and fluoride are ineffective when used separately. Aluminum fluoride also stabilizes receptors toward inactivation by gel filtration and ammonium sulfate precipitation. Aluminum fluoride prevents temperature-dependent transformation of steroid-receptor complexes to the DNA-binding state. Aluminum fluoride does not inhibit calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, and unoccupied receptors inactivated by this enzyme in the presence of aluminum fluoride can be completely reactivated by dithiothreitol. The effects of aluminum fluoride are due to stabilization of the complex between the glucocorticoid receptor and the 90-kDa mammalian heat-shock protein hsp90, which suggests that aluminum fluoride interacts directly with the receptor. Endogenous thermal inactivation of receptors in cytosol is not accompanied by receptor dephosphorylation. However, inactivation is correlated with dissociation of hsp90 from the unoccupied receptor. These results support the proposal that hsp90 is required for the receptor to bind steroid and dissociation of hsp90 is sufficient to inactivate the unoccupied receptor.

  20. aluminum oxide membrane: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum oxide grown on the Fe at 850 C forms a homogeneous hexagonal oxide film with a thickness of approximately 10 ?. Core level 38 Development of novel...

  1. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable DevelopmentWorld Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and...

  2. aluminum hydroxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  3. aluminum weld strength: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  4. aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  5. aluminum slag dross: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  6. aluminum buffing operation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  7. aluminum smelting plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  8. aluminum ingestion reduce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  9. aluminum triiodide induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  10. aluminum vanadate ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  11. aluminum alloy parts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  12. aluminum alloys part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  13. Tool Durability Maps for Friction Stir Welding of an Aluminum Alloy T. DebRoy, A. De*, H.K.D.H. Bhadeshia**, V. D. Manvatkar*, A. Arora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    1 Tool Durability Maps for Friction Stir Welding of an Aluminum Alloy T. DebRoy, A. De*, H of premature tool failure. A scheme is created which exploits the physical three-dimensional heat and mass flow accumulation models, enables the plotting of tool durability maps which define the domains of satisfactory tool

  14. Refining of solid ferrous scrap intermingled with copper by using molten aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwase, M. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach for the removal of copper from solid ferrous scrap has been proposed by the present authors. With this process, solid ferrous scrap intermingled with pure copper is brought into contact with molten aluminum, which dissolved copper preferentially, and is recovered as {l_brace}Al + Cu{r_brace} alloys. After a duration of 30 minutes at temperatures between 963 K and 1,223 K, steel scrap is removed from the bath, resulting in being free of copper contamination.

  15. Unsteady self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Qingming; Zhang, Yunming; Li, Shuzhuan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-sustained detonation waves in flake aluminum dust/air mixtures have been studied in a tube of diameter 199 mm and length 32.4 m. A pressure sensor array of 32 sensors mounted around certain circumferences of the tube was used to measure the shape of the detonation front in the circumferential direction and pressure histories of the detonation wave. A two-head spin detonation wave front was observed for the aluminum dust/air mixtures, and the cellular structure resulting from the spinning movement of the triple point was analyzed. The variations in velocity and overpressure of the detonation wave with propagation distance in a cell were studied. The interactions of waves in triple-point configurations were analyzed and the flow-field parameters were calculated. Three types of triple-point configuration exist in the wave front of the detonation wave of an aluminum dust/air mixture. Both strong and weak transverse waves exist in the unstable self-sustained detonation wave.

  16. aluminum alloy 6061-t6: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resolution study of the impact of an aluminum sphere on an aluminum plate supported by a hollow aluminum cylinder. In a previous report, an optimal set of input parameters The...

  17. loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075-T - matrix debonding occur in some aluminum alloys. · To model accurately MSFC behavior in aluminum

  18. Low-Cycle Fatigue of Ultra-Fine-Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walley, J. L.; Lavernia, E. J.; Gibeling, J. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Ultra-Fine Grained Aluminum Alloy, Poster Session, TMS,with other MA aluminum alloys and is attributed to theGrained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy J.L. WALLEY, E.J.

  19. Influences on Burr Size During Face-Milling of Aluminum Alloys and Cast Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shefelbine, Wendy; Dornfeld, David

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    burrs. As with the aluminum alloys, the machining conditionsON BURR FORMATION As with the aluminum alloys, there is someFACE-MILLING OF ALUMINUM-SILICON ALLOYS AND CAST IRON Wendy

  20. Economic and environmental evaluation of end-of-life aerospace aluminum options using optimization methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Emily, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of recycling have long been understood and the conspicuous energy savings of secondary aluminum production have caused aluminum recycling to increase. Obsolete aircraft are a valuable source of aluminum scrap ...

  1. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chung, D. “Silicon-Aluminum Network Composites Fabricated byFigure 95 - Fine model with initial aluminum matrix failure.slight necking of the aluminum matrix. Note failed elements

  2. Long-term and Highly Aluminum-resistant Root Elongation in a Camphor Tree Cinnamomum camphora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osawa, Hiroki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the detoxification of aluminum in roots of tea plant (Oda A, Yamamoto F, Effects of aluminum on growth and biomassT, Beneficial effect of aluminum on growth of plants adapted

  3. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AISI 4340 STEEL MODIFIED WITH ALUMINUM AND SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Met. Trans. 1,2163 (1972). Aluminum_~n Iron~, S. L. Case andSTEEL MODIFIED WITH ALUMINUM AND SILIC ON ManjeshwarThe influence of additions of aluminum and combinations of

  4. Low-Cycle Fatigue of Ultra-Fine-Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walley, J. L.; Lavernia, E. J.; Gibeling, J. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an Ultra-Fine Grained Aluminum Alloy, Poster Session,Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy J.L. WALLEY, E.J.consistent with other MA aluminum alloys and is attributed

  5. Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. The Role of Dissolved Aluminum in Silica Chemistry forDraft Public Health Goal for Aluminum in Drinking Water .1994. Control of Residual Aluminum in Filtered Water . AWWA,

  6. Experiments and Simulations of Penetration into Granite by an Aluminum Shaped Charge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M J; Randers-Pehrson, G; Kuklo, R M; Rambur, T A; Switzer, L L; Summes, M A

    2003-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experimental results and numerical simulations of jet penetration into granite from an aluminum lined shaped charge. Several penetration versus standoff experiments were conducted into an in-situ granite formation located in the Climax Ridge region of the Nevada Test Site. Simulations of the jet penetration were modeled with a two dimensional arbitrary lagrange eulerian hydrocode. The effects of variations in the granite flow stress, porosity, and EOS have been evaluated. The work described in this paper is a continuation of our studies on jet penetration and modeling into high strength concrete.

  7. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Arthur E. (Los Altos, CA); Braun, Robert L. (Livermore, CA); Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Otis R. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  8. Process for oil shale retorting using gravity-driven solids flow and solid-solid heat exchange

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, A.E.; Braun, R.L.; Mallon, R.G.; Walton, O.R.

    1983-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A cascading bed retorting process and apparatus are disclosed in which cold raw crushed shale enters at the middle of a retort column into a mixer stage where it is rapidly mixed with hot recycled shale and thereby heated to pyrolysis temperature. The heated mixture then passes through a pyrolyzer stage where it resides for a sufficient time for complete pyrolysis to occur. The spent shale from the pyrolyzer is recirculated through a burner stage where the residual char is burned to heat the shale which then enters the mixer stage.

  9. Joining Uranium to Aluminum using Electron Beam Welding and an Explosively Clad Niobium Interlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elmer, J W; Terrill, P; Brasher, D; Butler, D

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A uranium alloy was joined to a high strength aluminum alloy using a commercially pure niobium interlayer. Joining of the Nb interlayer to the aluminum alloy was performed using an explosive welding process, while joining the Nb interlayer to the uranium alloy was performed using an electron beam welding process. Explosive welding was selected to bond the Nb to the aluminum alloy in order to minimize the formation of brittle intermetallic phases. Electron beam welding was selected to join the Nb to the uranium alloy in order to precisely control melting so as to minimize mixing of the two metals. A Modified Faraday Cup (MFC) technique using computer-assisted tomography was employed to determine the power distribution of the electron beam so that the welding parameters could be directly transferred to other welding machines. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, microhardness, and tensile testing of the welds were used to characterize the resulting joints. This paper presents the welding techniques and processing parameters that were developed to produce high integrity ductile joints between these materials.

  10. Lithium aluminum/iron sulfide battery having lithium aluminum and silicon as negative electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Marian (Flossmoor, IL); Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a negative electrode, the electrode made thereby and a secondary electrochemical cell using the electrode. Silicon powder is mixed with powdered electroactive material, such as the lithium-aluminum eutectic, to provide an improved electrode and cell.

  11. Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective ofthis research is to provide quantitative data on the equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of aluminum minerals required to model changes in permeability and brine chemistry associated with fluid/rock interactions in the recharge, reservoir, and discharge zones of active geothermal systems. This requires a precise knowledge of the thermodynamics and speciation of aluminum in aqueous brines, spanning the temperature and fluid composition rangesencountered in active systems. The empirical and semi-empirical treatments of the solubility/hydrolysis experimental results on single aluminum mineral phases form the basis for the ultimate investigation of the behavior of complex aluminosilicate minerals. The principal objective in FY 1998 was to complete the solubility measurements on boehmite (AIOOH) inNaC1 media( 1 .O and 5.0 molal ionic strength, IOO-250°C). However, additional measurements were also made on boehmite solubility in pure NaOH solutions in order to bolster the database for fitting in-house isopiestic data on this system. Preliminary kinetic Measurements of the dissolution/precipitation of boehmite was also carried out, although these were also not planned in the earlier objective. The 1999 objectives are to incorporate these treatments into existing codes used by the geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

  12. Fast electromigration crack in nanoscale aluminum film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, O. A., E-mail: oaemel2@gmail.com; Ivanov, I. O. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current-induced breakage of 20?nm thin aluminum layers deposited onto capacitor grade polypropylene (PP) films is experimentally studied. Biexponential current pulses of different amplitude (10–15?A) and duration (0.1–1??s) were applied to the samples. Breakage occurred after fast development of electromigrating ?200?nm-wide cracks with initial propagation velocity of ?1?m/s under a high current density of ?10{sup 12?}A/m{sup 2}. The cracks stopped when their lengths reached 250–450??m. This behavior is explained by the balance of electromigration and stress-induced atomic fluxes.

  13. Fly ash-enhanced aluminum composites for automotive parts. [Reports for April to June, 1998, and July to September, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, Dean; Rohatgi, Pradeep

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are to produce and evaluate the use of aluminum ''ashalloys''--metal matrix composites that incorporate coal fly ash--in the commercial manufacture of cast automotive parts. Some highlights are: (1) Ashalloy ingot with ''C'' type fly ash was synthesized using stir casting techniques similar to the successful castings of ''F'' type fly ash. Agglomeration was noted. Stirring periods were increased up to 45 minutes compared to the normal 5 minutes to determine whether the shear force of stirring would disagglomerate the clusters noted with this type of fly ash. The resulting sample showed clustering. (2) The ashalloy ingots of ''C'' type fly ash were remelted and poured into permanent molds using a cloth filter to screen out clusters. There was no major reduction in clusters of fly ash particles in the composite since the filter with the mesh size larger than 1 x 1 mm was used. The composite melt would not flow through when filters with smaller openings were used. (3) The fly ash sample from Wisconsin Electric Power Company was sent for classification. (4) A 1 lb. sample of JTM-processed fly ash was sent to Wisconsin Electric Power Company for classification and 10 lb. of same fly ash was sent to The Jet Pulverizer Company for jet milling. (5) Experiments on fly ash pretreatment as well as synthesis of ash alloy are continuing. (6) Attempts are being made to apply high speed shear mixing with selected liquids to disperse the clusters noted in ashalloy with the ''C'' type fly ash base. Stir casting processes have been developed to incorporate type ''F'' fly ash of different sizes and measuring tensile data on cast bars. This data enables selection of the optimum size of fly ash to meet specific property requirements. Attempts are underway to develop stir casting techniques to incorporate ''C'' type fly ash in cast aluminum alloys. It is expected that the next milestone for making trial parts will be completed on schedule by June 1999.

  14. Method of forming aluminum oxynitride material and bodies formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakas, Michael P. (Ammon, ID) [Ammon, ID; Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering green bodies comprising aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material therein. Such green bodies may comprise aluminum, oxygen, and nitrogen in addition to the aluminum orthophosphate. For example, the green bodies may include a mixture of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material. Additional methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering a green body including a sacrificial material therein, using the sacrificial material to form pores in the green body during sintering, and infiltrating the pores formed in the green body with a liquid infiltrant during sintering. Bodies are formed using such methods.

  15. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATIC DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition profiles in lithium/sulfur battery analogues hasTHE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATICthe Lithium-Aluminum, Iron Sulfide Battery I. Galvanostatic

  16. Finite Element Modeling of Superplastic Sheet Forming Processes. Identification of Rheological and Tribological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    complex SPF/DB process (involving several sheets partially welded by a diffusion bonding technique prior-like process commonly applied to titanium and aluminum alloys at high temperature and in specific conditions structures. The most common alloys being used are aluminum and titanium alloys. The process consists

  17. Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum-ruthenium alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum- ruthenium alloys Steven M. Anlagea phases as a function of composition. We have chosen the aluminum-ruthenium alloy system because. %. The solidified alloys have been studied by electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction to determine

  18. Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass Hak Sung Lee1, * and Bohumil3A 2B2, Canada Abstract: Biomass of nonliving brown seaweed Sargassum fluitans pretreated.5. There are indications that the biomass hydroxyl groups were involved in sequestering the aluminum in the form

  19. BWeb Copy of the Aluminum Chapter from the 1st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    industry. It then exploits the power of arrays to develop a model which distinguishes between smelters for smelting aluminum on a commercial basis (Smith 1988, p. 17). In today's industry, a large smelter might produce around 0.2 million metric tons (mmt) of aluminum each year. The smelter would be located close

  20. ALUMINUM--2001 6.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Northwest, and low metal prices led several aluminum smelters to continue to reduce production consumption in 2001. The recycling rate for aluminum UBCs decreased to 55.4%, compared with 62.1% in 2000 prices led smelters in the Pacific Northwest to continue the cutbacks in production that were begun last

  1. Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 O) is used as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    477 Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O) is used as a chemical treatment of poultry litter, and pelletizing, the use of chemical amendments, primarily aluminum sulfate (alum, Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O), alter

  2. Molecular Scale Assessment of Methylarsenic Sorption on Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Molecular Scale Assessment of Methylarsenic Sorption on Aluminum Oxide M A S A Y U K I S H I M I Z than AsV or AsIII , their reduction can produce very toxic MMAIII or DMAIII . Aluminum oxides

  3. A Domain Decomposition Approach for Large-Scale Simulations of Flow Processes in Hydrate-Bearing Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Keni; Moridis, G.J.; Wu, Y.-S.; Pruess, K.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of the system behavior of hydrate-bearing geologic media involves solving fully coupled mass- and heat-balance equations. In this study, we develop a domain decomposition approach for large-scale gas hydrate simulations with coarse-granularity parallel computation. This approach partitions a simulation domain into small subdomains. The full model domain, consisting of discrete subdomains, is still simulated simultaneously by using multiple processes/processors. Each processor is dedicated to following tasks of the partitioned subdomain: updating thermophysical properties, assembling mass- and energy-balance equations, solving linear equation systems, and performing various other local computations. The linearized equation systems are solved in parallel with a parallel linear solver, using an efficient interprocess communication scheme. This new domain decomposition approach has been implemented into the TOUGH+HYDRATE code and has demonstrated excellent speedup and good scalability. In this paper, we will demonstrate applications for the new approach in simulating field-scale models for gas production from gas-hydrate deposits.

  4. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrard, W.N. (Defence Science and Technology Organization, Victoria (Australia))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  5. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  6. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  7. Final report on DSA methods for monitoring alumina in aluminum reduction cells with cermet anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensors Development Program was conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Processes. The work was performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objective of the Sensors Development Program in FY 1990 through FY 1992 was to determine whether methods based on digital signal analysis (DSA) could be used to measure alumina concentration in aluminum reduction cells. Specifically, this work was performed to determine whether useful correlations exist between alumina concentration and various DSA-derived quantification parameters, calculated for current and voltage signals from laboratory and field aluminum reduction cells. If appropriate correlations could be found, then the quantification parameters might be used to monitor and, consequently, help control the alumina concentration in commercial reduction cells. The control of alumina concentration is especially important for cermet anodes, which have exhibited instability and excessive wear at alumina concentrations removed from saturation.

  8. Process for the deposition of high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coatings on silicon-based substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sarin, V.K.

    1991-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for depositing a high temperature stress and oxidation resistant coating on a silicon nitride- or silicon carbide-based substrate body. A gas mixture is passed over the substrate at about 900--1500 C and about 1 torr to about ambient pressure. The gas mixture includes one or more halide vapors with other suitable reactant gases. The partial pressure ratios, flow rates, and process times are sufficient to deposit a continuous, fully dense, adherent coating. The halide and other reactant gases are gradually varied during deposition so that the coating is a graded coating of at least two layers. Each layer is a graded layer changing in composition from the material over which it is deposited to the material of the layer and further to the material, if any, deposited thereon, so that no clearly defined compositional interfaces exist. The gases and their partial pressures are varied according to a predetermined time schedule and the halide and other reactant gases are selected so that the layers include (a) an adherent, continuous intermediate layer about 0.5-20 microns thick of an aluminum nitride or an aluminum oxynitride material, over and chemically bonded to the substrate body, and (b) an adherent, continuous first outer layer about 0.5-900 microns thick including an oxide of aluminum or zirconium over and chemically bonded to the intermediate layer.

  9. Development of Cost-Effective Low-Permeability Ceramic and Refractory Components for Aluminum Melting and Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadolkar, Puja [ORNL; Ott, Ronald D [ORNL

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent review by the U.S. Advanced Ceramics Association, the Aluminum Association, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (DOE/OIT) described the status of advanced ceramics for aluminum processing, including monolithics, composites, and coatings. The report observed that monolithic ceramics (particularly oxides) have attractive properties such as resistance to heat, corrosion, thermal shock, abrasion, and erosion [1]. However, even after the developments of the past 25 years, there are two key barriers to commercialization: reliability and cost-effectiveness. Industry research is therefore focused on eliminating these barriers. Ceramic coatings have likewise undergone significant development and a variety of processes have been demonstrated for applying coatings to substrates. Some processes, such as thermal barrier coatings for gas turbine engines, exhibit sufficient reliability and service life for routine commercial use. Worldwide, aluminum melting and molten metal handling consumes about 506,000 tons of refractory materials annually. Refractory compositions for handling molten aluminum are generally based on dense fused cast silica or mullite. The microstructural texture is extremely important because an interlocking mass of coarser grains must be bonded together by smaller grains in order to achieve adequate strength. At the same time, well-distributed microscopic pores and cracks are needed to deflect cracks and prevent spalling and thermal shock damage [2]. The focus of this project was to develop and validate new classes of cost-effective, low-permeability ceramic and refractory components for handling molten aluminum in both smelting and casting environments. The primary goal was to develop improved coatings and functionally graded materials that will possess superior combinations of properties, including resistance to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting. When these materials are successfully deployed in aluminum smelting and casting operations, their superior performance and durability will give end users marked improvements in uptime, defect reduction, scrap/rework costs, and overall energy savings resulting from higher productivity and yield. The implementation of results of this program will result in energy savings of 30 trillion Btu/year by 2020. For this Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) project, riser tube used in the low-pressure die (LPD) casting of aluminum was selected as the refractory component for improvement. In this LPD process, a pressurized system is used to transport aluminum metal through refractory tubes (riser tubes) into wheel molds. It is important for the tubes to remain airtight because otherwise, the pressurized system will fail. Generally, defects such as porosity in the tube or cracks generated by reaction of the tube material with molten aluminum lead to tube failure, making the tube incapable of maintaining the pressure difference required for normal casting operation. Therefore, the primary objective of the project was to develop a riser tube that is not only resistant to thermal shock, erosion, corrosion, and wetting, but is also less permeable, so as to achieve longer service life. Currently, the dense-fused silica (DFS) riser tube supplied by Pyrotek lasts for only 7 days before undergoing failure. The following approach was employed to achieve the goal: (1) Develop materials and methods for sealing surface porosity in thermal-shock-resistant ceramic refractories; (2) Develop new ceramic coatings for extreme service in molten aluminum operations, with particular emphasis on coatings based on highly stable oxide phases; (3) Develop new monolithic refractories designed for lower-permeability applications using controlled porosity gradients and particle size distributions; (4) Optimize refractory formulations to minimize wetting by molten aluminum, and characterize erosion, corrosion, and spallation rates under realistic service conditions; and (5) Scale up the processing methods to full-sized components and perform field testi

  10. COMPARATIVE DURABILITY STUDY OF COMPETING MANUFACTURING PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    , cast aluminum, and cast iron knuckles. The connecting rods evaluated consisted of forged steel the adoption of optimum materials and components in automotive industry. Automotive designers have a wide range of materials and processes to select from. Steel forgings are in competition with aluminum forgings

  11. The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, P.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

  12. An aluminum resist substrate for microfabrication by LIGA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, James J.; Boehme, Dale R.; Hauck, Cheryl A. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Hunter, Luke L.; Griffiths, Stewart K.; McLean, Dorrance E.; Aigeldinger, Georg; Hekmaty, Michelle A.; Hachman, John T.; Losey, Matthew W.; Skala, Dawn M.; Korellis, John S.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Lu, Wei-Yang

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resist substrates used in the LIGA process must provide high initial bond strength between the substrate and resist, little degradation of the bond strength during x-ray exposure, acceptable undercut rates during development, and a surface enabling good electrodeposition of metals. Additionally, they should produce little fluorescence radiation and give small secondary doses in bright regions of the resist at the substrate interface. To develop a new substrate satisfying all these requirements, we have investigated secondary resist doses due to electrons and fluorescence, resist adhesion before exposure, loss of fine features during extended development, and the nucleation and adhesion of electrodeposits for various substrate materials. The result of these studies is a new anodized aluminum substrate and accompanying methods for resist bonding and electrodeposition. We demonstrate successful use of this substrate through all process steps and establish its capabilities via the fabrication of isolated resist features down to 6 {micro}m, feature aspect ratios up to 280 and electroformed nickel structures at heights of 190 to 1400 {micro}m. The minimum mask absorber thickness required for this new substrate ranges from 7 to 15 {micro}m depending on the resist thickness.

  13. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  14. An economic and technical assessment of black-dross and salt-cake-recycling systems for application in the secondary aluminum industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karvelas, D.; Daniels, E.; Jody, B.; Bonsignore, P.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The secondary aluminum industry annually disposes of large amounts of dross residues and salt cake, which are by-products from the processing of scrap aluminum for reuse. These wastes contain as much as 50% salts and are presently disposed of in conventional landfills. As the costs of landfill space increase and the availability of landfill space decreases, disposal of the residues will increasingly compromise the economics of recycling aluminum. Alternative processes exist by which the major constituents of the various drosses and salt cakes can be recovered for recycling. In this study, we review available recycling technologies and processes relevant to the recycling of black dross and salt cake and discuss new concepts that have the potential to improve the cost-effectiveness of recycling technologies.

  15. Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytes with LiBOB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytesin commercially available lithium-ion battery electrolytes,

  16. Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle- Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075- T651 using the PPR - matrix debonding occur in some aluminum alloys. o To model accurately MSFC behavior in aluminum. Aluminum: properties and physical metallurgy. ASM International, 1984. 3 120µm 120µm grain boundaries

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    films that form on aluminum and aluminum alloys in air protect the surface against further oxidationMolecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations

  18. 1 Research review paper 2 Metabolic reengineering invoked by microbial systems to decontaminate aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    by microbial systems to decontaminate aluminum: 3 Implications for bioremediation technologies 4 ChristopherQ1

  19. ALUMINUM-BRIDGED BISGLYOXIMATO COBALT COMPLEXES: SYNTHESIS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PROTON REDUCTION PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    194 CHAPTER 6 ALUMINUM-BRIDGED BISGLYOXIMATO COBALT COMPLEXES: SYNTHESIS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PROTON diglyoximato complexes connected by one or two aluminum bridges are described. The aluminum centers that the number of aluminum bridges and the nature of the substituents on the phenoxide ligands significantly

  20. GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum that were more aluminum-tolerant than the non-transgenic control, confirming that citrate synthase overexpression can be a useful tool to help achieve aluminum tolerance. Keywords Acid soils Á Aluminum toxicity Á

  1. Kinetics of aluminum fluoride complexation in acidic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.; Cronan, C.S.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic deposition has an important effect on the transport and speciation of soluble aluminum. Toxicity of aqueous aluminum seems to be strongly dependent on aluminum speciation and the presence of complexing ligands such as fluoride. A study is reported of the complex formation kinetics of AlF/sup 2 +/ in the environmentally significant pH range 2.9-4.9. The pH and temperature dependencies of the overall rate of reaction are discussed along with environmental implications for areas subjected to acidic deposition. 22 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  2. Process for fabricating device structures for real-time process control of silicon doping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiner, Kurt H. (San Jose, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon device structures designed to allow measurement of important doping process parameters immediately after the doping step has occurred. The test structures are processed through contact formation using standard semiconductor fabrication techniques. After the contacts have been formed, the structures are covered by an oxide layer and an aluminum layer. The aluminum layer is then patterned to expose the contact pads and selected regions of the silicon to be doped. Doping is then performed, and the whole structure is annealed with a pulsed excimer laser. But laser annealing, unlike standard annealing techniques, does not effect the aluminum contacts because the laser light is reflected by the aluminum. Once the annealing process is complete, the structures can be probed, using standard techniques, to ascertain data about the doping step. Analysis of the data can be used to determine probable yield reductions due to improper execution of the doping step and thus provide real-time feedback during integrated circuit fabrication.

  3. The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum - Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes - An NMR Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. William Casey

    2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B262 The Kinetics of Dissociations of Aluminum--Oxygen Bonds in Aqueous Complexes--An NMR Study. In this project we determined rates and mechanisms of Al(III)-O bond rupture at mineral surfaces and in dissolved aluminum complexes. We then compared the experimental results to simulations in an attempt to predict rate coefficients. Most of the low-temperature reactions that are geochemically important involve a bonded atom or molecule that is replaced with another. We probe these reactions at the most fundamental level in order to establish a model to predict rates for the wide range of reactions that cannot be experimentally studied. The chemistry of small aluminum cluster (Figure) provides a window into the hydrolytic processes that control rates of mineral formation and the transformation of adsorbates into extended structures. The molecule shown below as an example exposes several types of oxygens to the bulk solution including seven structurally distinct sets of bridging hydroxyls. This molecule is a rich model for the aqueous interface of aluminum (hydr)oxide minerals, since it approaches colloidal dimensions in size, yet is a dissolved complex with +18 charge. We have conducted both {sup 17}O- {sup 27}Al- and {sup 19}F-NMR experiments to identify the reactive sites and to determine the rates of isotopic exchange between these sites and the bulk solution. The research was enormously successful and led to a series of papers that are being used as touchstones for assessing the accuracy of computer models of bond ruptures in water.

  4. DURABILITY COMPARISON AND LIFE PREDICTIONS OF COMPETING MANUFACTURING PROCESSES: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatemi, Ali

    processes. These include forged steel, cast aluminum, and cast iron knuckles. Fatigue behavior is a key steel and cast aluminum knuckles. Finite element analysis of the steering knuckles was also conducted with the experimental component test results. INTRODUCTION Manufacturing processes face major competitions in automotive

  5. Ames Lab 101: BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruce Cook

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials scientist, Bruce Cook, discusses the super hard, low friction, and lubricious alloy know as BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium). BAM was discovered by Bruce Cook and his team a

  6. aluminum alloy composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 12 Promoters Oxide Promoters...

  7. aluminum alloy composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 12 Promoters Oxide Promoters...

  8. aluminum alloys surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  9. aluminum alloy surfaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  10. aluminum nitride powder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  11. aluminum garnet phosphor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 161 UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: based...

  12. aluminum extrusion die: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motor where aluminum has been the material of Dale T. Peters; John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush; Stephen P. Midson 38 Die KP und die Komintern. Open Access Theses and...

  13. Energy Challenges and Conservation Achievements in the Aluminum Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, A. C.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy requirements. This talk reviews the aluminum industry's and Alcoa's conservation activities of the past five post-embargo years. It highlights smelting improvements, still in the research and development stage, which nonetheless promise significant...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Work Plans

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of EPA. The plan describes actions the industry intends to take to achieve its Climate VISION goal by 2010. Read the Aluminum Association Work Plan (PDF 109 KB) Download...

  15. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Lowell D. (Kingston, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  16. New, More Efficient Technology for Remelting Aluminum Chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will introduce a new, more efficient technology for remelting the considerable volume of aluminum by 6.5% . Automated conveyors will transport chips from the machining operation to the new remelting operation for recycling. A reduction...

  17. Consolidation of aluminum 6061 powder by equal channel angular extrusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, John Montgomery

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equal channel angular extrusion is a promising approach to obtaining full density in powder metallurgy applications. This method can impose large effective deformations through uniform shear strain. Aluminum alloy 6061 powder is used as a test...

  18. Primary aluminum production : climate policy, emissions and costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnisch, Jochen.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Climate policy regarding perfluorocarbons (PFCs) may have a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates an integrated analysis of the effectiveness and likely ...

  19. Evaluation of heat stress in an aluminum smelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Stacy Rahkell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heat stress and heat strain was evaluated for the aluminum smelter workers at Alcoa, Rockdale Operations. Personal, environmental, and metabolic factors that contribute to heat-related illnesses were identified. The effectiveness of current...

  20. aa7075 aluminum alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  1. a319 aluminum alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  2. aluminum alloy electrochemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  3. aluminum alloy evaluacion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  4. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  5. ALUMINUM--2000 6.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with that of the previous year. At the end of 2000, world inventories, as reported by the International Aluminium Institute Metal Exchange Ltd. (LME) decreased dramatically, whereas inventories of aluminum alloy increased

  6. aluminum oxide thin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 12, DECEMBER 1998 High-Performance Polycrystalline SiGe Thin-Film Materials Science Websites Summary: --The use of aluminum oxide as the gate...

  7. aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

  8. aluminum hlw high: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 361 CONCEPT: N-TYPE SILICON SOLAR CELLS WITH SURFACE-PASSIVATED SCREEN-PRINTED ALUMINUM-ALLOYED REAR EMITTER Renewable...

  9. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, L.D.

    1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one micro-inch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  10. aluminum ammonium sulfate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN BORIC ACID SOLUTIONS A Thesis By HENRI KINSOLVING BASS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate...

  11. aluminum alloy reinforced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David E. 32 Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 belonging to the 1930s in seawater environment Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: seawater, conserve it, and display it in...

  12. aluminum alloys project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David E. 23 Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 belonging to the 1930s in seawater environment Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: seawater, conserve it, and display it in...

  13. Microstructural characterization of superplastic aluminum-lithium alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERPLASTIC ALUMINUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS A Thesis by RAJASE~ BALASUBRAMANIAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERPLASTIC ALUMINUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS A Thesis by RAJASE~ BALASUBRAMANIAN Approved as to style and content by: A~? alur N. Srinivasan (Chair...

  14. Characterizing Microalgae (Nannochloris oculata) Harvesting by Aluminum Flocculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ryan T.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry Weight Alum Aluminum Sulfate CF Concentration Factor CFU Culture Forming Unit DAF Dissolved Air Flotation DHA Docosahexaenoic Acid DO Dissolved Oxygen DW Dry Weight EF Electrolytic Flocculation EOM Extracellular Organic....6 Stepwise oxidation of aluminum ion species with increasing pH .............. 36 2.7 The effect of pH on zeta potenital and supernatant tubidity with the addition of 0.06 g/L Alum flocculant...

  15. An experimental investigation of aluminum honeycomb as an energy absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bland, William Joseph

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1964 Ma]or Sub)act: Aerospace Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND hairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) May 1964...

  16. The distribution of particulate aluminum in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feely, Richard Alan

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICULATE ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis RICHARD ALAN FEELY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1971... Major Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICULATE ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RICHARD ALAN FEELY Approved as to style a d content by: hairma of Committee Head Department (Member) Member) May, 1971 ABSTRACT...

  17. Reactions of aluminum with uranium fluorides and oxyfluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Nichols, R.W.; Lankford, B.S. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Every 30 to 40 million operating hours a destructive reaction is observed in one of the {approximately}4000 large compressors that move UF{sub 6} through the gaseous diffusion plants. Despite its infrequency, such a reaction can be costly in terms of equipment and time. Laboratory experiments reveal that the presence of moderate pressures of UF{sub 6} actually cools heated aluminum, although thermodynamic calculations indicate the potential for a 3000-4000{degrees}C temperature rise. Within a narrow and rather low (<100 torr; 1 torr = 133.322 Pa) pressure range, however, the aluminum is seen to react with sufficient heat release to soften an alumina boat. Three things must occur in order for aluminum to react vigorously with either UF{sub 6} or UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. 1. An initiating source of heat must be provided. In the compressors, this source can be friction, permitted by disruption of the balance of the large rotating part or by creep of the aluminum during a high-temperature treatment. In the absence of this heat source, compressors have operated for 40 years in UF{sub 6} without significant reaction. 2. The film protecting the aluminum must be breached. Melting (of UF{sub 5} at 620 K or aluminum at 930 K) can cause such a breach in laboratory experiments. In contrast, holding Al samples in UF{sub 6} at 870 K for several hours produces only moderate reaction. Rubbing in the cascade can undoubtedly breach the protective film. 3. Reaction products must not build up and smother the reaction. While uranium products tend to dissolve or dissipate in molten aluminum, AIF{sub 3} shows a remarkable tendency to surround and hence protect even molten aluminum. Hence the initial temperature rise must be rapid and sufficient to move reactants into a temperature region in which products are removed from the reaction site.

  18. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, M.I.; Gelbein, A.P.

    1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200 to 450 C and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  19. Process for the synthesis of aliphatic alcohol-containing mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greene, Marvin I. (Oradell, NJ); Gelbein, Abraham P. (Morristown, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the synthesis of mixtures which include saturated aliphatic alcohols is disclosed. In the first step of the process, the first catalyst activation stage, a catalyst, which comprises the oxides of copper, zinc, aluminum, potassium and one or two additional metals selected from the group consisting of chromium, magnesium, cerium, cobalt, thorium and lanthanum, is partially activated. In this step, a reducing gas stream, which includes hydrogen and at least one inert gas, flows past the catalyst at a space velocity of up to 5,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. The partially activated catalyst is then subjected to the second step of the process, second-stage catalyst activation. In this step, the catalyst is contacted by an activation gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide present in a volume ratio of 0.5:1 and 4:1, respectively, at a temperature of 200.degree. to 450.degree. C. and a pressure of between 35 and 200 atmospheres. The activation gas flows at a space velocity of from 1,000 to 20,000 liters (STP) per hour, per kilogram of catalyst. Second-stage activation continues until the catalyst is contacted with at least 500,000 liters (STP) of activation gas per kilogram of catalyst. The fully activated catalyst, in the third step of the process, contacts a synthesis gas stream comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  20. Aluminum Honeycomb Characteristics in Dynamic Crush Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bateman, Vesta I.; Swanson, Lloyd H.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen aluminum honeycomb cubes (3 in.) have been crushed in the Mechanical Shock Laboratory's drop table testing machines. This report summarizes shock experiments with honeycomb densities of 22.1 pcf and 38.0 pcf and with crush weights of 45 lb, 168 lb, and 268 lb. The honeycomb samples were crushed in all three orientations, W, L, and T. Most of the experiments were conducted at an impact velocity of {approx}40 fps, but higher velocities of up to 90 fps were used for selected experiments. Where possible, multiple experiments were conducted for a specific orientation and density of the honeycomb samples. All results are for Hexcel honeycomb except for one experiment with Alcore honeycomb and have been evaluated for validity. This report contains the raw acceleration data measured on the top of the drop table carriage, pictures of the crushed samples, and normalized force-displacement curves for all fifteen experiments. These data are not strictly valid for material characteristics in L and T orientations because the cross-sectional area of the honeycomb changed (split) during the crush. However, these are the best data available at this time. These dynamic crush data do suggest a significant increase in crush strength to 8000 psi ({approximately} 25-30% increase) over quasi-static values of {approximately}6000 psi for the 38.0 pcf Hexcel Honeycomb in the T-orientation. An uncertainty analysis is included and estimates the error in these data.

  1. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460?°C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51?±?3 and 87?±?5?kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475?°C and E{sub d} of 110?±?5?kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585?°C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62?±?3 and 270?±?10?kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited an additional high temperature peak at 910?°C with E{sub d}?=?370?±?10?kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d}?=?535?±?40?kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  2. Computer simulation of grain boundary self-diffusion in aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragunov, Andrei S., E-mail: andrei.dragunov@aun.edu.ng [American University of Nigeria, Nigeria, Adamawa State, Yola Yola By-Pass 98 Lamido Zubairu Way (Nigeria); Weckman, A. V.; Demyanov, B. F. [Altai State Technical University, Russia, Altai Region, Barnaul (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the work study the process of self-diffusion in symmetric tilt grain boundaries (GB) with the axes misorientation [100], [110] and [111]. The research was carried out by the methods of computer simulation The objects of the research are the three GB of common and special type for each axis misorientation. The angles of misorientation of the common GB is amounted to 10°, 30° and 50°. The simulation was performed by the method of molecular dynamics in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 K, with an interval of 50 K. For research on the direction jumps atoms were built tracks the movement of atoms in the process of self-diffusion. The calculations have shown, that for all of GB is characterized by pronounced anisotropy of the jumps at low temperatures (< 700K). At temperatures near to the melting point directions of the jumps are isotropic only for three GB (?=30°[100], ?=50=[100] and ?5(013)[100]). For other GB such as [100] and [110] remains priority direction of diffusion along the nuclei GB dislocations. Arrenius curves have from one to three linear plots with different tilt. Change the tilt of Arrenius dependences testifies to the change in the mechanism of self-diffusion. The parameters of grainboundary self-diffusion were determined The activation energy of grainboundary diffusion in 4–5 times lower than the energy of activation of a volume self-diffusion of aluminum (about 200 KJ/mol). The minimum value of activation energy has GB 10° with the axis misorientation [100] (10,15 KJ/mol), maximum (104.12 Kj/mol) - a special GB ?11(113)

  3. Experimental study of high energy electron interactions in a superconducting aluminum alloy resonant bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Barucci; M. Bassan; B. Buonomo; G. Cavallari; E. Coccia; S. D'Antonio; V. Fafone; C. Ligi; L. Lolli; A. Marini; G. Mazzitelli; G. Modestino; G. Pizzella; L. Quintieri; L. Risegari; A. Rocchi; F. Ronga; P. Valente; G. Ventura; S. M. Vinko

    2009-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak amplitude measurements of the fundamental mode of oscillation of a suspended aluminum alloy bar hit by an electron beam show that the amplitude is enhanced by a factor ~3.5 when the material is in the superconducting state. This result is consistent with the cosmic ray observations made by the resonant gravitational wave detector NAUTILUS, made of the same alloy, when operated in the superconducting state. A comparison of the experimental data with the predictions of the model describing the underlying physical process is also presented.

  4. Manganese-Aluminum-Based Magnets: Nanocrystalline t-MnAI Permanent Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Dartmouth is developing specialized alloys with magnetic properties superior to the rare earths used in today’s best magnets. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to turn the axles in their electric motors due to the magnetic strength of these minerals. However, rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. Dartmouth will swap rare earths for a manganese-aluminum alloy that could demonstrate better performance and cost significantly less. The ultimate goal of this project is to develop an easily scalable process that enables the widespread use of low-cost and abundant materials for the magnets used in EVs and renewable power generators.

  5. Effects of Nanoscale Structure on the Magnetism and Transport Properties of Chromium and Chromium-Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boekelheide, Zoe Austin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. L. Murray. The Al-Cr (aluminum-chromium) system. Joural3d transition elements and aluminum. Journal of Physics andof Chromium and Chromium-Aluminum Alloys by Zoe Austin

  6. SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keefer, M.

    2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

  7. Hierarchical superhydrophobic aluminum surfaces for condensation applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Ken, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many existing industrial systems, including thermal desalination plants and air conditioning systems, involve the process of condensation and are heavily dependent on this process for achieving adequate levels of energy ...

  8. REAL TIME ULTRASONIC ALUMINUM SPOT WELD MONITORING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regalado, W. Perez; Chertov, A. M.; Maev, R. Gr. [Institute for Diagnostic Imaging Research, Physics Department, University of Windsor, 292 Essex Hall, 401 Sunset Ave. N9B 3P4 Windsor, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloys pose several properties that make them one of the most popular engineering materials: they have excellent corrosion resistance, and high weight-to-strength ratio. Resistance spot welding of aluminum alloys is widely used today but oxide film and aluminum thermal and electrical properties make spot welding a difficult task. Electrode degradation due to pitting, alloying and mushrooming decreases the weld quality and adjustment of parameters like current and force is required. To realize these adjustments and ensure weld quality, a tool to measure weld quality in real time is required. In this paper, a real time ultrasonic non-destructive evaluation system for aluminum spot welds is presented. The system is able to monitor nugget growth while the spot weld is being made. This is achieved by interpreting the echoes of an ultrasound transducer located in one of the welding electrodes. The transducer receives and transmits an ultrasound signal at different times during the welding cycle. Valuable information of the weld quality is embedded in this signal. The system is able to determine the weld nugget diameter by measuring the delays of the ultrasound signals received during the complete welding cycle. The article presents the system performance on aluminum alloy AA6022.

  9. Hermetic aluminum radio frequency interconnection and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilgo, Riley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM); Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a light-weight, hermetic coaxial radio-frequency (RF) interconnection having an electrically conductive outer housing made of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, a central electrical conductor made of ferrous or non-ferrous material, and a cylinder of dielectric material comprising a low-melting-temperature, high-thermal-expansion aluminophosphate glass composition for hermetically sealing between the aluminum-alloy outer housing and the ferrous or non-ferrous center conductor. The entire RF interconnection assembly is made permanently hermetic by thermally fusing the center conductor, glass, and housing concurrently by bringing the glass to the melt point by way of exposure to an atmospheric temperature sufficient to melt the glass, less than 540.degree. C., but that does not melt the center conductor or the outer aluminum or aluminum alloy housing. The composition of the glass used is controlled to provide a suitable low dielectric constant so that an appropriate electrical characteristic impedance, for example 50 ohms, can be achieved for an electrical interconnection that performs well at high radio frequencies and also provides an interconnection maintaining a relatively small physical size.

  10. Interfacial tension between aluminum and chloride-fluoride melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silny, A. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry] [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Utigard, T.A. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science] [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scrap and recycled aluminum have to be remelted and refined before being made into useful new products. This often involves melting the aluminum under a molten salt cover in order to prevent oxidation and to enhance the coalescence and recovery of the molten metal. A technique was developed for the measurement of the interfacial tension between liquid metals and molten salts at elevated temperatures. The technique is based on the measurement of the capillary depression occurring when a capillary, which is moved vertically down through the molten salt layer, passes through the salt/metal interface. The depression is measured by simultaneous video recording of the immersion height of the alumina capillary and the position of a liquid meniscus in a horizontal tube connected to the alumina capillary. The interfacial tension was measured for (a) aluminum and an equimolar melt of NaCl + KCl with several salt additions at 1,000 K, (b) aluminum and NaCl + NaF at 1,123 K, and (c) aluminum and NaCl + KF at 1,123 K. It was found that the interfacial tension decreases with increasing amount of NaF, increases with the increasing amount of MgCl{sub 2} additions, remains unchanged with AlF{sub 3} additions, and slightly decreases with the addition of MgF{sub 2} and Na{sub 3}AlF{sub 6}.

  11. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CROSS-FLOW FILTRATION FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Nash, C.; Poirier, M.

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the interest of accelerating waste treatment processing, the DOE has funded studies to better understand filtration with the goal of improving filter fluxes in existing cross-flow equipment. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was included in those studies, with a focus on start-up techniques, filter cake development, the application of filter aids (cake forming solid precoats), and body feeds (flux enhancing polymers). This paper discusses the progress of those filter studies. Cross-flow filtration is a key process step in many operating and planned waste treatment facilities to separate undissolved solids from supernate slurries. This separation technology generally has the advantage of self-cleaning through the action of wall shear stress created by the flow of waste slurry through the filter tubes. However, the ability of filter wall self-cleaning depends on the slurry being filtered. Many of the alkaline radioactive wastes are extremely challenging to filtration, e.g., those containing compounds of aluminum and iron, which have particles whose size and morphology reduce permeability. Unfortunately, low filter flux can be a bottleneck in waste processing facilities such as the Savannah River Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant. Any improvement to the filtration rate would lead directly to increased throughput of the entire process. To date increased rates are generally realized by either increasing the cross-flow filter axial flowrate, limited by pump capacity, or by increasing filter surface area, limited by space and increasing the required pump load. SRNL set up both dead-end and cross-flow filter tests to better understand filter performance based on filter media structure, flow conditions, filter cleaning, and several different types of filter aids and body feeds. Using non-radioactive simulated wastes, both chemically and physically similar to the actual radioactive wastes, the authors performed several tests to demonstrate increases in filter performance. With the proper use of filter flow conditions and filter enhancers, filter flow rates can be increased over rates currently realized today.

  12. Reactive self-heating model of aluminum spherical nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karen S. Martirosyan; Maxim Zyskin

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-oxygen reaction is important in many highly energetic, high pressure generating systems. Recent experiments with nanostructured thermites suggest that oxidation of aluminum nanoparticles occurs in a few microseconds. Such rapid reaction cannot be explained by a conventional diffusion-based mechanism. We present a rapid oxidation model of a spherical aluminum nanoparticle, using Cabrera-Mott moving boundary mechanism, and taking self-heating into account. In our model, electric potential solves the nonlinear Poisson equation. In contrast with the Coulomb potential, a "double-layer" type solution for the potential and self-heating leads to enhanced oxidation rates. At maximal reaction temperature of 2000 C, our model predicts overall oxidation time scale in microseconds range, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  13. Reactive self-heating model of aluminum spherical nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martirosyan, Karen S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-oxygen reaction is important in many highly energetic, high pressure generating systems. Recent experiments with nanostructured thermites suggest that oxidation of aluminum nanoparticles occurs in a few microseconds. Such rapid reaction cannot be explained by a conventional diffusion-based mechanism. We present a rapid oxidation model of a spherical aluminum nanoparticle, using Cabrera-Mott moving boundary mechanism, and taking self-heating into account. In our model, electric potential solves the nonlinear Poisson equation. In contrast with the Coulomb potential, a "double-layer" type solution for the potential and self-heating leads to enhanced oxidation rates. At maximal reaction temperature of 2000 C, our model predicts overall oxidation time scale in microseconds range, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  14. COMPILATION OF LABORATORY SCALE ALUMINUM WASH AND LEACH REPORT RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HARRINGTON SJ

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compiles and analyzes all known wash and caustic leach laboratory studies. As further data is produced, this report will be updated. Included are aluminum mineralogical analysis results as well as a summation of the wash and leach procedures and results. Of the 177 underground storage tanks at Hanford, information was only available for five individual double-shell tanks, forty-one individual single-shell tanks (e.g. thirty-nine 100 series and two 200 series tanks), and twelve grouped tank wastes. Seven of the individual single-shell tank studies provided data for the percent of aluminum removal as a function of time for various caustic concentrations and leaching temperatures. It was determined that in most cases increased leaching temperature, caustic concentration, and leaching time leads to increased dissolution of leachable aluminum solids.

  15. Plasma Decontamination of Uranium From the Interior of Aluminum Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veilleux, J.M.; Munson, C.; Fitzpatrick, J.; Chamberlin, E.P.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    RF plasma glow discharges are being investigated for removing and recovering radioactive elements from contaminated objects, especially those contaminated with transuranic (TRU) materials. These plasmas, using nitrogen trifluoride as the working gas, have been successful at removing uranium and plutonium contaminants from test coupons of stainless steel and aluminum surfaces, including small cracks and crevices, and the interior surfaces of relatively hard to reach aluminum pipes. Contaminant removal exceeded 99.9% from simple surfaces and contaminant recovery using cryogenic traps has exceeded 50%. Work continues with the objective of demonstrating that transuranic contaminated waste can be transformed to low level waste (LLW) and to better understand the physics of the interaction between plasma and surface contaminants. This work summarizes the preliminary results from plasma decontamination from the interior of aluminum objects--the nooks and crannies experiments.

  16. Aluminum and polymeric coatings for protection of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colmenares, C.; McCreary, T.; Monaco, S.; Walkup, C.; Gleeson, G.; Kervin, J.; Smith, R.L.; McCaffrey, C.

    1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-plated aluminum films on uranium will not provide adequate protection for 25 years. Magnetron-plated aluminum films on uranium are much better than ion-plated ones. Kel-F 800 films on uranium can provide adequate protection for 25 years. Their use in production must be delayed until the following factors are sorted out: water permeability in Kel-F 800 must be determined between 30 and 60/sup 0/C; the effect of UF/sub 3/, at the Kel-F/metal interface, on the permeability of water must be assessed; and the effect of crystallinity on water permeability must be evaluated. Applying Kel-F films on aluminum ion-plated uranium provides a good interim solution for long term storage.

  17. Carbonaceous cathode with enhanced wettability for aluminum production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Rudolf; Gatty, David G.; Barca, Brian J.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of preparing carbonaceous blocks or bodies for use in a cathode in an electrolytic cell for producing aluminum wherein the cell contains an electrolyte and has molten aluminum contacting the cathode, the cathode having improved wettability with molten aluminum. The method comprises the steps of providing a carbonaceous block and a boron oxide containing melt. The carbonaceous block is immersed in the melt and pressure is applied to the melt to impregnate the melt into pores in the block. Thereafter, the carbonaceous block is withdrawn from the melt, the block having boron oxide containing melt intruded into pores therein, the boron oxide capable of reacting with a source of titanium or zirconium or like metal to form titanium or zirconium diboride during heatup or operation of said cell.

  18. Development of a hot isostatic pressing process for manufacturing silicon carbide particulate reinforced iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oakeson, David Oscar

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to aluminum, titanium, and some other metals and alloys. However, information obtained in processing iron can be used in developing guidelines for processing other metals. For example, the processing temperature as a fraction of the melting temperature... processes can be used for particulate reinforced MMCs which would break whisker or fiber reinforcements. ~' Conse- quently, particulate reinforced MMCs have appeared in other industries and have been demonstrated in applications including aluminum...

  19. Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Study of Phosphate Sorption Mechanisms on Aluminum (Hydr)oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Solid-State NMR Spectroscopic Study of Phosphate Sorption Mechanisms on Aluminum (Hydr)oxides Wei the mechanism of phosphate sorption on aluminum hydroxides under different environ- mental conditions, including

  20. The role of demand uncertainty in materials selection : a case study on aluminum recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabbas, Hashem H

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum is a versatile material that is used frequently in transportation and packaging, two industries with substantial recent growth. The increase in demand for aluminum, however, has outpaced the growth of primary ...