Sample records for aluminum asbestos plastic

  1. EFFECT OF GRAIN SIZE ON THE ACOUSTIC EMISSION GENERATED DURING PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORYDURING PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF ALUMINUM J. Baram Materialsof polycrystalline aluminum, of different grain sizes and at

  2. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling ALL plastics (#1 through #7) by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each and in LH100. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any

  3. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any trash or other

  4. Asbestos substitutes. January 1978-July 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1978-July 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography contains citations concerning materials used to replace asbestos. Aramid fibers, mineral fillers for plastics, phenolic resins, polyester, woven glass cloth, teflon-coated fibers, liquid silicone rubber, acrylic fibers, latex rubber, and flame retardant paper are considered. These materials are evaluated in gaskets, seals, cement, as brake and clutch linings, packing materials, and other places where asbestos is used. (This updated bibliography contains 219 citations, 26 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  5. A perturbation analysis of the unstable plastic flow pattern evolution in an aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Wei

    A perturbation analysis of the unstable plastic flow pattern evolution in an aluminum alloy Seung Abstract In the tensile loading of sheet metals made from some polycrystalline aluminum alloys, a single in the uniaxial tension of polycrystalline aluminum alloys with periodic stress relaxations depends

  6. Characterization of the plastic strain theory for predicting hot cracking during welding in aluminum alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Douglas Frederick

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PLASTIC STRAIN THEORY FQR PREDICTING HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING IN ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by DOUGLAS FREDERICK WALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1970 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering CHARACTERIZATION OF THE PLASTIC STRAIN THEORY FOR PREDICTING HOT CRACKING DURING WELDING IN ALUMINUM ALLOYS A Thesis by DOUGLAS FREDERICK WALTERS Approved...

  7. Continuous Severe Plastic Deformation Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raghavan Srinivasan (PI); Prabir K. Chaudhury; Balakrishna Cherukuri; Qingyou Han; David Swenson; Percy Gros

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Metals with grain sizes smaller than 1-micrometer have received much attention in the past decade. These materials have been classified as ultra fine grain (UFG) materials (grain sizes in the range of 100 to 1000-nm) and nano-materials (grain size <100-nm) depending on the grain size. This report addresses the production of bulk UFG metals through the use of severe plastic deformation processing, and their subsequent use as stock material for further thermomechanical processing, such as forging. A number of severe plastic deformation (SPD) methods for producing bulk UFG metals have been developed since the early 1990s. The most promising of these processes for producing large size stock that is suitable for forging is the equal channel angular extrusion or pressing (ECAE/P) process. This process involves introducing large shear strain in the work-piece by pushing it through a die that consists of two channels with the same cross-sectional shape that meet at an angle to each other. Since the cross-sections of the two channels are the same, the extruded product can be re-inserted into the entrance channel and pushed again through the die. Repeated extrusion through the ECAE/P die accumulates sufficient strain to breakdown the microstructure and produce ultra fine grain size. It is well known that metals with very fine grain sizes (< 10-micrometer) have higher strain rate sensitivity and greater elongation to failure at elevated temperature, exhibiting superplastic behavior. However, this superplastic behavior is usually manifest at high temperature (> half the melting temperature on the absolute scale) and very low strain rates (< 0.0001/s). UFG metals have been shown to exhibit superplastic characteristics at lower temperature and higher strain rates, making this phenomenon more practical for manufacturing. This enables part unitization and forging more complex and net shape parts. Laboratory studies have shown that this is particularly true for UFG metals produced by SPD techniques. This combination of properties makes UFG metals produced by SPD very attractive as machining, forging or extrusion stock, both from the point of view of formability as well as energy and cost saving. However, prior to this work there had been no attempt to transfer these potential benefits observed in the laboratory scale to industrial shop floor. The primary reason for this was that the laboratory scale studies had been conducted to develop a scientific understanding of the processes that result in grain refinement during SPD. Samples that had been prepared in the laboratory scale were typically only about 10-mm diameter and 50-mm long (about 0.5-inch diameter and 2-inches long). The thrust of this project was three-fold: (i) to show that the ECAE/P process can be scaled up to produce long samples, i.e., a continuous severe plastic deformation (CSPD) process, (ii) show the process can be scaled up to produce large cross section samples that could be used as forging stock, and (iii) use the large cross-section samples to produce industrial size forgings and demonstrate the potential energy and cost savings that can be realized if SPD processed stock is adopted by the forging industry. Aluminum alloy AA-6061 was chosen to demonstrate the feasibility of the approach used. The CSPD process developed using the principles of chamber-less extrusion and drawing, and was demonstrated using rolling and wire drawing equipment that was available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In a parallel effort, ECAE/P dies were developed for producing 100-mm square cross section SPD billets for subsequent forging. This work was carried out at Intercontinental Manufacturing Co. (IMCO), Garland TX. Forging studies conducted with the ECAE/P billets showed that many of the potential benefits of using UFG material can be realized. In particular, the material yield can be increased, and the amount of material that is lost as scrap can be reduced by as much as 50%. Forging temperatures can also be reduced by over 150ºC, resulting in energy savings in the ope

  8. CONTRACTOR ASBESTOS INFORMATION ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT AT SFU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRACTOR ASBESTOS INFORMATION ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT AT SFU An extensive Asbestos Survey has been term Asbestos Management Program was approved by the Workers' Compensation Board of British Columbia. Note: There is a possibility that ACM containing materials may not have been identified or labeled

  9. Characterization of the plastic strain theory for predicting hot cracking during welding in aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walters, Douglas Frederick

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16 17 18 32 35 36 10 Strain Data for 5052 Aluminum. 37 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Strain Duplication Test System. Recording System. Test Specimen Configuration (Dimensions are in inches) As Received 2024-T3 and 5086 Aluminum Specimens... 684 1097 1041 991 1026 1087 1031 1036 1002 Good Good Microcrack Microcrack Good Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack Microcrack 17 18 1065 1100 15...

  10. How to recycle asbestos containing materials (ACM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current disposal of asbestos containing materials (ACM) in the private sector consists of sealing asbestos wetted with water in plastic for safe transportation and burial in regulated land fills. This disposal methodology requires large disposal volumes especially for asbestos covered pipe and asbestos/fiberglass adhering to metal framework, e.g. filters. This wrap and bury technology precludes recycle of the asbestos, the pipe and/or the metal frameworks. Safe disposal of ACM at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, likewise, requires large disposal volumes in landfills for non-radioactive ACM and large disposal volumes in radioactive burial grounds for radioactive and suspect contaminated ACM. The availability of regulated disposal sites is rapidly diminishing causing recycle to be a more attractive option. Asbestos adhering to metal (e.g., pipes) can be recycled by safely removing the asbestos from the metal in a patented hot caustic bath which prevents airborne contamination /inhalation of asbestos fibers. The dissolution residue (caustic and asbestos) can be wet slurry fed to a melter and vitrified into a glass or glass-ceramic. Palex glasses, which are commercially manufactured, are shown to be preferred over conventional borosilicate glasses. The Palex glasses are alkali magnesium silicate glasses derived by substituting MgO for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in borosilicate type glasses. Palex glasses are very tolerant of the high MgO and high CaO content of the fillers used in forming asbestos coverings for pipes and found in boiler lashing, e.g., hydromagnesite (3MgCO{sub 3} Mg(OH){sub 2} 3H{sub 2}O) and plaster of paris, gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}). The high temperate of the vitrification process destroys the asbestos fibers and renders the asbestos non-hazardous, e.g., a glass or glass-ceramic. In this manner the glass or glass-ceramic produced can be recycled, e.g., glassphalt or glasscrete, as can the clean metal pipe or metal framework.

  11. Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  12. Toolbox Safety Talk Asbestos Awareness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    problems if inhaled into the lungs. The goal of the Cornell University EH&S Asbestos Management Program of abatement professionals and enforcement in NY. · The CU Asbestos Management Program governs how University specialized work practices and controls to protect building occupants. · Asbestos abatement projects

  13. GOVERNING COUNCIL Asbestos Management Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    : · The University will establish an Asbestos Management Program which will outline a comprehensive system to actively manage and stringently control all asbestos-containing materials in University buildings, and allGOVERNING COUNCIL Asbestos Management Policy June 23, 2011 To request an official copy

  14. Total plastic strain and electrical resistivity in high purity aluminum cyclically strained at 4.2 K 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehan, James Terence

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    important implications to the electrical behavior of aluminum reported here. B. Conce ts of Strain Controlled Tests The following section is a description of one type of mechanical test used to investigate fatigue characteristics in materials. While other... Stress 72 73 76 78 79 LIST OF TABLES Ta. ble Page I. Stopping Points and Parameter Settings of the Mechanical Test . 39 II. Test Variables of Experiments III. Rate of Mechanical Cycling and Average Number of Data Points Collected by Computer...

  15. Total plastic strain and electrical resistivity in high purity aluminum cyclically strained at 4.2 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehan, James Terence

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Air Force, contract monitored by Dr. C. Oberly. To my mother and father for the love and support they have given me. V1 TABLE OF CONTENTS Ps. ge ABSTRACT ACKNOWLEDGMENTS DEDICATION TABLE OF CONTENTS nl IV V1 LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF TABLES... CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION vu1 II REVIEW OF LITERATURE AND THEORETICAL BACKGROUND A. Observations of Resistivity Increase in Pure Aluminum at Low Temperatures B. Concepts of Strain Controlled Tests C. Eddy Current Decay Method of Resistivity...

  16. ASL & Plasticity Plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulson, Seana

    ASL & Plasticity #12;Plasticity Plasticity From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Plasticity has four meanings: · Plasticity (physics): In physics and engineering, plasticity is the propensity of a material to undergo permanent deformation under load. · Phenotypic plasticity: Describes the degree

  17. Managing asbestos: Ten costly sins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denson, F.A.; Onderick, W.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. Asbestos management is one of the toughest jobs facing a plant or environmental engineer today; even seasoned engineers can make mistakes. Much confusion exists about how best to manage this issue, especially in plant settings. Whether the company is small, medium, or large, asbestos has the power to steal from profits if not managed properly. To help POWER readers examine their current asbestos management programs, here are 10 common errors that could be stopped or avoided by practicing preventive techniques. The 10 costly sins presented are not mutually exclusive, and they certainly are not all-inclusive. They are offered as a way to stimulate ideas on how to build an ongoing, continuous, and improved asbestos management program. These include Sin 1: No written policy. Sin 2: Lack of corporate guidance. Sin 3: Not complying with regulations. Sin 4: Not worrying about other respirable fibers. Sin 5: Lawsuits--not culpable. Sin 6: No visible emissions, no problems. Sin 7: Managing asbestos manually.

  18. Asbestos : operating system security for mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Martijn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a port of the Asbestos operating system to the ARM processor. The port to the ARM allows Asbestos to run on mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital ...

  19. Combustion Tests of Rocket Motor Washout Material: Focus on Air toxics Formation Potential and Asbestos Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. C. Sclippa; L. L. Baxter; S. G. Buckley

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this investigation is to determine the suitability of cofiring as a recycle / reuse option to landfill disposal for solid rocket motor washout residue. Solid rocket motor washout residue (roughly 55% aluminum powder, 40% polybutadiene rubber binder, 5% residual ammonium perchlorate, and 0.2-1% asbestos) has been fired in Sandia's MultiFuel Combustor (MFC). The MFC is a down-fired combustor with electrically heated walls, capable of simulating a wide range of fuel residence times and stoichiometries. This study reports on the fate of AP-based chlorine and asbestos from the residue following combustion.

  20. Composition and method to remove asbestos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of a hexafluorosilicate salt, and free of or having only small amounts of an inorganic acid, an inorganic acid salt or a mixture thereof. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition also is disclosed.

  1. Composition and method to remove asbestos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an inorganic acid, and from about 0.1 to about 4% by weight of a hexafluorosilicate of ammonia, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition also is disclosed.

  2. Composition and method to remove asbestos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of a boron tetrafluoride salt, free of or having only small amounts of an inorganic acid, an inorganic acid salt or a mixture thereof. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition also is disclosed.

  3. Composition and method to remove asbestos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an inorganic acid, and from about 0.1 to about 4% by weight of a tetrafluoroborate of ammonia, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition also is disclosed.

  4. Composition and method to remove asbestos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of phosphoric acid, and from about 0.1 to about 4% by weight of a source of fluoride ions. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition also is disclosed.

  5. Asbestos Emission Control Plan Dakota County, Minnesota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Prepared for University of Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009 UMP005460 #12;Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County.0.doc iii Asbestos Emission Control Plan UMore Park Dakota County, Minnesota Revised: July 22, 2009

  6. Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mewes, B.S.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Asbestos Abatement Plan (Plan) lists priorities for asbestos abatement activities to be conducted in Hanford Site facilities. The Plan is based on asbestos assessment information gathered in fiscal year 1989 that evaluated all Hanford Site facilities for the presence and condition of asbestos. Of those facilities evaluated, 414 contain asbestos-containing materials and are classified according to the potential risk of asbestos exposure to building personnel. The Plan requires that asbestos condition update reports be prepared for all affected facilities. The reporting is completed by the asbestos coordinator for each of the 414 affected facilities and transmitted to the Plan manager annually. The Plan manager uses this information to reprioritize future project lists. Currently, five facilities are determined to be Class Al, indicating a high potential for asbestos exposure. Class Al and B1 facilities are the highest priority for asbestos abatement. Abatement of the Class A1 and Bl facilities is scheduled through fiscal year 1997. Removal of asbestos in B1 facilities will reduce the risk for further Class ``A`` conditions to arise.

  7. Techniques and Technologies for Field Detection of Asbestos Containing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos has been used in numerous applications at DOE sites including sprayed-on fireproofing, asphalt and vinyl floor tile, and asbestos-cement(transite) siding.

  8. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and Demolition Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and...

  9. asbestos location tracking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  10. asbesto ensaio iconografico: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  11. ao asbesto ensaio: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  12. amphibole asbestos bind: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  13. asbestos body formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  14. asbestos friction products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  15. asbestos tremolite anthophyllite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  16. asbestos alternative products: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    no occupational exposure to asbestos. Discussion: These cases illustrate that take-home asbestos exposure may lead to pleural disease at higher rates than commonly...

  17. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  18. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  19. asbestos: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease in a patient may be a marker for disease in household contacts. Patients with family members heavily exposed to asbestos should be strongly encouraged to quit smoking in...

  20. Plastic Bronchitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quysner, Annie; Surani, Salim; Roberts, Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. Three children with plastic bronchitis associated within E mergency M edicine Plastic Bronchitis Annie Quysner, MDElshami AA, Kang DS, et al. Plastic Bronchitis. Eur Resp J

  1. Acetone : a system call interface for Asbestos labels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Clifford A. (Clifford Arthur)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acetone is a secure operating system kernel that uses a shared address space and supports Asbestos labels. Acetone uses Asbestos labels to enable a wide variety of security policies including ones that prevent untrusted ...

  2. Mandatory security and performance of services in Asbestos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, David Patrick

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation for several system services, including network access and database storage, on a new operating system design, Asbestos. Using the security mechanism provided by Asbestos, ...

  3. UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA Procedures: ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    UNIVERSITY OF MANITOBA PROCEDURE Procedures: ASBESTOS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PROCEDURE Parent Policy relevant to management and control of asbestos-containing building materials known to be present throughout be made on a regular and required basis, in consultation with the Asbestos Management Program Committee

  4. ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluwihare, Lihini

    in advance if the renovation and demolition project with friable asbestos-containing materials is over 1601 ASBESTOS PROJECT MANAGEMENT University of California, San Diego UC San Diego project managers to maintenance, repair, and construction of UC-owned and leased buildings where asbestos-containing materials

  5. Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selby, Thomas W. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos.

  6. Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selby, T.W.

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos. 7 figs.

  7. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Vision: Sustainable Solutions for a Dynamic World alumvision.pdf More Documents...

  8. A plane stress anisotropic plastic flow theory for orthotropic sheet metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Wei

    such as automotive aluminum sheets. As textured sheet metals produced by hot and cold rolling exhibit significant for describing the anisotropic plastic flow of ortho- tropic polycrystalline aluminum sheet metals under plane are applied successfully to describe the anisotropic plastic flow behavior of 10 commercial aluminum alloy

  9. Pulmonary cytology in chrysotile asbestos workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobusch, A.B.; Simard, A.; Feldstein, M.; Vauclair, R.; Gibbs, G.W.; Bergeron, F.; Morissette, N.; Davis, R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of atypical cytology has been determined in relation to age, smoking and asbestos exposure for male workers employed in 3 mines in the Province of Quebec. Overall participation was 71%. Out of 867 participating workers, 626 (72%) presented a deep cough specimen within normal limits, 74 (8.5%) a specimen with mild atypical metaplasia and 10 (1.2%) a specimen with moderate atypical metaplasia. Four lung carcinoma were identified. Five percent of the workers initially interviewed did not return their specimen and 12.7% had unsatisfactory test results. Proportions of cellular atypical increased with age and asbestos exposure. Using logistic regression analysis, estimated probabilities of abnormal cytology for workers aged 25 years when started mining increased with both years of asbestos exposure and exposure index measured in fibres per cubic centimeter.

  10. 2014 Revision University of Florida Asbestos Operations and Maintenance 1 ASBESTOS CONTAINING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    . Any damage to ACM should be reported to Environmental Health and Safety. Contact Information: University of Florida Environmental Health and Safety (352) 392-3393 Distributed by: Department of Environmental Health & Safety Asbestos Program 352.392.3393 #12;

  11. ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

  12. Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    .. ) Laser Welding of Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys Welds made with sharp bevel-groove weld aluminum and by aluminum alloy 5456 have been studied. The results indicate that initial absorption varies, many aluminum alloys contain magnesium or zinc, which are easily vaporized and thereby form a plasma

  13. asbestos management systemfams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    handled and disposed of. These requirements cover Class II and Class III asbestos work and waste management and apply to workers and supervisors performing such work and...

  14. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, J.R.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C{sub 8}{single_bond}C{sub 15} alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  15. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER ASBESTOS AWARENESS POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    asbestos include roofing, walls and ceilings, panels and partitions, boilers and water tanks, heaters, flues and tank insulation, decorative plaster finishes, car parts, sprayed on coatings and insulation

  16. Corrosion inhibiting composition for treating asbestos containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartman, Judithann Ruth (Columbia, MD)

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed, wherein the composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, optionally a source of fluoride ions, and a corrosion inhibiting amount of thiourea, a lower alkylthiourea, a C.sub.8 -C.sub.15 alkylpyridinium halide or mixtures thereof. A method of transforming an asbestos-containing building material, while part of a building structure, into a non-asbestos material by using the present composition also is disclosed.

  17. Asbestos Safety Plan Page 1 of 4 Environmental Health and Safety Original: August 30, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    . The Program applies to routine work during which an employee may encounter asbestos as well as work undertaken and controlling access to all affected areas during asbestos work. All tasks involving the disturbance of asbestos identified and implemented. A qualified supervisor shall be available at asbestos controlled work

  18. Policy Name: Asbestos Management Policy Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management and Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton University

    or unintentional disturbance of asbestos- containing materials in University-owned or managed buildings. The Asbestos Management Program will address access to areas which house asbestos-containing materials as wellPolicy Name: Asbestos Management Policy Originating/Responsible Department: Facilities Management

  19. Asbestos, Environment, Fire, Health, Safety, and Security Policy 1. INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Asbestos, Environment, Fire, Health, Safety, and Security Policy 1. INTRODUCTION This document to prevent and control the impact of accidents and incidents involving students, staff, faculty of their missions. 2. PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION Overall responsibility for administration of this program resides

  20. asbestos induced diseases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease in a patient may be a marker for disease in household contacts. Patients with family members heavily exposed to asbestos should be strongly encouraged to quit smoking in...

  1. asbestos exposure lung: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease in a patient may be a marker for disease in household contacts. Patients with family members heavily exposed to asbestos should be strongly encouraged to quit smoking in...

  2. Asbestos-free brake-lining materials for hydrogenerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalonde, S.; Lanteigne, J. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different asbestos-free materials currently considered as new lining materials for hydrogenerator brakes were tested and compared to the original asbestos lining. Results show that these substitutes not only vary greatly from the original material in terms of mechanical properties and physical characteristics but also exhibit significantly different performances in braking tests. Consequently, these new materials are not entirely suitable for the intended application.

  3. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasevich, R.S.; Vaux, W. [KAI Technologies, Inc., Portsmouth, NH (United States); Ulerich, N. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center; Nocito, T. [Ohio DSI Corporation, New York (New York)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this three-phase program is to develop an integrated process for treating asbestos-containing material that is contaminated with radioactive and hazardous constituents. The integrated process will attempt to minimize processing and disposal costs. The objectives of Phase 1 were to establish the technical feasibility of asbestos decomposition, inorganic radionuclide nd heavy metal removal, and organic volatilization. Phase 1 resulted in the successful bench-scale demonstration of the elements required to develop a mixed waste treatment process for asbestos-containing material (ACM) contaminated with radioactive metals, heavy metals, and organics. Using the Phase 1 data, a conceptual process was developed. The Phase 2 program, currently in progress, is developing an integrated system design for ACM waste processing. The Phase 3 program will target demonstration of the mixed waste processing system at a DOE facility. The electromagnetic mixed waste processing system employs patented technologies to convert DOE asbestos to a non-hazardous, radionuclide-free, stable waste. The dry, contaminated asbestos is initially heated with radiofrequency energy to remove organic volatiles. Second,the radionuclides are removed by solvent extraction coupled with ion exchange solution treatment. Third, the ABCOV method converts the asbestos to an amorphous silica suspension at low temperature (100{degrees}C). Finally the amorphous silica is solidified for disposal.

  4. A comparison of current work-hardening models used in the analysis of plastic deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, David Kenneth

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on reyielding for reversed loading 2 The von Mises initial yield surface 3 Various definitions of yielding 4 Tensile loading, unloading and reloading. 5 Isotropic hardening 6 Linearized tensile stress-strain curve. 7 The uniaxial plastic stress... stress-strain curve, 6061-T6 aluminum. 91 15 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, isotropic hardening 92 16 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, kinematic hardening 93 17 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, mechanical...

  5. A comparison of current work-hardening models used in the analysis of plastic deformations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaughn, David Kenneth

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on reyielding for reversed loading 2 The von Mises initial yield surface 3 Various definitions of yielding 4 Tensile loading, unloading and reloading. 5 Isotropic hardening 6 Linearized tensile stress-strain curve. 7 The uniaxial plastic stress... stress-strain curve, 6061-T6 aluminum. 91 15 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, isotropic hardening 92 16 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, kinematic hardening 93 17 Uniaxial reversed loading of 6061-T6 aluminum, mechanical...

  6. 14/11/12 18.10Asbesto -Wikipedia Pagina 1 di 8http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asbesto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sproston, Jeremy

    a seguire lo schema di Modello di voce - Minerale Fibre di amianto antofillite (immagine SEM) Asbesto Da+ 2Si8O22(OH)2 dal greco: "fiocco di lana", varietà fibrosa del minerale riebeckite Balangeroite (Mg

  7. Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ann Occup Hyg . Author manuscript Page /1 7 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Abstract Purpose Automobile mechanics have been exposed to asbestos number of automobile mechanics, little is known about the non-malignant respiratory diseases observed

  8. Recycling of the product of thermal inertization of cement-asbestos for various industrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gualtieri, Alessandro F., E-mail: alessandro.gualtieri@unimore.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Giacobbe, Carlotta; Sardisco, Lorenza; Saraceno, Michele [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e R.E., Via S. Eufemia 19, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lassinantti Gualtieri, Magdalena [Dipartimento Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell'Ambiente, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905/a, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Lusvardi, Gigliola [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via G. Campi 183, I-41100 Modena (Italy); Cavenati, Cinzia; Zanatto, Ivano [ZETADI S.r.l., Via dell'Artigianato 10, Ferno (Italy)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of secondary raw materials is a priority of waste handling in the countries of the European community. A potentially important secondary raw material is the product of the thermal transformation of cement-asbestos, produced by prolonged annealing at 1200-1300 {sup o}C. The product is chemically comparable to a Mg-rich clinker. Previous work has assured the reliability of the transformation process. The current challenge is to find potential applications as secondary raw material. Recycling of thermally treated asbestos-containing material (named KRY.AS) in traditional ceramics has already been studied with successful results. The results presented here are the outcome of a long termed project started in 2005 and devoted to the recycling of this secondary raw materials in various industrial applications. KRY.AS can be added in medium-high percentages (10-40 wt%) to commercial mixtures for the production of clay bricks, rock-wool glasses for insulation as well as Ca-based frits and glass-ceramics for the production of ceramic tiles. The secondary raw material was also used for the synthesis of two ceramic pigments; a green uvarovite-based pigment [Ca{sub 3}Cr{sub 2}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}] and a pink malayaite-based pigment [Ca(Sn,Cr)SiO{sub 5}]. The latter is especially interesting as a substitute for cadmium-based pigments. This work also shows that KRY.AS can replace standard fillers in polypropylene plastics without altering the properties of the final product. For each application, a description and relevant results are presented and discussed.

  9. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, D.R.

    1988-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode is described for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution. 1 fig.

  10. Aluminum reference electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sadoway, Donald R. (Belmont, MA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable reference electrode for use in monitoring and controlling the process of electrolytic reduction of a metal. In the case of Hall cell reduction of aluminum, the reference electrode comprises a pool of molten aluminum and a solution of molten cryolite, Na.sub.3 AlF.sub.6, wherein the electrical connection to the molten aluminum does not contact the highly corrosive molten salt solution. This is accomplished by altering the density of either the aluminum (decreasing the density) or the electrolyte (increasing the density) so that the aluminum floats on top of the molten salt solution.

  11. Electromagnetic mixed-waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first phase of a program to develop and demonstrate a cost-effective, integrated process for remediation of asbestos-containing material that is contaminated with organics, heavy metals, and radioactive compounds was successfully completed. Laboratory scale tests were performed to demonstrate initial process viability for asbestos conversion, organics removal, and radionuclide and heavy metal removal. All success criteria for the laboratory tests were met. (1) Ohio DSI demonstrated greater than 99% asbestos conversion to amorphous solids using their commercial process. (2) KAI demonstrated 90% removal of organics from the asbestos suspension. (3) Westinghouse STC achieved the required metals removal criteria on a laboratory scale (e.g., 92% removal of uranium from solution, resin loadings of 0.6 equivalents per liter, and greater than 50% regeneration of resin in a batch test.) Using the information gained in the laboratory tests, the process was reconfigured to provide the basis for the mixed waste remediation system. An integrated process is conceptually developed, and a Phase 2 program plan is proposed to provide the bench-scale development needed in order to refine the design basis for a pilot processing system.

  12. Air Quality: Asbestos Notification Procedure Department: Chemical and General Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Air Quality: Asbestos Notification Procedure Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 The Bay Area Air Quality) and air quality program manager Determine if the project is classified as a demolition or renovation

  13. asbestos carbon nanotubes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asbestos carbon nanotubes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Carbon Nanotubes. Open Access...

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  15. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Aluminum Association The Aluminum Association, Inc. is the trade association for producers of primary aluminum, recyclers and semi-fabricated aluminum...

  16. Aluminum powder metallurgy processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flumerfelt, J.F.

    1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this dissertation is to explore the hypothesis that there is a strong linkage between gas atomization processing conditions, as-atomized aluminum powder characteristics, and the consolidation methodology required to make components from aluminum powder. The hypothesis was tested with pure aluminum powders produced by commercial air atomization, commercial inert gas atomization, and gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS). A comparison of the GARS aluminum powders with the commercial aluminum powders showed the former to exhibit superior powder characteristics. The powders were compared in terms of size and shape, bulk chemistry, surface oxide chemistry and structure, and oxide film thickness. Minimum explosive concentration measurements assessed the dependence of explosibility hazard on surface area, oxide film thickness, and gas atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization processing conditions. The GARS aluminum powders were exposed to different relative humidity levels, demonstrating the effect of atmospheric conditions on post-atomization oxidation of aluminum powder. An Al-Ti-Y GARS alloy exposed in ambient air at different temperatures revealed the effect of reactive alloy elements on post-atomization powder oxidation. The pure aluminum powders were consolidated by two different routes, a conventional consolidation process for fabricating aerospace components with aluminum powder and a proposed alternative. The consolidation procedures were compared by evaluating the consolidated microstructures and the corresponding mechanical properties. A low temperature solid state sintering experiment demonstrated that tap densified GARS aluminum powders can form sintering necks between contacting powder particles, unlike the total resistance to sintering of commercial air atomization aluminum powder.

  17. Evaluation of asbestos fibre content in discharge air from a portable canister vacuum cleaner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, James Turner

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Chairman f ommitt e He d o Department em (Member May 1975 111 ABSTRACT Evaluation of Asbestos Fibre Content In Discharge Air from a Portable Canister Vacuum Cleaner James Turner Wilson Jr. B. S. , Texas ABM University Directed by: Dr. Richard B... PITOI' CENTERLINE READING DURING ASBESTOS PICKUP' . . aooa 47 APPENDIX D ISOKINETIC SAMPLING PROBE DATA. . . ~, . . . , . . . , . . . ~ . ~ . . 49 VITA. ~ ~ ~ I ~ Vli 1 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Properties of Asbestos Fibres. ~Pa e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 4...

  18. Plastic Recycling Toter -ORANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    microfuge tubes - beakers - flasks - bottles - jars - Plastic disposable pipettes with cotton plugsPlastic Recycling Toter - ORANGE Glass Recycling Toter - TEAL Garbage Yellow sharps container Categories - All Plastic except Styrofoam - rinsed 3 times - may have contained Biohazard level 1 bacteria

  19. ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) autoroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle...

  20. Carbothermic Aluminum Production Using Scrap Aluminum As A Coolant

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing aluminum metal by carbothermic reduction of alumina ore. Alumina ore is heated in the presence of carbon at an elevated temperature to produce an aluminum metal body contaminated with about 10-30% by wt. aluminum carbide. Aluminum metal or aluminum alloy scrap then is added to bring the temperature to about 900-1000.degree. C. and precipitate out aluminum carbide. The precipitated aluminum carbide is filtered, decanted, or fluxed with salt to form a molten body having reduced aluminum carbide content.

  1. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Krupkin, N.V.; Kuespert, D.R.; Nishioka, G.M.; Lau, J.W.K.; Palmer, N.I.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  2. Aluminum-Catalyzed Intramolecular Hydroamination of Aminoalkenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koller, Juergen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum-catalyzed intramolecular hydroamination ofgroup 13 metals such as aluminum are exceedingly inexpensive

  3. Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS, J.A.

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

  4. Electromagnetic mixed waste processing system for asbestos decontamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasevich, R.S.; Vaux, W.G.; Nocito, T.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE sites contain a broad spectrum of asbestos materials (cloth, pipe lagging, sprayed insulation and other substances) which are contaminated with a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes due to its use during the development of the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. These wastes consist of cutting oils, lubricants, solvents, PCB`s, heavy metals and radioactive contaminants. The radioactive contaminants are the activation, decay and fission products of DOE operations. The asbestos must be converted by removing and separating the hazardous and radioactive materials to prevent the formation of mixed wastes and to allow for both sanitary disposal and effective decontamination. Currently, no technology exists that can meet these sanitary and other objectives.

  5. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  6. Recovery Act Weekly Video: 200 Area Asbestos Removal, U-Ancillary Demolition, 200 West Transfer Building Footings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A weekly update of the Recovery Act at work. Demolition of U-Ancillary that was contaminated with uranium and asbestos as well as removing asbestos from the Steam Generation Plant in the 200 East Area.

  7. Isokinetic vs still air sampling of asbestos fiber emission from high-velocity, low-volume vacuum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grabowski, John S

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jeanne M. Robin, whose love and understanding is the the backbone of this research. TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract Acknowledgements Dedi cati on List of Tables List of Figures Introduction Literature Review Asbestos Asbestos-Related Diseases...

  8. Plastic Surface Strain Mapping of Bent Sheets by Image Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Wei

    of 5XXX and 6XXX series automotive aluminum alloys is often more problematic (because of surface, the shape and surface plastic strain distribu- tions around a bent apex of a flat 2 mm thick automotive alu are widely used in making various electri- cal connectors and automotive components, respectively.2,3 Hemming

  9. Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Aluminum monocarbonyl and aluminum isocarbonyl Steve S. Wesolowski,a) T. Daniel Crawford,b) Justin of the aluminum monocarbonyl species AlCO and AlOC have been performed to predict the geometries, fragmentation, Ogden, and Oswald6 first isolated aluminum dicarbonyls in solid krypton and identified the species

  10. The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a , Gordon L. Nord a , Robert P Received 13 September 2007 Available online 1 October 2007 Abstract Fibrous minerals are common in nature but asbestiform minerals are rare. The unique mineralogical characteristic common to all the asbestos minerals

  11. Aluminum ion batteries: electrolytes and cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Luke

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anodes for Aluminum-Air Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.Anodes for Aluminum-Air Batteries. J. Electrochem. Soc.ALLOYS FOR ALUMINUM AIR BATTERIES. J. Electrochem. Soc.

  12. DEFLECTION MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS· C. Peters LawrenceMEASUREMENTS OF 25 mm ALUMINUM COLLARS" C. Peters Lawrenceinch thick 7075- T6 aluminum alloy plate. Inside corners

  13. Creating a GPS for aluminum ions | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Creating a GPS for aluminum ions Released: August 14, 2014 New approach pinpoints locations in simple zeolite catalysts Aluminum EXAFS and zeolite...

  14. ITP Aluminum: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Aluminum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    aluminum.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP Aluminum: Technical Working Group on Inert Anode Technologies...

  15. BOA: Asbestos pipe insulation removal robot system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project described in this report targets the development of a mechanized system for safe, cost-efficient and automated abatement of asbestos containing materials used as pipe insulation. Based on several key design criteria and site visits, a proof-of-concept prototype robot system, dubbed BOA, was designed and built, which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure -- restrictions to be alleviated through continued development. BOA removed asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. The containment and vacuum system on BOA was able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/ 8-hr. shift. This program consists of two phases. The first phase was completed and a demonstration was given to a review panel, consisting of DOE headquarters and site representatives as well as commercial abatement industry representatives. Based on the technical and programmatic recommendations drafted, presented and discussed during the review meeting, a new plan for the Phase II effort of this project was developed. Phase 11 will consist of a 26-month effort, with an up-front 4-month site-, market-, cost/benefit and regulatory study before the next BOA robot (14 months) is built, and then deployed and demonstrated (3 months) at a DOE site (such as Fernald or Oak Ridge) by the beginning of FY`97.

  16. Airborne asbestos fiber evaluation: a comparison of three methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studinka, Emil

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AIRBORNE ASBFSTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A CONPARISON OF TliR'E NETHODS A Thesis EYiIL STUDINKA Submitted to the Graduate Co'ilege of Texas ALN University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER OF SCIEtiCE December 1979... Najor Subject: Industrial Hygiene AIRBORNE ASBESTOS FIBER EVALUATION-A COMPARISON OF THRFE METHODS A Thesis by EMIL STUDI NKA Approved as to style and content by: ichard B. onzen air ar, of Committee) llaymon L. Johnston (Member) hlilliam P...

  17. REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU, X. George; Zhang, X.C.

    2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying hazardous materials and in characterizing radioactive contamination, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer has conducted research in two aspects: (1) to develop terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging system that can be used to analyze environmental samples such as asbestos in the field, and (2) to develop algorithms for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profiles in real-time in the field using gamma spectroscopy. The basic research focused on the following: (1) mechanism of generating of broadband pulsed radiation in terahertz region, (2) optimal free-space electro-optic sampling for asbestos, (3) absorption and transmission mechanisms of asbestos in THz region, (4) the role of asbestos sample conditions on the temporal and spectral distributions, (5) real-time identification and mapping of asbestos using THz imaging, (7) Monte Carlo modeling of distributed contamination from diffusion of radioactive materials into porous concrete and asbestos materials, (8) development of unfolding algorithms for gamma spectroscopy, and (9) portable and integrated spectroscopy systems for field testing in DOE. Final results of the project show that the combination of these innovative approaches has the potential to bring significant improvement in future risk reduction and cost/time saving in DOE's D and D activities.

  18. Plastic explosives Mike Hopkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravenel, Douglas

    Plastic explosives Mike Hill Mike Hopkins Doug Ravenel What this talk is about The poster The HHRH The reduced E4 -term 1.1 Plastic explosives: A C4 analog of the Kervaire invariant calculation Conference of Virginia Mike Hopkins Harvard University Doug Ravenel University of Rochester #12;Plastic explosives Mike

  19. Polycrystal Plasticity -Multiple Slip"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollett, Anthony D.

    Polycrystal Plasticity - Multiple Slip" 27-750 Texture, Microstructure & Anisotropy A.D. Rollett;2 Objective" The objective of this lecture is to show how plastic deformation in polycrystals requires of Los Alamos polycrystal plasticity, LApp; also the Viscoplastic Selfconsistent code, VPSC; also

  20. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Scientists ignite aluminum water mix Don't worry, that beer can you're holding is not going to spontaneously burst into flames. June 30, 2014...

  1. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason Allan (Mastic, NY); Reilly, James J. (Bellport, NY)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  2. Regeneration of aluminum hydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graetz, Jason Allan; Reilly, James J; Wegrzyn, James E

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and materials for the formation of hydrogen storage alanes, AlH.sub.x, where x is greater than 0 and less than or equal to 6 at reduced H.sub.2 pressures and temperatures. The methods rely upon reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular H.sub.2. The change in free energy is reduced by lowering the entropy change during the reaction by providing aluminum in a state of high entropy, and by increasing the magnitude of the change in enthalpy of the reaction or combinations thereof.

  3. Overview of Aluminum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreach to MultifamilyAluminum Overview of Aluminum

  4. Notice of Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM) Removal Request for Correction of Online ACM Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Inventory This form is to be completed for all asbestos abatement/removal work at the University of Maryland and type of material removed -as listed on DES inventory. (Indicate "NPL" ­ if described material is "not

  5. Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing...

  6. asbestos-related diffuse pleural: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disease in a patient may be a marker for disease in household contacts. Patients with family members heavily exposed to asbestos should be strongly encouraged to quit smoking in...

  7. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, David S. (Richmond, VA); Scott, Darwin H. (Mechanicsville, VA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cs are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  8. Aluminum battery alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, D.S.; Scott, D.H.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum alloys suitable for use as anode structures in electrochemical cells are disclosed. These alloys include iron levels higher than previously felt possible, due to the presence of controlled amounts of manganese, with possible additions of magnesium and controlled amounts of gallium.

  9. Chemical agents for conversion of chrysotile asbestos into non-hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY); Petrakis, Leon (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and methods for converting a chrysotile asbestos-containing material to a non-regulated environmentally benign solid which comprises a fluoro acid decomposing agent capable of dissociating the chrysotile asbestos to non-regulated components, wherein non-regulated components are non-reactive with the environment, and a binding agent which binds the non-regulated components to form an environmentally benign solid.

  10. Chemical agents for conversion of chrysotile asbestos into non-hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi; Petrakis, L.

    1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition and methods are disclosed for converting a chrysotile asbestos-containing material to a non-regulated environmentally benign solid which comprises a fluoro acid decomposing agent capable of dissociating the chrysotile asbestos to non-regulated components, wherein non-regulated components are non-reactive with the environment, and a binding agent which binds the non-regulated components to form an environmentally benign solid. 2 figs.

  11. Differences of growth response to aluminum excess of two Melaleuca trees differing in aluminum resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houman, Yoshifumi; Tahara, Ko; Shinmachi, Fumie; Noguchi, Akira; Satohiko, Sasaki; Hasegawa, Isao

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M, Yamanoshita T, Kojima K. , Role of aluminum-bindingligands in aluminum resistance of Eucalyptus camaldulensissoils, low pH and excess aluminum are the primary factors

  12. aluminum matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ... 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods Eagar, Thomas W. 2...

  13. TANK 12 SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S; Michael Hay, M; Kristine Zeigler, K; Michael Stone, M

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  14. Tank 12 Sludge Characterization and Aluminum Dissolution Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Hay, M.; Zeigler, K; Stone, M.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  15. SIMULATION OF STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    SIMULATION OF STRESSES DURING CASTING OF BINARY MAGNESIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOYS M.G. Pokorny1 , C, Geesthacht, Germany Keywords: Magnesium Alloys, Casting, Stress Simulation Abstract A visco-plastic deformation model is used to predict thermal stresses during casting of binary Mg-Al alloys. The predictions

  16. Materials Science and Engineering A 491 (2008) 88102 Plastic deformation of Al and AA5754 between 4.2 K and 295 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    reserved. Keywords: Aluminum; AA5754 Al alloys; Plastic deformation; Electrical resistivity; Work hardening; Strain rate sensitivity; Dislocation density; Fracture 1. Introduction Aluminum alloys of the 5000 (Al­Mg) series have been con- sidered for structural applications in the automotive industry [1]. The non

  17. Use Of Superacids To Digest Chrysotile And Amosite Asbestos In Simple Mixtures Or Matrices Found In Building Materials Compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY); Petrakis, Leon (Port Jefferson, NY); Webster, Ronald P. (Shoreham, NY)

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is provided. The composition comprises a flouro acid decomposing agent which can be applied to either amosite-containing thermal insulation or chrysotile-containing fire-proof material or to any asbestos-containing material which includes of chrysotile and amosite asbestos. The fluoro acid decomposing agent includes FP(O)(OH).sub.2, hexafluorophosphoric acid, a mixture of hydrofluoric and phosphoric acid and a mixture of hexafluorophosphoric acid and phosphoric acid. A method for converting asbestos-containing material to environmentally benign components is also provided

  18. 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Dr. Mutaz B. Habal June 6, 2013 McGill University Division of Plastic Surgery 2013 PLASTIC SURGERY VISITING PROFESSOR Special thanks to our sponsors: Representative: Katherine Marchand Canadian Association of Plastic Surgeons Educational Foundation Division of Plastic

  19. Possible Reasons Why Aluminum is a Beneficial Element for Melastoma malabathricum, an Aluminum Accumulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of adaptation to high aluminum condition in native plantit has been well known that aluminum (Al) toxicity restricts

  20. Aluminum Carbothermic Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Marshall J.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the non-proprietary research and development conducted on the Aluminum Carbothermic Technology (ACT) project from contract inception on July 01, 2000 to termination on December 31, 2004. The objectives of the program were to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of a new carbothermic process for producing commercial grade aluminum, designated as the ''Advanced Reactor Process'' (ARP). The scope of the program ranged from fundamental research through small scale laboratory experiments (65 kW power input) to larger scale test modules at up to 1600 kW power input. The tasks included work on four components of the process, Stages 1 and 2 of the reactor, vapor recovery and metal alloy decarbonization; development of computer models; and economic analyses of capital and operating costs. Justification for developing a new, carbothermic route to aluminum production is defined by the potential benefits in reduced energy, lower costs and more favorable environmental characteristics than the conventional Hall-Heroult process presently used by the industry. The estimated metrics for these advantages include energy rates at approximately 10 kWh/kg Al (versus over 13 kWh/kg Al for Hall-Heroult), capital costs as low as $1250 per MTY (versus 4,000 per MTY for Hall-Heroult), operating cost reductions of over 10%, and up to 37% reduction in CO2 emissions for fossil-fuel power plants. Realization of these benefits would be critical to sustaining the US aluminum industries position as a global leader in primary aluminum production. One very attractive incentive for ARP is its perceived ability to cost effectively produce metal over a range of smelter sizes, not feasible for Hall-Heroult plants which must be large, 240,000 TPY or more, to be economical. Lower capacity stand alone carbothermic smelters could be utilized to supply molten metal at fabrication facilities similar to the mini-mill concept employed by the steel industry. Major accomplishments for the program include definition of the system thermo-chemistry, demonstration of reactor stage 1, development of reactor stage 2 critical components in a 500 kW module, experimental determination of the vapor recovery reactor fundamentals, detailed design and installation of an advanced stage 1/vapor recovery reactor, feasibility of efficient separation of Al-C metal alloy product, updated capital and operating cost estimates, and development of computer models for all steps of the Advanced Reactor Process.

  1. Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollett, Anthony D.

    Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum Abhijit Brahme1,2 , Joseph Fridy3, Aluminum, Grain Boundary Mobility, Nucleation, Oriented Growth, Oriented Nucleation, Stored Energy, Monte Carlo Modeling. #12;Modeling Texture Evolution during Recrystallization in Aluminum 2 1. Introduction

  2. Asbestos Operations and Maintenance The purpose of these procedures is to provide safe methods for employees of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Standard revised in 1995. Definitions Class I Asbestos Work Removal/abatement of thermal insulation. Class II Asbestos Work Removal of floor or ceiling tiles, siding, roofing or transite panels or piping · Omit wetting when tiles are heated and removed intact. · Use vacuums equipped with HEPA filters

  3. Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minh, N.Q.; Loutfy, R.O.; Yao, N.P.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic aluminum may be produced by the electrolysis of Al/sub 2/S/sub 3/ at 700 to 800/sup 0/C in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

  4. Aluminum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat PumpAllegations ofAlumina and Aluminum

  5. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  6. LINEARIZED PLASTICITY IS THE EVOLUTIONARY -LIMIT OF FINITE PLASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanelli, Ulisse

    LINEARIZED PLASTICITY IS THE EVOLUTIONARY -LIMIT OF FINITE PLASTICITY ALEXANDER MIELKE AND ULISSE in plasticity. By taking the small-deformations limit, we prove via -convergence for rate-independent processes plastic evolution by means of a deli- cate recovery sequence construction relating energy and dissipation

  7. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Voluntary Aluminum Industry Partnership (VAIP), representing 98% of primary aluminum production in the United States, have committed under the Climate VISION program to a direct...

  8. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum……………………………………………………………………… Aluminum Alloy 6061-Figure 30 - Aluminum alloy 6061 tubes used to assembleencapsulated within the aluminum alloy 6061 matrix………………..

  9. The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

  10. Aluminum Zintl anion moieties within sodium aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnöckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland at College Park, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lee, Mal-Soon; Jena, P. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University of Pennsylvania, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: AKandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have established that aluminum moieties within selected sodium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Sodium–aluminum cluster anions, Na{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?}, were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on a select sub-set of stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for both cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra), and fragment molecular orbital based correlation diagrams.

  11. Spray Rolling Aluminum Strip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavernia, E.J.; Delplanque, J-P; McHugh, K.M.

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray forming is a competitive low-cost alternative to ingot metallurgy for manufacturing ferrous and non-ferrous alloy shapes. It produces materials with a reduced number of processing steps, while maintaining materials properties, with the possibility of near-net-shape manufacturing. However, there are several hurdles to large-scale commercial adoption of spray forming: 1) ensuring strip is consistently flat, 2) eliminating porosity, particularly at the deposit/substrate interface, and 3) improving material yield. Through this program, a new strip/sheet casting process, termed spray rolling, has been developed, which is an innovative manufacturing technique to produce aluminum net-shape products. Spray rolling combines the benefits of twin-roll casting and conventional spray forming, showing a promising potential to overcome the above hurdles associated with spray forming. Spray rolling requires less energy and generates less scrap than conventional processes and, consequently, enables the development of materials with lower environmental impacts in both processing and final products. Spray Rolling was developed as a collaborative project between the University of California-Davis, the Colorado School of Mines, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and an industry team. The following objectives of this project were achieved: (1) Demonstration of the feasibility of the spray rolling process at the bench-scale level and evaluation of the materials properties of spray rolled aluminum strip alloys; and (2) Demonstration of 2X scalability of the process and documentation of technical hurdles to further scale up and initiate technology transfer to industry for eventual commercialization of the process.

  12. EUROSPF Conference APPLICATION TECHNOLOGY OF ALUMINUM BLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    6th EUROSPF Conference APPLICATION TECHNOLOGY OF ALUMINUM BLOW FORMING FOR AUTOMOTIVE CLOSURE PANEL Replacement by aluminum for the closure panels is one of the common methods for lightening car body. However. As a solution to cover the low stamping formability of aluminum, Blow forming technology of aluminum which

  13. Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, The Clean Air Act mandates a specific analytical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    75 KEY WORDS Asbestos, polarized light microscopy, PLM, NESHAP ABSTRACT The Clean Air Act of the polarized light microscopy (PLM) test method that re moved the compositing of layers and effectively sought within the sample. In 1994 and again in 1995, the EPA recommended that the 1993 PLM method be used

  14. Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Jacques Ameille, MD1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Asbestos-related diseases in automobile mechanics Jacques Ameille, MD1 , Nicole Rosenberg, MD2-related diseases in automobile mechanics Corresponding author Jacques Ameille, MD, Unité de pathologie plaques, automobile mechanics, HRCT inserm-00671970,version1-20Feb2012 Author manuscript, published

  15. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  16. aluminum alloy produced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries. Domestic secondary aluminum production--the primary materials source for aluminum-silicon alloys--was...

  17. aluminum metal matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract Solidification of metal aluminum and aluminum alloys is modeled on uneven surfaces char- acterized by sinusoidal curves Zabaras, Nicholas J. 108 Aluminum-tungsten...

  18. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Jamaica in the World Aluminum Industry, 1838–1973, Vol.2007. Doordan, Dennis. “Promoting Aluminum: Designers andthe American Aluminum Industry. ” Design Issues 9, no. 2 (

  19. Aluminum-detoxifying compounds in roots of Eucalyptus camaldulensis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tahara, Ko; Hashida, Koh; Ohara, Seiji; Kojima, Katsumi; Shinohara, Kenji

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M, Yamanoshita T, Kojima K, Role of aluminum-bindingligands in aluminum resistance of Eucalyptus camaldulensisH, Sasaki S, Kojima K. Aluminum distribution and reactive

  20. Adaptive Plasticity and Plasticity as an Adaptation: A Selective Review of Plasticity in Animal Morphology and Life History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotthard, Karl

    Adaptive Plasticity and Plasticity as an Adaptation: A Selective Review of Plasticity in Animal wide-ranging. All key REVIEW references should be cited. A summary is required. Adaptive plasticity and plasticity as an adaptation: a selective review of plasticity in animal morphology and life history Karl

  1. Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    5015/03/08 Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling Water and fizzy drinks bottles Contaminated plastic (food, fluids, etc.) Oil containers Toxic chemical containers Metal strips or fasteners Carrier bags and bin liners Margarine tubs, wall coverings Yoghurt pots, egg cartons, plastic packaging

  2. A comparison of the physical and chemical properties of asbestos, mineral wool and fibrous glass insulation material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Michael Galen

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARISON OF THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ASBESTOS, MINERAL WOOL AND FIBROUS GLASS INSULATION MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL GALEN COWAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AMi University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene A COMPARISON OF THE PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF ASBESTOS, MINERAL WOOL AND FIBROUS GLASS INSULATION MATERIAL A Thesis by MICHAEL GALEN COWAN Approved...

  3. Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites by R. Kiehn and T. W................... .. ....... ... ... 3 Literature Review ......... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ........ 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ........... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods

  4. Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum From Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradford, Donald R (Underwood, WA); Barnett, Robert J. (Goldendale, WA); Mezner, Michael B. (Sandy, OR)

    2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrolytic cell for producing aluminum from alumina having a reservoir for collecting molten aluminum remote from the electrolysis.

  5. Current technologies and trends of aluminum design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Michael, 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of current aluminum technology in the building and construction industry was carried out. Aluminum is an ideal material for building in corrosive environments and for building structures where small ...

  6. Micro Joining of Aluminum Graphite Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velamati, Manasa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced aluminum graphite composites have unique thermal properties due to opposing coefficients of thermal expansion of aluminum and graphite. The thermal and mechanical properties of such composites are anisotropic due to directional properties...

  7. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Alloys PROPERTIES OF THE ALUMINUM-WATER REACTIONS RELATIVE ........... 14 TO ON-BOARD SYSTEM aluminum alloys such as aluminum-lithium and aluminum-gallium has been studied. In this case, the molten nature of the alloy prevents the development of a coherent and adherent aluminum oxide layer. However

  8. Aluminum-carbon composite electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farahmandi, C.J.; Dispennette, J.M.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high performance double layer capacitor having an electric double layer formed in the interface between activated carbon and an electrolyte is disclosed. The high performance double layer capacitor includes a pair of aluminum impregnated carbon composite electrodes having an evenly distributed and continuous path of aluminum impregnated within an activated carbon fiber preform saturated with a high performance electrolytic solution. The high performance double layer capacitor is capable of delivering at least 5 Wh/kg of useful energy at power ratings of at least 600 W/kg. 3 figs.

  9. BOA: Asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system, Phase 2. Topical report, January--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explored the regulatory impact and cost-benefit of a robotic thermal asbestos pipe-insulation removal system over the current manual abatement work practice. The authors are currently in the second phase of a two-phase program to develop a robotic asbestos abatement system, comprised of a ground-based support system (including vacuum, fluid delivery, computing/electronics/power, and other subsystems) and several on-pipe removal units, each sized to handle pipes within a given diameter range. The intent of this study was to (i) aid in developing design and operational criteria for the overall system to maximize cost-efficiency, and (ii) to determine the commercial potential of a robotic pipe-insulation abatement system.

  10. Aluminum in Superconducting Magnets Robert J. Weggel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    is aluminum, either ultrapure, as quenchstabilization matrix metal, and/or alloyed and coldworked and heat for magnets in which the stresses and strains are modest. The strongest aluminum alloy commercially available., "Mechanical properties of commercial aluminum alloys at 253o C (­423o F)," NATO ARW, Kiev 713 Sept. 2003

  11. MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING OF ALUMINUM NANOPARTICLE FORMATION R. Schefflan D. Kalyon S. Kovenklioglu Stevens Picatinny Arsenal's process for making alumina coated nanoparticles of aluminum involves the conversion of gaseous aluminum, in the presence of helium carrier gas, to solid nanoparticles and their subsequent

  12. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dougherty, Daniel J.

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J. We present Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios

  13. Aluminum--2004 5. Areferencethatincludesasectionmark()isfoundintheinternet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum--2004 5. Areferencethatincludesasectionmark(§)isfoundintheinternet ReferenceCitedsection. Aluminum ByPatriciaA.Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared by Benjamin S. Goff.S.GeologicalSurvey(uSGS)requestforproductiondata. CommercialDevelopmentCo.(CDC)ofSt.louis,mO, boughtKaiserAluminumCorp.'s200,000-metric-ton-per-year (t

  14. Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthi, Shriram

    Aluminum: Principled Scenario Exploration through Minimality Tim Nelson1, Salman Saghafi1, Daniel J Aluminum, a modification of Alloy that presents only minimal scenarios: those that contain no more than is necessary. Aluminum lets users explore the scenario space by adding to scenarios and backtracking. It also

  15. Comments on the EPA/NIOSH guide to respiratory protection in the asbestos abatement industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hack, A.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The respirators recommended by EPA and NIOSH for asbestos are not only extreme and impractical, but more important, unlikely to provide the highest protection possible. Because of the ease of wearing, powered air purifying respirators may provide as good protection as air line devices with fewer interruptions. Placing carcinogens in the category of compounds that are considered immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH) is a mistake and leads to error in the selection of respiratory protection.

  16. Evaluation of the effect of capacity upon the performance of four industrial asbestos vacuum cleaners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loflin, Wilburn Joseph

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of asbestos which the manufacturing company specified that its vacuum cleaner was designed to contain (manufacturer's specified capacity). The suction pressure and airborne fiber concentrations were taken at each amount to determine what effect capacity... had upon vacuum cleaner performance. The analysis conducted on the collected data and the graphical repre- sentations of that data indicated that the effect capacity had upon vacuum cleaner performance was not evident in the airborne fiber con...

  17. Mechanical Demolition of Buildings with Concrete Asbestos Board Siding: Methodology, Precautions, and Results at the Hanford Central Plateau - 12417

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehler, Kurt [Decommissioning and Demolition, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the start of its contract in 2008, the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has demolished 25 buildings with concrete asbestos board (CAB) siding using mechanical means. While the asbestos contained in CAB siding is not friable in its manufactured form, concerns persist that mechanical methods of demolition have the potential to render the asbestos friable and airborne, therefore posing a health risk to demolition workers and the public. CH2M HILL's experience demonstrates that when carefully managed, mechanical demolition of CAB siding can be undertaken safely, successfully, and in compliance with regulatory requirements for the disposal of Class II Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM). While the number of buildings demolished at Hanford and the number of samples collected does not make a conclusive argument that CAB cannot be made friable with normal demolition techniques, it certainly provides a significant body of evidence for the success of the approach. Of course, there are many factors that affect how to demolish a structure and dispose of the waste. These factors will impact the success depending on each site. The most obvious factors which contribute to this success at Hanford are: 1. The availability of onsite waste disposal where the handling and cost of asbestos-containing waste is not much different than other potentially contaminated waste. Therefore, segregation of demolition debris from the potential asbestos contamination is not necessary from a debris handling or asbestos disposal aspect. 2. The space between structures is typically significant enough to allow for large exclusion zones. There are not many restrictions due to cohabitation issues or potential contamination of adjacent facilities. 3. The willingness of the regulators and client to understand the industrial safety issues associated with manual CAB removal. (authors)

  18. Characterizatin of ultrafine aluminum nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandstrom, M. M. (Mary M.); Jorgensen, B. S. (Betty S.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Smith, B. L. (Bettina L.); Son, S. F. (Steven F.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum nanopowders with particle sizes ranging from {approx}25 nm to 80 nm were characterized by a variety of methods. We present and compare the results from common powder characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), BET gas adsorption surface area analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and low angle laser light scattering (LALLS). Aluminum nanoparticles consist of an aluminum core with an aluminum oxide coating. HRTEM measurements of both the particle diameter and oxide layer thickness tend to be larger than those obtained from BET and TGA. LALLS measurements show a large degree of particle agglomeration in solution; therefore, primary particle sizes could not be determined. Furthermore, results from small-angle scattering techniques (SAS), including small-angle neutron (SANS) and x-ray (SAXS) scattering are presented and show excellent agreement with the BET, TGA, and HRTEM. The suite of analytical techniques presented in this paper can be used as a powerful tool in the characterization of many types of nanosized powders.

  19. Retrofit for Plastic Resin Driers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, B.; Thuro, G.

    RETROFIT FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have... installation of dew point meters and a programmable controller to tailor the regeneration cycle to the required dew point temperature. Background It was estimated that there are about 450 plastic processors in the Southern California Edison service...

  20. Fabrication of plastic biochips

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saaem, Ishtiaq; Ma, Kuo-Sheng; Alam, S. Munir; Tian Jingdong [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Medicine and Human Vaccine Institute, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A versatile surface functionalization procedure based on rf magnetron sputtering of silica was performed on poly(methylmethacrylate), polycarbonate, polypropylene, and cyclic olefin copolymers (Topas 6015). The hybrid thermoplastic surfaces were characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectrometer analysis and contact angle measurements. The authors then used these hybrid materials to perform a sandwich assay targeting an HIV-1 antibody using fluorescent detection and biotinylated peptides immobilized using the bioaffinity of biotin-neutravidin. They found a limit of detection similar to arrays on glass surfaces and believed that this plastic biochip platform may be used for the development of disposable immunosensing and diagnostic applications.

  1. Waste Toolkit A-Z Plastic bags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Plastic bags Can I recycle plastic bags? No. At the moment you can't recycle plastic bags in the University recycling. Instead, choose alternatives to plastic bags when shopping have to use a cotton bag 131 times to ensure it has lower global warming potential than a plastic

  2. Waste Toolkit A-Z Plastic Grundon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Plastic ­ Grundon Also see `Swap Shop' and `Office Recycling ­ Grundon' in the Waste Toolkit A-Z How can I recycle plastic? There are lots of different types of plastic. Typically, waste contractors can only recycle PETE plastic and HDPE plastic. The University's preferred waste

  3. FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutbrod, H.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, A.scheme for one module Plastic Soil Response (based on protonS Ropidity ——» Fig. 3. Plastic Ball acceptance in the plane

  4. PLASTIC DEFORMATIONPLASTIC DEFORMATION Modes of Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramaniam, Anandh

    PLASTIC DEFORMATIONPLASTIC DEFORMATION Modes of Deformation The Uniaxial Tension Test Mechanisms underlying Plastic Deformation Strengthening mechanisms Mechanical Metallurgy George E Dieter McClick here to know about all the mechanisms by which materials fail #12;Slip (Dislocation motion) Plastic

  5. DIVISION 6 -WOOD AND PLASTICS 06000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 06000 GENERAL 1. For both woods and plastics, special attention is called to matters of flame spread-dried. 3. For exterior wood or plastic framed structures, see Division 4 for dimensions of Sample Panel

  6. Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badyaev, Alex

    Developmental Plasticity Links Local Adaptation and Evolutionary Diversification in Foraging, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona Developmental plasticity is thought to reconcile the constraining role morphology into adulthood, providing an opportunity to directly examine the links between plasticity of bone

  7. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Alloys PROPERTIES OF THE ALUMINUM-WATER REACTIONS RELATIVE ........... 14 TO ON-BOARD SYSTEM metal. In addition, the reaction of water with molten aluminum alloys such as aluminum-lithium and aluminum-gallium has been studied. In this case, the molten nature of the alloy prevents the development

  8. Rhythms and plasticity: television temporality at home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irani, Lilly; Jeffries, Robin; Knight, Andrea

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    priority. Plastic television watching did not demand com-and domestic demands [5]. 5.7 Nearly plastic Many of the

  9. Production of anhydrous aluminum chloride composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vandergrift, G.F. III; Krumpelt, M.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1981-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for producing an anhydrous aluminum chloride composition from a water-based aluminous material such as a slurry of aluminum hydroxide in a multistage extraction process in which the aluminum ion is first extracted into an organic liquid containing an acidic extractant and then extracted from the organic phase into an alkali metal chloride or chlorides to form a melt containing a mixture of chlorides of alkali metal and aluminum. In the process, the organic liquid may be recycled. In addition, the process advantageously includes an electrolysis cell for producing metallic aluminum and the alkali metal chloride or chlorides may be recycled for extraction of the aluminum from the organic phase.

  10. Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Final Report on the Safety Assessment of Aluminum Silicate, Calcium Silicate, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, Magnesium Silicate, Magnesium Trisilicate, Sodium Magnesium Silicate, Zirconium Silicate, Attapulgite, Bentonite, Fuller's Earth, Hectorite, Kaolin, Lithium Magnesium Silicate, Lithium Magnesium

  11. Use of reagents to convert chrysotile and amosite asbestos used as insulation or protection for metal surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY); Petrakis, Leon (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for converting asbestos-containing material, covering metal pipes or other metal surfaces, to non-regulated, environmentally benign-materials, and inhibiting the corrosion of the metal pipes or other metal surfaces. The composition comprises a combination of at least two multiple-functional group reagents, in which each reagent includes a Fluro acid component and a corrosion inhibiting compoment. A method for converting asbestos-containing material, covering metal pipes or other metal surfaces, to non-regulated, environmentally benign-materials, and inhibiting the corrosion of the metal pipes or other metal surfaces is also provided.

  12. High resistivity aluminum antimonide radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W. (Livermore, CA); Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA); Yee, Jick H. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystal materials have been prepared for use as ambient (room) temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray radiation detection.

  13. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resources & Links Industry Associations FederalState Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Expertise Auto Aluminum...

  14. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Resources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Partnership The Voluntary Aluminum Industrial Partnership (VAIP) is an innovative pollution prevention program developed jointly by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  15. High resistivity aluminum antimonide radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sherohman, John W.; Coombs, III, Arthur W.; Yee, Jick H.

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Bulk Aluminum Antimonide (AlSb)-based single crystal materials have been prepared for use as ambient (room) temperature X-ray and Gamma-ray radiation detection.

  16. aluminum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  17. High Performance Plastic DSSC | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Performance Plastic DSSC Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > High Performance Plastic DSSC...

  18. Plasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam with metallic foam coremetallic foam coremetallic foam coremetallic foam core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xiaoyu

    Plasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity of sandwich beam withPlasticity-- · Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006 --Plasticity of lightweight sandwich structures, 2006

  19. The Pricing of Electricity to Aluminum Smelters in the Northwest 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, T. J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    major industrial firms, primarily aluminum companies operating aluminum smelters in the region. These direct service industries (DSIs) have a contractual right to purchase up to 3.500 average megawatts annually from Bonneville. Because the aluminum...

  20. iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    © iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan Handouts to explore mechanistic link between Alzheimer's and aluminum 5. Brief proposal expanding Points to Aluminum's Link With Alzheimer's Disease" from 1989. Provide handout

  1. Scientists ignite aluminum water mix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter PrincipalfuelTorus ExperimentScientists ignite aluminum

  2. Indentation of plastically graded materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, In-Suk, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The introduction of certain controlled gradients in plastic properties is known to promote resistance to the onset of damage at contact surfaces during some tribological applications. Gradients in composition, microstructure ...

  3. Re-usability of plastics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonas, Calvin (Calvin A.)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research project was designed in order to learn more about the quality of recycled plastics when compared to new material. The study was carried out by researching and learning about how the recycling process operates. ...

  4. Memory stability and synaptic plasticity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billings, Guy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous experiments have demonstrated that the activity of neurons can alter the strength of excitatory synapses. This synaptic plasticity is bidirectional and synapses can be strengthened (potentiation) or weakened ...

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting of the UBC Farm alternatives to traditional plastics and conventional plastic waste management in the agricultural setting ................................................................................................................. 9 Agricultural plastics

  6. THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    THE AGE OF PLASTIC INGENUITY + RESPONSIBILITY An Interdisciplinary Symposium Stone Age, Bronze Age, Iron Age...and now the Age of Plastic. The Smithsonian Institution is leveraging its collections--arguably the world's greatest repository of plastic material culture--to investigate the significance of plastic, its

  7. Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

  8. Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    9/24/2010 1 Phenotypic Plasticity, Ecophysiology, and Climate Change Loren Albert Image is plasticity?p y · Examples · Limitations to plasticity: Valladares et al. 2007 ·Ecophysiological when the habitat changes? Habitat Tracking Ackerly 2003 #12;9/24/2010 3 Evolution Plasticity #12

  9. Plastics Engineering UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Plastics Engineering UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Fall 2013 and Beyond Freshman Year Sophomore Year/Fall Semester Cr Sophomore/Spring Semester 26.001 Plastics Safety Lecture 0 26.002 Plastics Safety Lecture 0 26.201 Polymeric Materials I 3 26.202 Polymeric Materials II 3 26.215 Plastics Proc. Eng

  10. aluminum oxide layer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  11. aluminum oleate layered: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  12. aluminum oxide layers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE...

  13. aluminum matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites Materials Science Websites Summary: ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle...

  14. Commonwealth Aluminum: Manufacturer Conducts Plant-Wide Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Costs by Increasing Energy Efficiency in Process Heating Systems ITP Aluminum: Aluminum Industry Roadmap for the Automotive Market (May 1999) Improving Process Heating System...

  15. Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity Energy Assessment Helps Kaiser Aluminum Save Energy and Improve Productivity This case study describes how a DOE energy...

  16. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed countries aluminum smelters consume up to 1/3 ordam to power an aluminum smelter in the 1960s, displacing

  17. aluminum alloy matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: ccsd-00002835,version2-14Sep2004 Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces Damien experimental light scattering measurements from aluminum surfaces obtained...

  18. aluminum automotive components: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    set of the pn junction with self-assembled, anodic aluminum Anlage, Steven 375 EFFECT OF ENCAPSULANT ON HIGH-TEMPERATURE RELIABILITY OF THE GOLD WIREBOND ALUMINUM BONDPAD...

  19. aluminum high pressure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS Renewable Energy Websites Summary: ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR...

  20. aluminum hydride reduction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 300 A...

  1. aluminum reduction plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 226 A...

  2. activated aluminum oxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University, Ankara 06531, Turkey Aluminum borate chemicals of aluminum sulphate and boric acid. The synthesis temperature of 1075C was found Tas, A. Cuneyt 323 A...

  3. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Hunter Douglas Aluminum...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Hunter Douglas Aluminum Plant Div of Bridgeport Brass Co - CA 11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: HUNTER DOUGLAS ALUMINUM PLANT, DIV. OF BRIDGEPORT BRASS CO. (CA.11 ) Eliminated from...

  4. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  5. Aluminum industry energy conservation workshop V papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers given at a recent meeting sponsored by The Aluminum Association. The focus of the meeting is on energy conservation in the aluminum industry. Topics include recovery of waste heat, more energy efficient design of plants, and government policies.

  6. Aluminum low temperature smelting cell metal collection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA)

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten salt electrolyte in an electrolytic cell having an anodic liner for containing the electrolyte, the liner having an anodic bottom and walls including at least one end wall extending upwardly from the anodic bottom, the anodic liner being substantially inert with respect to the molten electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes is provided and disposed vertically in the electrolyte. A plurality of cathodes is disposed vertically in the electrolyte in alternating relationship with the anodes. The anodes are electrically connected to the anodic liner. An electric current is passed through the anodic liner to the anodes, through the electrolyte to the cathodes, and aluminum is deposited on said cathodes. Oxygen bubbles are generated at the anodes and the anodic liner, the bubbles stirring the electrolyte. Molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes into a tubular member positioned underneath the cathodes. The tubular member is in liquid communication with each cathode to collect the molten aluminum therefrom while excluding electrolyte. Molten aluminum is delivered through the tubular member to a molten aluminum reservoir located substantially opposite the anodes and cathodes. The molten aluminum is collected from the cathodes and delivered to the reservoir while avoiding contact of the molten aluminum with the anodic bottom.

  7. TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each floor. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics. However, any trash or other

  8. Color Matching for PlasticsColor Matching for Plastics Bill CheethamBill Cheetham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Ian

    1 Color Matching for PlasticsColor Matching for Plastics Bill CheethamBill Cheetham GeneralIndustrial Systems Information ServicesInformation Services Medical SystemsMedical Systems PlasticsPlastics Power Electric Global Research Applications ­ GE Plastics · FormTool - lab color matching tool · Color

  9. Gating of Permanent Molds for ALuminum Casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Schwam; John F. Wallace; Tom Engle; Qingming Chang

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a two-year project, DE-FC07-01ID13983 that concerns the gating of aluminum castings in permanent molds. The main goal of the project is to improve the quality of aluminum castings produced in permanent molds. The approach taken was determine how the vertical type gating systems used for permanent mold castings can be designed to fill the mold cavity with a minimum of damage to the quality of the resulting casting. It is evident that somewhat different systems are preferred for different shapes and sizes of aluminum castings. The main problems caused by improper gating are entrained aluminum oxide films and entrapped gas. The project highlights the characteristic features of gating systems used in permanent mold aluminum foundries and recommends gating procedures designed to avoid common defects. The study also provides direct evidence on the filling pattern and heat flow behavior in permanent mold castings.

  10. PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.crack propagation r aluminum alloys, 2024~T3 at low and

  11. PREDICTION OF LOW-CYCLE FATIGUE-LIFE BY ACOUSTIC EMISSION. PART 1: 2024-T3 ALUMINUM ALLOY PART 2: ALCLAD 7075-T6/ ALUMINUM ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baram, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low-cycle fatigue life of Aluminum sheet alloys by acoustictoughness of structural aluminum alloys. Fracture . Fracturetoughness of structural aluminum alloys, Eng. Fracture Mech.

  12. Development and evaluation of an uncoupled, incremental constitutive model for elastic-plastic behavior at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronenworth, Jeff

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF AN UNCOUPLED, INCREMENTAL CONSTITUTIVE MODEL FOR ELASTIC- PLASTIC BEHAVIOR AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES A Thesis by JEFF... relaxa- tion tests at various temperatures. Evaluation of the model is per- formed by comparison with experiments involving various thermal and mechanical load historys on 5086 aluminum alloy, 304 stainless steel and hastelloy-X. iv DEDICATION I...

  13. Extruded plastic scintillator including inorganic powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a plastic scintillator is disclosed. A plurality of nano-sized particles and one or more dopants can be combined with a plastic material for the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof. The nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material can be combined within the dry inert atmosphere of an extruder to produce a reaction that results in the formation of a plastic scintillator thereof and the deposition of energy within the plastic scintillator, such that the plastic scintillator produces light signifying the detection of a radiative element. The nano-sized particles can be treated with an inert gas prior to processing the nano-sized particles, the dopant and the plastic material utilizing the extruder. The plastic scintillator can be a neutron-sensitive scintillator, x-ray sensitive scintillator and/or a scintillator for the detection of minimum ionizing particles.

  14. Characterization of porous GASAR aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonenberger, R.J. [FM Technologies, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Kee, A.J. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Everett, R.K.; Matic, P. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental and numerical analyses were performed on porous aluminum samples to evaluate microstructure and mechanical properties. Experiments considered of tensile tests on dog-bone specimens containing 9 to 17% porosity, which were instrumented with axial and transverse extensometers. Properties measured included Young`s modulus, Poisson`s ratio remained constant with porosity., For the numerical simulations, 3-D, mesoscale, multilayer models were constructed to evaluate the effects of pore morphology and interactions on material properties. The models allowed systematic spatial positioning of the pore within the cell and the ability to form solid zones. Pore arrangement, the effect of constraint, and gradients on the stress state were investigated. By using different combinations of hex cells as building blocks, several complicated microstructural arrangements were simulated.

  15. ALUMINUM--2003 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal and alloys held by the London Metal Exchange Ltd. (LME) also increased. Primary aluminumALUMINUM--2003 5.1 ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 2003, 7 domestic companies operated 15 primary aluminum reduction plants

  16. Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Waste Reaction Indicators in a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 landfills may contain aluminum from residential and commercial solid waste, industrial waste, and aluminum American Society of Civil Engineers. CE Database subject headings: Solid wastes; Leaching; Aluminum

  17. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous aluminum oxide gels contain a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous aluminum oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including aluminum, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  18. ALUMINUM--1998 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALUMINUM--1998 5.1 ALUMINUM By Patricia A. Plunkert Domestic survey data and tables were prepared, international data coordinator. In 1998, 13 domestic companies operated 23 primary aluminum reduction plants to be $5.4 billion. Aluminum recovered from purchased scrap decreased to approximately 3.4 million tons

  19. UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

  20. A comparative study of collection efficiencies using 0.80 and 1.2 micrometer pore size filters in evaluating airborne asbestos dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Grady Lynn

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. RO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A Thesis by GRADY LYNN HOLT Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974. Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene A COMPARATIVE . TUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. BO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A...

  1. A comparative study of collection efficiencies using 0.80 and 1.2 micrometer pore size filters in evaluating airborne asbestos dust 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Grady Lynn

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. RO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A Thesis by GRADY LYNN HOLT Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974. Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene A COMPARATIVE . TUDY OF COLLECTION EFFICIENCIES USING O. BO AND 1. 2 MICROMETER PORE SIZE FILTERS IN EVALUATING AIRBORNE ASBESTOS DUST A...

  2. Synthesis of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforced with in situ devitrified Al-Ni-La amorphous particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhihui H; Han, B Q; Witkin, D; Ajdelsztajn, L; Laverna, E J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforcedAbstract Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites wereamount of nanoscale aluminum oxide, nitride and carbide

  3. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  4. Plastics' Color Problem: How a New Device Will Prevent Waste...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    key facts? Commercial plastics made at 752 degrees Fahrenheit and 2,000 psi Conventional plastic color detectors break at high temps and pressures Plastics with incorrect colors,...

  5. Shrink-Induced Superhydrophobic and Antibacterial Surfaces in Consumer Plastics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freschauf, Lauren R; McLane, Jolie; Sharma, Himanshu; Khine, Michelle; Bansal, Vipul

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transformation of a Simple Plastic into a Superhydrophobic2005) Biocompatibility of Plastics. Technical WhitePaper.2011) Hot embossing of plastic microfluidic devices using

  6. MIPP Plastic Ball electronics upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldin, Boris; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upgrade electronics design for Plastic Ball detector is described. The Plastic Ball detector was a part of several experiments in the past and its back portion (proposed to be used in MIPP) consists of 340 photomultipliers equipped with a sandwich scintillator. The scintillator sandwich has fast and slow signal component with decay times 10 ns and 1 {micro}s respectively. The upgraded MIPP experiment will collect up to 12,000 events during each 4 second spill and read them out in {approx}50 seconds between spills. The MIPP data acquisition system will employ deadtime-less concept successfully implemented in Muon Electronics of Dzero experiment at Fermilab. An 8-channel prototype design of the Plastic Ball Front End (PBFE) implementing these requirements is discussed. Details of the schematic design, simulation and prototype test results are discussed.

  7. Identification of aluminum scale with the aid of synthetically produced basic aluminum fluoride complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuchart, C.E. (Halliburton Services, Duncan, OK (United States)); Ali, S.A. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc., New Orleans, LA (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum scaling can be a problem following HF acidizing. In this paper, a series of synthetic aluminum scales was prepared and identified. The aluminum compounds of a field scale were identified with similar procedures. Recent field work showed that the use of acetic acid in the HF acidizing sequences significantly decreased scaling. The role of acetic acid is discussed on the basis of laboratory support of these field data.

  8. Aluminum (Al) Etch Instructions The CEPSR cleanroom stores Aluminum Etchant Type A, a pre-made product used for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Philip

    Aluminum (Al) Etch Instructions The CEPSR cleanroom stores Aluminum Etchant Type A, a pre-made product used for removing or etching away aluminum. This etchant is stored inside the acid or corrosive a specific thickness of aluminum that is desired. Note: Once the bottle is empty or you find that it's etch

  9. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired. 5 figs.

  10. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  11. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  12. DEMOLISHING A COLD-WAR-ERA FUEL STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; ORGILL TK; DAGAN EB

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the K East basin within six months of tumover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team implemented open-air demolition techniques to demolish the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovation that aided demolition was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building, portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by removing the CAB during demolition using heavy equipment. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that similar open-air demolition ofcontaminated structures can be performed successfully.

  13. DEMOLISHING A COLD WARE ERA FULE STORAGE BASIN SUPERSTRUCTURE LADEN WITH ASBESTOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LLOYD ER; STEVENS JM; DAGAN EB; ORGILL TK; GREEN MA; LARSON CH; ZINSLI LC

    2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The K East (KE) Basin facilities are located near the north end of the Hanford Site's 100 K area. The facilities were built in 1950 as part of the KE Reactor complex and constructed within 400 meters of the Columbia River, which is the largest river in the Pacific Northwest and by volume the fourth largest river in the United States. The basin, located adjacent to the reactor, was used for the underwater storage of irradiated nuclear fuel discharged from the reactor. The basin was covered by a superstructure comprising steel columns and beams, concrete, and cement asbestos board (CAB) siding. The project's mission was to complete demolition of the structure over the KE Basin within six months of turnover from facility deactivation activities. The demolition project team applied open-air demolition techniques to bring the facility to slab-on-grade. Several innovative techniques were used to control contamination and maintain contamination control within the confines of the demolition exclusion zone. The techniques, which focused on a defense-in-depth approach, included spraying fixatives on interior and exterior surfaces before demolition began; applying fixatives during the demolition; misting using a fine spray of water during demolition; and demolishing the facility systematically. Another innovative approach that made demolition easier was to demolish the building with the non-friable CAB remaining in place. The CAB siding covered the exterior of the building and portions of the interior walls, and was an integral part of the multiple-layered roof. The project evaluated the risks involved in removing the CAB material in a radiologically contaminated environment and determined that radiological dose rates and exposure to radiological contamination and industrial hazards would be significantly reduced by using heavy equipment to remove the CAB during demolition. The ability to perform this demolition safely and without spreading contamination (radiological or asbestos) demonstrates that contaminated structures can be torn down successfully using similar open-air demolition techniques.

  14. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the reduction of the change in free energy of the reaction between aluminum and molecular hydrogen. The change in free energy is reduced by providing Al in a state of high entropy...

  15. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-based fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willit, J. L.

    1998-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have successfully demonstrated aluminum electrorefining from a U-Al-Si alloy that simulates spent aluminum-based reactor fuel. The aluminum product contains less than 200 ppm uranium. All the results obtained have been in agreement with predictions based on equilibrium thermodynamics. We have also demonstrated the need for adequate stirring to achieve a low-uranium product. Most of the other process steps have been demonstrated in other programs. These include uranium electrorefining, transuranic fission product scrubbing, fission product oxidation, and product consolidation by melting. Future work will focus on the extraction of active metal and rare earth fission products by a molten flux salt and scale-up of the aluminum electrorefining.

  16. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  17. UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donhowe, E. T.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975, and therefore has had the opportunity to evaluate practical operations of the UV technology...

  18. High thermal conductivity aluminum nitride ceramic body

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huseby, I. C.; Bobik, C. F.

    1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a polycrystalline aluminum nitride ceramic body having a porosity of less than about 10% by volume of said body and a thermal conductivity greater than 1.0 W/cm-K at 22/sup 0/ C., which comprises forming a mixture comprised of aluminum nitride powder and an yttrium additive selected from the group consisting of yttrium, yttrium hydride, yttrium nitride and mixtures thereof, said aluminum nitride and yttrium additive having a predetermined oxygen content, said mixture having a composition wherein the equivalent % of yttrium, aluminum, nitrogen and oxygen shapping said mixture into a compact and sintering said compact at a temperature ranging from about 1850/sup 0/ C. to about 2170/sup 0/ C. in an atmosphere selected from the group consisting of nitrogen, argon, hydrogen and mixtures thereof to produce said polycrystalline body.

  19. An optimal replacement problem in aluminum production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spanks, Lisa Marie

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN OPTIMAL REPLACEMENT PROBLEM IN ALUMINUM PRODUCTION Thesis by LISA MARIE SPANKS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992... Major Subject: Industrial Engineering AN OPTIMAL REPLACEMENT PROBLEM IN ALUMINUM PRODUCTION Thesis by LISA MARIE SPANKS Approved as to style and content by: Richard M. Feldman (Chair of Committee) James H. Matis (Member) ryan L. Deuermey r...

  20. Plasticity of Dendritic Excitability Andreas Frick,* Daniel Johnstony

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    Plasticity of Dendritic Excitability Andreas Frick,* Daniel Johnstony Baylor College of Medicine function display plasticity under diverse circumstances such as neuromo- dulation, adaptation, learning­115, 2005 Keywords: intrinsic plasticity; synaptic plasticity; long- term potentiation (LTP); dendrite

  1. Aluminum Microfoams for Reduced Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions of Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the foamability of Aluminum alloy . Journal of Materialthe more conventional aluminum alloy, would have a higheraerospace technologies, aluminum alloys are the materials of

  2. SUBTHRESHOLD DISPLACEMENT DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drosd, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONDAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATIONby irradiating copper-aluminum alloys at high tempera­ tures

  3. Aluminum Microfoams for Reduced Fuel Consumption and Pollutant Emissions of Transportation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the foamability of Aluminum alloy . Journal of MaterialFoamability of particle reinforced Aluminum Melt. Ma. -wiss.particle-stabilised Aluminum foams . Advanced Engineering

  4. Aluminum and copper in drinking water enhance inflammatory oroxidative events specifically in the brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effects of iron and aluminum on stress-related genelopathy syndrome. Possible aluminum intoxication. N. Engl.Chronic exposure to aluminum in drinking water increases

  5. IMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTIC COMPOSITIONS THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF SUPERPLASTICITY PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pech, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTICIMPROVED FORMABILITY OF ALUMINUM-GERMANIUM NEAR EUTECTICAl-Ge) wire. Al-Ge «00F Aluminum-Germanium Atomic Percentage

  6. Transcriptomic analysis reveals differential gene expression in common bean (Phaseoulus vulgaris) for aluminum resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eticha, Dejene; Zahn, Marc; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Horst, Walter J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition zone is the most aluminum-sensitive apical rootsoils is mainly limited by aluminum toxicity. In addition,L. under conditions of aluminum stress. Plant Physiol 104:

  7. A NEW A15 MULTIFILAMENTARY SUPERCONDUCTOR BASED ON THE NIOBIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, G.C.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BASED ON THE NIOBIUM-ALUMINUM-SILICON SYSTEM Gary C. Quinnpsi. Photomicrograph of an Aluminum-Silicon eutectic filledmultifilimentary niobium-aluminum-silicon wire, a) sample #

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE GASEOUS AND SOLID PRODUCTS OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutsen, G.F.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Gary F. Knutsen (M. S.OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Contents Abstract . .OF DECOMPOSITION OF ALUMINUM SULFATE Gary F. Knutsen

  9. Mechanical properties and microstructures of dual phase steels containing silicon, aluminum and molybdenum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neill, Thomas John O'

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEELS CONTAINING SILICON, ALUMINUM AND MOLYBDENUM Thomasdeoxidizing action of aluminum results in grain refinementquench martensite, Both (a) and Aluminum particle within the

  10. A Study of Aluminum Dependent Root Growth Inhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nezames, Cynthia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    symptom triggered by aluminum, but not the primary cause ofRI (1986) Characterization of hydroxy-aluminum solutionsby aluminum-27 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Soil

  11. Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J. Steigmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mechanically equivalent elastic-plastic deformations and the problem of plastic spin David J author to receive correspondence (steigman@me.berkeley.edu) Abstract: The problem of plastic spin is phrased in terms of a notion of mechanical equivalence among local relaxed configurations of an elastic/plastic

  12. Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROOFS Influence of plasticizer molecular weight on plasticizer retention in PVC geomembranes T. D, accepted 31 October 2004 ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane. Plasticizers can migrate from PVC geomembranes over time because of contact with air, liquid, and

  13. Optimal phenotypic plasticity in a stochastic environment 1 Optimal phenotypic plasticity in a stochastic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal phenotypic plasticity in a stochastic environment 1 Optimal phenotypic plasticity.coquillard@unice.fr ; phone: #33 4 92 38 64 30 Abstract This paper addresses the question of optimal phenotypic plasticity expense of plasticity, and benefit is fitness. The dispersion matrix of the genes' response (H = ln

  14. ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (SEMI-RIGID PLASTIC PACKAGING)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    ASSISTANT PROFESSOR (SEMI-RIGID PLASTIC PACKAGING) IN FOOD, NUTRITION, & PACKAGING SCIENCES/rigid plastics packaging. The successful candidate will be responsible for teaching undergraduate and graduate in university teaching, experience in designing and implementing semi-rigid/rigid plastics research, a record

  15. Plasticity in FEniCS Piotr Minakowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Plasticity in FEniCS Piotr Minakowski Institute of Applied Mathematics and Mechanics, University@karlin.mff.cuni.cz SEMIN´AR O SOFTWARU PRO GEOFYZIKY aneb Jednooc´i slep´ym #12;Outline Plasticity Introduction Computational Methods Fluid Model of Crystal Plasticity Motivations Model Kirchhoff stress Numerical treatment

  16. Neural Plasticity of Development and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    Neural Plasticity of Development and Learning Galvan, 2010 Presented by Kristen Morin and Sunil Patel I. Defining Development and Learning II. Neural Plasticity III. Progressive and Regressive Changes with Learning IV. Plasticity of Developmental Timing V. Neural Mechanism- Same or Different? VI. Methodological

  17. Reversibleirreversible plasticity transition in twinned copper nanopillars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Reversible­irreversible plasticity transition in twinned copper nanopillars J.A. Brown, N 31 October 2009 Abstract Through computer simulations, we show that plasticity in twinned copper nanopillar under compression, plastic deformation can be totally reversed when rR is in the range 0:5 6 rR 6

  18. Synaptic plasticity and memory Richard Kempter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempter, Richard

    Synaptic plasticity and memory Richard Kempter 1,2,3 & Dietmar Schmitz 2,3 1 Institute in the central nervous system. In its most general form, the "synaptic plasticity and memory hypothesis" states, and that synaptic plasticity is both necessary and sufficient for the storage of information underlying

  19. Plasticity of Metal Nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of Metal Nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque-4040 (Dated: November 24, 2011) Abstract The mechanisms of plasticity in metal naowires with diameters below 100 nm are reviewed. At these length scales, plasticity in face-centered-cubic metals subjected

  20. PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY Functional and Conceptual Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeWitt, Thomas J.

    PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY Functional and Conceptual Approaches Edited by Thomas J. DeWitt Samuel M. A great breadth of ideas fall under the rubric of phenotypic plasticity, and this book is designed these diverse ideas under an intentionally broad definition of plasticity: environment-dependent phenotype

  1. NUMERICAL APPROACHES TO THERMALLY COUPLED PERFECT PLASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Soeren

    NUMERICAL APPROACHES TO THERMALLY COUPLED PERFECT PLASTICITY S¨OREN BARTELS AND TOM´AS ROUB at small strains exhibiting also stress-driven Prandtl-Reuss perfect plasticity are considered limit passage. Keywords: Thermodynamics, Prandtl-Reuss plasticity, Kelvin-Voigt rheology, thermal

  2. Shock-Induced Structural Phase Transition, Plasticity, and Brittle Cracks in Aluminum Nitride Ceramic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    into an elastic wave and a slower SPT wave that transforms the wurtzite structure into the rocksalt phase into the wurtzite phase. Nanovoids coalesce into mode I cracks while dislocations give rise to kink bands and mode. Before impact, the crystal- line structure of the target material is wurtzite. The z axis, parallel

  3. When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells | ANSER Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > When Function Follows Form: Plastic Solar Cells...

  4. The viability of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Haopeng; Jae Ko, Yeon; Zhang, Xinxing; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Schnoeckel, Hansgeorg [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Eichhorn, Bryan W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Jena, Puru [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Kiran, Boggavarapu, E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, McNeese State University, Lake Charles, Louisiana 70609 (United States); Kandalam, Anil K., E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu, E-mail: akandalam@wcupa.edu, E-mail: kbowen@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, West Chester University, West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations, we have investigated the extent to which the aluminum moieties within selected magnesium-aluminum clusters are Zintl anions. Magnesium-aluminum cluster anions were generated in a pulsed arc discharge source. After mass selection, photoelectron spectra of Mg{sub m}Al{sub n}{sup ?} (m, n = 1,6; 2,5; 2,12; and 3,11) were measured by a magnetic bottle, electron energy analyzer. Calculations on these four stoichiometries provided geometric structures and full charge analyses for the cluster anions and their neutral cluster counterparts, as well as photodetachment transition energies (stick spectra). Calculations revealed that, unlike the cases of recently reported sodium-aluminum clusters, the formation of aluminum Zintl anion moieties within magnesium-aluminum clusters was limited in most cases by weak charge transfer between the magnesium atoms and their aluminum cluster moieties. Only in cases of high magnesium content, e.g., in Mg{sub 3}Al{sub 11} and Mg{sub 2}Al{sub 12}{sup ?}, did the aluminum moieties exhibit Zintl anion-like characteristics.

  5. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G; Thiyagarajan, Pappannan

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of about 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically carbon nanotubes having a partially filled core (encapsulated) adjacent to one end of the nanotube. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  6. Process for remediation of plastic waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pol, Vilas G. (Westmont, IL); Thiyagarajan, Pappannan (Germantown, MD)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A single step process for degrading plastic waste by converting the plastic waste into carbonaceous products via thermal decomposition of the plastic waste by placing the plastic waste into a reactor, heating the plastic waste under an inert or air atmosphere until the temperature of 700.degree. C. is achieved, allowing the reactor to cool down, and recovering the resulting decomposition products therefrom. The decomposition products that this process yields are carbonaceous materials, and more specifically egg-shaped and spherical-shaped solid carbons. Additionally, in the presence of a transition metal compound, this thermal decomposition process produces multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

  7. Polishing compound for plastic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stowell, M.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

  8. The effects of process variations on residual stress in laser peened 7049 T73 aluminum alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rankin, Jon E; Hill, Michael R; Hackel, Lloyd A

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook - Aluminum and Aluminum Alloys, ASM International,the Fatigue Life of 7050 Aluminum Alloy, Defence Science &in laser peened 7049 T73 aluminum alloy Jon E. Rankin and

  9. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL DISCONTINUITIES ON THE STRENGTH OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALUMINUM OXIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, J.S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE STRENGTH OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALUMINUM OXIDE S. Wallace ofThe variables and number of aluminum oxide (almnina). size~

  10. ALUMINUM AND CHROMIUM LEACHING WORKSHOP WHITEPAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D; Jeff Pike, J; Bill Wilmarth, B

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop was held on January 23-24, 2007 to discuss the status of processes to leach constituents from High Level Waste (HLW) sludges at the Hanford and Savannah River Sites. The objective of the workshop was to examine the needs and requirements for the HLW flowsheet for each site, discuss the status of knowledge of the leaching processes, communicate the research plans, and identify opportunities for synergy to address knowledge gaps. The purpose of leaching of non-radioactive constituents from the sludge waste is to reduce the burden of material that must be vitrified in the HLW melter systems, resulting in reduced HLW glass waste volume, reduced disposal costs, shorter process schedules, and higher facility throughput rates. The leaching process is estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of SRS by seven years and decrease the number of HLW canisters to be disposed in the Repository by 1000 [Gillam et al., 2006]. Comparably at Hanford, the aluminum and chromium leaching processes are estimated to reduce the operating life cycle of the Waste Treatment Plant by 20 years and decrease the number of canisters to the Repository by 15,000-30,000 [Gilbert, 2007]. These leaching processes will save the Department of Energy (DOE) billions of dollars in clean up and disposal costs. The primary constituents targeted for removal by leaching are aluminum and chromium. It is desirable to have some aluminum in glass to improve its durability; however, too much aluminum can increase the sludge viscosity, glass viscosity, and reduce overall process throughput. Chromium leaching is necessary to prevent formation of crystalline compounds in the glass, but is only needed at Hanford because of differences in the sludge waste chemistry at the two sites. Improving glass formulations to increase tolerance of aluminum and chromium is another approach to decrease HLW glass volume. It is likely that an optimum condition can be found by both performing leaching and improving formulations. Disposal of the resulting aluminum and chromium-rich streams are different at the two sites, with vitrification into Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass at Hanford, and solidification in Saltstone at SRS. Prior to disposal, the leachate solutions must be treated to remove radionuclides, resulting in increased operating costs and extended facility processing schedules. Interim storage of leachate can also add costs and delay tank closure. Recent projections at Hanford indicate that up to 40,000 metric tons of sodium would be needed to dissolve the aluminum and maintain it in solution, which nearly doubles the amount of sodium in the entire current waste tank inventory. This underscores the dramatic impact that the aluminum leaching can have on the entire system. A comprehensive view of leaching and the downstream impacts must therefore be considered prior to implementation. Many laboratory scale tests for aluminum and chromium dissolution have been run on Hanford wastes, with samples from 46 tanks tested. Three samples from SRS tanks have been tested, out of seven tanks containing high aluminum sludge. One full-scale aluminum dissolution was successfully performed on waste at SRS in 1982, but generated a very large quantity of liquid waste ({approx}3,000,000 gallons). No large-scale tests have been done on Hanford wastes. Although the data to date give a generally positive indication that aluminum dissolution will work, many issues remain, predominantly because of variable waste compositions and changes in process conditions, downstream processing, or storage limitations. Better approaches are needed to deal with the waste volumes and limitations on disposal methods. To develop a better approach requires a more extensive understanding of the kinetics of dissolution, as well as the factors that effect rates, effectiveness, and secondary species. Models of the dissolution rate that have been developed are useful, but suffer from limitations on applicable compositional ranges, mineral phases, and particle properties that are difficult to measure. The experimental

  11. Excimer laser interactions with an aluminum alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koutsomichalis, A.; Kefalidou, A. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Lab. of Physical Metallurgy

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An AlCuMg alloy was irradiated using a KrF pulsed excimer laser. A microstructural study showed the presence of a laser treated zone having a uniform depth of approximately 20 {micro}m. The surface layer of the laser treated aluminum alloy exhibited a wavy topography and its surface roughness was found to depend on the number of laser pulses per step. A X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the presence of aluminum oxides and nitrides on the surface of the laser irradiated specimens. Corrosion measurements showed that the laser treated aluminum alloy exhibited a higher corrosion resistance. The corrosion behavior of the irradiated specimens is related to the energy density of the incident laser pulses.

  12. Aluminum phosphate ceramics for waste storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagh, Arun; Maloney, Martin D

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure describes solid waste forms and methods of processing waste. In one particular implementation, the invention provides a method of processing waste that may be particularly suitable for processing hazardous waste. In this method, a waste component is combined with an aluminum oxide and an acidic phosphate component in a slurry. A molar ratio of aluminum to phosphorus in the slurry is greater than one. Water in the slurry may be evaporated while mixing the slurry at a temperature of about 140-200.degree. C. The mixed slurry may be allowed to cure into a solid waste form. This solid waste form includes an anhydrous aluminum phosphate with at least a residual portion of the waste component bound therein.

  13. Method of winning aluminum metal from aluminous ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Naperville, IL); Keller, Rudolf (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminous ore such as bauxite containing alumina is blended with coke or other suitable form of carbon and reacted with sulfur gas at an elevated temperature. For handling, the ore and coke can be extruded into conveniently sized pellets. The reaction with sulfur gas produces molten aluminum sulfide which is separated from residual solid reactants and impurities. The aluminum sulfide is further increased in temperature to cause its decomposition or sublimation, yielding aluminum subsulfide liquid (AlS) and sulfur gas that is recycled. The aluminum monosulfide is then cooled to below its disproportionation temperature to again form molten aluminum sulfide and aluminum metal. A liquid-liquid or liquid-solid separation, depending on the separation temperature, provides product aluminum and aluminum sulfide for recycle to the disproportionation step.

  14. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen - 2010 Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage The purpose of this White Paper is to describe and evaluate the potential of aluminum-water reactions for the

  15. aluminum pressure vessels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angular region on the surface Stokes, Yvonne 204 iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan Chemistry Websites Summary: iCons, 2011 Alzheimers and Aluminum: Lesson Plan...

  16. aluminum silicon titanium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 7 HIGH-EFFICIENCY BACK-JUNCTION SILICON SOLAR CELL WITH AN IN-LINE EVAPORATED ALUMINUM FRONT GRID Renewable Energy Websites Summary:...

  17. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Produce Hydrogen: A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage. Version 2, 2010. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A...

  18. Development of a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody Panels AMD 309 Development of a Cosmetic Corrosion Test for Aluminum Autobody Panels AMD 309 Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office...

  19. Characterizing Microalgae (Nannochloris oculata) Harvesting by Aluminum Flocculation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ryan T.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    oculata by aluminum chloride. N. oculata flocculation was studied by manipulating the culture pH and ionic strength before the addition of aluminum chloride. The removal efficiency, concentration factor, settling rate, and zeta potential of the culture...

  20. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  1. ALUMINUM--1997 5.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aluminum smelter by February 1998 at an annual rate of 27,000 tons. The Troutdale smelter, which has at its 204,000-ton- per-year Longview, WA, primary aluminum smelter. The restart was expected

  2. New, More Efficient Technology for Remelting Aluminum Chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, D.

    step. Lastly, a new more efficient technology for stirring the molten aluminum during the recycling process will be introduce. A molten metal pump will be employed to stir the molten aluminum more completely....

  3. aluminum phosphate catalyst: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 213 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  4. aluminum sodium sulfate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 232 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  5. aluminum inorganic compounds: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Chair... Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran 1991-01-01 211 The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN...

  6. ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

  7. Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6 Engine to Effect Cost-Effective Mass Reduction Magnesium Replacement of Aluminum Cast Components in a Production V6...

  8. Measurements of electrical and mechanical properties of aluminum composite cryoconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundby, Paul C.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of annealing on the residual resistance ratio (RRR) of five (5) composite aluminum cryoconductor wires and mechanical properties on fifteen (15) aluminum cryoconductor wires are presented. The independent variables of the study include...

  9. Does aluminum smelting cause lung disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramson, M.J.; Wlodarczyk, J.H.; Saunders, N.A.; Hensley, M.J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evidence concerning a relationship between work in the aluminum industry and lung disease has been reviewed using epidemiologic criteria. Adequate data on environmental exposure are rarely presented. Case series on aluminum potroom workers over the past 50 years have identified an asthmalike syndrome that appears to be due to an irritant rather than an allergic mechanism. These studies have been supported by evidence of within shift variability of measures of lung function. However, to date, there is inadequate evidence to resolve the question of whether potroom exposure initiates asthma or merely precipitates asthmalike symptoms in a predisposed individual. Cross-sectional studies have demonstrated evidence of reduced lung function, consistent with chronic airflow limitation. In exposed aluminum smelter workers compared to unexposed control subjects. Cigarette smoking, the major potential confounding variable, has been measured and accounted for in multivariate analyses. To date, evidence is lacking from longitudinal studies about the development of disabling chronic obstructive lung disease. Exposure to coal tar pitch volatiles in the production and consumption of anodes has biologic plausibility for an association of lung cancer with work in an aluminum smelter. Although retrospective mortality studies have failed to account for the probable high prevalence of smoking in blue collar workers, the relative risk of lung cancer is very low if present at all. Pulmonary fibrosis has not been shown to be a significant problem in aluminum smelter workers. Future research in the aluminum industry needs to concentrate on longitudinal studies, preferably with an inception cohort for the investigation of potroom asthma. 92 references.

  10. Method And Reactor For Production Of Aluminum By Carbothermic Reduction Of Alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aune, Jan Arthur (Ytre Enebakk, NO); Johansen, Kai (Kristiansand, NO)

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A hollow partition wall is employed to feed carbon material to an underflow of a carbothermic reduction furnace used to make aluminum. The partition wall divides a low temperature reaction zone where aluminum oxide is reacted with carbon to form aluminum carbide and a high temperature reaction zone where the aluminum carbide and remaining aluminum oxide are reacted to form aluminum and carbon monoxide.

  11. Aluminum across the Americas: Caribbean Mobilities and Transnational American Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheller, Mimi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zinc, bauxite, and the hydroelectric power needed to smeltthe Afobaka hydroelectric dam to power an aluminum smelter

  12. The corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Henry Kinsolving

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the corrosion of aluminum in boric acid solutions was made. The total immersion, continuous agitation method of testing was used. Commercially pure aluminum and two aluminum alloys were exposed to various concentrations of boric acid...THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN BORIC ACID SOLUTIONS A Thesis By HENRI KINSOLVING BASS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College oi' Texas' in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  13. Cathode Connector For Aluminum Low Temperature Smelting Cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA)

    2003-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Cathode connector means for low temperature aluminum smelting cell for connecting titanium diboride cathode or the like to bus bars.

  14. Construction of an innovative retaining wall and slope protection for controlling erosion of asbestos in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, C.G.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Resources Management (ERM) is constructing an innovative H-Pile retaining wall and slope protection to control erosion of soil mixed with asbestos-containing material (ACM) along a half-mile long section of a flowing creek in a metropolitan area. Former manufacturing plants adjacent to the creek historically produced ACM-reinforced construction materials. ACM was apparently used as subgrade fill consistent with industry practices at the time, and when manufacturing ceased, the site was closed with approval by the state and the U.S. EPA. Erosion along the creek has resulted in exposure of the ACM and the need to stabilize the bank due to backwater flooding and storm water discharge from a large urban area. Through a cooperative effort among the state regulatory agency, the municipal sewer district, the U.S. Army Corps. of Engineers (USACOE), and the local community, construction is in progress for an H-Pile beam and concrete lagging wall that extends the length of the project reach. Behind the wall, cabled concrete mats are placed over the graded slope to stabilize ACM-bearing soil. Premier to the success of the project is protecting the environment from release of ACM during construction, and minimizing the disturbance of ACM-bearing soil. Unique soil sampling, testing, and handling procedures were negotiated through the state's voluntary cleanup program, with the intent of receiving a No Further Action letter for the completed project.

  15. Diffusion of benzene confined in the oriented nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamontov, E. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., MS 8562, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8562 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2115 (United States); Kumzerov, Yu.A.; Vakhrushev, S.B. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of benzene that completely fills the nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers with a characteristic diameter of about 5 nm. The macroscopical alignment of the nanochannels in fibers provided an interesting opportunity to study anisotropy of the dynamics of confined benzene by means of collecting the data with the scattering vector either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers axes. The translational diffusive motion of benzene molecules was found to be isotropic. While bulk benzene freezes at 278.5 K, we observed the translational dynamics of the supercooled confined benzene on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds even below 200 K, until at about 160 K its dynamics becomes too slow for the {mu}eV resolution of the neutron backscattering spectrometer. The residence time between jumps for the benzene molecules measured in the temperature range of 260 K to 320 K demonstrated low activation energy of 2.8 kJ/mol.

  16. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, Gary (Ringwood, NJ); Reilly, James (Bellport, NY); Graetz, Jason (Mastic, NY); Wegrzyn, James E. (Brookhaven, NY)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  17. Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Reactions and Problems in Municipal Solid Waste Landfills G. Vincent Calder, Ph.D.1 ; and Timothy D. Stark, Ph.D., P.E., F.ASCE2 Abstract: Aluminum enters municipal solid waste MSW landfills from: Solid wastes; Aluminum; Chemicals; Waste disposal; Landfills. Author keywords: Solid waste; Leachate

  18. Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optical frequency standards based on mercury and aluminum ions W. M. Itano, J. C. Bergquist, A-16 . Keywords: aluminum, atomic clocks, frequency standards, ion traps, mercury 1. INTRODUCTION Optical frequency standards based on the mercury ion and, more recently, the aluminum ion are under devel- opment

  19. Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and mantle fluids Craig E. Manning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Mobilizing aluminum in crustal and mantle fluids Craig E. Manning Department of Earth and Space December 2005 Available online 9 March 2006 Abstract Aluminum is a major rock-forming element, but its low by formation of polynuclear Na­Al­Si­O clusters and/or polymers. Aluminum should not be assumed to be immobile

  20. Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    Inhibition of Aluminum Oxyhydroxide Precipitation with Citric Acid Daniel M. Dabbs, Usha as an agent for increasing the solubility of aluminum oxyhydroxides in aqueous solutions of high (>2.47 mol/mol) hydroxide-to-aluminum ratios. Conversely, citric acid also colloidally stabilizes particles in aqueous

  1. POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    POST-SHOCK TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS OF ALUMINUM A. Seifter1 , S. T. Stewart2 , M. R. Furlanetto1 concurrent VISAR measurements in the same optical path, validation experiments on aluminum have been-shock temperature of 495 K ± 30 K was recorded from a polished free surface of aluminum 2024-T4 subject to a peak

  2. The Effects of Fe3+ Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    The Effects of Fe3+ and Mn3+ on Aluminum Silicate Phase Relations in North-Central New Mexico, U, New Mexico 87131 (Received 28 November 1983; in revised form 2 October 1984) ABSTRACT Aluminum, then their equilibrium coexistence is invariant. However, the aluminum silicate minerals are not pure in highly oxidized

  3. Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aluminum Removal from Photographic Waste Submitted to Dr. Tony Bi By: Kristen Favel, Tiffany Jung, and Kenny Tam CHBE 484 University of British Columbia April 15, 2009 #12;ii "Aluminum Removal from photographic waste has shown elevated levels of aluminum in the fixer, which exceed sewer discharge standards

  4. ccsd00002835, Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00002835, version 2 ­ 14 Sep 2004 Light scattering from cold rolled aluminum surfaces Damien Camille Soula , 31400 Toulouse, France We present experimental light scattering measurements from aluminum scattering measurements of an s-polarized electromagnetic wave (632.8 nanometers) from a rough aluminum alloy

  5. Review Article Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneff, Stephanie

    Review Article Aluminum-Induced Entropy in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living of the Al toxicants to which we are being exposed. 1. Introduction Aluminum (Al) is the most common metal

  6. CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environment.14 Keywords: Landfills, aluminum, hydrogen, salt cake, dross, calorimeter, waste disposal15 16 17CLASSIFICATION AND REACTIVITY OF SECONDARY ALUMINUM PRODUCTION WASTE Navid H. Jafari Student Member and Reactivity of Secondary Aluminum Production Waste1 Navid H. Jafari1 , Timothy D. Stark2 and Ralph Roper3 2 3

  7. National Plastics Corporation: Energy Assessment Helps Automotive Plastic Parts Maker Save $34,000 Per Year

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial Technologies Program's BestPractices case study based on a comprehensive plant assessment conducted at National Plastics Corporation by ITP's Industrial Assessment Center in conjunction with The Society of the Plastics Industry, Inc.

  8. Rigid-Plastic Approximations for Predicting Plastic Deformation of Cylindrical Shells Subject to Dynamic Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoo Fatt, Michelle S.

    A theoretical approach was developed for predicting the plastic deformation of a cylindrical shell subject to asymmetric dynamic loads. The plastic deformation of the leading generator of the shell is found by solving for ...

  9. ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ECONOMIC IMPACT OF CENTURY ALUMINUM OF WEST VIRGINIA, INC. By Randall A. Childs Bureau of Business and Economic Research College of Business and Economics West Virginia more than 660 employees with a production capacity of 170,000 tonnes per year. The economic impact

  10. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  11. Flash threshold of shocked aluminum silicofluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, G.H.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a 0.5-mm polycarbonate flier striking a 0.5-mm polycarbonate target, we found that a velocity of 1.42 km/s was necessary to cause aluminum silicofluoride sprayed on the far surface to flash. We calculated that the pressure in the polycarbonate was 2.93 GPa. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Aluminum Solubility in Complex Electrolytes - 13011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnew, S.F. [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., 1806 Terminal Dr., Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Columbia Energy and Environmental Services, Inc., 1806 Terminal Dr., Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Johnston, C.T. [Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Dept. of Crop, Soil, and Environmental Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting aluminum solubility for Hanford and Savannah River waste liquids is very important for their disposition. It is a key mission goal at each Site to leach as much aluminum as practical from sludges in order to minimize the amount of vitrified high level waste. And it is correspondingly important to assure that any soluble aluminum does not precipitate during subsequent decontamination of the liquid leachates with ion exchange. This report shows a very simple and yet thermodynamic model for aluminum solubility that is consistent with a wide range of Al liquors, from simple mixtures of hydroxide and aluminate to over 300 Hanford concentrates and to a set of 19 Bayer liquors for temperatures from 20-100 deg. C. This dimer-dS{sub mix} (DDS) model incorporates an ideal entropy of mixing along with previous reports for the Al dimer, water activities, gibbsite, and bayerite thermodynamics. We expect this model will have broad application for nuclear wastes as well as the Bayer gibbsite process industry. (authors)

  13. Chemical vapor deposition of aluminum oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy (Cambridge, MA); Kramer, Keith (Cleveland, OH); Liu, Xinye (Cambridge, MA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aluminum oxide film is deposited on a heated substrate by CVD from one or more alkylaluminum alkoxide compounds having composition R.sub.n Al.sub.2 (OR').sub.6-n, wherein R and R' are alkyl groups and n is in the range of 1 to 5.

  14. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

  15. Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, H.M.; Bohnert, G.W.; Olson, R.B.; Hand, T.E.

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in a liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic. 3 figs.

  16. Method to separate and recover oil and plastic from plastic contaminated with oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Henry M. (Overland Park, KS); Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Olson, Ronald B. (Kansas City, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO)

    1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method to separate and recover oils and recyclable plastic from plastic contaminated with oil. The invention utilizes the different solubility of oil in as liquid or supercritical fluid as compared to a gas to effect separation of the oil from the plastic.

  17. Materials Science and Engineering A 445446 (2007) 186192 Plastic instabilities and dislocation densities during plastic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Science and Engineering A 445­446 (2007) 186­192 Plastic instabilities and dislocation densities during plastic deformation in Al­Mg alloys Gyozo Horv´ath, Nguyen Q. Chinh, Jeno Gubicza, J 2006 Abstract Plastic deformation of Al­Mg alloys were investigated by analyzing the stress

  18. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 WHEN PLASTICITY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 WHEN PLASTICITY? Chris MORLEY Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Keywords: concrete, plasticity, cracking, flow, size effect, fibre reinforcement 1 BACKGROUND The need for adequate

  19. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  20. Fabrication of nickel microbump on aluminum using electroless nickel plating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, H.; Honma, H. [Kanto Gakuin Univ., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fabrication of nickel microbumps on an aluminum electrode using a nickel displacement and a direct nickel plating process was investigated. Electroless nickel plating reaction with hypophosphite as a reducing agent was not initiated on the aluminum substrate, because aluminum does not have catalytic action on the oxidation of hypophosphite. Accordingly, nickel was initially deposited on the aluminum using nickel displacement plating for the initiation of the electroless plating. Nickel bumps on the aluminum electrode were fabricated by treatment of the nickel displacement plating followed by electroless nickel plating. Nickel microbumps also can be formed on the aluminum electrode without the displacement plating process. Activation of the aluminum surface is an indispensable process to initiate electroless nickel plating. Uniform bumps 20 {micro}m wide and 15 {micro}m high with good configuration were obtained by direct nickel plating after being activated with dimethyl amine borane.

  1. Microarray Analysis on Human Neuroblastoma Cells Exposed to Aluminum, Beta1–42-Amyloid or the Beta1–42-Amyloid Aluminum Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J (1992) Selective accumulation of aluminum and iron in theB, Tognon G, Zatta P (2005) Aluminum-triggered structuralrole of beta-amyloid(1-42)-aluminum complex in Alzheimer’s

  2. THE RESPONSE OF SOLIDS TO ELASTIC/ PLASTIC INDENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, S.S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SOLIDS TO ELASTIC/PLASTIC INDENTATION S.S. Chiang, D.B.134. Table I Normalized Plastic Zone Size (B) and Materialken from the elastic/plastic boundary, surface intersection,

  3. CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutbrod, H.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier,WITH MODULES OF THE PLASTIC BALL H.H. Gutbrod, M.R. Maier*,of modules of the Plastic Ball detector for positive pions

  4. Elastic–Plastic Spherical Contact Modeling Including Roughness Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Etsion, I.; Talke, F. E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multilevel model for elastic–plastic contact between ajunction growth of an elastic–plastic spherical contact. J.nite element based elastic–plastic model for the contact of

  5. Developmental plasticity and the evolution of parental effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Developmental plasticity and the evolution of parental effects Tobias Uller Edward Grey Institute for evolutionary biologists is to understand how developmental plasticity can influence the evolutionary process. Devel- opmental plasticity frequently involves parental effects, which might enable adaptive and context

  6. Castable plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A.; Morales, Alfredo M.; Gonzales, Marcela G.; Keifer, Patrick M.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided as are methods of making such a mold via the infusion of a castable liquid formulation through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale master mold. Upon casting and demolding, the porous metal substrate is embedded within the cast formulation and projects a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. The plastic structure provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate, which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved, leaving the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  7. Sacrificial plastic mold with electroplatable base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Hruby, Jill M. (Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  8. Sacrificial Plastic Mold With Electroplatable Base

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domeier, Linda A. (Danville, CA); Hruby, Jill M. (Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo M. (Livermore, CA)

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sacrificial plastic mold having an electroplatable backing is provided. One embodiment consists of the infusion of a softened or molten thermoplastic through a porous metal substrate (sheet, screen, mesh or foam) and into the features of a micro-scale molding tool contacting the porous metal substrate. Upon demolding, the porous metal substrate will be embedded within the thermoplastic and will project a plastic structure with features determined by the mold tool. This plastic structure, in turn, provides a sacrificial plastic mold mechanically bonded to the porous metal substrate which provides a conducting support suitable for electroplating either contiguous or non-contiguous metal replicates. After electroplating and lapping, the sacrificial plastic can be dissolved to leave the desired metal structure bonded to the porous metal substrate. Optionally, the electroplated structures may be debonded from the porous substrate by selective dissolution of the porous substrate or a coating thereon.

  9. Fiberglass plastics in power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, D. [Ashland Performance Materials (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiberglass reinforced plastics (FRPs) are replacing metal in FGDs, stacks, tanks, cooling towers, piping and other plant components. The article documents the use of FRP in power plants since the 1970s. The largest volume of FRP in North American power plants is for stack liners and ductwork. Absorber vessel shells and internal components comprise the third largest use. The most common FRP absorber vessels are known as jet bubbling reactors (JBRs). One of the largest JBRs at a plant on the Ohio River removes 99% of sulphur dioxide from high sulphur coal flue gas. FRPs last twice as long as wood structures when used for cooling towers and require less maintenance. 1 tab., 2 photos.

  10. Characterization of the plastic substrates, the reflective layers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the plastic substrates, the reflective layers, the adhesives, and the grooves of today's archival-grade Characterization of the plastic substrates, the reflective layers, the...

  11. Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economical Remediation of Plastic Waste into Advanced Materials with Coatings Technology available for licensing: An autogenic pyrolysis process to convert plastic waste into...

  12. Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plastic Bags to Batteries: A Green Chemistry Solution Share Description Plastic bags are the scourge of roadsides, parking lots and landfills. But chemistry comes to the rescue At...

  13. Recovery of gallium from aluminum industry residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, M.S.; Neto, K.C.M.; Nobrega, A.W.; Medeiros, J.A.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is proposed to recover gallium from flue dust aluminum residues produced in plants by using solid-phase extraction with a commercial polyether-type polyurethane foam (PUF). Gallium can be separated from high concentrations of aluminum, iron, nickel, titanium, vanadium, copper, zinc, sulfate, fluoride, and chloride by extraction with PUF from 3 M sulfuric acid and 3 M sodium chloride concentration medium with at least a 92% efficiency. Gallium backextraction was fast and quantitative with ethanol solution. In all recovery steps commercial-grade reagents could be used, including tap water. The recovered gallium was precipitated with sodium hydroxide solution, purified by dissolution and precipitation, calcinated, and the final oxide was 98.6% pure.

  14. Fluorescence energy transfer enhancement in aluminum nanoapertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Torres, Juan; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jérome

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) are confining light into attoliter volumes, enabling single molecule fluorescence experiments at physiological micromolar concentrations. Among the fluorescence spectroscopy techniques that can be enhanced by ZMWs, F\\"{o}rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used in life sciences. Combining zero-mode waveguides with FRET provides new opportunities to investigate biochemical structures or follow interaction dynamics at micromolar concentration with single molecule resolution. However, prior to any quantitative FRET analysis on biological samples, it is crucial to establish first the influence of the ZMW on the FRET process. Here, we quantify the FRET rates and efficiencies between individual donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs diffusing in aluminum zero-mode waveguides. Aluminum ZMWs are important structures thanks to their commercial availability and the large literature describing their use for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. We also compare the ...

  15. Generation and structural characterization of aluminum cyanoacetylide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabezas, Carlos; Peña, Isabel; Alonso, José L., E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Parque Científico Uva, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén 5, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio, E-mail: alargo@qf.uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, Campus Miguel Delibes, Paseo de Belén 7, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Guillemin, Jean-Claude [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, École Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Cernicharo, José [Group of Molecular Astrophysics, ICMM C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz N3 Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined spectroscopy measurements and theoretical calculations bring to light a first investigation of a metallic cyanoacetylide, AlC{sub 3}N, using laser ablation molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy. This molecule was synthesized in a supersonic expansion by the reaction of aluminum vapour with C{sub 3}N, produced from solid aluminum rods and BrCCCN in a newly constructed ablation-heating nozzle device. A set of accurate rotational and {sup 27}Al and {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants have been determined from the analysis of the rotational spectrum and compared with those predicted in a high-level ab initio study, conducting to the assignment of the observed species to linear AlCCCN. We have searched for this species towards the carbon-rich evolved star IRC + 10216 but only an upper limit to its abundance has been obtained.

  16. Inert anodes and advanced smelting of aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ASME Technical Working Group on Inert Anode Technologies

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issued associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint. It discusses the outlook for the direct retrofit of advanced reduction technologies to existing aluminum smelters, and compares retrofits to ''brown field'' usage and ''green field'' adoption of the technologies. A number of observations and recommendations are offered for consideration concerning further research and development efforts that may be directed toward these advanced technologies. The opportunities are discussed in the context of incremental progress that is being made in conventional Hall-Heroult cell systems.

  17. Laser assisted arc welding for aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuerschbach, P.W.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effector to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (<1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  18. Ignition of Aluminum Particles and Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Boiko, V M

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review experimental data and models of the ignition of aluminum (Al) particles and clouds in explosion fields. The review considers: (i) ignition temperatures measured for single Al particles in torch experiments; (ii) thermal explosion models of the ignition of single Al particles; and (iii) the unsteady ignition Al particles clouds in reflected shock environments. These are used to develop an empirical ignition model appropriate for numerical simulations of Al particle combustion in shock dispersed fuel explosions.

  19. Experimental superplastic characterization of advanced aluminum alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopp, Christopher Carl

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of America Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. E. Goforth An investigation into the experimental superplastic characterization of advanced aluminum alloys consisted of the design and assembly of an experimental test facility for measuring the effects... of strain-rate, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The experimental apparatus was designed to accurately monitor these parameters while allowing for active control of the strain-rate and hydrostatic pressure. The results obtained from...

  20. Dissolved aluminum in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myre, Peggy Lynne

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in areas of minimum sediment resuspension. With limited data available it appears that the boundary of the sediment/water interface does release dissolved Al, but kinetically Al should decrease with depth in the sediment during authigenesis. The Al... DISSOLVED ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by PEGGY LYNNE MYRE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Majo...

  1. Influence of argon and oxygen on charge-state-resolved ion energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Johanna; Anders, Andre; Mraz, Stanislav; Atiser, Adil; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy distributions of filtered aluminum arcs Johanna Roséndistributions (IEDs) in filtered aluminum vacuum arc plasmasfor vacuum arc plasmas. Aluminum plasma, for example,

  2. THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Douglas J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three prototype Table II. aluminum-carbon bonds and theirPhysics THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, ANDLBL-l0871 The Prototype Aluminum - Carbon Single, Double.

  3. INSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    fracture in aluminum alloys at short time scales (10-8 s) · Role of PMMA backing material window -Changing. (2006) * Advised by Yoshi Toyoda and Y. M. Gupta Aluminum Thickness (m) Aluminum Alloy AluminumINSTITUTE FOR SHOCK PHYSICSLaser-Shock Spall Experiments in Aluminum II: Interface Measurements

  4. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    in armor structures made of high-performance aluminum alloys (including solution-strengthened and age-hardenable aluminum alloy grades). It is argued that due to the large width of FSW joints found in thick aluminum-solution strengthened and cold-worked aluminum alloy armor FSW-weld test structure. Keywords aluminum armor, ballistic

  5. Plastic flow in solids with interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anurag Gupta; David Steigmann

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-equilibrium theory of isothermal and diffusionless evolution of incoherent interfaces within a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic deformation in the bulk away from the interface. Using the continuum theory for defect distribution (in bulk and over the interface) we formulate a general kinematical framework, derive relevant balance laws and jump conditions, and prescribe a thermodynamically consistent constitutive/kinetic structure for interface evolution.

  6. Plastic Deformation of 2D Crumpled Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M A F Gomes; V P Brito; A S O Coelho; C C Donato

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    When a single long piece of elastic wire is injected trough channels into a confining two-dimensional cavity, a complex structure of hierarchical loops is formed. In the limit of maximum packing density, these structures are described by several scaling laws. In this paper it is investigated this packing process but using plastic wires which give origin to completely irreversible structures of different morphology. In particular, it is studied experimentally the plastic deformation from circular to oblate configurations of crumpled wires, obtained by the application of an axial strain. Among other things, it is shown that in spite of plasticity, irreversibility, and very large deformations, scaling is still observed.

  7. aluminum equivalent approximation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - TxSpace Summary: based coatings. The Coors Brewing Company Can Manufacturing Plant has been utilizing this technology in full scale aluminum can production since 1975,...

  8. aluminum composites final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Biological Systems: Implications for Neurological years, mining, smelting, and refining of aluminum (Al) in various forms have increasingly exposed living of the Al...

  9. aluminum calcium sodium: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pores Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 380 2009 SIMULIA Customer Conference 1 Aluminum Bottle Forming Simulation with Abaqus Engineering Websites Summary: 2009 SIMULIA Customer...

  10. aluminum alloy pressure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the pores Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 349 2009 SIMULIA Customer Conference 1 Aluminum Bottle Forming Simulation with Abaqus Engineering Websites Summary: 2009 SIMULIA Customer...

  11. Aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an aluminum-stabilized Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb[sub 3]Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials. 4 figs.

  12. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Anton (Los Alamos, NM)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  13. Aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    1984-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent discloses an aluminum-stabilized Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor and process for producing same, utilizing ultrapure aluminum. Ductile components are co-drawn with aluminum to produce a conductor suitable for winding magnets. After winding, the conductor is heated to convert it to the brittle Nb/sub 3/Sn superconductor phase, using a temperature high enough to perform the transformation but still below the melting point of the aluminum. This results in reaction of substantially all of the niobium, while providing stabilization and react-in-place features which are beneficial in the fabrication of magnets utilizing superconducting materials.

  14. aluminum microstructural features: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on aluminum. Fig: Prototype (direct machining- fluidic devices Metals can be used for tooling Mass and batch production of thermoplastic LOC devices Bone, Gary 9 Refinement of the...

  15. Joining of parts via magnetic heating of metal aluminum powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Ian

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining at least two parts includes steps of dispersing a joining material comprising a multi-phase magnetic metal-aluminum powder at an interface between the at least two parts to be joined and applying an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The AMF has a magnetic field strength and frequency suitable for inducing magnetic hysteresis losses in the metal-aluminum powder and is applied for a period that raises temperature of the metal-aluminum powder to an exothermic transformation temperature. At the exothermic transformation temperature, the metal-aluminum powder melts and resolidifies as a metal aluminide solid having a non-magnetic configuration.

  16. Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

  17. Aluminum nitrate recrystallization and recovery from liquid extraction raffinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, W.L.; Compere, A.L.; Googin, J.M.; Huxtable, W.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid sludges resulting form biodenitrification of discarded aluminum nitrate are the largest Y-12 Plant process solid waste. Aluminum nitrate feedstocks also represent a major plant materials cost. The chemical constraints on aluminum nitrate recycle were investigated to determine the feasibility of increasing recycle while maintaining acceptable aluminum nitrate purity. Reported phase behavior of analogous systems, together with bench research, indicated that it would be possible to raise the recycle rate from 35% to between 70 and 90% by successive concentration and recrystallization of the mother liquor. A full scale pilot test successfully confirmed the ability to obtain 70% recycle in existing process equipment.

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Aluminum Concentrations in Storm Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It is never found free in nature and is found in most rocks, primarily in stable silicate mineral phases such as feldspars and phylosilicates. Aluminum enters environmental...

  19. Electrodeposition of magnesium and magnesium/aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, A.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrolytes and plating solutions for use in processes for electroplating and electroforming pure magnesium and alloys of aluminum and magnesium and also electrodeposition processes. An electrolyte of this invention is comprised of an alkali metal fluoride or a quaternary ammonium halide, dimethyl magnesium and/or diethyl magnesium, and triethyl aluminum and/or triisobutyl aluminum. An electrolyte may be dissolved in an aromatic hydrocarbon solvent to form a plating solution. The proportions of the component compounds in the electrolyte are varied to produce essentially pure magnesium or magnesium/aluminum alloys having varying selected compositions.

  20. Aluminum fluoride inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor inactivation and transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Housley, P.R. (Univ. of South Carolina School of Medicine, Columbia (USA))

    1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride, in the presence of aluminum ions, reversibly inhibits the temperature-mediated inactivation of unoccupied glucocorticoid receptors in cytosol preparations from mouse L cells. The effect is concentration-dependent, with virtually complete stabilization of specific glucocorticoid-binding capacity at 2 mM fluoride and 100 microM aluminum. These concentrations of aluminum and fluoride are ineffective when used separately. Aluminum fluoride also stabilizes receptors toward inactivation by gel filtration and ammonium sulfate precipitation. Aluminum fluoride prevents temperature-dependent transformation of steroid-receptor complexes to the DNA-binding state. Aluminum fluoride does not inhibit calf intestine alkaline phosphatase, and unoccupied receptors inactivated by this enzyme in the presence of aluminum fluoride can be completely reactivated by dithiothreitol. The effects of aluminum fluoride are due to stabilization of the complex between the glucocorticoid receptor and the 90-kDa mammalian heat-shock protein hsp90, which suggests that aluminum fluoride interacts directly with the receptor. Endogenous thermal inactivation of receptors in cytosol is not accompanied by receptor dephosphorylation. However, inactivation is correlated with dissociation of hsp90 from the unoccupied receptor. These results support the proposal that hsp90 is required for the receptor to bind steroid and dissociation of hsp90 is sufficient to inactivate the unoccupied receptor.

  1. aluminum oxide membrane: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum oxide grown on the Fe at 850 C forms a homogeneous hexagonal oxide film with a thickness of approximately 10 ?. Core level 38 Development of novel...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gas Protocol enhances and expands for the aluminum sector the World Business Council for Sustainable DevelopmentWorld Resources Institute greenhouse gas corporate accounting and...

  3. aluminum hydroxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  4. aluminum weld strength: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  5. aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  6. aluminum slag dross: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  7. aluminum buffing operation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  8. aluminum smelting plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  9. aluminum ingestion reduce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  10. aluminum triiodide induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  11. aluminum vanadate ion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Repository Summary: Damping and Dynamic Modulus Measurements in Alumina and Tungsten Fibre-Reinforced Aluminium Composites. the damping capacity of aluminum tungsten fiber...

  12. aluminum alloy parts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  13. aluminum alloy aa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For a wide Grujicic, Mica 2 Processing and Properties of Environmentally-Friendly Corrosion Resistant Hybrid Nanocomposite Coatings for Aluminum Alloy AA2024. Open Access...

  14. aluminum alloy processed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  15. aluminum alloys part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aluminum-magnesium-silicon alloy that may combine strength, extrudability, favorable corrosion resistance with low cost and scrap compatibility. The first (more) Li, Xiao, 1963-...

  16. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Reed, S.T.

    1988-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An antireflection film made from reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  17. Sol-gel antireflective coating on plastics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An antireflection film made from a reliquified sol-gel hydrolyzation, condensation polymeric reaction product of a silicon, alkoxides and/or metal alkoxides, or mixtures thereof. The film is particularly useful for coating plastics.

  18. Plastic flow in solids with interfaces Anurag Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Plastic flow in solids with interfaces Anurag Gupta David. J. Steigmann November 22, 2011 Abstract a plastically deforming solid is developed. The irreversible dynamics of the interface are driven by its normal motion, incoherency (slip and misorientation), and an intrinsic plastic flow; and purely by plastic

  19. Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Plastic strain due to twinning in austenitic TWIP steels B. Qin and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* Twinning induced plasticity steels are austenitic alloys in which mechanical twinning is a prominent deformation, Twinning, Twinning induced plasticity, Automobiles Introduction Mechanical twinning is a plastic

  20. PLASTIC: Providing Lightweight & Adaptable Service Technology for Pervasive Information & Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PLASTIC: Providing Lightweight & Adaptable Service Technology for Pervasive Information@tid.es Abstract The PLASTIC project adopts and revisits service- oriented computing for Beyond 3rd Generation (B3G. Specifically, PLASTIC introduces the PLASTIC platform to enable robust distributed lightweight services in B3G

  1. Seismology of plastic deformation Jero^me Weiss *, Francois Louchet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jérôme

    Seismology of plastic deformation Je´ro^me Weiss *, Franc¸ois Louchet Laboratoire de Glaciologie et-free critical picture of dislocational plasticity that challenges the classical continuum models of plasticity rights reserved. Keywords: Acoustic methods; Dislocation dynamics; Plastic deformation; Self

  2. Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault rupture directivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmowska, Renata

    Influence of plastic deformation on bimaterial fault rupture directivity Nora DeDontney,1 Elizabeth of the role of the stress state on the distribution of plastic deformation and the direction of preferred in determining the location of plastic deformation. For different orientations, plastic deformation can

  3. Plasticity of opsin gene expression in cichlids from Lake Malawi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton, Karen L.

    Plasticity of opsin gene expression in cichlids from Lake Malawi CHRISTOPHER M. HOFMANN, KELLY E. O plasticity has important evolutionary implications. In this study, we examined retinal plasticity in five found that the magnitude of plasticity varied across species. These findings have important implications

  4. Phenotypic Plasticity KAILEN A. MOONEY AND ANURAG A. AGRAWAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mooney, Kailen A.

    43 FO U R Phenotypic Plasticity KAILEN A. MOONEY AND ANURAG A. AGRAWAL Phenotypic plasticity (Fig. 4.1A). Such plasticity is nearly ubiquitous in nature and occurs in various animal and plant phenotypes, including behavior, physiology, and morphology. Pheno- typic plasticity may be observed as both

  5. Development/Plasticity/Repair Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grau, James

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors Control Metaplasticity the spinal cord can support several forms of plasticity, including response­outcome (instrumental) learning. This inhibi- tion of plasticity in spinal learning is itself a form of plasticity that requires i

  6. Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum Oxide Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Ab Initio Study of the Interaction of Water with Cluster Models of the Aluminum Terminated (0001) r-Aluminum to hydroxylation of the aluminum terminated surface, the two water process was found to be the most exothermic, occurring within 10-2 s. I. Introduction As one of the most important ceramic materials, R-aluminum oxide

  7. aluminum alloy 6061-t6: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    resolution study of the impact of an aluminum sphere on an aluminum plate supported by a hollow aluminum cylinder. In a previous report, an optimal set of input parameters The...

  8. loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075-T - matrix debonding occur in some aluminum alloys. · To model accurately MSFC behavior in aluminum

  9. Low-Cycle Fatigue of Ultra-Fine-Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walley, J. L.; Lavernia, E. J.; Gibeling, J. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Ultra-Fine Grained Aluminum Alloy, Poster Session, TMS,with other MA aluminum alloys and is attributed to theGrained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy J.L. WALLEY, E.J.

  10. Influences on Burr Size During Face-Milling of Aluminum Alloys and Cast Iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shefelbine, Wendy; Dornfeld, David

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    burrs. As with the aluminum alloys, the machining conditionsON BURR FORMATION As with the aluminum alloys, there is someFACE-MILLING OF ALUMINUM-SILICON ALLOYS AND CAST IRON Wendy

  11. Economic and environmental evaluation of end-of-life aerospace aluminum options using optimization methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Emily, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of recycling have long been understood and the conspicuous energy savings of secondary aluminum production have caused aluminum recycling to increase. Obsolete aircraft are a valuable source of aluminum scrap ...

  12. Aluminum-tungsten fiber composites with cylindrical geometry and controlled architecture of tungsten reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, Carl Joesph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chung, D. “Silicon-Aluminum Network Composites Fabricated byFigure 95 - Fine model with initial aluminum matrix failure.slight necking of the aluminum matrix. Note failed elements

  13. Fabrication and applications of nanocomposite structures using anodized aluminum oxide membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gapin, Andrew Isaac

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hall, Process of Reducing Aluminum from its Fluoride SaltsFrary and Z. Jeffries, Aluminum and its Production, McGraw-1 (1948). J. E. Hatch, Aluminum Properties and Physical

  14. Long-term and Highly Aluminum-resistant Root Elongation in a Camphor Tree Cinnamomum camphora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osawa, Hiroki

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the detoxification of aluminum in roots of tea plant (Oda A, Yamamoto F, Effects of aluminum on growth and biomassT, Beneficial effect of aluminum on growth of plants adapted

  15. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF AISI 4340 STEEL MODIFIED WITH ALUMINUM AND SILICON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Met. Trans. 1,2163 (1972). Aluminum_~n Iron~, S. L. Case andSTEEL MODIFIED WITH ALUMINUM AND SILIC ON ManjeshwarThe influence of additions of aluminum and combinations of

  16. Low-Cycle Fatigue of Ultra-Fine-Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walley, J. L.; Lavernia, E. J.; Gibeling, J. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an Ultra-Fine Grained Aluminum Alloy, Poster Session,Grained Cryomilled 5083 Aluminum Alloy J.L. WALLEY, E.J.consistent with other MA aluminum alloys and is attributed

  17. Control of residual aluminum from conventional treatment to improve reverse osmosis performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabelich, C J; Ishida, K P; Gerringer, F W; Evangelista, R; Kalyan, M; Suffet, I H

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. The Role of Dissolved Aluminum in Silica Chemistry forDraft Public Health Goal for Aluminum in Drinking Water .1994. Control of Residual Aluminum in Filtered Water . AWWA,

  18. Lithium aluminum/iron sulfide battery having lithium aluminum and silicon as negative electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Marian (Flossmoor, IL); Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a negative electrode, the electrode made thereby and a secondary electrochemical cell using the electrode. Silicon powder is mixed with powdered electroactive material, such as the lithium-aluminum eutectic, to provide an improved electrode and cell.

  19. Geochemistry of Aluminum in High Temperature Brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective ofthis research is to provide quantitative data on the equilibrium and thermodynamic properties of aluminum minerals required to model changes in permeability and brine chemistry associated with fluid/rock interactions in the recharge, reservoir, and discharge zones of active geothermal systems. This requires a precise knowledge of the thermodynamics and speciation of aluminum in aqueous brines, spanning the temperature and fluid composition rangesencountered in active systems. The empirical and semi-empirical treatments of the solubility/hydrolysis experimental results on single aluminum mineral phases form the basis for the ultimate investigation of the behavior of complex aluminosilicate minerals. The principal objective in FY 1998 was to complete the solubility measurements on boehmite (AIOOH) inNaC1 media( 1 .O and 5.0 molal ionic strength, IOO-250°C). However, additional measurements were also made on boehmite solubility in pure NaOH solutions in order to bolster the database for fitting in-house isopiestic data on this system. Preliminary kinetic Measurements of the dissolution/precipitation of boehmite was also carried out, although these were also not planned in the earlier objective. The 1999 objectives are to incorporate these treatments into existing codes used by the geothermal industry to predict the chemistry ofthe reservoirs; these calculations will be tested for reliability against our laboratory results and field observations. Moreover, based on the success of the experimental methods developed in this program, we intend to use our unique high temperature pH easurement capabilities to make kinetic and equilibrium studies of pH-dependent aluminosilicate transformation reactions and other pH-dependent heterogeneous reactions.

  20. A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history-dependent plastic potential function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    A single hardening elasto-plastic model for Kaolin clay with loading-history- dependent plastic and failure criteria are found to be strongly dependent on the principal stress rotation angle () and plastic work. A unique plastic potential function determined solely by the current stress state

  1. Fast electromigration crack in nanoscale aluminum film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelyanov, O. A., E-mail: oaemel2@gmail.com; Ivanov, I. O. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current-induced breakage of 20?nm thin aluminum layers deposited onto capacitor grade polypropylene (PP) films is experimentally studied. Biexponential current pulses of different amplitude (10–15?A) and duration (0.1–1??s) were applied to the samples. Breakage occurred after fast development of electromigrating ?200?nm-wide cracks with initial propagation velocity of ?1?m/s under a high current density of ?10{sup 12?}A/m{sup 2}. The cracks stopped when their lengths reached 250–450??m. This behavior is explained by the balance of electromigration and stress-induced atomic fluxes.

  2. Process simulation of aluminum reduction cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabsh, I. [CompuSIM Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Dupuis, M. [GeniSim, Jonquiere, Quebec (Canada); Gomes, A. [Alcan Aluminio do Brasil S.A., Salvador, Bahia (Brazil)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program was developed to model the dynamic behavior of an aluminum reduction cell. The program simulates the physical process by solving the heat and mass balance equations that characterize the behavior of eleven chemical species in the system. It also models operational events (such as metal tapping, anode change, etc.) and the process control logic including various alumina feeding policies and anode effect quenching. The program is a PC based Windows{reg_sign} application that takes full advantage of the Windows user interface. This paper describes the implementation of the process model and the control logic. Various results using the simulation are compared to measured data.

  3. Method of forming aluminum oxynitride material and bodies formed by such methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bakas, Michael P. (Ammon, ID) [Ammon, ID; Lillo, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Chu, Henry S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering green bodies comprising aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material therein. Such green bodies may comprise aluminum, oxygen, and nitrogen in addition to the aluminum orthophosphate. For example, the green bodies may include a mixture of aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and aluminum orthophosphate or another sacrificial material. Additional methods of forming aluminum oxynitride (AlON) materials include sintering a green body including a sacrificial material therein, using the sacrificial material to form pores in the green body during sintering, and infiltrating the pores formed in the green body with a liquid infiltrant during sintering. Bodies are formed using such methods.

  4. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATIC DISCHARGE BEHAVIOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Richard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    composition profiles in lithium/sulfur battery analogues hasTHE LITHIUM-ALUMINUM, IRON SULFIDE BATTERY. I. GALVONOSTATICthe Lithium-Aluminum, Iron Sulfide Battery I. Galvanostatic

  5. Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum-ruthenium alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Icosahedral phase formation in rapidly quenched aluminum- ruthenium alloys Steven M. Anlagea phases as a function of composition. We have chosen the aluminum-ruthenium alloy system because. %. The solidified alloys have been studied by electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction to determine

  6. Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Characteristics of Aluminum Biosorption by Sargassum fluitans Biomass Hak Sung Lee1, * and Bohumil3A 2B2, Canada Abstract: Biomass of nonliving brown seaweed Sargassum fluitans pretreated.5. There are indications that the biomass hydroxyl groups were involved in sequestering the aluminum in the form

  7. BWeb Copy of the Aluminum Chapter from the 1st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    industry. It then exploits the power of arrays to develop a model which distinguishes between smelters for smelting aluminum on a commercial basis (Smith 1988, p. 17). In today's industry, a large smelter might produce around 0.2 million metric tons (mmt) of aluminum each year. The smelter would be located close

  8. ALUMINUM--2001 6.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Pacific Northwest, and low metal prices led several aluminum smelters to continue to reduce production consumption in 2001. The recycling rate for aluminum UBCs decreased to 55.4%, compared with 62.1% in 2000 prices led smelters in the Pacific Northwest to continue the cutbacks in production that were begun last

  9. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA); DiMilia, Robert A. (Baton Rouge, LA); Dynys, Joseph M. (New Kensington, PA); Phelps, Frankie E. (Apollo, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  10. Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 O) is used as a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    477 Aluminum sulfate (alum; Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O) is used as a chemical treatment of poultry litter, and pelletizing, the use of chemical amendments, primarily aluminum sulfate (alum, Al2 (SO4 )3 ·14H2 O), alter

  11. Molecular Scale Assessment of Methylarsenic Sorption on Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Molecular Scale Assessment of Methylarsenic Sorption on Aluminum Oxide M A S A Y U K I S H I M I Z than AsV or AsIII , their reduction can produce very toxic MMAIII or DMAIII . Aluminum oxides

  12. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  13. Corrosion behavior of aluminum-lithium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrard, W.N. (Defence Science and Technology Organization, Victoria (Australia))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion behavior of three aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloys was investigated in aerated 0.5 M sodium sulfate (Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4]), deaerated 3.5% sodium chloride (NaCl), and aerated 3.5% NaCl. Corrosion behavior of the Aluminum Association (AA) alloys 2090-T8E41 (UNS A92090, sheet), AA 8090-T851 (UNS A98090, sheet), and AA 8090-T82551 (UNS A98090, bar) was compared to behavior of the conventional AA 7075-T6 (UNS A97075, sheet). Uniform corrosion was the predominant form of attack in aerated Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] and deaerated NaCl, although some localized attack resulted from corrosion of intermetallics on specimen surfaces. Pitting was the main form of attack in aerated NaCl. In all three media, the sheet materials corroded at a similar rate, but the bar form of AA 8090 corroded at a lower rate. Pretreatment of the alloys by immersion in a cerium (Ce) solution inhibited pitting in aerated NaCl but only for a short period.

  14. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, James M. (Lisle, IL); Lepetre, Yves J. (Lauris, FR); Schuller, Ivan K. (Woodridge, IL); Ketterson, John B. (Evanston, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources.

  15. Superconducting structure with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murduck, J.M.; Lepetre, Y.J.; Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1989-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A superconducting structure is formed by depositing alternate layers of aluminum nitride and niobium nitride on a substrate. Deposition methods include dc magnetron reactive sputtering, rf magnetron reactive sputtering, thin-film diffusion, chemical vapor deposition, and ion-beam deposition. Structures have been built with layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride having thicknesses in a range of 20 to 350 Angstroms. Best results have been achieved with films of niobium nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 70 Angstroms and aluminum nitride deposited to a thickness of approximately 20 Angstroms. Such films of niobium nitride separated by a single layer of aluminum nitride are useful in forming Josephson junctions. Structures of 30 or more alternating layers of niobium nitride and aluminum nitride are useful when deposited on fixed substrates or flexible strips to form bulk superconductors for carrying electric current. They are also adaptable as voltage-controlled microwave energy sources. 8 figs.

  16. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGE SOLID ANGLE SPECTROMETER WITH CHARGED PARTICLE IDENTIFICATION FOR THE BEVALAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, M.R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of charged particles in a Plastic Ball module. (XBL 7910-of Califomia. THE PLASTIC BALL - A MULTI-DETECTOR, LARGEBerkeley, California Summary PLASTIC 8/>Ll PLASTIC WALL For

  17. PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS: ANALYTICAL AND COMPUTER SIMULATION STUDIES OF DISLOCATION GLIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altintas, Sabri

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Rate Processes in Plastic Deformation of Materials, J. C.PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS: ANALYTICAL AND COMPUTERCAPTIONS FIGURES - iii - PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF CRYSTALS:

  18. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature plastic gripper is described actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  19. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, W.J.; Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Folta, J.A.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same are disclosed. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis. 8 figs.

  20. Miniature plastic gripper and fabrication method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Los Altos, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, Milton A. (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or closed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  1. Fabrication method for miniature plastic gripper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Krulevitch, Peter A. (Los Altos, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, Milton A. (Berkeley, CA); Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature plastic gripper actuated by inflation of a miniature balloon and method of fabricating same. The gripper is constructed of either heat-shrinkable or heat-expandable plastic tubing and is formed around a mandrel, then cut to form gripper prongs or jaws and the mandrel removed. The gripper is connected at one end with a catheter or tube having an actuating balloon at its tip, whereby the gripper is opened or dosed by inflation or deflation of the balloon. The gripper is designed to removably retain a member to which is connected a quantity or medicine, plugs, or micro-components. The miniature plastic gripper is inexpensive to fabricate and can be used for various applications, such as gripping, sorting, or placing of micron-scale particles for analysis.

  2. Aluminum Tape Evaluation for Sealable Aluminum Tubes Containing Mark 22 Fuel Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RHODES, WILLIAM

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the HEU Blend Down project, aluminum tape is required to seal aluminum tubes that will hold contaminated Mark 22 fuel tubes for dissolution. From a large field of candidate tapes, Avery Dennison's Fasson 0802 tape (synthetic rubber adhesive system) was found to be acceptable for this application. This tape will disentangle in the normal H-Canyon dissolver solution and have no detrimental effect on the H-Canyon process. Upon placement of Fasson 0802 tape into the dissolver solution, nitric acid will attack and disentangle the block copolymer network and destroy the adhesive nature of the material, resulting in insoluble particles that can be removed via centrifuge operations (cake weight increase of no more than 1 percent). The addition of the tape will not generate off-gas products and the resultant solution characteristics (surface tension, viscosity, density, and disengagement time) will be unaffected. Further, the potential effect on the down-stream evaporation system is negligible. Since the tape will not be placed in a high radiation environment, radiation stability is not an issue. Through detailed discussions with Avery Dennison chemists and based on analytical tests, a fairly detailed understanding of the constituents comprising the proprietary adhesive system has been assembled. Most importantly, chlorine was not detected in the aluminum tape (neutron activation analysis detection limit is 16 ppm). Finally, application of this tape will not impact LEU specifications.

  3. Diode laser welding of aluminum to steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santo, Loredana; Quadrini, Fabrizio; Trovalusci, Federica [University of Rome Tor Vergata, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser welding of dissimilar materials was carried out by using a high power diode laser to join aluminum to steel in a butt-joint configuration. During testing, the laser scan rate was changed as well as the laser power: at low values of fluence (i.e. the ratio between laser power and scan rate), poor joining was observed; instead at high values of fluence, an excess in the material melting affected the joint integrity. Between these limiting values, a good aesthetics was obtained; further investigations were carried out by means of tensile tests and SEM analyses. Unfortunately, a brittle behavior was observed for all the joints and a maximum rupture stress about 40 MPa was measured. Apart from the formation of intermeltallic phases, poor mechanical performances also depended on the chosen joining configuration, particularly because of the thickness reduction of the seam in comparison with the base material.

  4. Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytes with LiBOB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xueyuan; Devine, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passivation of Aluminum in Lithium-ion Battery Electrolytesin commercially available lithium-ion battery electrolytes,

  5. Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle- Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075- T651 using the PPR - matrix debonding occur in some aluminum alloys. o To model accurately MSFC behavior in aluminum. Aluminum: properties and physical metallurgy. ASM International, 1984. 3 120µm 120µm grain boundaries

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    films that form on aluminum and aluminum alloys in air protect the surface against further oxidationMolecular dynamics simulations of the nano-scale room-temperature oxidation of aluminum single Abstract The oxidation of aluminum single crystals is studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations

  7. Cast B2-phase iron-aluminum alloys with improved fluidity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maziasz, Philip J. (122 Clark La., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Paris, Alan M. (P.O. Box 64, Tarrs, PA 15688); Vought, Joseph D. (124 Cove Point Rd., Rockwood, TN 37854)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for iron aluminum alloys. A composition includes iron, aluminum and manganese. A method includes providing an alloy including iron, aluminum and manganese; and processing the alloy. The systems and methods provide advantages because additions of manganese to iron aluminum alloys dramatically increase the fluidity of the alloys prior to solidification during casting.

  8. 1 Research review paper 2 Metabolic reengineering invoked by microbial systems to decontaminate aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appanna, Vasu

    by microbial systems to decontaminate aluminum: 3 Implications for bioremediation technologies 4 ChristopherQ1

  9. ALUMINUM-BRIDGED BISGLYOXIMATO COBALT COMPLEXES: SYNTHESIS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PROTON REDUCTION PROPERTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    194 CHAPTER 6 ALUMINUM-BRIDGED BISGLYOXIMATO COBALT COMPLEXES: SYNTHESIS AND ELECTROCHEMICAL PROTON diglyoximato complexes connected by one or two aluminum bridges are described. The aluminum centers that the number of aluminum bridges and the nature of the substituents on the phenoxide ligands significantly

  10. GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum tolerance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    GENETIC TRANSFORMATION AND HYBRIDIZATION Bacterial citrate synthase expression and soil aluminum that were more aluminum-tolerant than the non-transgenic control, confirming that citrate synthase overexpression can be a useful tool to help achieve aluminum tolerance. Keywords Acid soils Á Aluminum toxicity Á

  11. Kinetics of aluminum fluoride complexation in acidic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plankey, B.J.; Patterson, H.H.; Cronan, C.S.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidic deposition has an important effect on the transport and speciation of soluble aluminum. Toxicity of aqueous aluminum seems to be strongly dependent on aluminum speciation and the presence of complexing ligands such as fluoride. A study is reported of the complex formation kinetics of AlF/sup 2 +/ in the environmentally significant pH range 2.9-4.9. The pH and temperature dependencies of the overall rate of reaction are discussed along with environmental implications for areas subjected to acidic deposition. 22 references, 6 figures, 4 tables.

  12. Process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics and material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moorhead, Arthur J. (Knoxville, TN); Kim, Hyoun-Ee (Seoul, KR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for strengthening aluminum based ceramics is provided. A gaseous atmosphere consisting essentially of silicon monoxide gas is formed by exposing a source of silicon to an atmosphere consisting essentially of hydrogen and a sufficient amount of water vapor. The aluminum based ceramic is exposed to the gaseous silicon monoxide atmosphere for a period of time and at a temperature sufficient to produce a continuous, stable silicon-containing film on the surface of the aluminum based ceramic that increases the strength of the ceramic.

  13. A RADIATION-RESISTANT CHROMIUM-ACTIVATED ALUMINUM OXIDE SCIHTILLATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison Jr., Robert W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5-7, 1969. UCRL-19270 Lucile PVC LiQht shield Ught pipe . --agent. anodizing tank is of PVC plastic. The The cell Tests

  14. Transformation induced plasticity assisted steels: stress or strain affected martensitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Transformation induced plasticity assisted steels: stress or strain affected martensitic transformation? S. Chatterjee and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia* Transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels contain a small quantity of carbon enriched retained austenite, which transforms into martensite during

  15. Severe plastic deformation of difficult-to-work alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapici, Guney Guven

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work aims to reveal the microstructural evolution and post-processing mechanical behavior of difficult-to-work alloys upon severe plastic deformation. Severe plastic deformation is applied using equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE...

  16. MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethna, James P.

    MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY A Dissertation Presented RIGHTS RESERVED #12;MESOSCALE THEORY OF GRAINS AND CELLS: POLYCRYSTALS & PLASTICITY Surachate Limkumnerd, continuum explanation for the evolution of dislocations into sharp walls. We present here a mesoscale theory

  17. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 2. Propagation of a hydraulic fracture Seth fracture and fault mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geome- chanics in nonconventional the development of complex hydraulic fractures (HFs) that are commonly ob- served in the field and in experiments

  18. Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ze'ev, Reches

    Damage and plastic deformation of reservoir rocks: Part 1. Damage fracturing Seth Busetti, Kyran mechanics, fluid flow in fractured reservoirs, and geomechanics in nonconventional reservoirs. Kyran Mish finite deformation of reservoir rocks. We present an at- tempt to eliminate the main limitations

  19. Plastic Gamma Sensors: An Application in Detection of Radioisotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Mukhopadhyay

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief survey of plastic scintillators for various radiation measurement applications is presented here. The utility of plastic scintillators for practical applications such as gamma radiation monitoring, real-time radioisotope detection and screening is evaluated in laboratory and field measurements. This study also reports results of Monte Carlo-type predictive responses of common plastic scintillators in gamma and neutron radiation fields. Small-size plastic detectors are evaluated for static and dynamic gamma-ray detection sensitivity of selected radiation sources.

  20. An evaluation of four hardening rules of the incremental theory of plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunsaker, Barry

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 2024-T3 Aluminum, Mroz and Mechanical Sublayer Model 96 LIST OF FIGURES (Continued) Figure Page 17 Uniaxial Compressive Stress-Strain Curve, 6061-T6 Aluminum . . . . . . . . . . ~ 97 18 Uniaxial Reversed Loading of 6061-T6 Aluminum, Isotropic... Hardening 19 Uniaxial Reversed Loading of 6061-T6 Aluminum, Kinematic Hardening 99 20 Uniaxial Reversed Loading of 6061-T6 Aluminum, Mechanical Sublayer Model (4 sublayers). . . . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 100 21 Uniaxial Reversed Loading of 6061-T6 Aluminum...

  1. Ames Lab 101: BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruce Cook

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials scientist, Bruce Cook, discusses the super hard, low friction, and lubricious alloy know as BAM (Boron-Aluminum-Magnesium). BAM was discovered by Bruce Cook and his team a

  2. aluminum alloy composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 12 Promoters Oxide Promoters...

  3. aluminum alloy composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage U.S. Department of Energy Version 2 - 2010 1 12 Promoters Oxide Promoters...

  4. aluminum alloys surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  5. aluminum alloy surfaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  6. aluminum nitride powder: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide A. J. Kerr, E. Chagarov, S. Gu, T. Kaufman-Osborn, S. Madisetti, J. Wu, P. M. Asbeck, S. Oktyabrsky, and A. C. Chemistry Websites...

  7. aluminum garnet phosphor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 161 UV Curable Coatings in Aluminum Can Production Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: based...

  8. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information The primary aluminum industry emits PFCs and CO2 directly from the production process and indirectly emits CO2 from its energy consumption. In 2001, the U.S....

  9. aluminum extrusion die: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motor where aluminum has been the material of Dale T. Peters; John G. Cowie; Edwin F. Brush; Stephen P. Midson 38 Die KP und die Komintern. Open Access Theses and...

  10. Energy Challenges and Conservation Achievements in the Aluminum Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon, A. C.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy requirements. This talk reviews the aluminum industry's and Alcoa's conservation activities of the past five post-embargo years. It highlights smelting improvements, still in the research and development stage, which nonetheless promise significant...

  11. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Aluminum: Work Plans

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of EPA. The plan describes actions the industry intends to take to achieve its Climate VISION goal by 2010. Read the Aluminum Association Work Plan (PDF 109 KB) Download...

  12. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, Lowell D. (Kingston, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  13. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Aluminum-Alumina Composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudlur, Pradeep

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary goal of this study is to determine the effects of processing conditions, compositions and microstructural morphologies of the constituents on the physical and thermo-mechanical properties of alumina (Al_2O_3) reinforced aluminum (Al...

  14. New, More Efficient Technology for Remelting Aluminum Chips 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosek, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will introduce a new, more efficient technology for remelting the considerable volume of aluminum by 6.5% . Automated conveyors will transport chips from the machining operation to the new remelting operation for recycling. A reduction...

  15. Consolidation of aluminum 6061 powder by equal channel angular extrusion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, John Montgomery

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Equal channel angular extrusion is a promising approach to obtaining full density in powder metallurgy applications. This method can impose large effective deformations through uniform shear strain. Aluminum alloy 6061 powder is used as a test...

  16. Primary aluminum production : climate policy, emissions and costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harnisch, Jochen.; Sue Wing, Ian.; Jacoby, Henry D.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    Climate policy regarding perfluorocarbons (PFCs) may have a significant influence on investment decisions in the production of primary aluminum. This work demonstrates an integrated analysis of the effectiveness and likely ...

  17. Evaluation of heat stress in an aluminum smelter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Stacy Rahkell

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of heat stress and heat strain was evaluated for the aluminum smelter workers at Alcoa, Rockdale Operations. Personal, environmental, and metabolic factors that contribute to heat-related illnesses were identified. The effectiveness of current...

  18. aa7075 aluminum alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  19. a319 aluminum alloy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  20. aluminum alloy electrochemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  1. aluminum alloy evaluacion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the solid-state. (more) Pedrazas, Nicholas Alan 2010-01-01 5 ABSTRACT. The corrosion behavior of iron-aluminum alloys and their potential Materials Science Websites...

  2. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frye, L.D.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to profice a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one microinch. The fay surface are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy continguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  3. ALUMINUM--2000 6.1 By Patricia A. Plunkert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with that of the previous year. At the end of 2000, world inventories, as reported by the International Aluminium Institute Metal Exchange Ltd. (LME) decreased dramatically, whereas inventories of aluminum alloy increased

  4. aluminum oxide thin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEVICE LETTERS, VOL. 19, NO. 12, DECEMBER 1998 High-Performance Polycrystalline SiGe Thin-Film Materials Science Websites Summary: --The use of aluminum oxide as the gate...

  5. aluminum nitride insulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    K-r grown by a modified Bridgman tech- nique,r6 Rollins, Andrew M. 27 Low-voltage organic thin film transistors with hydrophobic aluminum nitride film as gate insulator Materials...

  6. aluminum hlw high: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 361 CONCEPT: N-TYPE SILICON SOLAR CELLS WITH SURFACE-PASSIVATED SCREEN-PRINTED ALUMINUM-ALLOYED REAR EMITTER Renewable...

  7. Gas-tungsten arc welding of aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frye, L.D.

    1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-tungsten arc welding method for joining together structures formed of aluminum alloy with these structures disposed contiguously to a heat-damagable substrate of a metal dissimilar to the aluminum alloy. The method of the present invention is practiced by diamond machining the fay surfaces of the aluminum alloy structures to provide a mirror finish thereon having a surface roughness in the order of about one micro-inch. The fay surfaces are aligned and heated sufficiently by the tungsten electrode to fuse the aluminum alloy contiguous to the fay surfaces to effect the weld joint. The heat input used to provide an oxide-free weld is significantly less than that required if the fay surfaces were prepared by using conventional chemical and mechanical practices.

  8. aluminum ammonium sulfate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    boric acid solutions Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: THE CORROSION OF ALUMINUM IN BORIC ACID SOLUTIONS A Thesis By HENRI KINSOLVING BASS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate...

  9. aluminum alloy reinforced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David E. 32 Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 belonging to the 1930s in seawater environment Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: seawater, conserve it, and display it in...

  10. aluminum alloys project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David E. 23 Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 belonging to the 1930s in seawater environment Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: seawater, conserve it, and display it in...

  11. Navy-ship plastic waste recycled into marine pilings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    March, F.A. [Seaward International Inc., Clearbrook, VA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seaward International Inc., developed a new, composite, structurally reinforced, plastic-composite marine piling fabricated from 100 percent recycled plastic. A cooperative research program was begun in 1995 between the Navy and Seaward to develop a use for Navy ships waste plastic as a core in the construction of the marine piling.

  12. TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 TIME DOMAIN REFLECTOMETRY MEASUREMENT AND HIGHLY PLASTIC CLAYS By: J. A. Kuhn1 and J. G. Zornberg for use in highly plastic clay. The clay used for experimentation was taken locally from the Eagle Ford Ford Clay is determined. INTRODUCTION The progression of wetting and drying fronts in highly plastic

  13. 1 Visco-plastic rheology 1.1 Effective viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    1 Visco-plastic rheology 1.1 Effective viscosity Rheology specifies the relationship between viscosity eff, = 2eff , (2) which includes viscous and plastic components, 1 eff = 1 visc + 1 plast . (3) Also the strain rate tensor can be split into viscous and plastic part, = visc + plast , (4) where

  14. Glassy and plastic crystals of cyanoadamantane : a Brillouin scattering investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    L-617 « Glassy » and plastic crystals of cyanoadamantane : a Brillouin scattering investigation J. Abstract. 2014 The elastic constants ofcyanoadamantane have been measured in the plastic and « glassy temperature. The temperature dependence of C11 in the plastic phase has been explain- ed by the setting

  15. Ecient elasto-plastic simulation ICA, University of Stuttgart, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieners, Christian

    EÃ?cient elasto-plastic simulation C. Wieners ICA, University of Stuttgart, Germany Summary. In this paper we describe a method for the construction of radial re- turn algorithms to the plasticity models plasticity, the constitutive equations are determined by the free energy functional and a monotone function

  16. CONTAINED PLASTIC DEFORMATION NEAR CRACKS AND NOTCHES UNDER LONGITUDINAL SHEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTAINED PLASTIC DEFORMATION NEAR CRACKS AND NOTCHES UNDER LONGITUDINAL SHEAR James R. Rice* ABSTRACT An exact linear elastic-perfectly plastic solution is presented for the problem of a sharp notch coordinates corresponding to given stresses, position of the elastic-plastic boundary, and accompanying

  17. Macroscopic yield criteria for plastic anisotropic materials containing spheroidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Macroscopic yield criteria for plastic anisotropic materials containing spheroidal voids Vincent-Leblond-Devaux's (GLD) analysis of an rigid-ideal plastic (von Mises) spheroidal volume containing a confocal spheroidal of the proposed approximate yield criterion for plastic anisotropic media containing non-spherical voids

  18. Hill SyStem PlaStic mulcHed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    a Hill SyStem PlaStic mulcHed Strawberry Production Guide for colder areaS #12;#12;i Trade names do they intend or imply discrimination against those not mentioned. Hill SyStem PlaStic mulcHed ..................................................................27 Consider Fall Laying of Extra Plastic Mulch

  19. PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PLASTICIZER RETENTION IN PVC GEOMEMBRANES T. D. Stark1 , H. Choi2 , and P. W. Diebel3 1, Ontario, Canada, N1R 5T6; PH (519)623-1630; email: PDiebel@cgtower.com ABSTRACT: Plasticizers are used to make PVC flexible so it can be used as a geomembrane for containment purposes. Plasticizers can migrate

  20. Phenotypic plasticity: linking molecular mechanisms with evolutionary outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    Phenotypic plasticity: linking molecular mechanisms with evolutionary outcomes CARL D. SCHLICHTING1-ordinating editor: A. Novoplansky Abstract. We argue that phenotypic plasticity should be broadly construed level, all plastic responses originate at the level of individual cells, which receive and process

  1. Plasticity in fretting of coated substrates Matthew R. Begleya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    Plasticity in fretting of coated substrates Matthew R. Begleya , John W. Hutchinsonb of the plastic deformation in a metal substrate fretted by a ¯at- bottomed circular peg under steady normal load of the corners of the peg. Deformation within the plastic zone is characterized, including regions of elastic

  2. Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balibar, Sébastien

    Giant Plasticity of a Quantum Crystal Ariel Haziot,1 Xavier Rojas,1 Andrew D. Fefferman,1 John R crystals may irreversibly deform. This phenomenon is known as plasticity and it is due to the motion and in the zero temperature limit, helium 4 crystals present a giant plasticity that is anisotropic and reversible

  3. Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phenotypic Plasticity Opposes Species Invasions by Altering Fitness Surface Scott D. Peacor1 ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species

  4. Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Developmental Plasticity in Cartesian Genetic Programming Artificial Neural Networks Maryam Mahsal developmental plasticity in Artificial Neural Networks using Carte- sian Genetic Programming. This is inspired by developmental plasticity that exists in the biological brain allowing it to adapt to a changing environment

  5. A study of microbend test by strain gradient plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsia, K Jimmy

    A study of microbend test by strain gradient plasticity W. Wanga , Y. Huangb, *, K.J. Hsiac , K with plastic deformation is on the order of microns. This size effect cannot be explained by classical plasticity theories since their constitutive relations do not have an intrinsic material length. Strain

  6. Plasticity of metal nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    Plasticity of metal nanowires Christopher R. Weinberger*a and Wei Cai*b Received 2nd August 2011, Accepted 24th November 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c2jm13682a The mechanisms of plasticity in metal nanowires with diameters below 100 nm are reviewed. At these length scales, plasticity in face-centered-cubic metals

  7. Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennin, Michael

    Reversible plasticity in amorphous materials Micah Lundberg1 , Kapilanjan Krishan1 , Ning Xu2 to external loads. Plasticity, i.e. dis- sipative and irreversible macroscopic changes in a material for reversible plastic events at the microscopic scale in both experiments and simulations of two

  8. Harnessing plasticity to understand learning and treat disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilgard, Michael P.

    Harnessing plasticity to understand learning and treat disease Michael P. Kilgard The University, USA A large body of evidence suggests that neural plasticity contributes to learning and disease. Recent studies sug- gest that cortical map plasticity is typically a transient phase that improves

  9. Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Phenotypic plasticity facilitates recurrent rapid adaptation to introduced predators Alison G) A central role for phenotypic plasticity in adaptive evolution is often posited yet lacks empirical support of preexisting developmental pathways, producing rapid adaptive change. We examined the role of plasticity

  10. Developmental plasticity in plants: implications of non-cognitive behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novoplansky, Ariel

    Developmental plasticity in plants: implications of non- cognitive behavior ARIEL NOVOPLANSKY of interest in phenotypic plasticity in the last two decades. Most studies, however, are being carried out- logical and evolutionary approaches to the study of developmental plasticity. So as to focus

  11. Plastics, materials and dreams of dematerialization Bernadette Bensaude Vincent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Plastics, materials and dreams of dematerialization Bernadette Bensaude Vincent Published in J. Gabrys, G. Hawkins, M. Michael eds, Accumulation: The Material Politics of Plastic London, Routledge, pp. 17-29. `Plastics happen; that is all we need to know on earth.' This remark is extracted from Gain

  12. Plasticity at the micron scale John W. Hutchinson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchinson, John W.

    Plasticity at the micron scale John W. Hutchinson* Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences into the plastic range: smaller is stronger. This eect has important implications for an increasing number of applications in electronics, structural materials and MEMS. Plastic behavior at this scale cannot

  13. Microstructural characterization of superplastic aluminum-lithium alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Rajasekaran

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERPLASTIC ALUMINUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS A Thesis by RAJASE~ BALASUBRAMANIAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SUPERPLASTIC ALUMINUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS A Thesis by RAJASE~ BALASUBRAMANIAN Approved as to style and content by: A~? alur N. Srinivasan (Chair...

  14. Characterizing Microalgae (Nannochloris oculata) Harvesting by Aluminum Flocculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ryan T.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry Weight Alum Aluminum Sulfate CF Concentration Factor CFU Culture Forming Unit DAF Dissolved Air Flotation DHA Docosahexaenoic Acid DO Dissolved Oxygen DW Dry Weight EF Electrolytic Flocculation EOM Extracellular Organic....6 Stepwise oxidation of aluminum ion species with increasing pH .............. 36 2.7 The effect of pH on zeta potenital and supernatant tubidity with the addition of 0.06 g/L Alum flocculant...

  15. An experimental investigation of aluminum honeycomb as an energy absorber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bland, William Joseph

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1964 Ma]or Sub)act: Aerospace Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF ALUMINUM HONEYCOMB AS AN ENERGY ABSORBER A Thesis By WILLIAM JOSEPH BLAND hairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) May 1964...

  16. The distribution of particulate aluminum in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feely, Richard Alan

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICULATE ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis RICHARD ALAN FEELY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the reguirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1971... Major Subject: Oceanography THE DISTRIBUTION OF PARTICULATE ALUMINUM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by RICHARD ALAN FEELY Approved as to style a d content by: hairma of Committee Head Department (Member) Member) May, 1971 ABSTRACT...

  17. Reactions of aluminum with uranium fluorides and oxyfluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Nichols, R.W.; Lankford, B.S. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Every 30 to 40 million operating hours a destructive reaction is observed in one of the {approximately}4000 large compressors that move UF{sub 6} through the gaseous diffusion plants. Despite its infrequency, such a reaction can be costly in terms of equipment and time. Laboratory experiments reveal that the presence of moderate pressures of UF{sub 6} actually cools heated aluminum, although thermodynamic calculations indicate the potential for a 3000-4000{degrees}C temperature rise. Within a narrow and rather low (<100 torr; 1 torr = 133.322 Pa) pressure range, however, the aluminum is seen to react with sufficient heat release to soften an alumina boat. Three things must occur in order for aluminum to react vigorously with either UF{sub 6} or UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. 1. An initiating source of heat must be provided. In the compressors, this source can be friction, permitted by disruption of the balance of the large rotating part or by creep of the aluminum during a high-temperature treatment. In the absence of this heat source, compressors have operated for 40 years in UF{sub 6} without significant reaction. 2. The film protecting the aluminum must be breached. Melting (of UF{sub 5} at 620 K or aluminum at 930 K) can cause such a breach in laboratory experiments. In contrast, holding Al samples in UF{sub 6} at 870 K for several hours produces only moderate reaction. Rubbing in the cascade can undoubtedly breach the protective film. 3. Reaction products must not build up and smother the reaction. While uranium products tend to dissolve or dissipate in molten aluminum, AIF{sub 3} shows a remarkable tendency to surround and hence protect even molten aluminum. Hence the initial temperature rise must be rapid and sufficient to move reactants into a temperature region in which products are removed from the reaction site.

  18. Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 THE PLASTICITY OF UNREINFORCED CONCRETE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    Morley Symposium on Concrete Plasticity and its Application. University of Cambridge 23 rd July, 2007 THE PLASTICITY OF UNREINFORCED CONCRETE Jacques HEYMAN Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, UK Keywords: Mass concrete, plasticity 1 THE MATERIAL If a material is to be structurally useful

  19. Method of cleaning plastics using super and subcritical media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P. (Tyngsborough, MA); Spall, W. Dale (Los Alamos, NM); Talhi, Abdelhafid (Nashua, NH)

    1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a plastic, such as polyethylene or polypropylene, to remove at least a portion of at least one contaminant includes combining the plastic with a supercritical medium, such as carbon dioxide or sulfur hexafluoride, whereby at least a portion of the contaminant dissolves in the supercritical medium. Alternatively, the plastic can be combined with a suitable liquid medium, such as carbon dioxide or liquid sulfur hexafluoride. At least a portion of the medium, containing the dissolved contaminant, is separated from the plastic, thereby removing at least a portion of the contaminant from the plastic.

  20. Method of coextruding plastics to form a composite sheet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsien, Hsue C. (Chatham Township, Morris County, NJ)

    1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to a method of producing a composite sheet of plastic materials by means of coextrusion. Two plastic materials are matched with respect to their melt indices. These matched plastic materials are then coextruded in a side-by-side orientation while hot and soft to form a composite sheet having a substantially uniform demarkation therebetween. The plastic materials are fed at a substantially equal extrusion velocity and generally have substantially equal viscosities. The coextruded plastics can be worked after coextrusion while they are still hot and soft.