National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for altitude correction factor

  1. Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jing-Lei; Wu, Shi-Tong; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

  2. Optimizing Power Factor Correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

    1986-01-01

    FACTOR CORRECTION Robert K. Phillips and Louis C. Burmeister, Mechanical Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS The optimal investment for power factor correcting capacitors for Kansas Power and Light Company large power contract customers... consumer of electricity were made for demands of 200, 400, 800, 1,600, 3,200, and 6,400 k\\~ and monthly energy consumption periods of 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours for several capacitor purchase and installation costs. The results...

  3. Chiral corrections to hyperon axial form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, B. C.

    2008-05-01

    We study the complete set of flavor-changing hyperon axial-current matrix elements at small momentum transfer. Using partially quenched heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, we derive the chiral and momentum behavior of the axial and induced pseudoscalar form factors. The meson pole contributions to the latter posses a striking signal for chiral physics. We argue that the study of hyperon axial matrix elements enables a systematic lattice investigation of the efficacy of three-flavor chiral expansions in the baryon sector. This can be achieved by considering chiral corrections to SU(3) symmetry predictions, and their partially quenched generalizations. In particular, despite the presence of eight unknown low-energy constants, we are able to make next-to-leading order symmetry breaking predictions for two linear combinations of axial charges.

  4. Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Tang, M.

    2006-01-01

    Tebei has very rich solar energy in China and needs heating in winter,but the present energy building design code has no solar correction factor for the overall heat transfer coefficient of building envelope for Tebei. ...

  5. Design of a Boost Power Factor Correction Converter Using Optimization Techniques Sergio Busquets-Monge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    Design of a Boost Power Factor Correction Converter Using Optimization Techniques Sergio Busquets Foundation under Award Number EEC-9731677. #12;Design of a Boost Power Factor Correction Converter Using of a boost power factor correction front-end converter with an input electromagnetic interference filter

  6. Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

    2012-07-01

    The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

  7. Comparative Study of Power Factor Correction Converters For Single Phase Half-Bridge Inverters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    of input current harmonic distortion and en- ergy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION Uninterruptible power supplyComparative Study of Power Factor Correction Converters For Single Phase Half-Bridge Inverters Gui an isolation transformer, and sinu- soidal input currents if a power factor correction (PFC) con- verter

  8. New AC-DC Power Factor Correction Architecture Suitable for High Frequency Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Seungbum

    This paper presents a novel ac-dc power factor correction (PFC) power conversion architecture for single-phase grid interface. The proposed architecture has significant advantages for achieving high efficiency, good power ...

  9. Two-loop enhancement factor for 1/Q corrections to event shapes in deep inelastic scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrinal Dasgupta; Bryan R. Webber

    2000-10-22

    We compute the two-loop enhancement factors for our earlier one-loop calculations of leading (1/Q) power corrections to the mean values of some event shape variables in deep inelastic lepton scattering. The enhancement is found to be equal to the universal ``Milan factor'' for those shape variables considered, provided the one-loop calculation is performed in a particular way. As a result, the phenomenology of power corrections to DIS event shapes remains largely unaffected.

  10. Global analysis of proton elastic form factor data with two-photon exchange corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Arrington; W. Melnitchouk; J. A. Tjon

    2007-09-01

    We use the world's data on elastic electron-proton scattering and calculations of two-photon exchange effects to extract corrected values of the proton's electric and magnetic form factors over the full Q^2 range of the existing data. Our analysis combines the corrected Rosenbluth cross section and polarization transfer data, and is the first extraction of G_Ep and G_Mp including explicit two-photon exchange corrections and their associated uncertainties. In addition, we examine the angular dependence of the corrected cross sections, and discuss the possible nonlinearities of the cross section as a function of epsilon.

  11. BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A POWER-FACTOR-CORRECTION BOOST CONVERTER: UNCOVERING FAST-SCALE INSTABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    BIFURCATION ANALYSIS OF A POWER-FACTOR-CORRECTION BOOST CONVERTER: UNCOVERING FAST to a power-factor-correc- tion (PFC) boost converter to examine the fast-scale insta- bility problem to a current-programmed boost converter. In this paper, we study the onset of period-doubling (fast-scale) in

  12. Simulation of a Wireless Power Transfer System for Electric Vehicles with Power Factor Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickelsimer, Michael C [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transfer has been a popular topic of recent research. Most research has been done to address the limitations of coil-to-coil efficiency. However, little has been done to address the problem associated with the low input power factor with which the systems operate. This paper details the steps taken to analyze a wireless power transfer system from the view of the power grid under a variety of loading conditions with and without power factor correction.

  13. Isolated Boost FullbridgeTopology Suitablefor High Power and Power Factor Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    -2921-69399 Abstrmt - Isolated variants of the boost converter topology for single phase powerfactorcorrectionare are anticipated.Reasonsfor the popularity of the boost converter as com- pared to other PFC topologies are-converterdominate the one-stage power factor correction schemes although the isolated boost full- bridge converter (IBF

  14. The accuracy of climate models' simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of grid scale correction factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterhalter, Wade

    2011-09-01

    Global climate change is expected to impact biological populations through a variety of mechanisms including increases in the length of their growing season. Climate models are useful tools for predicting how season length might change in the future. However, the accuracy of these models tends to be rather low at regional geographic scales. Here, I determined the ability of several atmosphere and ocean general circulating models (AOGCMs) to accurately simulate historical season lengths for a temperate ectotherm across the continental United States. I also evaluated the effectiveness of regional-scale correction factors to improve the accuracy of these models. I found that both the accuracy of simulated season lengths and the effectiveness of the correction factors to improve the model's accuracy varied geographically and across models. These results suggest that regional specific correction factors do not always adequately remove potential discrepancies between simulated and historically observed environmental parameters. As such, an explicit evaluation of the correction factors' effectiveness should be included in future studies of global climate change's impact on biological populations.

  15. A Mixed-SignalASIC Power-Factor-Correction(PFC) Controller for High Frequency Switching Rectifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Mixed-SignalASIC Power-Factor-Correction(PFC) Controller for High Frequency Switching Rectifiers power-stage interfacing should be simple with few components needed. To reduce design costs, very little design should be necessary to implement the con- troller using the most common power stages

  16. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, Stephen; Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn T.

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

  17. Experimental setup for the determination of the correction factors of the neutron doseratemeters in fast neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliescu, Elena; Bercea, Sorin; Dudu, Dorin; Celarel, Aurelia [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30 St, P.O.BOX MG-6,Magurele, cod 077125 (Romania)

    2013-12-16

    The use of the U-120 Cyclotron of the IFIN-HH allowed to perform a testing bench with fast neutrons in order to determine the correction factors of the doseratemeters dedicated to neutron measurement. This paper deals with researchers performed in order to develop the irradiation facility testing the fast neutrons flux generated at the Cyclotron. This facility is presented, together with the results obtain in determining the correction factor for a doseratemeter dedicated to the neutron dose equivalent rate measurement.

  18. QCD corrections to $B \\to ?$ form factors from light-cone sum rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Ming Wang; Yue-Long Shen

    2015-06-01

    We compute perturbative corrections to $B \\to \\pi$ form factors from QCD light-cone sum rules with $B$-meson distribution amplitudes. Applying the method of regions we demonstrate factorization of the vacuum-to-$B$-meson correlation function defined with an interpolating current for pion, at one-loop level, explicitly in the heavy quark limit. The short-distance functions in the factorization formulae of the correlation function involves both hard and hard-collinear scales; and these functions can be further factorized into hard coefficients by integrating out the hard fluctuations and jet functions encoding the hard-collinear information. Resummation of large logarithms in the short-distance functions is then achieved via the standard renormalization-group approach. We further show that structures of the factorization formulae for $f_{B \\pi}^{+}(q^2)$ and $f_{B \\pi}^{0}(q^2)$ at large hadronic recoil from QCD light-cone sum rules match that derived in QCD factorization. In particular, we perform an exploratory phenomenological analysis of $B \\to \\pi$ form factors, paying attention to various sources of perturbative and systematic uncertainties, and extract $|V_{ub}|= \\left(3.05^{+0.54}_{-0.38} |_{\\rm th.} \\pm 0.09 |_{\\rm exp.}\\right) \\times 10^{-3}$ with the inverse moment of the $B$-meson distribution amplitude $\\phi_B^{+}(\\omega)$ determined by reproducing $f_{B \\pi}^{+}(q^2=0)$ obtained from the light-cone sum rules with $\\pi$ distribution amplitudes. Furthermore, we present the invariant-mass distributions of the lepton pair for $B \\to \\pi \\ell \

  19. Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess-Flores, M

    2011-11-10

    Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

  20. Frequency Scalable Non-Linear Waveform Generator for Mixed-Simal Power-Factor-Correction IC Controller'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    derives a family of digital non-linear waveform generators fundamental to the developement of an adaptiveFrequency Scalable Non-Linear Waveform Generator for Mixed-Simal Power-Factor-Correction IC of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0425 Abstract This paper

  1. Determination of Correction Factors for Small Field Based on Measurement and Numerical Calculation using Cylindrical Ionization Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Kwangwoo; Park, Sungho; Choi, Jin Hwa; Park, Suk Won; Bak, Jino

    2015-01-01

    We studied the investigation of volume averaging effect for air-filled cylindrical ionization chambers to determine correction factors in small photon field for the given chamber. As a method, we measured output factors using several cylindrical ionization chambers and calculated with mathematical method similar to deconvolution in which we modeled non-constant and inhomogeneous exposure function in the cavity of chamber. The parameters in exposure function and correction factors were determined by solving a system of equations we developed with measurement data and geometry of the given chamber. Correction factors (CFs) we had found are very similar to that from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. For example, CFs in this study were computed as 1.116 for PTW31010, and 1.0225 for PTW31016, while CFs from MC were reported as approximately between 1.17 and 1.20 for PTW31010, and between 1.02 and 1.06 for PTW31016 in of 6MV photon beam . Furthermore, the result from the method of deconvolution combined with MC for cham...

  2. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  3. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-04-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  4. The radiation protection problems of high altitude and space flight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper considers the radiation environment in aircraft at high altitudes and spacecraft in low earth orbit and in deep space and the factors that influence the dose equivalents. Altitude, latitude and solar cycle are the major influences for flights below the radiation belts. In deep space, solar cycle and the occurrence of solar particle events are the factors of influence. The major radiation effects of concern are cancer and infertility in males. In high altitude aircraft the radiation consists mainly of protons and neutrons, with neutrons contributing about half the equivalent dose. The average dose rate at altitudes of transcontinental flights that approach the polar regions are greater by a factor of about 2.5 than on routes at low latitudes. Current estimates of does to air crews suggest they are well within the ICRP (1990) recommended dose limits for radiation workers.

  5. Self-energy correction to the hyperfine splitting and the electron g factor in hydrogen-like ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yerokhin, Vladimir A

    2009-01-01

    The hyperfine structure (hfs) and the g factor of a bound electron are caused by external magnetic fields. For the hfs, the magnetic field is due to the nuclear spin. A uniform-in-space and constant-in-time magnetic field is used to probe the bound-electron g factor. The self-energy corrections to these effects are more difficult to evaluate than those to the Lamb shift. Here, we describe a numerical approach for both effects in the notoriously problematic regime of hydrogen-like bound systems with low nuclear charge numbers. The calculation is nonperturbative in the binding Coulomb field. Accurate numerical values for the remainder functions are provided for 2P states and for nS states with n=1,2,3.

  6. Fast-Scale Instability of Single-Stage Power-Factor-Correction Power Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    power applications. The circuit employs a cascade configuration of a boost converter and a forward of a boost PFC converter and a forward converter for output regulation [1]. Being a single- stage converter regulation since the DCM boost converter can automatically achieve a good power factor without additional

  7. Single-Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL] [ORNL; Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance. To understand the power flow through the system this paper presents a novel approach to the system model and the impact of different control parameters on the load power. The implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation is also discussed.

  8. Constraints on the annihilation corrections in $B_{u,d}$ ${\\to}$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Junfeng; Hu, Xiaohui; Yang, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the contributions of hard spectator scattering and annihilation in $B$ ${\\to}$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. With available experimental data on $B$ ${\\to}$ ${\\pi}K^{\\ast}$, ${\\rho}K$, ${\\pi}{\\rho}$ and $K{\\phi}$ decays, comprehensive $\\chi^2$ analyses on parameters $X_{A,H}^{i,f}$ or (${\\rho}_{A,H}^{i,f}$, ${\\phi}_{A,H}^{i,f}$) are performed, where $X_{A}^{f}$ ($X_{A}^{i}$) and $X_{H}$ are used to parameterize the endpoint divergences of the (non)factorizable annihilation and hard spectator scattering amplitudes, respectively. From $\\chi^2$ analyses, it is found that (1) the topology-dependent parameterization is feasible for $B$ ${\\to}$ $PV$ decays; (2) A relatively small value of inverse moment parameter ${\\lambda}_{B}$ ${\\sim}$ 0.2 GeV for $B$ meson wave function is allowed by $B$ ${\\to}$ $PP$, $PV$ decays; (3) At present accurate level of experimental measurements and theoretical evaluations, $X_{H}$ $=$ $X_{A}^{i}$ is a good simplification, but $X_{H}$ $\

  9. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community, Environment Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Corrective Action Individual Permit: Corrective Action Certifications If...

  10. A new high performance AC to DC rectifier with input power factor correction and harmonic reduction capacity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Roberto

    1994-01-01

    been at my side sharing my glory and pains, always willing to lend a good ear and a good hand. TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Page 1. 1 What Is Power Factor? I. 2 Cause of Low Power Factor-Diode Bridge Rectifier with Output Filter... 78 78 83 85 V CONCLUSION 86 V. I Conclusions V. 2 Suggestions for Future Work REFERENCES 86 88 89 APPENDIX 91 A. PSPICE SIMULATIONS 91 A. I Diode Bridge Rectifier Circuit A. 2 LC Low-Pass Filter Circuit A. 3 LC Series Resonant Circuit...

  11. Human health impacts of high altitude emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eastham, Sebastian D. (Sebastian David)

    2015-01-01

    Millions of deaths worldwide are attributed annually to exposure degraded surface air quality and UV-induced skin cancer. However, the focus has been on surface emissions, and the contribution of high altitude emissions ...

  12. Relative Response to Low-Energy Photons and Determination of Instrument Correction Factors for Portable Radiation Instrumentation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagoner, David Andrew

    2011-10-21

    ................................................ 7 Basic Radiation Detector Theory ................................................... 7 Portable Radiation Instrumentation Tested .................................... 10 Ck Dose Equivalent Conversion Factors... of rugged silicon diode detectors. Through the years it has become necessary to develop compact and portable instruments based on these detectors. With the onset of nuclear power and the increasing use of radioactive materials, portable radiation...

  13. SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C; Tang, Lixin; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan; Campbell, Steven L; Miller , John M.

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

  14. EMRI corrections to the angular velocity and redshift factor of a mass in circular orbit about a Kerr black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhay G. Shah; John L. Friedman; Tobias S. Keidl

    2012-09-26

    This is the first of two papers on computing the self-force in a radiation gauge for a particle moving in circular, equatorial orbit about a Kerr black hole. In the EMRI (extreme-mass-ratio inspiral) framework, with mode-sum renormalization, we compute the renormalized value of the quantity $h_{\\alpha\\beta}u^\\alpha u^\\beta$, gauge-invariant under gauge transformations generated by a helically symmetric gauge vector; and we find the related order $\\frak{m}$ correction to the particle's angular velocity at fixed renormalized redshift (and to its redshift at fixed angular velocity). The radiative part of the perturbed metric is constructed from the Hertz potential which is extracted from the Weyl scalar by an algebraic inversion\\cite{sf2}. We then write the spin-weighted spheroidal harmonics as a sum over spin-weighted spherical harmonics and use mode-sum renormalization to find the renormalization coefficients by matching a series in $L=\\ell+1/2$ to the large-$L$ behavior of the expression for $H := \\frac12 h_{\\alpha\\beta}u^\\alpha u^\\beta $. The non-radiative parts of the perturbed metric associated with changes in mass and angular momentum are calculated in the Kerr gauge.

  15. Towards a Monitoring System for High Altitude Objects Sbastien Jean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donsez, Didier

    Towards a Monitoring System for High Altitude Objects Sébastien Jean University of Grenoble LCIS.fr ABSTRACT High Altitude Objects (HAO), typically sounding balloons, are mobile objects that gather Altitude Objects 1. INTRODUCTION High Altitude Objects (HAO), typically sounding balloons, can fly several

  16. Constraints on hard spectator scattering and annihilation corrections in $B_{u,d}$ ${\\to}$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junfeng Sun; Qin Chang; Xiaohui Hu; Yueling Yang

    2015-03-11

    In this paper, we investigate the contributions of hard spectator scattering and annihilation in $B\\to PV$ decays within the QCD factorization framework. With available experimental data on $B\\to \\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi \\rho$ and $K\\phi$ decays, comprehensive $\\chi^2$ analyses of the parameters $X_{A,H}^{i,f}({\\rho}_{A,H}^{i,f},{\\phi}_{A,H}^{i,f})$ are performed, where $X_A^f$ ($X_A^i$) and $X_H$ are used to parameterize the endpoint divergences of the (non)factorizable annihilation and hard spectator scattering amplitudes, respectively. Based on $\\chi^2$ analyses, it is observed that (1) The topology-dependent parameterization scheme is feasible for $B\\to PV$ decays; (2) At the current accuracy of experimental measurements and theoretical evaluations, $X_H=X_A^i$ is allowed by $B\\to PV$ decays, but $X_{H}\

  17. Characterization of radiation beams used to determinate the correction factor for a CyberKnife® unit reference field using ionization chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragón-Martínez, Nestor Massillon-JL, Guerda; Gómez-Muñoz, Arnulfo

    2014-11-07

    This paper aimed to characterize a 6 MV x-ray beam from a Varian® iX linear accelerator in order to obtain the correction factors needed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism{sup 1}. The experiments were performed in a liquid water phantom under different irradiation conditions: a) Calibration of the reference field of 10 cm × 10 cm at 90 cm SSD and 10 cm depth was carried out according to the TRS-398 protocol using three ionization chambers (IC) calibrated in different reference laboratory and b) Measurement of the absorbed dose rate at 70 cm SSD and 10 cm depth in a 10 cm × 10 cm and 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm fields was obtained in order to simulate the CyberKnife® conditions where maximum distance between the source and the detector is equal to 80 cm and the maximum field size is 6 cm diameter. Depending where the IC was calibrated, differences between 0.16% and 2.24% in the absorbed dose rate measured in the 10 cm × 10 cm field at 90 cm SSD were observed, while for the measurements at 70 cm SSD, differences between 1.27% and 3.88% were obtained. For the 5.4 cm × 5.4 cm field, the absorbed dose measured with the three ICs varies between 1.37% and 3.52%. The increase in the difference on the absorbed dose when decreasing the SSD could possibly be associated to scattering radiation generated from the collimators and/or the energy dependence of the ionization chambers to low-energy radiation. The results presented in this work suggest the importance of simulating the CyberKnife® conditions using other linear accelerator for obtaining the correction factors as proposed by the IAEA/AAPM new formalism in order to measure the absorbed dose with acceptable accuracy.

  18. Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

  19. Low-Altitude Laser Altimeter to Assist UAV Autolanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergmann, Nicholas M

    2012-08-31

    This project presents a low-altitude laser altimeter system to assist UAV autolanding. This system generates aircraft altitude and attitude estimates; it consists of laser illuminators, a digital imaging unit (image sensor, lens, and optical filter...

  20. High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    High Altitude Unmanned Air System for Atmospheric Science Missions A. S´obester , S. J. Johnston and processing atmospheric observations across a range of altitudes. We consider the aeronautical a specified block of airspace. I. The Need for Wide Altitude Range Atmospheric Observations The ability

  1. FAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the lower ionospheric (80 to 95 km altitude) flash due to heating by an impinging electromagnetic pulseFAST PHOTOMETRIC IMAGING OF HIGH ALTITUDE OPTICAL FLASHES ABOVE THUNDERSTORMS a dissertation." A novel photometric array with a high-speed triggered data acquisition system, bore-sighted image

  2. Corrective Action

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture | NationalCorrective Action

  3. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Duran, Andrew J. (Oviedo, FL); Kudman, Irwin (Boca Raton, FL)

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  4. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2015-07-10

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In-situ observations of snow cover fraction since the 1960s suggest that the snow pack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2–2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean–atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover fraction to various anthropogenic factors. Atmore »the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. Especially, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow are coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.« less

  5. Nuclear correction factors from neutrino DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Kovarik

    2011-07-15

    Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions and we use this framework to analyze the consistency of neutrino DIS data with other nuclear data.

  6. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Duran, A.J.; Kudman, I.

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  7. Key issues of ultraviolet radiation of OH at high altitudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yuhuai; Wan, Tian; Jiang, Jianzheng; Fan, Jing

    2014-12-09

    Ultraviolet (UV) emissions radiated by hydroxyl (OH) is one of the fundamental elements in the prediction of radiation signature of high-altitude and high-speed vehicle. In this work, the OH A{sup 2}?{sup +}?X{sup 2}? ultraviolet emission band behind the bow shock is computed under the experimental condition of the second bow-shock ultraviolet flight (BSUV-2). Four related key issues are discussed, namely, the source of hydrogen element in the high-altitude atmosphere, the formation mechanism of OH species, efficient computational algorithm of trace species in rarefied flows, and accurate calculation of OH emission spectra. Firstly, by analyzing the typical atmospheric model, the vertical distributions of the number densities of different species containing hydrogen element are given. According to the different dominating species containing hydrogen element, the atmosphere is divided into three zones, and the formation mechanism of OH species is analyzed in the different zones. The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method and the Navier-Stokes equations are employed to compute the number densities of the different OH electronically and vibrationally excited states. Different to the previous work, the trace species separation (TSS) algorithm is applied twice in order to accurately calculate the densities of OH species and its excited states. Using a non-equilibrium radiation model, the OH ultraviolet emission spectra and intensity at different altitudes are computed, and good agreement is obtained with the flight measured data.

  8. Correction: Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Miceala; Ono, Nadia; Planutiene, Marina; Planutis, Kestutis; Nelson, Edward L; Holcombe, Randall F

    2013-01-01

    macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulatingmacrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulatingmacrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulating

  9. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  10. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  11. From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

  12. Parametric study of high altitude nuclear EMP fields. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavigne, R.J.

    1984-03-01

    A program is developed to model the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear detonation. A Runge-Kutta numerical technique is used to solve for the electric fields. A continuous Fourier Transform of the EMP is used to determine the frequency profile of the EMP. Parametric studies are performed to determine cause and effect relationships between burst parameters and the EMP frequency profile from 100 KHz to 100 MHz. Burst parameters studied are: gamma pulse time history, gamma ray energies from 1 MeV to 10 MeV, gamma ray yield, height of burst from 75 Km to 200 Km and intersection angle of the slant range with the geomagnetic field from 90 degrees to 30 degrees.

  13. Adiabatic effects on radiation belt electrons at low altitude Weichao Tu1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    Adiabatic effects on radiation belt electrons at low altitude Weichao Tu1,2 and Xinlin Li1] The stormtime adiabatic effects of radiation belt electrons mirroring at low altitude are not analogous to those of equatorially mirroring electrons. During the main phase of a geomagnetic storm the adiabatic effects

  14. Extension of a Martian general circulation model to thermospheric altitudes: UV heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    Extension of a Martian general circulation model to thermospheric altitudes: UV heating altitudes: UV heating and photochemical models, J. Geophys. Res., 110, E09008, doi:10.1029/2004JE002312. 1. Introduction [2] New modeling efforts and new data from spacecraft instrumentation are two relevant topics

  15. High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed* Grenoble (G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Abstract-- High altitude wind energy (HAWE) is a new interest in sustainable development, renewable energy systems, such as solar photo-voltaic, wind and tidal

  16. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

  17. Corrective Action Program Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-03-02

    This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

  18. Method of absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saveliev, Alexei; Jangale, Vilas Vyankatrao; Zelepouga, Sergeui; Pratapas, John

    2013-09-17

    A method and apparatus for absorbance correction in a spectroscopic heating value sensor in which a reference light intensity measurement is made on a non-absorbing reference fluid, a light intensity measurement is made on a sample fluid, and a measured light absorbance of the sample fluid is determined. A corrective light intensity measurement at a non-absorbing wavelength of the sample fluid is made on the sample fluid from which an absorbance correction factor is determined. The absorbance correction factor is then applied to the measured light absorbance of the sample fluid to arrive at a true or accurate absorbance for the sample fluid.

  19. Highlights from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretz, John

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory was completed this year at a 4100-meter site on the flank of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico. HAWC is a water Cherenkov ground array with the capability to distinguish 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays from the hadronic cosmic-ray background. HAWC is uniquely suited to study extremely high energy cosmic-ray sources, search for regions of extended gamma-ray emission, and to identify transient gamma-ray phenomena. HAWC will play a key role in triggering multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies of active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Observation of TeV photons also provide unique tests for a number of fundamental physics phenomena including dark matter annihilation and primordial black hole evaporation. Operation began mid-2013 with the partially-completed detector. Multi-TeV emission from the Galactic Plane is clearly seen in the first year of operation, confirming a number of known TeV sources, and a numb...

  20. Correction: Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Miceala; Ono, Nadia; Planutiene, Marina; Planutis, Kestutis; Nelson, Edward L; Holcombe, Randall F

    2013-01-01

    macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases circulatingto determine if administration of GM-CSF in this setting waswhich they received 500 ug GM-CSF daily for 4 days starting

  1. Measuring Diversity on a Low-Altitude UAV in a Ground-to-Air Wireless 802.11 Mesh Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kung, H. T.

    Measuring Diversity on a Low-Altitude UAV in a Ground-to-Air Wireless 802.11 Mesh Network H. T ground node and receivers on a small, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in a 802.11 wireless as well. I. INTRODUCTION Small, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have reached a development

  2. GENERATING CONSTANT ALTITUDE DATA FROM THE PDS Whilst analysing the MGS Accelerometer data archived with the PDS (Keating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    344 APPENDIX B GENERATING CONSTANT ALTITUDE DATA FROM THE PDS PROFILES Whilst analysing the MGS an interesting complication in how the constant altitude data are generated. Although this is not of direct. The constant altitude data in the PDS archive are generated from the profile data in the same archive (Keating

  3. Calculation of extremity neutron fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Zika, Annmarie Ruth

    1997-01-01

    -to-dose equivalent conversion factors to Los Alamos National Laboratory extremity dosimeter correction factors is performed....

  4. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, S.T.

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

  5. Resummed QCD Power Corrections to Nuclear Shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, J; Qiu, Jianwei; Vitev, Ivan

    2004-01-01

    We calculate and resum a perturbative expansion of nuclear enhanced power corrections to the structure functions measured in deeply inelastic scattering of leptons on a nuclear target. Our results for the Bjorken $x$-, $Q^2$- and $A$-dependence of nuclear shadowing in $F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ and the nuclear modifications to $F_L^A(x,Q^2)$, obtained in terms of the QCD factorization approach, are consistent with the existing data. We demonstrate that the low-$Q^2$ behavior of these data and the measured large longitudinal structure function point to a critical role for the power corrections when compared to other theoretical approaches.

  6. Resummed QCD Power Corrections to Nuclear Shadowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianwei Qiu; Ivan Vitev

    2005-01-10

    We calculate and resum a perturbative expansion of nuclear enhanced power corrections to the structure functions measured in deeply inelastic scattering of leptons on a nuclear target. Our results for the Bjorken $x$-, $Q^2$- and $A$-dependence of nuclear shadowing in $F_2^A(x,Q^2)$ and the nuclear modifications to $F_L^A(x,Q^2)$, obtained in terms of the QCD factorization approach, are consistent with the existing data. We demonstrate that the low-$Q^2$ behavior of these data and the measured large longitudinal structure function point to a critical role for the power corrections when compared to other theoretical approaches.

  7. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Hamblen, D.G.; Brouillette, C.R.

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  8. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Hamblen, David G. (East Hampton, CT); Brouillette, Carl R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  9. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  10. Correction coil cable

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Sou-Tien (Danville, CA)

    1994-11-01

    A wire cable assembly (10, 310) adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies (532) for the superconducting super collider. The correction coil cables (10, 310) have wires (14, 314) collected in wire arrays (12, 312) with a center rib (16, 316) sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly (18, 318 ). The core assembly (18, 318) is surrounded by an assembly housing (20, 320) having an inner spiral wrap (22, 322) and a counter wound outer spiral wrap (24, 324). An alternate embodiment (410) of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable (410) on a particle tube (733) in a particle tube assembly (732).

  11. Physical and computer modeling of military earth grounding practices in a HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) environment. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuneo, A.A. Jr.; Loftus, J.J.; Perala, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    Military grounding practices compatible with hardening electronic systems to high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) illumination are considered. This study concerns the grounding practices outlined in MIL-STD-188-124, Common Long-Haul/Tactical Communications Systems. Three standard grounding schemes and one new scheme were chosen for study at a 10:1 scale, illuminated by a 59-V/m peak simulated HEMP. There were several significant results: (a) The theoretical technique in general agrees to within a factor of three with the experimental results, (b) The type end of earth ground system does not appear to be important, and (c) Intrasite transients tend to be dominated by electromagnetic coupling to completed conductive loops. When the loop is broken, the transient is characterized by the half-wavelength resonance of the conductor. Grounding paths which do not form part of the loop do not contribute significantly to the transient in the loop.

  12. Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Defect correction in optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemker, P.W.

    Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Defect correction in optimization "Manifold Mapping" P.W. Hemker IPIR/CWI/UvA June 11, 2010 Manifold Mapping P.W. Hemker #12;Motivation Defect correction The algorithm Summary Motivation Motivation determine x1, x2, x1, x3, x4, x5, x6, x7 Manifold

  13. Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Ensure Program Correctness Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group Lab Coordinator Bow-Yaw Wang The Programming Languages and Formal Methods Research Group develops techniques to help ensure program correctness. Our research in programming languages focuses on syntactic, semantic

  14. Corrective Measures Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentratingPortalCoolCoronary Stents ImprovedCorrective

  15. RCRA corrective action and closure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This information brief explains how RCRA corrective action and closure processes affect one another. It examines the similarities and differences between corrective action and closure, regulators` interests in RCRA facilities undergoing closure, and how the need to perform corrective action affects the closure of DOE`s permitted facilities and interim status facilities.

  16. Hierarchical Correctness Proofs Distributed Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuttle, Mark R.

    distributed networks. With this model we are able to construct modular, hierarchical correct- ness proofs these messages and process variables can be extremely di cult, and the resulting proofs of correct- ness of the full algorithm's correct- ness. Some time ago, we began to consider this approach of proof by re nement

  17. Ikarus: Large-Scale Participatory Sensing at High Altitudes Michael von Kaenel, Philipp Sommer, and Roger Wattenhofer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikarus: Large-Scale Participatory Sensing at High Altitudes Michael von Kaenel, Philipp Sommer, and Roger Wattenhofer Computer Engineering and Networks Laboratory ETH Zurich, Switzerland {vkaenemi,sommer

  18. Gravity waves and high-altitude CO$_2$ ice cloud formation in the Martian atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi?it, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO$_2$ condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral parameterization. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO$_2$ ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO$_2$ cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  19. Effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on telecommunications assets. Final Technical Information Bulletin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-06-01

    The objective of the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Mitigation Program is the removal of EMP as a significant impediment to timely reestablishment of regional and national telecommunications following an attack against the United States that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The program approach involves estimating the effects of High-altitude EMP (HEMP) on telecommunication connectivity and traffic-handling capability, assessing the impact of available HEMP mitigation alternatives, and developing a comprehensive plan for implementating mitigation alternatives. This report summarizes available test results as they apply to the EMP Mitigation Program, and supercedes all previous versions of this report.

  20. Using error correction to determine the noise model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laforest; D. Simon; J. -C. Boileau; J. Baugh; M. Ditty; R. Laflamme

    2007-01-25

    Quantum error correcting codes have been shown to have the ability of making quantum information resilient against noise. Here we show that we can use quantum error correcting codes as diagnostics to characterise noise. The experiment is based on a three-bit quantum error correcting code carried out on a three-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum information processor. Utilizing both engineered and natural noise, the degree of correlations present in the noise affecting a two-qubit subsystem was determined. We measured a correlation factor of c=0.5+/-0.2 using the error correction protocol, and c=0.3+/-0.2 using a standard NMR technique based on coherence pathway selection. Although the error correction method demands precise control, the results demonstrate that the required precision is achievable in the liquid-state NMR setting.

  1. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  2. Phylogeny of ulotrichalean algae from extreme high-altitude and high-latitude ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Phylogeny of ulotrichalean algae from extreme high-altitude and high-latitude ecosystems S. K the terrestrial algae that are found in these systems. Here, we show that terrestrial algae in the Ulotrichales and the high Himalayas. We further show that these ulotrichalean algae are closely related (using 18S, ITS/5.8S

  3. The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    The Effects of Altitude on Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck On-Road Emissions G A R Y A . B I S H O P , * J oxide from 5772 heavy-duty diesel trucks at five locations in the United States and Europe show slightly emissions has largely been focused on the regulation and control of exhaust emissions from light

  4. System for beaming power from earth to a high altitude platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, Herbert W. (Oakland, CA); Porter, Terry J. (Ridgecrest, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Power is transmitted to a high altitude platform by an array of diode pumped solid state lasers each operated at a single range of laser wavelengths outside of infrared and without using adaptive optics. Each laser produces a beam with a desired arrival spot size. An aircraft avoidance system uses a radar system for automatic control of the shutters of the lasers.

  5. Pheromone-mediated optomotor anemotaxis and altitude control exhibited by male oriental fruit moths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Pheromone-mediated optomotor anemotaxis and altitude control exhibited by male oriental fruit),flyingunder high windspeeds tended to steer coursesmore a intothewind and to increasetheir airspeedscomparedwith angles and to maintain an upwind progress of between c 50-100 c d s despite variable wind velocities

  6. A Hovering Flapping-Wing Microrobot with Altitude Control and Passive Upright Stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Robert

    A Hovering Flapping-Wing Microrobot with Altitude Control and Passive Upright Stability Z. E. Teoh forces [2]. Despite these challenges, various groups have reported success in building small scale aerial that enabled liftoff was an underactuated, passive mechanism that regulated the angle of attack of the wings [7

  7. On the HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) response of protective relays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Barnes, P.R. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the susceptibility of protective relays to the transients produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms responsible for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are examined. The predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse. 11 refs., 16 figs.

  8. On the HEMP environment for protective relays. [High-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Salas, T.M. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1994-01-01

    An assessment of the transient environment for protective relays produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are used to develop estimates of possible HEMP threats to relays. These predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse strength.

  9. On scaling cosmogenic nuclide production rates for altitude and latitude using cosmic-ray measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    On scaling cosmogenic nuclide production rates for altitude and latitude using cosmic 2001 Abstract The wide use of cosmogenic nuclides for dating terrestrial landforms has prompted for production rates of cosmogenic nuclides. Over the past 50 years, the overwhelming majority of nucleon flux

  10. Colonization of high altitudes by alien plants over the last two centuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kratochvíl, Lukas

    Colonization of high altitudes by alien plants over the last two centuries Petr Pyseka,b,1 an elegant explana- tion for global patterns of alien species richness in mountain regions. These authors for explaining the patterns of alien species richness than dispersal processes or pre- adaptation of species

  11. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    1999-07-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 321, Weather Station Fuel Storage, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 321 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Area 22, and consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS) 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area. This CAS contains a fuel storage area approximately 325 by 540 feet, which was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historical Camp Desert Rock facility, which was operational from 1951 to 1958. The corrective action investigation conducted in February 1999 found the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels to be total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics at two sample locations. During this investigation, the two corrective action objectives identified were (1) to prevent or mitigate exposure to near-surface soil containing contaminants of concern, and (2) to prevent spread of contaminants of concern beyond the corrective action unit. Based on the corrective action objectives, the two corrective action alternatives developed for consideration were: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; and Alternative 2 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. The two alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred corrective action alternative chosen on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety was Alternative 2. This alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at the Weather Station Fuel Storage site.

  12. Proton form factor effects in hydrogenic atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daza, F. Garcia; Kelkar, N. G.; Nowakowski, M.

    2011-10-21

    The proton structure corrections to the hyperfine splittings in electronic and muonic hydrogen are evaluated using the Breit potential with electromagnetic form factors. In contrast to other methods, the Breit equation with q{sup 2} dependent form factors is just an extension of the standard Breit equation which gives the hyperfine splitting Hamiltonian. Precise QED corrections are comparable to the structure corrections which therefore need to be evaluated ab initio.

  13. Correction to kinetic energy density using exactly solvable model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexey Sergeev; Raka Jovanovic; Sabre Kais; Fahhad H Alharbi

    2015-06-03

    An accurate non-gradient-expansion based correction to Thomas--Fermi is developed using solvable model. The used model is a system of $N$ non-interacting electrons moving independently in the Coulomb field of the nuclear charge. The presented correction is applicable for atoms and should be extendable beyond that. The method exploits the fact that the difference between the Thomas--Fermi approximation and the non-interacting kinetic energy is comparable to the difference between the same values inside the proposed solvable model. The numerical experiments show that by adding this correction factor, the precision of Thomas--Fermi approximation is enhanced by an order of magnitude.

  14. CORRECT TRACKING IN FFAGS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERG, J.S.

    2006-01-30

    Fixed field alternating gradient accelerators have many features which require careful modeling in simulation. They accept beams over an extremely large momentum range, generally at least a factor of 2. They often use magnets whose lengths are comparable to their apertures. The beam often makes large angles with respect to the magnet axis and pole face normal. In some applications (muons in particular), the beam occupies a substantial fraction of the magnet aperture. The longitudinal dynamics in these machines often differ significantly from what one finds in more conventional machines such as synchrotrons. These characteristics require that simulation codes be careful to avoid inappropriate approximations in describing particle motion in FFAGs. One must properly treat the coordinate system geometry independently from the magnetic fields. One cannot blindly assume that phase space variables are small. One must take magnet end fields properly into account. Finally, one must carefully consider what it means to have a ''matched'' distribution that is injected into these machines.

  15. The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickenbotham, Adam Lyle

    2012-01-01

    subject’s vision. It can also implement an artificial pupilvision. 14,15 Multifocal IOLs function on a similar principle with multiple zones on the artificialvision. Monovision can be similarly applied in cataract surgery by placing a slightly higher powered artificial

  16. MODIFIED SOLAR INSOLATION AS AN AGRONOMIC FACTOR IN TERRACED ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Tom

    of altitude, latitude, slope aspect, slope angle, and season. The net solar bene®t or cost from slope levelingMODIFIED SOLAR INSOLATION AS AN AGRONOMIC FACTOR IN TERRACED ENVIRONMENTS T. P. EVANS*1 AND B; Accepted 16 August 1999 ABSTRACT We present a model that calculates incident solar radiation falling

  17. RCRA corrective action: Work plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01

    This Information Brief describes the work plans that owners/operators may have to prepare in conjunction with the performance of corrective action for compliance with RCRA guidelines. In general, the more complicated the performance of corrective action appears from the remedial investigation and other analyses, the more likely it is that the regulator will impose work plan requirements. In any case, most owner/operators will prepare work plans in conjunction with the performance of corrective action processes as a matter of best engineering management practices.

  18. Range corrections in Proton Halo Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryberg, Emil; Hammer, H -W; Platter, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the effects of finite-range corrections in halo effective field theory for S-wave proton halo nuclei. We calculate the charge radius to next-to-leading order and the astrophysical S-factor for low-energy proton capture to fifth order in the low-energy expansion. As an application, we confront our results with experimental data for the S-factor for proton capture on Oxygen-16 into the excited $1/2^+$ state of Fluorine-17. Our low-energy theory is characterized by a systematic low-energy expansion, which can be used to quantify an energy-dependent model error to be utilized in data fitting. Finally, we show that the existence of proton halos is suppressed by the need for two fine tunings in the underlying theory.

  19. Effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on telecommunications assets. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-15

    In response to Executive Order (E.O.) 12472 and National Security Decision Directive 97 (NSDD-97), the Office of the Manager, National Communications System (OMNCS) has begun an ElectroMagnetic Pulse (EMP) mitigation program. The objective of this program is the removal of EMP as a significant impediment to timely reestablishment of regional and national telecommunications following an attack against the United States that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The methodology for developing an EMP mitigation program plan was described in the National Communications System (NCS) report Electromagnetic Pulse Mitigation Program Approach of July 1982. The program approach involves estimating the effects of High-altitude EMP (HEMP) on telecommunications capabilities, assessing the impact of available HEMP mitigation alternatives, and developing a comprehensive plan for implementing mitigation alternatives. The purpose of this report is to summarize available test results as they apply to the EMP mitigation program.

  20. On the HEMP (high-altitude electromagnetic pulse) environment for protective relays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.E.; Wiggins, C.M.; Salas, T.M. (BDM International, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Barnes, P.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the transient environment for protective relays produced by high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) events is presented in this paper. Several mechanisms for coupling of HEMP to relay terminals are used to develop estimates of possible HEMP threats to relays. These predicted relay responses to HEMP events are compared to measured data on a solid state based relay's impulse strength. 12 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. 55-Gallon Drum Attenuation Corrections for Waste Assay Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, V.R.

    2002-04-03

    The present study shows how the percent attenuation for low-level waste (LLW), carbon-steel 55-gallon drums (44 and 46 mil) and for transuranic (TRU) DOT Type 7A 55-gallon drums (approximately 61 mil) changes with gamma energy from 60 keV to 1400 keV. Attenuation for these drums is in the range of 5 to 15 percent at energies from 400 to 1400 keV and from 15 to 35 percent at energies from 120 to 400 keV. At 60 keV, these drums attenuate 70-80 percent of the gamma rays. Correction factors were determined in order to correct for gamma attenuation of a TRU drum if a calibration is performed with a LLW drum. These correction factors increase the activities of the TRU drum by from 10 percent to 2 percent in the energy range of 165 to 1400 keV, with an increase of about 50 percent at 60 keV. Correction factors for TRU drums and for analyses without a drum were used to adjust the percent yield for frequently measured gamma rays, so that the assay libraries could be modified to provide the drum attenuation corrections.

  2. Entropic corrections to Einstein equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendi, S. H. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, A. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175-132, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Considering the general quantum corrections to the area law of black hole entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity interprets as an entropic force, we derive the modified forms of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory of gravitation and Einstein field equations. As two special cases we study the logarithmic and power-law corrections to entropy and find the explicit form of the obtained modified equations.

  3. Fuel Efficiency Benefits and Implementation Consideration for Cruise Altitude and Speed Optimization in the National Airspace System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Luke

    2014-07-29

    This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

  4. Full efficiency benefits and implementation considerations for cruise altitude and speed optimization in the National Airspace system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, Luke L

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the potential fuel burn benefits of altitude and speed optimization in the cruise phase of flight for domestic airlines in the United States. Airlines can achieve cost reductions and reduce environmental ...

  5. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

  6. Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I Environmental Management Headquarters Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase I The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to specify U.S. Department of...

  7. Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

    2003-06-03

    A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  8. Sensor Data Management, Validation, Correction,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    in three areas Envelope Equipment System/building integration Develop component technologies that are more in real buildings #12;6 Envelope research lab facilities Heat Flow Through Roof/Attic Assemblies Heat FlowSensor Data Management, Validation, Correction, and Provenance for Building Technologies Charles

  9. Figure correction of multilayer coated optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chapman; Henry N. (Livermore, CA), Taylor; John S. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-16

    A process is provided for producing near-perfect optical surfaces, for EUV and soft-x-ray optics. The method involves polishing or otherwise figuring the multilayer coating that has been deposited on an optical substrate, in order to correct for errors in the figure of the substrate and coating. A method such as ion-beam milling is used to remove material from the multilayer coating by an amount that varies in a specified way across the substrate. The phase of the EUV light that is reflected from the multilayer will be affected by the amount of multilayer material removed, but this effect will be reduced by a factor of 1-n as compared with height variations of the substrate, where n is the average refractive index of the multilayer.

  10. Development of ultra-thin polyethylene balloons for high altitude research upto mesosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, B Suneel; Ojha, D K; Peter, G Stalin; Vasudevan, R; Anand, D; Kulkarni, P M; Reddy, V Anmi; Rao, T V; Sreenivasan, S

    2014-01-01

    Ever since its inception four decades back, Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Hyderabad has been functioning with the needs of its user scientists at its focus. During the early nineties, when the X-ray astronomy group at TIFR expressed the need for balloons capable of carrying the X-ray telescopes to altitudes up to 42 km, the balloon group initiated research and development work on indigenous balloon grade films in various thickness not only for the main experiment but also in parallel, took up the development of thin films in thickness range 5 to 6 microns for fabrication of sounding balloons required for probing the stratosphere up to 42 km as the regular 2000 grams rubber balloon ascents could not reach altitudes higher than 38 km. By the year 1999, total indigenisation of sounding balloon manufacture was accomplished. The work on balloon grade ultra-thin polyethylene film in thickness range 2.8 to 3.8 microns for fabrication of balloons capable of penetrating mesosphere ...

  11. Estimate of air carrier and air taxi crash frequencies from high altitude en route flight operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanzo, D.; Kimura, C.Y.; Prassinos, P.G.

    1996-06-03

    In estimating the frequency of an aircraft crashing into a facility, it has been found convenient to break the problem down into two broad categories. One category estimates the aircraft crash frequency due to air traffic from nearby airports, the so-called near-airport environment. The other category estimates the aircraft crash frequency onto facilities due to air traffic from airways, jet routes, and other traffic flying outside the near-airport environment The total aircraft crash frequency is the summation of the crash frequencies from each airport near the facility under evaluation and from all airways, jet routes, and other traffic near the facility of interest. This paper will examine the problems associated with the determining the aircraft crash frequencies onto facilities outside the near-airport environment. This paper will further concentrate on the estimating the risk of aircraft crashes to ground facilities due to high altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic. High altitude air carrier and air taxi traffic will be defined as all air carrier and air taxi flights above 18,000 feet Mean Sea Level (MSL).

  12. Development of a new high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment and resulting over head line responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesche, F.M.; Barnes, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    Being able to accurately determine the response of an electrical system which is excited by a high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) requires a knowledge of the time history of the incident EMP field strength, as well as its angle of incidence and polarization. A commonly used, unclassified, description of this environment is provided by the ''Bell Laboratory waveform.'' Recent studies have shown, however, that this EMP waveform tends to overestimate the response of an above-ground transmission line by more than an order of magnitude. As a result, other unclassified high altitude EMP environments have been developed. This presentation discusses the development of two alternate unclassified EMP environment descriptions: one arising from a simple radiating dipole moment model, and the other resulting from curve-fitting the calculated fields from a computer code named CHAP. For both of these EMP models, the electric field at two earth observation points are compared. These fields are then coupled to an above-ground line and the resulting open-circuit voltage responses are compared. Using the CHAP EMP environment, a limited parametric study of the peak positive and negative open-circuit voltage is then performed and surface plots of these peak voltages are presented. 8 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Relativistic corrections to prompt $J/\\psi$ photo- and hadroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to prompt $J/\\psi$ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[1]}$ color-singlet and the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$, ${}^1\\!S_{0}^{[8]}$, and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[8]}$ color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$ and ${}^3\\!D_1^{[8]}$ channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, except in the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ color-singlet channel of hadroproduction. We also observe significant differences in the line shapes of the relativistic corrections between photoproduction and hadroproduction.

  14. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    2008-01-15

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  15. Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miloshevich, Larry

    Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

  16. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  17. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013)

  18. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    2015-04-07

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013)

  19. Study to assess the effects of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse on electric power systems. Phase I, final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legro, J.R.; Abi-Samra, N.C.; Crouse, J.C.; Hileman, A.R.; Kruse, V.J.; Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Tesche, F.M.

    1986-02-01

    The high-altitude burst of a nuclear device over the continental United States can expose civilian electric utility systems to transient electromagnetic pulses (EMP). The electromagnetic fields experienced within one second after the burst have been collectively defined by the term high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The phenomena has been subdivided, for this report, into an early-time HEMP field followed by an intermediate-time HEMP field. This volume documents a preliminary research effort to: investigate the nature and coupling of the HEMP environments to electric power systems, define the construction of approximate system response models, and document the development of a methodology to assess equipment and system vulnerability.

  20. Sparse breakdown and statistical sneakthrough'' effects in low-altitude microwave propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Bolton, P.R.; Sieger, G.E.; Fittinghoff, D.N.

    1990-01-01

    It is generally assumed that the beam intensity that can be transmitted through the atmosphere by a high-power microwave pulse will be limited by the air-breakdown threshold. Air breakdown by microwave has been studied extensively, both theoretically and experimentally. It is a cascade process in which free electrons, driven by the microwave electric field, generate further ionization through collisions with air molecules. The process can disrupt the propagation of a microwave pulse if the electron plasma density grows to within an appreciable fraction of critical density. In a pulsed beam this can happen if, and only if, the field strength is sufficiently large and the beam encounters one or more initiating free seed'' electrons sufficiently early in the pulse. This paper discusses this sparse breakdown in low-altitude wave propagation.

  1. Radiative reactions and coherence modeling in the high-altitude electromagnetic pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.; Rabinowitz, M.

    1988-03-15

    A high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10/sup 4/ V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self-field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self-generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self-generated electric field accounts for the energy-flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  2. Electroweak Radiative Corrections at High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansgar Denner

    2001-10-11

    For energies far above the electroweak scale, large electroweak radiative corrections occur that grow logarithmically with energy and can easily reach several tens of per cent in the TeV range. Recent work on these corrections is reviewed.

  3. Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Correctional Managed Health Care Michael Vasquenza, BS Kirsten Shea, MBA #12;NO CONFLICTS of budget reductions · Pharmacy services · Aging population · Legal obligations · Logistics specific to Correctional Institutions / Building InfrastructureInfrastructure · Space and accompanying environment

  4. Surface Correction to Landau Diamagnetism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.

    1975-01-01

    field applied perpendicular to the surface, we show that gd ??g?'/3, where gd and g~ are, respectively, the surface corrections to the Landau diamagnetism and the Pauli paramagnetism. The total surface contribution to the susceptibility is y' :=(2.../3)(pa/w )A [y(kw) -w/4], where y(k+) is the phase shift for k, = kF . Since iyi = w/4 and y(k F) & (y), the surface contributions to the magnetic susceptibility and electronic heat capacity are positive. s 1 sXg= ?3Xp~ (2) where X'?and X~ are...

  5. LA RPARTITION DE L'OZONE ATMOSPHRIQUE EN FONCTION DE L'ALTITUDE Par M. D. BARBIER.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    LA RÉPARTITION DE L'OZONE ATMOSPHÉRIQUE EN FONCTION DE L'ALTITUDE Par M. D. BARBIER. Observatoire observations en déter- minant la distribution de l'ozone par une série de Charlier du type A. En général on ne peut déterminer que la quantité totale d'ozone et la hauteur moyenne de la distribution, ces quantités

  6. Evidence for kinetic Alfven waves and parallel electron energization at 46 RE altitudes in the plasma sheet boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Evidence for kinetic Alfve´n waves and parallel electron energization at 4­6 RE altitudes electron heating features and earthward electron beams, indicating strong parallel energization provide strong evidence that in addition to the auroral particle energization processes known to occur

  7. HIGH SPEED, IN-FLIGHT STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MEDIUM ALTITUDE LONG ENDURANCE UNMANNED AIR VEHICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HIGH SPEED, IN-FLIGHT STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEM FOR MEDIUM ALTITUDE LONG ENDURANCE on Structural Health Monitoring July 8-11, 2014. La Cité, Nantes, France Copyright © Inria (2014) 274 hal Health Monitoring (2014)" #12;substantiation of structural bonded jointsmay be based on: "repeatable

  8. Microbial population dynamics in an extreme environment: controlling factors in talus soils at 3750 m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Microbial population dynamics in an extreme environment: controlling factors in talus soils at 3750 unvegetated soils Abstract. High elevation talus soils are extreme environments for life. They are pertinent, in vegetated and unvegetated soils from a high altitude talus slope at 3750 m in the Colorado Front Range

  9. Simulation of high-altitude effects on heavy-duty diesel emissions. Final report, 31 October 1988-30 September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Human, D.M.; Ullman, T.L.

    1989-09-01

    Exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines operating at high altitude are of concern. EPA and Colorado Department of Health sponsored the project to characterize regulated and selected unregulated emissions from a naturally-aspirated Caterpillar 3208 and a turbocharged Cummins NTC-350 diesel engine at both low and simulated high altitude conditions (about 6000 ft). Emissions testing was performed over cold- and hot-start transient cycles as well as selected steady-state modes. Additionally, the turbocharged engine was operated with mechanically variable and fixed retarded fuel injection timing to represent normal and malfunction conditions, respectively. High altitude operation generally reduced NOx emissions approximately 10% for both engines. Average composite transient emissions of HC, CO, particulate matter, and aldehydes measured at high altitude for the naturally-aspirated engine were 2 to 4 times the levels noted for low altitude conditions. The same emission constituents from the turbocharged engine at high altitude with normal timing were 1.2 to 2 times the low altitude levels, but were 2 to 4 times the low altitude levels with malfunction timing.

  10. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

  11. Deuteron Form Factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, G.R.; Huleihel, K.; Zhang, H. (Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08855 (United States))

    1995-01-30

    We obtain the perturbative QCD (PQCD) prediction for the leading twist deuteron form factor, treated as a pair of nucleons in nonrelativistic bound state. It is [lt]10[sup [minus]3] times experiment at [ital Q][sup 2]=4 GeV[sup 2], suggesting that PQCD is not relevant to the deuteron form factor at present values of [ital Q][sup 2], or that non-nucleon (e.g., hidden color'') degrees of freedom must be included for a correct description of the deuteron. The tree-level amplitude [similar to][ital eg][sup 10] and is the sum of several 10[sup 6] Feynman diagrams, making it an interesting case study in the behavior of perturbation theory.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-12-08

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

  13. Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campisi, John A.

    2009-07-01

    There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

  14. Evaluation of two Vaisala RS92 radiosonde solar radiative dry bias correction algorithms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dzambo, A. M.; Turner, D. D.; Mlawer, E. J.

    2015-10-20

    Solar heating of the relative humidity (RH) probe on Vaisala RS92 radiosondes results in a large dry bias in the upper troposphere. Two different algorithms (Miloshevich et al., 2009, MILO hereafter; and Wang et al., 2013, WANG hereafter) have been designed to account for this solar radiative dry bias (SRDB). These corrections are markedly different with MILO adding up to 40 % more moisture to the original radiosonde profile than WANG; however, the impact of the two algorithms varies with height. The accuracy of these two algorithms is evaluated using three different approaches: a comparison of precipitable water vapor (PWV),more »downwelling radiative closure with a surface-based microwave radiometer at a high-altitude site (5.3 km MSL), and upwelling radiative closure with the space-based Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS). The PWV computed from the uncorrected and corrected RH data is compared against PWV retrieved from ground-based microwave radiometers at tropical, mid-latitude, and arctic sites. Although MILO generally adds more moisture to the original radiosonde profile in the upper troposphere compared to WANG, both corrections yield similar changes to the PWV, and the corrected data agree well with the ground-based retrievals. The two closure activities – done for clear-sky scenes – use the radiative transfer models MonoRTM and LBLRTM to compute radiance from the radiosonde profiles to compare against spectral observations. Both WANG- and MILO-corrected RH are statistically better than original RH in all cases except for the driest 30 % of cases in the downwelling experiment, where both algorithms add too much water vapor to the original profile. In the upwelling experiment, the RH correction applied by the WANG vs. MILO algorithm is statistically different above 10 km for the driest 30 % of cases and above 8 km for the moistest 30 % of cases, suggesting that the MILO correction performs better than the WANG in clear-sky scenes. The cause of this statistical significance is likely explained by the fact the WANG correction also accounts for cloud cover – a condition not accounted for in the radiance closure experiments.« less

  15. Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

    2011-01-01

    Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

  16. A methodology to assess the effects of high altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, E.R. Jr.; Eichler, C.H.; Barnes, P.R.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) from high altitude nuclear detonations (HEMP) has the potential to seriously disrupt electric power systems. A methodology has been developed to assess the vulnerability of electric power systems to this phenomena for any specified nuclear burst scenario. The methodology is based on a structured approach whereby the power system is broken down into subsystems, functional groups, and circuits and devices. Vulnerability (likelihood of failure) is assessed for individual equipment (circuits and devices) for each nuclear burst scenario. These effects are then evaluated for their performance impact on successively higher system levels. This forms the input for classical load flow, short circuit and transient stability studies to evaluate system stability and survivability. Applicability of the assessment methodology is not dependent on the quality of component/equipment vulnerability data. Susceptibility of power equipment to HEMP damage may be determined by established technical analysis, by intepretation of equipment design and testing standards, and by laboratory testing. This paper has been written not only for the electric utility engineer, but also for experts in EMP who may not be knowledgeable in electric utility systems. 12 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Method and apparatus for providing pulse pile-up correction in charge quantizing radiation detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    A radiation detection method and system for continuously correcting the quantization of detected charge during pulse pile-up conditions. Charge pulses from a radiation detector responsive to the energy of detected radiation events are converted to voltage pulses of predetermined shape whose peak amplitudes are proportional to the quantity of charge of each corresponding detected event by means of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. These peak amplitudes are sampled and stored sequentially in accordance with their respective times of occurrence. Based on the stored peak amplitudes and times of occurrence, a correction factor is generated which represents the fraction of a previous pulses influence on a preceding pulse peak amplitude. This correction factor is subtracted from the following pulse amplitude in a summing amplifier whose output then represents the corrected charge quantity measurement.

  18. Rulison Site corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    Project Rulison was a joint US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and Austral Oil Company (Austral) experiment, conducted under the AEC`s Plowshare Program, to evaluate the feasibility of using a nuclear device to stimulate natural gas production in low-permeability gas-producing geologic formations. The experiment was conducted on September 10, 1969, and consisted of detonating a 40-kiloton nuclear device at a depth of 2,568 m below ground surface (BGS). This Corrective Action Report describes the cleanup of petroleum hydrocarbon- and heavy-metal-contaminated sediments from an old drilling effluent pond and characterization of the mud pits used during drilling of the R-EX well at the Rulison Site. The Rulison Site is located approximately 65 kilometers (40 miles) northeast of Grand Junction, Colorado. The effluent pond was used for the storage of drilling mud during drilling of the emplacement hole for the 1969 gas stimulation test conducted by the AEC. This report also describes the activities performed to determine whether contamination is present in mud pits used during the drilling of well R-EX, the gas production well drilled at the site to evaluate the effectiveness of the detonation in stimulating gas production. The investigation activities described in this report were conducted during the autumn of 1995, concurrent with the cleanup of the drilling effluent pond. This report describes the activities performed during the soil investigation and provides the analytical results for the samples collected during that investigation.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Environmenta' Management Headquarters

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Environmenta' Management Headquarters Phase 2: Radiological Release Event at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on February 14 2014 Washington, DC 20585 August 2015 Corrective...

  20. Dispersion corrections to parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorchtein, M.; Horowitz, C. J. [Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, M. J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    We consider the dispersion correction to elastic parity violating electron-proton scattering due to {gamma}Z exchange. In a recent publication, this correction was reported to be substantially larger than the previous estimates. In this paper, we study the dispersion correction in greater detail. We confirm the size of the disperion correction to be {approx}6% for the QWEAK experiment designed to measure the proton weak charge. We enumerate parameters that have to be constrained to better than relative 30% in order to keep the theoretical uncertainty for QWEAK under control.

  1. Re: Corrected Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    September 25, 2014 To: expartecommunication@hq.doe.gov (sent via email) Re: Corrected Memorandum Summarizing Ex Parte Communication This memorandum is submitted to revise and...

  2. Linear optics measurements and corrections using an AC dipole in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, G.; Bai, M.; Yang, L.

    2010-05-23

    We report recent experimental results on linear optics measurements and corrections using ac dipole. In RHIC 2009 run, the concept of the SVD correction algorithm is tested at injection energy for both identifying the artificial gradient errors and correcting it using the trim quadrupoles. The measured phase beatings were reduced by 30% and 40% respectively for two dedicated experiments. In RHIC 2010 run, ac dipole is used to measure {beta}* and chromatic {beta} function. For the 0.65m {beta}* lattice, we observed a factor of 3 discrepancy between model and measured chromatic {beta} function in the yellow ring.

  3. Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

    2013-04-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

  4. You have printed the following article: Relationships between Vegetation Zonation and Altitude in a Salt-Marsh System in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medrano, Mónica

    Vegetation Zonation and Altitude in a Salt-Marsh System in Northwest Spain J. M. Sánchez; J. Izco; M. Medrano Zonation in North Carolina Salt Marshes David A. Adams Ecology, Vol. 44, No. 3. (Jul., 1963), pp. 445-0147%28199310%29142%3A4%3C718%3ACAFIMP%3E2.0.CO%3B2-6 Studies in Salt-Marsh Ecology Sections I to III V. J. Chapman

  5. Regenerative fuel cells for High Altitude Long Endurance Solar Powered Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitlitsky, F.; Colella, N.J.; Myers, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, C.J. [Aero Vironment, Inc., Monrovia, CA (United States)

    1993-06-02

    High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned missions appear to be feasible using a lightweight, high efficiency, span-loaded, Solar Powered Aircraft (SPA) which includes a Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) system and novel tankage for energy storage. An existing flightworthy electric powered flying wing design was modified to incorporate present and near-term technologies in energy storage, power electronics, aerodynamics, and guidance and control in order to design philosophy was to work with vendors to identify affordable near-term technological opportunities that could be applied to existing designs in order to reduce weight, increase reliability, and maintain adequate efficiency of components for delivery within 18 months. The energy storage subsystem for a HALE SPA is a key driver for the entire vehicle because it can represent up to half of the vehicle weight and most missions of interest require the specific energy to be considerably higher than 200 W-hr/kg for many cycles. This stringent specific energy requirement precludes the use of rechargeable batteries or flywheels and suggests examination of various RFC designs. An RFC system using lightweight tankage, a single fuel cell (FC) stack, and a single electrolyzer (EC) stack separated by the length of a spar segment (up to 39 ft), has specific energy of {approximately}300 W-hr/kg with 45% efficiency, which is adequate for HALE SPA requirements. However, this design has complexity and weight penalties associated with thermal management, electrical wiring, plumbing, and structural weight. A more elegant solution is to use unitized RFC stacks (reversible stacks that act as both FCs and ECs) because these systems have superior specific energy, scale to smaller systems more favorably, and have intrinsically simpler thermal management.

  6. Engine gaseous, aerosol precursor and particulate at simulated flight altitude conditions. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wey, C.C.

    1998-10-01

    The overall objective of the NASA Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) is to develop scientific bases for assessing atmospheric impacts of the exhaust emissions by both current and future fleets of subsonic and supersonic aircraft. Among the six primary elements of the AEAP is Emissions Characterization. The objective of the Emission Characterization effort is to determine the exhaust emission constituents and concentrations at the engine exit plane. The specific objective of this engine test is to obtain a database of gaseous and particulate emissions as a function of fuel sulfur and engine operating conditions. The database of the particulate emission properties is to be used as a comparative baseline with subsequent flight measurement. The engine used in this test was a Pratt and Whitney F100-200E turbofan engine. Aviation fuel (Jet A) with a range of fuel sulfur was used. Low and high sulfur values are limited by commercially available fuels and by fuel specification limits of 0.3% by weight. Test matrix was set by parametrically varying the combustor inlet temperature (T3) between idle and maximum power setting at simulated SLS and up to five other altitudes for each fuel. Four diagnostic systems, extractive and non-intrusive, were assembled for the gaseous and particulate emissions characterization measurements study. NASA extractive system includes smoke meter and analyzers for measurement of CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NOx, O{sub 2}, total unburnt hydrocarbons (THC), and SO{sub 2}. Particulate emissions were characterized by University of Missouri-Rolla Mobile Aerosol Sampling System.

  7. Proving the Correctness of Coroutines without History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Edmund M.

    Proving the Correctness of Coroutines without History Variables Edmund M. Clarke (Duke University) Abstract We examine the question of whether history variables are necessary in formal proofs of correctness for coroutines. History v ~ are special variables which are added to a program to facilitate its Droof

  8. Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, Claude

    Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory C. Bernard and E.D. Freeland perturbation theory including electromagnetism, and discuss the extent to which quenched-photon simulations can-lat]17Nov2010 #12;Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory E.D. Freeland 1

  9. EXACT WAVEFRONT CORRECTION IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosier, Lionel - Institut de Mathématiques �lie Cartan, Université Henri Poincaré

    EXACT WAVEFRONT CORRECTION IN ADAPTIVE OPTICS. Pierre Le Gall Lionel Rosier Institut Elie Cartan an adaptive optical system in which a deformable mirror is controlled to compensate for random wavefront c 2005 IFAC Keywords: Adaptive optics, exact wavefront correction, membrane mirror. 1. INTRODUCTION

  10. Fuel cell flooding detection and correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DiPierno Bosco, Andrew (Rochester, NY); Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY)

    2000-08-15

    Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

  11. The Challenge of Quantum Error Correction.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    in the design of physical bits. #12;What we need Hardware requirements: 1. Many 103-104 / R individual bits (R flip classical error b. Phase error 0exp( ( ) )z i E t dt = - Fluctuates 1. Need hardware error #12;Classical error correction by the software and hardware. , / 2 0 Hardware error correction: Ising

  12. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    sequences, the MR signal is given by: We can target , T1, and T2 measurements through appropriate selectionA Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Research Qualifying Exam June 10, 2003 #12;Outline 1. Introduction to bias correction 2. Magnetic resonance imaging 3

  13. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group July 17, 2003 With W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, R. Mulkern, C. Tempany, A. Willsky #12;Outline 1 inhomogeneity that corrupts magnetic resonance (MR) images. Correcting for the bias field makes both human

  14. A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    A Variational Approach to MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan, W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A that corrupts magnetic resonance (MR) images. Correcting for the bias field makes both human analysis (e that encourages smoothness in b and piecewise smoothness in f: We generally choose p 1 to help preserve edges D

  15. Quantum Error Correction for Quantum Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbara M. Terhal

    2015-04-10

    Active quantum error correction using qubit stabilizer codes has emerged as a promising, but experimentally challenging, engineering program for building a universal quantum computer. In this review we consider the formalism of qubit stabilizer and subsystem stabilizer codes and their possible use in protecting quantum information in a quantum memory. We review the theory of fault-tolerance and quantum error-correction, discuss examples of various codes and code constructions, the general quantum error correction conditions, the noise threshold, the special role played by Clifford gates and the route towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation. The second part of the review is focused on providing an overview of quantum error correction using two-dimensional (topological) codes, in particular the surface code architecture. We discuss the complexity of decoding and the notion of passive or self-correcting quantum memories. The review does not focus on a particular technology but discusses topics that will be relevant for various quantum technologies.

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    1998-08-31

    This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

  17. Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla address http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/tds/boiler.html. Following are the corrections to these errors and some

  18. Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla_steam_water_est(sr) = #12;Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 2 7. p.11, The initial

  19. QCD Corrections to Scalar Diquark Production at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Han; Ian Lewis; Thomas McElmurry

    2010-02-15

    We calculate the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to quark-quark annihilation to a scalar resonant state ("diquark") in a color representation of antitriplet or sextet at the Tevatron and LHC energies. At the LHC, we find the enhancement (K-factor) for the antitriplet diquark is typically about 1.31--1.35, and for the sextet diquark is about 1.22--1.32 for initial-state valence quarks. The full transverse-momentum spectrum for the diquarks is also calculated at the LHC by performing the soft gluon resummation to the leading logarithm and all orders in the strong coupling.

  20. Inflationary power spectra with quantum holonomy corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielczarek, Jakub, E-mail: jakub.mielczarek@uj.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Cracow, 30-059 Poland (Poland)

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we study slow-roll inflation with holonomy corrections from loop quantum cosmology. It was previously shown that, in the Planck epoch, these corrections lead to such effects as singularity avoidance, metric signature change and a state of silence. Here, we consider holonomy corrections affecting the phase of cosmic inflation, which takes place away from the Planck epoch. Both tensor and scalar power spectra of primordial inflationary perturbations are computed up to the first order in slow-roll parameters and V/?{sub c}, where V is a potential of the scalar field and ?{sub c} is a critical energy density (expected to be of the order of the Planck energy density). Possible normalizations of modes at short scales are discussed. In case the normalization is performed with use of the Wronskian condition applied to adiabatic vacuum, the tensor and scalar spectral indices are not quantum corrected in the leading order. However, by choosing an alternative method of normalization one can obtain quantum corrections in the leading order. Furthermore, we show that the holonomy-corrected equations of motion for tensor and scalar modes can be derived based on effective background metrics. This allows us to show that the classical Wronskian normalization condition is well defined for the cosmological perturbations with holonomy corrections.

  1. Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crist, D.; Spencer, D.D.

    1996-12-31

    For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

  2. Neutrinoless double beta decay and QCD corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namit Mahajan

    2014-01-30

    We consider one loop QCD corrections and renormalization group running of the neutrinoless double beta decay amplitude focusing on the short-range part of the amplitude (without the light neutrino exchange) and find that these corrections can be sizeable. Depending on the operator under consideration, there can be moderate to large cancellations or significant enhancements. We discuss several specific examples in this context. Such large corrections will lead to significant shifts in the half-life estimates which currently are known to be plagued with the uncertainties due to nuclear physics inputs to the physical matrix elements.

  3. Quadratic electroweak corrections for polarized Moller scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Aleksejevs, S. Barkanova, Y. Kolomensky, E. Kuraev, V. Zykunov

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses the two-loop (NNLO) electroweak radiative corrections to the parity violating electron-electron scattering asymmetry induced by squaring one-loop diagrams. The calculations are relevant for the ultra-precise 11 GeV MOLLER experiment planned at Jefferson Laboratory and experiments at high-energy future electron colliders. The imaginary parts of the amplitudes are taken into consideration consistently in both the infrared-finite and divergent terms. The size of the obtained partial correction is significant, which indicates a need for a complete study of the two-loop electroweak radiative corrections in order to meet the precision goals of future experiments.

  4. Review of Power Corrections in DIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Kluge

    2006-06-23

    An overview is given of analyses in DIS at HERA which confront the predictions of power corrections with measured data. These include mean values and distributions of 2-jet as well as 3-jet event shape variables and jet rates.

  5. Quantum error-correcting codes and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gottesman, Daniel (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-10-03

    A method of forming quantum error-correcting codes by first forming a stabilizer for a Hilbert space. A quantum information processing device can be formed to implement such quantum codes.

  6. Correct Hardware Design and Verification Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margaria, T.; Melham, T.F.

    Margaria,T. Melham,T.F. Correct Hardware Design and Verification Methods: 11th IFIP WG10.5 Advanced Research Working Conference, CHARME 2001: UK Springer Verlag

  7. Correcting Iron Deficiencies in Grain Sorghum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.; Unruh, L. G.

    1996-02-20

    Until grain sorghum develops an extensive root system, young plants may be unable to obtain enough ferrous iron to maintain normal growth. This publication offers strategies for avoiding, identifying and correcting iron deficiencies....

  8. Time-like pion electromagnetic form factors in $k_{T}$ factorization with the Next-to-leading-order twist-3 contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan Cheng; Zhen-Jun Xiao

    2015-05-12

    We calculate the time-like pion electromagnetic form factor in the $k_T$ factorization formalism with the inclusion of the next-to-leading-order(NLO) corrections to the leading-twist and sub-leading-twist contributions. It's found that the total NLO correction can enhance (reduce) the magnitude (strong phase) of the leading order form factor by $20\\% - 30\\%$ ( $ 5$ GeV$^2$, and the NLO twist-3 correction play the key role to narrow the gap between the pQCD predictions and the measured values for the time-like pion electromagnetic form factor.

  9. The Influence of Source and Cost of Information Access on Correct and Errorful Interactive Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    USA +1 703 993 1357 gray@gmu.edu ABSTRACT Routine interactive behavior reveals patterns of interactionThe Influence of Source and Cost of Information Access on Correct and Errorful Interactive Behavior Wayne D. Gray & Wai-Tat Fu Human Factors & Applied Cognition George Mason University Fairfax, VA 22030

  10. Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to light Higgs Pair production via vector boson fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terrance Figy

    2008-06-15

    We present the NLO QCD corrections for light Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion at the LHC within the CP conserving type II two higgs doublet model in the form of a fully flexible parton--level Monte Carlo program. Scale dependences on integrated cross sections and distributions are reduced with QCD K-factors of order unity.

  11. Center-of-mass corrections reexamined: a many-body expansion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Center-of-mass corrections reexamined: a many-body expansion approach Bogdan Mihaila Department, Durham, NH 03824 (August 4, 2006) A many-body expansion for the computation of the charge form factor of the calculation involving realistic nuclear wave functions. Results obtained for the Argonne v18 two

  12. Manifold corrections on spinning compact binaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong Shuangying; Wu Xin [Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China)

    2010-05-15

    This paper deals mainly with a discussion of three new manifold correction methods and three existing ones, which can numerically preserve or correct all integrals in the conservative post-Newtonian Hamiltonian formulation of spinning compact binaries. Two of them are listed here. One is a new momentum-position scaling scheme for complete consistency of both the total energy and the magnitude of the total angular momentum, and the other is the Nacozy's approach with least-squares correction of the four integrals including the total energy and the total angular momentum vector. The post-Newtonian contributions, the spin effects, and the classification of orbits play an important role in the effectiveness of these six manifold corrections. They are all nearly equivalent to correct the integrals at the level of the machine epsilon for the pure Kepler problem. Once the third-order post-Newtonian contributions are added to the pure orbital part, three of these corrections have only minor effects on controlling the errors of these integrals. When the spin effects are also included, the effectiveness of the Nacozy's approach becomes further weakened, and even gets useless for the chaotic case. In all cases tested, the new momentum-position scaling scheme always shows the optimal performance. It requires a little but not much expensive additional computational cost when the spin effects exist and several time-saving techniques are used. As an interesting case, the efficiency of the correction to chaotic eccentric orbits is generally better than one to quasicircular regular orbits. Besides this, the corrected fast Lyapunov indicators and Lyapunov exponents of chaotic eccentric orbits are large as compared with the uncorrected counterparts. The amplification is a true expression of the original dynamical behavior. With the aid of both the manifold correction added to a certain low-order integration algorithm as a fast and high-precision device and the fast Lyapunov indicators of two nearby trajectories, phase space scans for chaos in the spinning compact binary system are given.

  13. Harmonic distortion correction in pipelined analog to digital converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panigada, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Background Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedBackground Correction of Harmonic Distortion in PipelinedADC with 69dB SNDR Enabled by Digital Harmonic Distortion

  14. Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-08-04

    This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

  15. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions...

  16. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes...

  17. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Office Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On...

  18. Automatic grammar correction : using PCFGs and whole sentence context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vineet

    2012-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automatic Grammar Correction: Using2002). Bleu: a method for automatic evaluation of machineABSTRACT OF THE THESIS Automatic Grammar Correction: Using

  19. Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II Environmental Management Los Alamos Field Corrective Action Plan - Radiological Release Phase II On March...

  20. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Housekeeping category corrective action unit work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Unit (CAU) Work Plan is to provide a strategy to be used by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), the US Department of Defense (DoD) Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA) (formerly the Defense Nuclear Agency), and contractor personnel for conducting corrective actions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Nevada off-site locations including the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), the Project Shoal Area, and the Central Nevada Test Area. This Work Plan applies to housekeeping category CAUs already listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Appendices (FFACO, 1996) as well as newly identified Corrective Action Sites (CASs) that will follow the housekeeping process.

  2. Power Corrections to Event Shape Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. L. Dokshitzer; B. R. Webber

    1997-04-30

    We estimate the effects of non-perturbative physics on the differential distributions of infrared- and collinear-safe $e^+e^-$ event shape variables, by extending the notion of an infrared-regular effective strong coupling, which accounts for the non-perturbative corrections to the mean values of several shape variables, to their distributions. This leads to $1/Q$ power corrections over a range of values of the shape variables considered, where $Q$ is the centre-of-mass energy. In the case of the thrust variable, the leading correction is simply a shift of the distribution, by an amount proportional to $1/Q$. We show that this gives an excellent description of the data throughout a wide range of $T$ and $Q$.

  3. RCRA corrective action program guide (Interim)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for compliance with an increasingly complex spectrum of environmental regulations. One of the most complex programs is the corrective action program proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the authority of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as amended by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA). The proposed regulations were published on July 27, 1990. The proposed Subpart S rule creates a comprehensive program for investigating and remediating releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous waste constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities permitted to treat, store, or dispose of hazardous wastes. This proposed rule directly impacts many DOE facilities which conduct such activities. This guidance document explains the entire RCRA Corrective Action process as outlined by the proposed Subpart S rule, and provides guidance intended to assist those persons responsible for implementing RCRA Corrective Action at DOE facilities.

  4. Heterotic $?$'-corrections in Double Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oscar A. Bedoya; Diego Marques; Carmen Nunez

    2014-12-15

    We extend the generalized flux formulation of Double Field Theory to include all the first order bosonic contributions to the $\\alpha '$ expansion of the heterotic string low energy effective theory. The generalized tangent space and duality group are enhanced by $\\alpha'$ corrections, and the gauge symmetries are generated by the usual (gauged) generalized Lie derivative in the extended space. The generalized frame receives derivative corrections through the spin connection with torsion, which is incorporated as a new degree of freedom in the extended bein. We compute the generalized fluxes and find the Riemann curvature tensor with torsion as one of their components. All the four-derivative terms of the action, Bianchi identities and equations of motion are reproduced. Using this formalism, we obtain the first order $\\alpha'$ corrections to the heterotic Buscher rules. The relation of our results to alternative formulations in the literature is discussed and future research directions are outlined.

  5. ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR Correction (KAZRCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected forCorrection (KAZRCOR) ARM

  6. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Turner, David

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  7. Electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Portelli; S. Dürr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szabó; A. Ramos

    2011-01-12

    At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.

  8. The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is Sustainable - Coal, Oil and Natural Gas · Natural Gas is a Clean Fuel - relative to what - coal? · RenewablesThe Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant Andrew C. Kadak Massachusetts Institute of Technology are "clean and free"... · Conservation with sacrifice will work · There is no solution to nuclear waste

  9. Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Jeremy Carter Correctional Magnetic Coils for Beryllium- based Ion Plasma Chamber Physics 492R was to develop and assemble two sets of identical magnetic coils for the Beryllium based plasma chamber. This particular plasma in nature is Beryllium based and is being studied by various professors, as well

  10. NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Turner, David

    2012-03-23

    From 2000-2008, the NSA AERI hatch was determined to be indicated as open too frequently. Analysis suggests that the hatch was actually opening and closing properly but that its status was not being correctly reported by the hatch controller to the datastream. An algorithm was written to determine the hatch status from the observed

  11. Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    . For example, for fast-spin echo (FSE) pulse sequences, the MR signal is given by this equation: · Target T1Image Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J strength · Spatially varying field strength encodes spatial location in the frequency domain #12;MR Imaging

  12. ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS 2008, Volume 112B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berne, Bruce J.

    of the microscopic contact angle obtained in the simulations to a macroscopic value, via eq 7, was not performed function. Although eq 7 is correct, the combination of the approximated (temperature independent) line propose to use the values of the contact angles, 0, obtained directly from the simulations

  13. PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS FROM STRAY LIGHT CORRECTED HINODE FILTERGRAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, Rohan E.; Mathew, Shibu K.; Bayanna, A. Raja; Rubio, Luis R. Bellot; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ravindra, B.

    2012-06-20

    High-resolution blue continuum filtergrams from Hinode are employed to study the umbral fine structure of a regular unipolar sunspot. The removal of scattered light from the images increases the rms contrast by a factor of 1.45 on average. Improvement in image contrast renders identification of short filamentary structures resembling penumbrae that are well separated from the umbra-penumbra boundary and comprise bright filaments/grains flanking dark filaments. Such fine structures were recently detected from ground-based telescopes and have now been observed with Hinode. A multi-level tracking algorithm was used to identify umbral dots (UDs) in both the uncorrected and corrected images and to track them in time. The distribution of the values describing the photometric and geometric properties of UDs is more easily affected by the presence of stray light while it is less severe in the case of kinematic properties. Statistically, UDs exhibit a peak intensity, effective diameter, lifetime, horizontal speed, and a trajectory length of 0.29I{sub QS}, 272 km, 8.4 minutes, 0.45 km s{sup -1}, and 221 km, respectively. The 2 hr 20 minute time sequence depicts several locations where UDs tend to appear and disappear repeatedly with various time intervals. The correction for scattered light in the Hinode filtergrams facilitates photometry of umbral fine structure, which can be related to results obtained from larger telescopes and numerical simulations.

  14. Speed of sound in quark gluon plasma with one loop correction in mean field potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, S Somorendro

    2015-01-01

    We study thermodynamic properties and speed of sound in a free en- ergy evolution of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with one loop correction factor in the mean-field potential. The values of the thermodynamic prop- erties like pressure, entropy and specific heat are calculated for a range of temperatures. The results agree with the recent lattice results. The speed of sound is found to be C2 s = 0.3 independent of parameters used in the loop correction which matches almost with lattice calculations.

  15. Speed of sound in quark gluon plasma with one loop correction in mean field potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Somorendro Singh; R. Ramanathan

    2015-05-14

    We study thermodynamic properties and speed of sound in a free en- ergy evolution of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with one loop correction factor in the mean-field potential. The values of the thermodynamic prop- erties like pressure, entropy and specific heat are calculated for a range of temperatures. The results agree with the recent lattice results. The speed of sound is found to be C2 s = 0.3 independent of parameters used in the loop correction which matches almost with lattice calculations.

  16. Non-linear screening corrections of stellar nuclear reaction rates and their effects on solar neutrino fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodore E. Liolios

    2000-02-14

    Non-linear electron screening corrections of stellar nuclear fusion rates are calculated analytically in the framework of the Debye-Huckel model and compared with the respective ones of Salpeter's weak screening approximation. In typical solar conditions, the deviation from Salpeter's screening factor is less than one percent, while for hotter stars such corrections turn out to be of the order of one percent only over the limits of the Debye-Huckel model. Moreover, an investigation of the impact of the derived non-linear screening effects on the solar neutrino fluxes yields insignificant corrections for both the pp and CNO chain reactions.

  17. Correction method for in-air output ratio for output variations occurring with changes in backscattered radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajiri, Minoru; Tokiya, Yuji; Watanabe, Kazuhiro [Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); International University of Health and Welfare, 1-4-3, Mita, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-8329 (Japan); Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: The in-air output ratio (S{sub c}) for a rectangular field is usually obtained using an equivalent square field formula. However, it is well-known that S{sub c} obtained using an equivalent square field formula differs slightly from the measured S{sub c}. Though several correction methods have been suggested for the monitor-backscatter effect, the authors propose a more simple correction method for a rectangular field. Methods: For rectangular fields and equivalent square fields, the authors assumed that the output variation was the product of six output variations for each backscattering area at the top of the collimator jaws, and the correction factor was the ratio of the output variation for a rectangular field to the output variation for an equivalent square field. The output variation was measured by using a telescope measurement. Results: The differences between the measured and corrected S{sub c} ranged from -0.20% to 0.28% for symmetric rectangular fields by applying the correction factor to S{sub c} obtained using an equivalent square field formula. This correction method is also available for asymmetric rectangular fields. Conclusions: The authors propose a method to correct S{sub c} obtained using an equivalent square field formula, and a method to obtain the output variation for a field defined by collimator jaws.

  18. Method and apparatus for reconstructing in-cylinder pressure and correcting for signal decay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-03-12

    A method comprises steps for reconstructing in-cylinder pressure data from a vibration signal collected from a vibration sensor mounted on an engine component where it can generate a signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio, and correcting the vibration signal for errors introduced by vibration signal charge decay and sensor sensitivity. The correction factors are determined as a function of estimated motoring pressure and the measured vibration signal itself with each of these being associated with the same engine cycle. Accordingly, the method corrects for charge decay and changes in sensor sensitivity responsive to different engine conditions to allow greater accuracy in the reconstructed in-cylinder pressure data. An apparatus is also disclosed for practicing the disclosed method, comprising a vibration sensor, a data acquisition unit for receiving the vibration signal, a computer processing unit for processing the acquired signal and a controller for controlling the engine operation based on the reconstructed in-cylinder pressure.

  19. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streelight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streelight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltage were beyond the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some do the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Did high-altitude EMP (electromagnetic pulse) cause the Hawaiian streetlight incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittitoe, C N

    1989-04-01

    Studies of electromagnetic pulse (EMP) effects on civilian and military systems predict results ranging from severe destruction to no damage. Convincing analyses that support either extreme are rare. The Hawaiian streetlight incident associated with the Starfish nuclear burst is the most widely quoted observed damage. We review the streetlight characteristics and estimate the coupling between the Starfish EMP and a particular streetlight circuit identified as one of the few that failed. Evidence indicates that the damage was EMP-generated. The main contributing factors were the azimuthal angle of the circuit relative to the direction of EMP propagation, and the rapid rise of the EMP signal. The azimuthal angle provided coherent buildup of voltage as the EMP swept across the transmission line. The rapid rise allowed substantial excitation before the canceling effects of ground reflections limited the signals. Resulting voltages were at the threshold for causing the observed fuse damage and are consistent with this damage occurring in only some of the strings in the systems. 15 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Error Correction Using Probabilistic Language Models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunder, Gowrishankar

    2015-05-07

    performing model which is similar to what we have implemented towards the later part of the research. Yuret at. al. [23] have proposed solutions towards generating corrections making use of Wordnet training data and a thesaurus but it is pretty complicated..., especially related to the Thesaurus part and is not entirely applicable in a practical sense. An Entropy-based Language model [5] provides a class-based abstraction helping in better predictions. In such a model, an hierarchy of grammatical constructs...

  2. Quantum Corrections in Galileons from Matter Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavinia Heisenberg

    2014-10-09

    Galileon interactions represent a class of effective field theories that have received much attention since their inception. They can be treated in their own right as scalar field theories with a specific global shift and Galilean symmetry or as a descendant of a more fundamental theory like massive gravity. It is well known that the Galileon theories are stable under quantum corrections thanks to the non-renormalization theorem which is not due to the symmetry. We consider different covariant couplings of this Galileon scalar field with the matter field: the conformal coupling, the disformal coupling and the longitudinal coupling. We compute the one-loop quantum corrections to the Galileon interactions from the coupling to the external matter fields. In all the considered cases of covariant couplings we show that the terms generated by one-loop matter corrections not only renormalize the Galileon interactions but also give rise to higher order derivative ghost interactions. However, the renormalized version of the Galileon interactions as well as the new interactions come at a scale suppressed by the original classical coupling scale and hence are harmless within the regime of validity of the effective field theory.

  3. Mean Field Analysis of Quantum Annealing Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shunji Matsuura; Hidetoshi Nishimori; Tameem Albash; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-10-26

    Quantum annealing correction (QAC) is a method that combines encoding with energy penalties and decoding to suppress and correct errors that degrade the performance of quantum annealers in solving optimization problems. While QAC has been experimentally demonstrated to successfully error-correct a range of optimization problems, a clear understanding of its operating mechanism has been lacking. Here we bridge this gap using tools from quantum statistical mechanics. We study analytically tractable models using a mean-field analysis, specifically the $p$-body ferromagnetic infinite-range transverse-field Ising model as well as the quantum Hopfield model, in the zero temperature limit. We demonstrate that for $p=2$, where the quantum phase transition is of second order, QAC pushes the phase transition to infinite transverse field strength. For $p\\ge3$, where the quantum phase transition is of first order, QAC softens the closing of the gap for small energy penalty values and prevents its closure for sufficiently large energy penalty values. Thus QAC provides protection from excitations that occur near the quantum critical point.

  4. High-temperature differential emission measure and altitude variations in the temperature and density of solar flare coronal X-ray sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey, Natasha; Dennis, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The detailed knowledge of plasma heating and acceleration region properties presents a major observational challenge in solar flare physics. Using the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the high temperature differential emission measure, DEM(T), and the energy-dependent spatial structure of solar flare coronal sources are studied quantitatively. The altitude of the coronal X-ray source is observed to increase with energy by ~+0.2 arcsec/keV between 10 and 25 keV. Although an isothermal model can fit the thermal X-ray spectrum observed by RHESSI, such a model cannot account for the changes in altitude, and multi-thermal coronal sources are required where the temperature increases with altitude. For the first time, we show how RHESSI imaging information can be used to constrain the DEM(T) of a flaring plasma. We develop a thermal bremsstrahlung X-ray emission model with inhomogeneous temperature and density distributions to simultaneously reproduce: i) DEM(T), ii) altitude as a function of ...

  5. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth MARK D. ZELINKA Department of Atmospheric Sciences received 12 May 2011, in final form 15 November 2011) ABSTRACT Cloud radiative kernels and histograms

  6. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 3. Data analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 Switching System. This volume describes the post test analysis of the measured electromagnetic fields and induced transients. This volume also includes a comparison of the characteristic attributes of the various simulator environments.

  7. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 2. Test program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 Switching System. This volume is a detailed description of the test procedures, test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. This volume also presents a discussion of the conclusion and recommendations of the program.

  8. Using remote-sensing data to determine equilibrium-line altitude and mass-balance time series: validation on three French glaciers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabatel, Antoine

    Using remote-sensing data to determine equilibrium-line altitude and mass-balance time series to calculate glacier mass balance using remote-sensing data. Snowline measurements from remotely sensed images by ground measurements and remote sensing are compared and show excellent correlation (r2 > 0.89), both

  9. Quantum corrected non-thermal radiation spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Subhajit Saha; Christian Corda

    2015-05-28

    Tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH) emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda) introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking's periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Campbell

    2000-04-01

    This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

  11. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kivel, N

    2015-01-01

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the heli...

  12. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996; as amended March 2010). CAU 562 consists of 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada National Security Site. Site characterization activities were performed in 2009 and 2010, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 562. The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives is summarized. (1) CAS 02-26-11, Lead Shot, will be clean closed by removing shot. (2) CAS 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain, will be clean closed by removing paint and contaminated soil. As a best management practice (BMP), asbestos tile will be removed. (3) CAS 02-59-01, Septic System, will be clean closed by removing septic tank contents. As a BMP, the septic tank will be removed. (4) CAS 02-60-01, Concrete Drain, contains no contaminants of concern (COCs) above action levels. No further action is required; however, as a BMP, the concrete drain will be removed. (5) CAS 02-60-02, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. As a BMP, the drain grates and drain pipe will be removed. (6) CAS 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. As a BMP, the steam cleaning sump grate and outfall pipe will be removed. (7) CAS 02-60-04, French Drain, was clean closed. Corrective actions were completed during corrective action investigation activities. (8) CAS 02-60-05, French Drain, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil. (9) CAS 02-60-06, French Drain, contains no COCs above action levels. No further action is required. (10) CAS 02-60-07, French Drain, requires no further action. The french drain identified in historical documentation was not located during corrective action investigation activities. (11) CAS 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the mud trap. As a BMP, the mud trap and outfall pipe will be removed. (12) CAS 23-99-06, Grease Trap, will be clean closed by removing sediment from the grease trap and backfilling the grease trap with grout. (13) CAS 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls, will be clean closed by removing contaminated soil and the sludge-containing outfall pipe.

  13. Correction to NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Hsu, Juno

    2010-01-01

    J. Hsu (2008), NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto,Correction to “NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from Kyoto”2010), Correction to “NF 3 , the greenhouse gas missing from

  14. Tonopah Test Range Summary of Corrective Action Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald B. Jackson

    2007-05-01

    Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and Corrective Action Units (CAUs) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) may be placed into three categories: Clean Closure/No Further Action, Closure in Place, or Closure in Progress.

  15. Correcting Nitrogen Deficiencies in Cotton with Urea-Based Products 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Stichler, Charles

    1995-11-22

    Correcting nitrogen deficiency is important for cotton plant growth. This publication explains nitrogen requirements, the problems associated with nitrogen deficiency, and ways to correct deficiencies using urea as a source ...

  16. Perturbative corrections to the determination of Vub from the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Perturbative corrections to the determination of Vub from the P+spectrum in B ->Xu l nu bar Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Perturbative corrections to the determination...

  17. Higher Derivative Corrections to O-Plane Actions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhao

    2014-11-17

    Higher derivative corrections to effective actions are very important and of great interest in string theory. The aim of this dissertation is to develop a method to constrain the higher derivative corrections to O-plane ...

  18. Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to...

  19. Hadronic ?Z box corrections in Møller scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2014-04-01

    The possibility of measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in Moller scattering with sufficient accuracy to determine sin2?W to 0.1% offers a complementary path to the discovery of new physics to that followed at high energy colliders. We present a new calculation of the ?Z box contribution to parity-violating electron-proton scattering, which constitutes an important uncertainty in computing the background to this process. We show that while the ?Z correction grows rapidly with energy, it can be relatively well constrained by data from parity-violating inelastic scattering and parton distribution functions.

  20. Automation of one-loop QCD corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin Hirschi; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Maria Vittoria Garzelli; Fabio Maltoni; Roberto Pittau

    2013-05-14

    We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

  1. Massive Feynman integrals and electroweak corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janusz Gluza; Tord Riemann

    2015-01-19

    There are steady advances in the calculation of electroweak corrections to massive scattering problems at colliders, from the very beginning in the nineteen seventies until contemporary developments. Recent years brought a remarkable progress due to new calculational technologies. This was motivated by demands from phenomenological applications at particle accelerators: higher multiplicities of the final states, extreme kinematics, need of higher precision and thus of higher orders in perturbation theory. We describe selected contributions from the project "Massive particle production" of Sonderforschungsbereich/Transregio 9 of Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft.

  2. Study of 1/m corrections in HQET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shunsuke Negishi; Hideo Matsufuru; Tetsuya Onogi; Takashi Umeda

    2005-10-07

    We report our exploratory study on the matching condition of HQET with QCD including 1/m corrections. We introduce a new observable from the dependence of the heavy-light effective energy on the twisted boundary condition parameter $\\theta$, which could be used to match the kinetic term $\\vec{D}^2/(2m)$. Carrying out quenched QCD simulations for fixed lattice spacing in small volumes with O(a)-improved Wilson fermions, we study the 1/m dependence of this observable, from which the static limit and 1/m coefficient can be extracted. We also compare our preliminary result with HQET.

  3. Corrections to our results for optical nanofiber traps in Cesium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Ding; A. Goban; K. S. Choi; H. J. Kimble

    2012-12-20

    Several errors in Refs. [1, 2] are corrected related to the optical trapping potentials for a state-insensitive, compensated nanofiber trap for the D2 transition of atomic Cesium. Section I corrects our basic formalism in Ref. [1] for calculating dipole-force potentials. Section II corrects erroneous values for a partial lifetime and a transition wavelength in Ref. [1]. Sections III and IV present corrected figures for various trapping configurations considered in Refs. [1] and [2], respectively.

  4. QCD corrections to Associated t-tbar-H production at the Tevatron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Reina; S. Dawson; D. Wackeroth

    2001-09-07

    We present in detail the calculation of the O(alpha_s^3)inclusive total cross section for the process (p pbar-> t tbar h) in the Standard Model, at the Tevatron center-of-mass energy sqrt(s_H)=2 TeV. The next-to-leading order QCD corrections significantly reduce the renormalization and factorization scale dependence of the Born cross section. They slightly decrease or increase the Born cross section depending on the values of the renormalization and factorization scales

  5. Radiative Corrections to the PREX and QWEAK Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. J. Horowitz

    2012-07-01

    The high precision parity violating electron scattering experiments PREX and QWEAK are sensitive to radiative corrections. In this paper we introduce the PREX experiment that measures the neutron radius of {sup 208}Pb and discuss coulomb distortion corrections. We then discuss dispersion corrections for QWEAK that aims to measure the weak charge of the proton.

  6. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: E 1.01 Page 1 of 2 INFORMATION ON HEALTH SERVICES Effective Date: 04/01/01 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional

  7. Compiler Correctness and Implementation Verification: The Verifix Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    Compiler Correctness and Implementation Verification: The Verifix Approach Wolfgang Goerigk \\Lambda \\Lambda Hans Langmaack \\Lambda Holger Pfeifer x Harald Ruess x Wolf Zimmermann z Abstract Compiler the correctness of the compiling specification and the correctness of the compiler implementation. We will discuss

  8. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: B 1.01 Page 1 of 2 INFECTION CONTROL of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall establish and maintain

  9. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: F 1.01 Page 1 of 1 HEALTHY LIFESTYLE PROMOTION Effective Date: 04/01/01 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC), Correctional

  10. Sensitivity of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector to Sources of Multi-TeV Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garcia-Luna, J L; Garcia-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garc\\'\\ia, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, O; Mart\\'\\inez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is an array of large water Cherenkov detectors sensitive to gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays in the energy band between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. The observatory will be used to measure high-energy protons and cosmic rays via detection of the energetic secondary particles reaching the ground when one of these particles interacts in the atmosphere above the detector. HAWC is under construction at a site 4100 meters above sea level on the northern slope of the volcano Sierra Negra, which is located in central Mexico at 19 degrees N latitude. It is scheduled for completion in 2014. In this paper we estimate the sensitivity of the HAWC instrument to point-like and extended sources of gamma rays. The source fluxes are modeled using both unbroken power laws and power laws with exponential cutoffs. HAWC, in one year, is sensitive to point sources with integral power-law spectra as low as 5x10^-13 cm^-2 sec^-1 above 2 TeV (approximately 50 mCrab) over 5 sr of the sky...

  11. Ecological Risk Assessment Framework for Low-Altitude Overflights by Fixed-Wing and Rotary-Wing Military Aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, R.A.

    2001-01-12

    This is a companion report to the risk assessment framework proposed by Suter et al. (1998): ''A Framework for Assessment of Risks of Military Training and Testing to Natural Resources,'' hereafter referred to as the ''generic framework.'' The generic framework is an ecological risk assessment methodology for use in environmental assessments on Department of Defense (DoD) installations. In the generic framework, the ecological risk assessment framework of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1998) is modified for use in the context of (1) multiple and diverse stressors and activities at a military installation and (2) risks resulting from causal chains, e.g., effects on habitat that indirectly impact wildlife. Both modifications are important if the EPA framework is to be used on military installations. In order for the generic risk assessment framework to be useful to DoD environmental staff and contractors, the framework must be applied to specific training and testing activities. Three activity-specific ecological risk assessment frameworks have been written (1) to aid environmental staff in conducting risk assessments that involve these activities and (2) to guide staff in the development of analogous frameworks for other DoD activities. The three activities are: (1) low-altitude overflights by fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft (this volume), (2) firing at targets on land, and (3) ocean explosions. The activities were selected as priority training and testing activities by the advisory committee for this project.

  12. Human Factors @ UB Fall 2010 Human Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    . Outsourcing aviation maintenance: Hu- man factors implications, specifically for communications. C. Drury, K. Guy, C. Wenner. International Journal of Aviation Psychology, 2010, 20, 124 ­ 143. #12;2 Human Factors

  13. Application of power-factor correction in the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade magnet power supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corvin, W.C.

    1981-08-14

    The magnet power supply for the Tandem Mirror Experiment Upgrade (TMX Upgrade) contains 24 groups of dc rectifiers that feed the water-cooled magnets. Each group consists of five or less rectifiers, connected in series. All 24 are current-regulating, using phase-controlled bilateral thyristors in the rectifier transformer primaries. The electric utility system must furnish reactive power to these phase-controlled thyristors as well as to the cmmutating diodes in the rectifier bridges.

  14. Analysis of silicon carbide based semiconductor power devices and their application in power factor correction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durrani, Yamin Qaisar

    2005-11-01

    Recent technological advances have allowed silicon (Si) semiconductor technology to approach the theoretical limits of the Si material; however, power device requirements for many applications are at a stage that the present Si-based power devices...

  15. Stability Analysis of Complete Two-Stage Power-Factor-Correction Power Supplies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    - versity under internal allocation G-YE04. dc/dc buck converter boost PFC pre-regulator average current-stage cascade struc- ture, consisting of a PFC preregulator and a dc/dc converter. Previous studies of the dynamical be- haviour mainly focused on the boost PFC prereg- ulator, assuming that it is being terminated

  16. A High Efficiency Single-PhaseBower Factor Corrected Switched Mode Rectifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noé, Reinhold

    -derived topologieswas presented, which intended to answer these questions. The comparison covered a) the boost converter, b) the boost converter following SouzaBarbi and c) the 3-level boost- converter [3]. The final result revealed that the standard boost converter represents an optimum solution for a PFC- SMR, when

  17. Hopf-Type Intermediate-Scale Bifurcation in Single-Stage Power-Factor-Correction Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    in PFC boost converter [8] and is referred to as slow-scale instability in this paper. In practice-end boost converter serves as a 1L 1D 1 'D 1C S 2D 2L 2r 2 'D 2C R 1r in ( )v t boost PFC converter forward converter Fig. 1. The single-stage isolated PFC power supply (SSIPP) [3]. This circuit consists of a boost

  18. Advance Three Phase Power Factor Correction Schemes for Utility Interface of Power Electronic Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albader, Mesaad

    2014-07-30

    Modern power electronic systems operate with different voltage and/or frequency rating such as Adjustable speed drive, Micro Grid, Uninterruptable Power Supplies (UPS) and High Voltage DC Transmission Systems. To match power electronic systems...

  19. Testing and Evaluation of a Power Factor Correction for Power-Savings Potential 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alotaibi, A.

    2011-01-01

    is to develop the electromagnetic fields (EMFs) to ground the induction windings of the motor. In Kuwait, consumers only pay for the active power and energy used in kWh. A PFC unit stores the reactive power needed to create EMFs within the inductive loads...

  20. Efficiency Optimization for a Power Factor Correction (PFC) Rectifier with Gallium Nitride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    and utilized to identify the best design by numeric optimization of switching frequency, number of turns) and to increase the power density. Despite of the comparable low switching losses of GaN transistors circuit that achieves negative voltage at switch-off with a unipolar power supply is described in Section

  1. Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation with nonsquare grid blocks and anisotropic permeability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dukmin

    1988-01-01

    of the well inflow equation for a partially perforated well is written as J model 0. 00708 kh ln(ro/rw) + s3D (4) where h is thickness of layer perforated. Fjerstad also pre- sented a new equation for the proper shut-in time including s3D as ro e D 2(ht.../h - 1) 67. 5 dsctdx e At' - [ ] ( ] . (5) rw k This equation reduces to Eq. 3 for a fully penetrating well. The current work investigates how the actual pwf is related to the po obtained in the three-dimensional reservoir simulation model...

  2. Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel Ruggirello RachelRadiation Dry Bias in the

  3. High-altitude gravity waves in the Martian thermosphere observed by MAVEN/NGIMS and modeled by a gravity wave scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi?it, Erdal; Liu, Guiping; Medvedev, Alexander S; Mahaffy, Paul R; Kuroda, Takeshi; Jakosky, Bruce M

    2015-01-01

    First high-altitude observations of gravity wave (GW)-induced CO$_2$ density perturbations in the Martian thermosphere retrieved from NASA's NGIMS instrument on board the MAVEN satellite are presented and interpreted using the extended GW parameterization of Yi\\u{g}it et al. [2008] and the Mars Climate Database as an input. Observed relative density perturbations between 180-220 km of 20-40 % demonstrate appreciable local time, latitude, and altitude variations. Modeling for the spatiotemporal conditions of the MAVEN observations suggests that GWs can directly propagate from the lower atmosphere to the thermosphere, produce appreciable dynamical effects, and likely contribute to the observed fluctuations. Modeled effects are somewhat smaller than the observed but their highly variable nature is in qualitative agreement with observations. Possible reasons for discrepancies between modeling and measurements are discussed.

  4. Nonthermal correction to black hole spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen-Yu Wen

    2014-11-14

    Area spectrum of black holes have been obtained via various methods such as quasinormal modes, adiabatic invariance and angular momentum. Among those methods, calculations were done by assuming black holes in thermal equilibrium. Nevertheless, black holes in the asymptotically flat space usually have negative specific heat and therefore tend to stay away from thermal equilibrium. Even for those black holes with positive specific heat, temperature may still not be well defined in the process of radiation, due to the back reaction of decreasing mass. Respect to these facts, it is very likely that Hawking radiation is nonthermal and the area spectrum is no longer equidistant. In this note, we would like to illustrate how the area spectrum of black holes is corrected by this nonthermal effect.

  5. Optimal error estimates for corrected trapezoidal rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talvila, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Corrected trapezoidal rules are proved for $\\int_a^b f(x)\\,dx$ under the assumption that $f"\\in L^p([a,b])$ for some $1\\leq p\\leq\\infty$. Such quadrature rules involve the trapezoidal rule modified by the addition of a term $k[f'(a)-f'(b)]$. The coefficient $k$ in the quadrature formula is found that minimizes the error estimates. It is shown that when $f'$ is merely assumed to be continuous then the optimal rule is the trapezoidal rule itself. In this case error estimates are in terms of the Alexiewicz norm. This includes the case when $f"$ is integrable in the Henstock--Kurzweil sense or as a distribution. All error estimates are shown to be sharp for the given assumptions on $f"$. It is shown how to make these formulas exact for all cubic polynomials $f$. Composite formulas are computed for uniform partitions.

  6. Optics measurements and corrections at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai M.; Aronson, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Luo, Y.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; White, S.

    2012-05-20

    The further improvement of RHIC luminosity performance requires more precise understanding of the RHIC modeling. Hence, it is necessary to minimize the beta-beat, deviation of measured beta function from the calculated beta functions based on an model. The correction of betabeat also opens up the possibility of exploring operating RHIC polarized protons at a working point near integer, a prefered choice for both luminosity as well as beam polarization. The segment-by-segment technique for reducing beta-beat demonstrated in the LHC operation for reducing the beta-beat was first tested in RHIC during its polarized proton operation in 2011. It was then fully implemented during the RHIC polarized proton operation in 2012. This paper reports the commissioning results. Future plan is also presented.

  7. Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José J. Baldoví; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Ariño; Guillermo Mínguez Espallargas

    2014-08-22

    Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

  8. Final Report: Correctness Tools for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    2014-10-27

    In the course of developing parallel programs for leadership computing systems, subtle programming errors often arise that are extremely difficult to diagnose without tools. To meet this challenge, University of Maryland, the University of Wisconsin—Madison, and Rice University worked to develop lightweight tools to help code developers pinpoint a variety of program correctness errors that plague parallel scientific codes. The aim of this project was to develop software tools that help diagnose program errors including memory leaks, memory access errors, round-off errors, and data races. Research at Rice University focused on developing algorithms and data structures to support efficient monitoring of multithreaded programs for memory access errors and data races. This is a final report about research and development work at Rice University as part of this project.

  9. Dual energy CT for attenuation correction with PET/CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M.; Kinahan, Paul E.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: The authors evaluate the energy dependent noise and bias properties of monoenergetic images synthesized from dual-energy CT (DECT) acquisitions. These monoenergetic images can be used to estimate attenuation coefficients at energies suitable for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This is becoming more relevant with the increased use of quantitative imaging by PET/CT and SPECT/CT scanners. There are, however, potential variations in the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images as a function of energy. Methods: The authors used analytic approximations and simulations to estimate the noise and bias of synthesized monoenergetic images of water-filled cylinders with different shapes and the NURBS-based cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantom from 40 to 520 keV, the range of SPECT and PET energies. The dual-kVp spectra were based on the GE Lightspeed VCT scanner at 80 and 140 kVp with added filtration of 0.5 mm Cu. The authors evaluated strategies of noise suppression with sinogram smoothing and dose minimization with reduction of tube currents at the two kVp settings. The authors compared the impact of DECT-based attenuation correction with single-kVp CT-based attenuation correction on PET quantitation for the NCAT phantom for soft tissue and high-Z materials of bone and iodine contrast enhancement. Results: Both analytic calculations and simulations displayed the expected minimum noise value for a synthesized monoenergetic image at an energy between the mean energies of the two spectra. In addition the authors found that the normalized coefficient of variation in the synthesized attenuation map increased with energy but reached a plateau near 160 keV, and then remained constant with increasing energy up to 511 keV and beyond. The bias was minimal, as the linear attenuation coefficients of the synthesized monoenergetic images were within 2.4% of the known true values across the entire energy range. Compared with no sinogram smoothing, sinogram smoothing can dramatically reduce noise in the DECT-derived attenuation map. Through appropriate selection of tube currents for high and low kVp scans, DECT can deliver roughly the same amount of radiation dose as that of a single kVp CT scan, but could be used for PET attenuation correction with reduced bias in contrast agent regions by a factor of ?2.6 and slightly reduced RMSE for the total image. Conclusions: When DECT is used for attenuation correction at higher energies, there is a noise amplification that is dependent on the energy of the synthesized monoenergetic image of linear attenuation coefficients. Sinogram smoothing reduces the noise amplification in DECT-derived attenuation maps without increasing bias. With an appropriate selection of CT techniques, a DECT scan with the same radiation dose as a single CT scan can result in a PET image with improved quantitative accuracy.

  10. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    Transcription Factor Encyclopedia. Genome Biology 2012 13:Factor Encyclopedia. Gen- ome Biology 2012, 13:000. where ‘Biology 2012, 13:R24 http://genomebiology.com/2012/13/3/R24 SOFTWARE Open Access The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

  11. Fast Correction Optics to Reduce Chromatic Aberrations in Longitudinally Compressed Ion Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    FAST CORRECTION OPTICS TO REDUCE CHROMATIC ABERRATIONS INrecent work on fast correction optics that remove the time-EINZEL LENS CORRECTION OPTIC An electrostatic, Einzel lens [

  12. CORRRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 427: AREA 3 SEPTIC WASTE SYSTEMS 2 AND 6, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-06-23

    This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 (Corrective Action Unit 427) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 427 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites, each an individual septic waste system (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Septic Waste System 2 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW02. (2) Septic Waste System 6 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW06. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. From November 1997 through January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste System Numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997b). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated that contamination is present in some portions of the CAU and not in others as described in Table ES-1 and shown in Figure A.2-2 of Appendix A. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 427: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing TPH at concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per kilogram (NAC, 1996b). (2) Close Sep tic Tank 33-5 in accordance with Nevada Administrative Code 459 (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the Tonopah Test Range, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls; Alternative 3 - Closure of Septic Tank 33-5, Excavation, and Disposal The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for Corrective Action Unit 427 is Alternative 2, Closure of Septic Tank 33-5 and Administrative Controls. The preferred corrective action alternative was evaluated on technical merit, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternative meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils. During corrective action implementation, this alternative will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Echelard

    2006-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

  14. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR THE AREA 3 LANDFILL COMPLEX, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, CAU 424, REVISION 0, MARCH 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1998-03-03

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) has been prepared for the Area 3 Landfill Complex (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 424) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Corrective Action Unit 424 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs), each an individual landfill located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Landfill A3-1 is CAS No. 03-08-001-A301. (2) Landfill A3-2 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A302. (3) Landfill A3-3 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A303. (4) Landfill A3-4 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A304. (5) Landfill A3-5 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A305. (6) Landfill A3-6 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A306. (7) Landfill A3-7 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A307. (8) Landfill A3-8 is CAS No. 03-08-002-A308. The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each CAS. The scope of this CADD consists of the following: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (6) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. In June and July 1997, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated four groupings of site characteristics as shown in Table ES-1. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for CAU No. 424: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing waste. (2) Remediate the site per applicable state and federal regulations (NAC, 1996c). (3) Prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. Based on the review of existing data, future land use, and current operations at the TTR, the following alternatives were developed for consideration at the Area 3 Landfill Complex CAU: Alternative 1 - No Action; Alternative 2 - Administrative Closure; Alternative 3 - Partial Excavation, Backfill, and Recontouring The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy-selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, preferred alternatives were selected for each CAS as indicated in Table ES-2. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on their technical merits, focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, and safety. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. These alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contents of the landfills. During corrective action implementation, these alternatives will present minimal potential threat to site workers who come in contact with the waste. However, procedures will be developed and implemented to ensure worker health and safety.

  15. Totally Corrective Boosting with Cardinality Penalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasil S. Denchev; Nan Ding; Shin Matsushima; S. V. N. Vishwanathan; Hartmut Neven

    2015-04-07

    We propose a totally corrective boosting algorithm with explicit cardinality regularization. The resulting combinatorial optimization problems are not known to be efficiently solvable with existing classical methods, but emerging quantum optimization technology gives hope for achieving sparser models in practice. In order to demonstrate the utility of our algorithm, we use a distributed classical heuristic optimizer as a stand-in for quantum hardware. Even though this evaluation methodology incurs large time and resource costs on classical computing machinery, it allows us to gauge the potential gains in generalization performance and sparsity of the resulting boosted ensembles. Our experimental results on public data sets commonly used for benchmarking of boosting algorithms decidedly demonstrate the existence of such advantages. If actual quantum optimization were to be used with this algorithm in the future, we would expect equivalent or superior results at much smaller time and energy costs during training. Moreover, studying cardinality-penalized boosting also sheds light on why unregularized boosting algorithms with early stopping often yield better results than their counterparts with explicit convex regularization: Early stopping performs suboptimal cardinality regularization. The results that we present here indicate it is beneficial to explicitly solve the combinatorial problem still left open at early termination.

  16. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as a primary reference for PMOA PM-1 for development of Corrective Action Requests (CARs) and Continuous Improvement Opportunities (CIOs), as well as the assessment of...

  17. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan Addendum Radiological Release Event Phase II On Friday, February 14, 2014 there...

  18. Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Nuclear Waste Partnership (NWP) Corrective Action Plan - Truck Fire and Radiological Release Phase I Submittal of the Underground Salt...

  19. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, D.U.L.; Conway, P.H.

    1994-11-15

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system. 11 figs.

  20. Feed-forward digital phase and amplitude correction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, David U. L. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA); Conway, Patrick H. (Rancho Palos Verdes, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Phase and amplitude modifications in repeatable RF pulses at the output of a high power pulsed microwave amplifier are made utilizing a digital feed-forward correction system. A controlled amount of the output power is coupled to a correction system for processing of phase and amplitude information. The correction system comprises circuitry to compare the detected phase and amplitude with the desired phase and amplitude, respectively, and a digitally programmable phase shifter and attenuator and digital logic circuitry to control the phase shifter and attenuator. The Phase and amplitude of subsequent are modified by output signals from the correction system.

  1. Combining QCD and electroweak corrections to dilepton production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Combining QCD and electroweak corrections to dilepton production in the framework of the FEWZ simulation code Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combining QCD and...

  2. Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Corrective Action Standard...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (ECASOP) Issued by Office of Project Management, Oversight, and Assessments (PMOA) PM-1 September 21, 2015 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EVMS CORRECTIVE ACTION SOP SEPTEMBER 21, 2015 ii...

  3. First-order quantum-gravitational correction to Friedmannian cosmology from covariant, holomorphic spinfoam cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Röken

    2015-07-01

    The first-order loop quantum gravity correction of the simplest, classical general-relativistic Friedmann Hamiltonian constraint, emerging from a holomorphic spinfoam cosmological model peaked on homogeneous, isotropic geometries, is studied. The quantum Hamiltonian constraint, satisfied by the EPRL transition amplitude between the boundary cosmological coherent states, includes a contribution of the order of the Planck constant $\\hbar$ that also appears in the corresponding semiclassical symplectic model. The analysis of this term gives a quantum-gravitational correction to the classical Friedmann dynamics of the scale factor yielding a small decelerating expansion (small accelerating contraction) of the universe. The robustness of the physical interpretation is established for arbitrary refinements of the boundary graphs. Also, mathematical equivalences between the semiclassical cosmological model and certain classical fluid and scalar field theories are explored.

  4. MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOVILLE, JT; LAHAYE, RJ

    2002-10-01

    OAK A271 MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Error field optimization on DIII-D tokamak plasma discharges has routinely been done for the last ten years with the use of the external ''n = 1 coil'' or the ''C-coil''. The optimum level of correction coil current is determined by the ability to avoid the locked mode instability and access previously unstable parameter space at low densities. The locked mode typically has toroidal and poloidal mode numbers n = 1 and m = 2, respectively, and it is this component that initially determined the correction coil current and phase. Realization of the importance of nearby n = 1 mode components m = 1 and m = 3 has led to a revision of the error field correction algorithm. Viscous and toroidal mode coupling effects suggested the need for additional terms in the expression for the radial ''penetration'' field B{sub pen} that can induce a locked mode. To incorporate these effects, the low density locked mode threshold database was expanded. A database of discharges at various toroidal fields, plasma currents, and safety factors was supplement4ed with data from an experiment in which the fields of the n = 1 coil and C-coil were combined, allowing the poloidal mode spectrum of the error field to be varied. A multivariate regression analysis of this new low density locked mode database was done to determine the low density locked mode threshold scaling relationship n{sub e} {proportional_to} B{sub T}{sup -0.01} q{sub 95}{sup -0.79} B{sub pen} and the coefficients of the poloidal mode components in the expression for B{sub pen}. Improved plasma performance is achieved by optimizing B{sub pen} by varying the applied correction coil currents.

  5. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-04-06

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  6. A Neuro-Evolutionary Approach to Micro Aerial Vehicle Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumer, Kagan

    that the MAV response to maintaining altitude in the presence of wind gusts improves by a factor of five of the control laws with fast and highly non-linear dynamics. Such methods rely heavily on difficult to obtain times to minor altitude and heading corrections over a traditional PID controller. In addition, we show

  7. Self-interaction corrections in density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuneda, Takao; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2014-05-14

    Self-interaction corrections for Kohn-Sham density functional theory are reviewed for their physical meanings, formulations, and applications. The self-interaction corrections get rid of the self-interaction error, which is the sum of the Coulomb and exchange self-interactions that remains because of the use of an approximate exchange functional. The most frequently used self-interaction correction is the Perdew-Zunger correction. However, this correction leads to instabilities in the electronic state calculations of molecules. To avoid these instabilities, several self-interaction corrections have been developed on the basis of the characteristic behaviors of self-interacting electrons, which have no two-electron interactions. These include the von Weizsäcker kinetic energy and long-range (far-from-nucleus) asymptotic correction. Applications of self-interaction corrections have shown that the self-interaction error has a serious effect on the states of core electrons, but it has a smaller than expected effect on valence electrons. This finding is supported by the fact that the distribution of self-interacting electrons indicates that they are near atomic nuclei rather than in chemical bonds.

  8. CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    CORRECTION OF BUTT-WELDING INDUCED DISTORTIONS BY LASER FORMING Peng Cheng, Andrew J. Birnbaum, Y Egland Technology and Solutions Division Caterpillar Inc. Peoria, IL KEYWORDS Welding, Distortion, Correction, Laser Forming ABSTRACT Welding-induced distortion is an intrinsic phenomenon arising due

  9. Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Note Correction of Eddy-Current Distortions in Diffusion Tensor Images Using the Known,2 Purpose: To correct eddy-current artifacts in diffusion ten- sor (DT) images without the need to obtain- tortions caused by eddy currents induced by large diffusion gradients. We propose a new postacquisition

  10. Correcting second-order contamination in low-resolution spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Stanishev

    2007-05-23

    An empirical method for correcting low-resolution astronomical spectra for second-order contamination is presented. The method was developed for correcting spectra obtained with grism #4 of the ALFOSC spectrograph at the Nordic Optical Telescope and the performance is demonstrated on spectra of two nearby bright Type Ia supernovae.

  11. Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitelson, Branden

    Does rationality consist in responding correctly to reasons? John Broome Journal of Moral form. What does it mean to say that rationality consists in responding correctly to reasons? Partly does not call for a response from you. Your punishment is the responsibility of the authorities

  12. Complete Two-Loop Corrections to H -> gamma gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampiero Passarino; Christian Sturm; Sandro Uccirati

    2007-07-10

    In this paper the complete two-loop corrections to the Higgs-boson decay, H -> gamma gamma, are presented. The evaluations of both QCD and electroweak corrections are based on a numerical approach. The results cover all kinematical regions, including the WW normal-threshold, by introducing complex masses in the relevant (gauge-invariant) parts of the LO and NLO amplitudes.

  13. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: C 1.00 Page 1 of 1 UCHC/CMHC EMPLOYEES: ACCESSING E-MAIL Effective Date: 07/30/07 POLICY: University of Connecticut Health Center (UCHC

  14. UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: P 1.01 Page 1 of 1 PATIENT SAFETY SYSTEM, Daniel Bannish PsyD _______________________________________ #12;UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER

  15. Device for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA); Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Kuklo, Thomas C. (Oakdale, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A system for wavefront correction in an ultra high power laser. As the laser medium flows past the optical excitation source and the fluid warms its index of refraction changes creating an optical wedge. A system is provided for correcting the thermally induced optical phase errors.

  16. Corrective measures evaluation report for Tijeras Arroyo groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, M. Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-08-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation report was prepared as directed by a Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Supporting information includes background concerning the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. The evaluation of remedial alternatives included identifying and describing four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, comparing remedial alternatives to the criteria, and selecting the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, monitored natural attenuation of the contaminants of concern (trichloroethene and nitrate) is the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure for Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater. Design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are also presented.

  17. Updated ASME PTC-46 generalized performance test equations and corrections for application to overall plant performance testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, J.R.; Pratt, G.H.

    1995-12-31

    Detailed development and discussion of performance test equations and corrections applicable to an overall plant performance test were presented to the industry at the 1993 JPGC Performance Test Code Session. The equations were being developed and discussed at the time by the ASME PTC-46 Committee Task Group on Calculations. This paper presents further work which consolidates two sets of general equations into one general equation each for corrected net power and heat rate of a power plant. This results in a more concise representation, and ensures consideration by the Code user of all data requirements. All PTC-46 users will start with the same fundamental equations and then select appropriate correction factors for the cycle being tested and the objectives of the test.

  18. PDF Nuclear Corrections for Charged Lepton and Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Schienbein; J. Y. Yu; K. Kovarik; C. Keppel; J. G. Morfin; F. Olness; J. F. Owens

    2010-02-11

    We perform a \\chi^2-analysis of Nuclear Parton Distribution Functions (NPDFs) using neutral current charged-lepton Deeply Inelastic Scattering (DIS) and Drell-Yan data for several nuclear targets. The nuclear A dependence of the NPDFs is extracted in a next-to-leading order fit. We compare the nuclear corrections factors F2(Fe)/F2(D) for this charged-lepton data with other results from the literature. In particular, we compare and contrast fits based upon the charged-lepton DIS data with those using neutrino-nucleon DIS data.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-02-01

    Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 18-22-05, Drum • 18-22-06, Drums (20) • 18-22-08, Drum • 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area • 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

  20. Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandru Iyer

    2008-11-17

    The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

  1. Tests of Higgs boson compositeness through the HHH form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gounaris, G J

    2015-01-01

    We show how the $q^2$-dependence of the triple Higgs boson HHH form factor can reveal the presence of various types of new physics contributions, like new particles coupled to the Higgs boson or Higgs boson constituents, without directly observing them. We compare the effect of such new contributions to the one of higher order SM corrections to the point-like HHH coupling, due to triangle, 4-leg and s.e. diagrams. We establish simple analytic expressions describing accurately at high energy these SM corrections, as well as the examples of new physics contributions.

  2. Tests of Higgs boson compositeness through the HHH form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Gounaris; F. M. Renard

    2015-10-14

    We show how the $q^2$-dependence of the triple Higgs boson HHH form factor can reveal the presence of various types of new physics contributions, like new particles coupled to the Higgs boson or Higgs boson constituents, without directly observing them. We compare the effect of such new contributions to the one of higher order SM corrections to the point-like HHH coupling, due to triangle, 4-leg and s.e. diagrams. We establish simple analytic expressions describing accurately at high energy these SM corrections, as well as the examples of new physics contributions.

  3. Revision of absorption corrections for the $p p \\to p p ?^{+} ?^{-}$ process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Lebiedowicz; Antoni Szczurek

    2015-05-11

    We include new additional absorption corrections into the Lebiedowicz-Szczurek (non-resonant) model for $p p \\to p p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ or $p \\bar p \\to p \\bar p \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ processes. They are related to the $\\pi N$ nonperturbative interaction in the final state of the reaction. The role of the absorption corrections is quantified for several differential distributions for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 0.2, 1.96, 7, and 8 TeV. The new absorption corrections lead to further decrease of the cross section by about a factor of two. They change the shape of some distributions ($d \\sigma / dt$, $d \\sigma / dp_{t,p}$, $d \\sigma/d \\phi_{pp}$) but leave almost unchanged shape of other distributions ($d \\sigma / dM_{\\pi \\pi}$, $d \\sigma / dy_{\\pi}$, $d \\sigma /dp_{t,\\pi}$, $d \\sigma/ d \\phi_{\\pi \\pi}$). The effect may have important impact on the interpretation of the recent STAR and CDF data as well as the forthcoming data of the ALICE, ATLAS + ALFA and CMS + TOTEM collaborations.

  4. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: • Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. • Conduct radiological surveys. • Perform field screening. • Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. • Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. • Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. • Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

  5. Power Corrections in Electron-Positron Annihilation: Experimental Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Kluth

    2006-06-20

    Experimental studies of power corrections with e+e- data are reviewed. An overview of the available data for jet and event shape observables is given and recent analyses based on the Dokshitzer-Marchesini-Webber (DMW) model of power corrections are summarised. The studies involve both distributions of the observables and their mean values. The agreement between perturbative QCD combined with DMW power corrections and the data is generally good, and the few exceptions are discussed. The use of low energy data sets highlights deficiencies in the existing calculations for some observables. A study of the finiteness of the physical strong coupling at low energies using hadronic $\\tau$ decays is shown.

  6. Power Corrections and Renormalons in $e^+e^-$ Fragmentation Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1996-08-21

    We estimate the power corrections (infrared renormalon contributions) to the coefficient functions for the transverse, longitudinal and asymmetric fragmentation functions in $e^+e^-$ annihilation, using a method based on the analysis of one-loop Feynman graphs containing a massive gluon. The leading corrections have the expected $1/Q^2$ behaviour, but the gluonic coefficients of the longitudinal and transverse contributions separately have strong singularities at small $x$, which cancel in their sum. This leads to $1/Q$ corrections to the longitudinal and transverse parts of the annihilation cross section, which cancel in the total cross section.

  7. Nuclear enhanced power corrections to DIS structure functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaofeng Guo; Jianwei Qiu; Wei Zhu

    2001-10-03

    We calculate nuclear enhanced power corrections to structure functions measured in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We find that the nuclear medium enhanced power corrections at order of $O(\\alpha_s/Q^2)$ enhance the longitudinal structure function $F_L$, and suppress the transverse structure function $F_1$. We demonstrate that strong nuclear effects in $\\sigma_A/\\sigma_D$ and $R_A/R_D$, recently observed by HERMES Collaboration, can be explained in terms of the nuclear enhanced power corrections.

  8. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Anacleto; F. A. Brito; G. C. Luna; E. Passos; J. Spinelly

    2015-01-31

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  9. Quantum-corrected finite entropy of noncommutative acoustic black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anacleto, M A; Luna, G C; Passos, E; Spinelly, J

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the generalized uncertainty principle in the tunneling formalism via Hamilton-Jacobi method to determine the quantum-corrected Hawking temperature and entropy for 2+1-dimensional noncommutative acoustic black holes. In our results we obtain an area entropy, a correction logarithmic in leading order, a correction term in subleading order proportional to the radiation temperature associated with the noncommutative acoustic black holes and an extra term that depends on a conserved charge. Thus, as in the gravitational case, there is no need to introduce the ultraviolet cut-off and divergences are eliminated.

  10. NLO QCD corrections to ZZ jet production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Gleisberg, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Sanguinetti, G.

    2010-05-26

    A fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Z-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Tevatron and LHC is presented. This process is an important background for Higgs particle and new physics searches at hadron colliders. We find sizable corrections for cross sections and differential distributions, particularly at the LHC. Residual scale uncertainties are typically at the 10% level and can be further reduced by applying a veto against the emission of a second hard jet. Our results confirm that NLO corrections do not simply rescale LO predictions.

  11. Solar neutrinos radiative corrections in neutrino-electron scattering experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahcall, J N; Sirlin, A; Bahcall, John N; Kamionkowski, Marc; Sirlin, Alberto

    1995-01-01

    Radiative corrections to the electron recoil-energy spectra and to total cross sections are computed for neutrino-electron scattering by solar neutrinos. Radiative corrections change monotonically the electron recoil spectrum for incident \\b8 neutrinos, with the relative probability of observing recoil electrons being reduced by about 4 \\% at the highest electron energies. For p-p and \\be7 neutrinos, the recoil spectra are not affected significantly. Total cross sections for solar neutrino-electron scattering are reduced by about 2 \\% compared to previously computed values. We also calculate the recoil spectra from ^{13}N and ^{15}O neutrinos including radiative corrections.

  12. Image analysis for facility siting: a comparison of low- and high-altitude image interpretability for land use/land cover mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, H.M.; Estes, J.E.; Ezra, C.E.; Scepan, J.; Tinney, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    For two test sites in Pennsylvania the interpretability of commercially acquired low-altitude and existing high-altitude aerial photography are documented in terms of time, costs, and accuracy for Anderson Level II land use/land cover mapping. Information extracted from the imagery is to be used in the evaluation process for siting energy facilities. Land use/land cover maps were drawn at 1:24,000 scale using commercially flown color infrared photography obtained from the United States Geological Surveys' EROS Data Center. Detailed accuracy assessment of the maps generated by manual image analysis was accomplished employing a stratified unaligned adequate class representation. Both are-weighted and by-class accuracies were documented and field-verified. A discrepancy map was also drawn to illustrate differences in classifications between the two map scales. Results show that the 1:24,000 scale map set was accurate (99% to 94% area-weighted) than the 1:62,500 scale set, especially when sampled by class (96% to 66%). The 1:24,000 scale maps were also more time-consuming and costly to produce, due mainly to higher image acquisition costs.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 137: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.:0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 137: Waste Disposal Sites. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 137 contains sites that are located in Areas 1, 3, 7, 9, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 137 is comprised of the eight corrective action sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) CAS 01-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; (2) CAS 03-23-01, Waste Disposal Site; (3) CAS 03-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (4) CAS 03-99-15, Waste Disposal Site; (5) CAS 07-23-02, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (6) CAS 09-23-07, Radioactive Waste Disposal Site; (7) CAS 12-08-01, Waste Disposal Site; and (8) CAS 12-23-07, Waste Disposal Site. The Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, geophysical surveys, sampling of environmental media, analysis of samples, and assessment of investigation results, where appropriate. Data will be obtained to support corrective action alternative evaluations and waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 137 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting corrective action alternatives.

  14. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2010-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

  15. A practical global distortion correction method for an image intensifier based x-ray fluoroscopy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Luis F.; Ozturk, Cengizhan; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Lederman, Robert J. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 and Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Biomedical Engineering Institute, Bogazici University, Istanbul (Turkey); Lab of Cardiac Energetics, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Cardiovascular Branch, Division of Intramural Research, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    X-ray images acquired on systems with image intensifiers (II) exhibit characteristic distortion which is due to both external and internal factors. The distortion is dependent on the orientation of the II, a fact particularly relevant to II's mounted on C arms which have several degrees of freedom of motion. Previous descriptions of distortion correction strategies have relied on a dense sampling of the C-arm orientation space, and as such have been limited mostly to a single arc of the primary angle, {alpha}. We present a new method which smooths the trajectories of the segmented vertices of the grid phantom as a function of {alpha} prior to solving the two-dimensional warping problem. It also shows that the same residual errors of distortion correction could be achieved without fitting the trajectories of the grid vertices, but instead applying the previously described global method of distortion correction, followed by directly smoothing the values of the polynomial coefficients as functions of the C-arm orientation parameters. When this technique was applied to a series of test images at arbitrary {alpha}, the root-mean-square (RMS) residual error was 0.22 pixels. The new method was extended to three degrees of freedom of the C-arm motion: the primary angle, {alpha}; the secondary angle, {beta}; and the source-to-intensifier distance, {lambda}. Only 75 images were used to characterize the distortion for the following ranges: {alpha}, {+-}45 deg. ({delta}{alpha}=22.5 deg.); {beta}, {+-}36 deg. ({delta}{beta}=18 deg.); {lambda}, 98-118 cm ({delta}{lambda}=10 cm). When evaluated on a series of test images acquired at arbitrary ({alpha},{beta},{lambda}), the RMS residual error was 0.33 pixels. This method is targeted at applications such as guidance of catheter-based interventions and treatment planning for brachytherapy, which require distortion-corrected images over a large range of C-arm orientations.

  16. Bayesian redshift-space distortions correction from galaxy redshift surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Angulo, Raul E; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernandez; Prada, Francisco; Yepes, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    We present a Bayesian reconstruction method which maps a galaxy distribution from redshift-space to real-space inferring the distances of the individual galaxies. The method is based on sampling density fields assuming a lognormal prior with a likelihood given by the negative binomial distribution function modelling stochastic bias. We assume a deterministic bias given by a power law relating the dark matter density field to the expected halo or galaxy field. Coherent redshift-space distortions are corrected in a Gibbs-sampling procedure by moving the galaxies from redshift-space to real-space according to the peculiar motions derived from the recovered density field using linear theory with the option to include tidal field corrections from second order Lagrangian perturbation theory. The virialised distortions are corrected by sampling candidate real-space positions (being in the neighbourhood of the observations along the line of sight), which are compatible with the bulk flow corrected redshift-space posi...

  17. Passive background correction method for spatially resolved detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Randal L. (Tijeras, NM); Hargis, Jr., Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10

    A method for passive background correction during spatially or angularly resolved detection of emission that is based on the simultaneous acquisition of both the passive background spectrum and the spectrum of the target of interest.

  18. Electroweak radiative corrections to W boson production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baur, U. [Department of Physics, SUNY at Buffalo, NY (United States); Keller, S., Wackeroth, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)

    1996-11-14

    We present some results of a new calculation of the O({alpha}) electroweak radiative corrections to W boson production at hadron colliders with special emphasis on the transverse mass distribution.

  19. Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy dependence of acceptance-corrected dielectron excess mass spectrum at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN19.6 and 200 GeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  20. Corrective Actin Tracking System CATS User's Guide for Direct...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    09072004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access Document Number EH-33-2004-09-0001.Ver.4.0 The United States Department of...

  1. Verification of full functional correctness for imperative linked data structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zee, Karen K

    2010-01-01

    We present the verification of full functional correctness for a collection of imperative linked data structures implemented in Java. A key technique that makes this verification possible is a novel, integrated proof ...

  2. Proof Plans for the Correction of False Conjectures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bundy, Alan; Monroy, Raul; Ireland, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Theorem proving is the systematic derivation of a mathcmaticM proof from a set of axioms by the use of rules of inference. We ~re interested in a related but far less explored problem: the analysis and correction of ...

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area • 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

  4. Wide angle Compton scattering on the proton: study of power suppressed corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kivel; M. Vanderhaeghen

    2015-04-04

    We study the wide angle Compton scattering process on a proton within the soft collinear factorization (SCET) framework. The main purpose of this work is to estimate the effect due to certain power suppressed corrections. We consider all possible kinematical power corrections and also include the subleading amplitudes describing the scattering with nucleon helicity flip. Under certain assumptions we present a leading-order factorization formula for these amplitudes which includes the hard- and soft-spectator contributions. We apply the formalism and perform a phenomenological analysis of the cross section and asymmetries in the wide angle Compton scattering on a proton. We assume that in the relevant kinematical region where $-t,-u>2.5$~GeV$^{2}$ the dominant contribution is provided by the soft-spectator mechanism. The hard coefficient functions of the corresponding SCET operators are taken in the leading-order approximation. The analysis of existing cross section data shows that the contribution of the helicity flip amplitudes to this observable is quite small and comparable with other expected theoretical uncertainties. We also show predictions for double polarization observables for which experimental information exists.

  5. Power Corrections and Renormalons in Deep Inelastic Structure Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1996-04-23

    We study the power corrections (infrared renormalon contributions) to the coefficient functions for non-singlet deep inelastic structure functions due to gluon vacuum polarization insertions in one-loop graphs. Remarkably, for all the structure functions $F_1$, $F_2$, $F_3$ and $g_1$, there are only two such contributions, corresponding to $1/Q^2$ and $1/Q^4$ power corrections. We compute their dependence on Bjorken $x$. The results could be used to model the dominant higher-twist contributions.

  6. Estimation of Power Corrections to Hadronic Event Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1994-08-03

    Power corrections to hadronic event shapes are estimated using a recently suggested relationship between perturbative and non-perturbative effects in QCD. The infrared cutoff dependence of perturbative calculations is related to non-perturbative contributions with the same dependence on the energy scale $Q$. Corrections proportional to $1/Q$ are predicted, in agreement with experiment. An empirical proportionality between the magnitudes of perturbative and non-perturbative coefficients is noted.

  7. Calculation of Power Corrections to Hadronic Event Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. L. Dokshitzer; B. R. Webber

    1995-04-04

    We compute power corrections to hadronic event shapes in $e^+e^-$ annihilation, assuming an infrared regular behaviour of the effective coupling $\\alpha_s$. With the integral of $\\alpha_s$ over the infrared region as the only non-perturbative parameter, also measured in heavy quark physics, we can account for the empirical features of $1/Q$ corrections to the mean values of various event shapes.

  8. Suboptimal quantum-error-correcting procedure based on semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Shinji Hara; Koji Tsumura

    2006-06-13

    In this paper, we consider a simplified error-correcting problem: for a fixed encoding process, to find a cascade connected quantum channel such that the worst fidelity between the input and the output becomes maximum. With the use of the one-to-one parametrization of quantum channels, a procedure finding a suboptimal error-correcting channel based on a semidefinite programming is proposed. The effectiveness of our method is verified by an example of the bit-flip channel decoding.

  9. Assessment and Corrective Management for Fish Populations in Small Impoundments. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1985-01-01

    to the pondowner for correcting unbalanced or undesirable fish populations. These include renovation, harvest manipu lation and supplemental stocking. However, if unsatisfactory fish populations are a result of poor water quality, improper pond design or an over...-abundance of aquatic vegetation, the suggested corrective techniques alone may not be successful. Renovation Total renovation using rotenone should be considered for a farm pond if species such as gar, bowfin, flathead catfish, chain pickerel, black bullheads...

  10. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chitanvis, S M

    2006-01-01

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  11. Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirish M. Chitanvis

    2006-06-13

    We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

  12. Chiral corrections and the axial charge of the delta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2008-07-01

    Chiral corrections to the delta axial charge are determined using heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. Knowledge of this axial coupling is necessary to assess virtual-delta contributions to nucleon and delta observables. We give isospin relations useful for a lattice determination of the axial coupling. Furthermore, we detail partially quenched chiral corrections, which are relevant to address partial quenching and/or mixed action errors in lattice calculations of the delta axial charge.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-02

    The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed.

  14. Fault-Tolerant Error Correction with the Gauge Color Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin J. Brown; Naomi H. Nickerson; Dan E. Browne

    2015-08-03

    The gauge color code is a quantum error-correcting code with local syndrome measurements that, remarkably, admits a universal transversal gate set without the need for resource-intensive magic state distillation. A result of recent interest, proposed by Bomb\\'{i}n, shows that the subsystem structure of the gauge color code admits an error-correction protocol that achieves tolerance to noisy measurements without the need for repeated measurements, so called single-shot error correction. Here, we demonstrate the promise of single-shot error correction by designing a two-part decoder and investigate its performance. We simulate fault-tolerant error correction with the gauge color code by repeatedly applying our proposed error-correction protocol to deal with errors that occur continuously to the underlying physical qubits of the code over the duration that quantum information is stored. We estimate a sustainable error rate, i.e. the threshold for the long time limit, of $ \\sim 0.31\\%$ for a phenomenological noise model using a simple decoding algorithm.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

  16. Corrective action decision document for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench (Corrective Action Unit Number 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-26

    The North Disposal Trench, located north of the eastern most lagoon, was installed in 1963 to receive solid waste and construction debris from the Operation Roller Coaster man camp. Subsequent to Operation Roller Coaster, the trench continued to receive construction debris and range cleanup debris (including ordnance) from Sandia National Laboratories and other operators. A small hydrocarbon spill occurred during Voluntary Corrective Action (VCA) activities (VCA Spill Area) at an area associated with the North Disposal Trench Corrective Action Site (CAS). Remediation activities at this site were conducted in 1995. A corrective action investigation was conducted in September of 1996 following the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP); the detailed results of that investigation are presented in Appendix A. The Roller Coaster Lagoons and North Disposal Trench are located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), a part of the Nellis Air Force Range, which is approximately 225 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air.

  17. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wickline, Alfred

    2006-12-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

  18. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Gustafason

    2001-02-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

  19. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE/NV Operations Office

    1999-05-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-05-08

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

  1. 2006 Royal Statistical Society 09641998/07/170000 Proofs subject to correction. Not to be reproduced without permission. Contributions to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    longer than 400 words will be cut by the editor. J. R. Statist. Soc. A (2007) 170, Part 2, pp. 1­22 Model statistical language, latentnet, is available to analyse data by using the model. Keywords: Bayes factor; Dyad© 2006 Royal Statistical Society 0964­1998/07/170000 Proofs subject to correction

  2. Collaborating for Quality and Safety: Implementing Therapeutic Phlebotomy in Connecticut Correctional Facility Infirmaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Collaborating for Quality and Safety: Implementing Therapeutic Phlebotomy in Connecticut to be performed in Connecticut Correctional facility medical unit infirmaries, and improve the patient care in Connecticut Correctional Managed Heath Care (CMHC)Connecticut Correctional Managed Heath Care (CMHC) medical

  3. Design techniques for graph-based error-correcting codes and their applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan, Ching Fu

    2006-04-12

    -correcting (channel) coding. The main idea of error-correcting codes is to add redundancy to the information to be transmitted so that the receiver can explore the correlation between transmitted information and redundancy and correct or detect errors caused...

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krause

    2010-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) presents information supporting the selection of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) leading to the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 562, Waste Systems, in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 562 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 02-26-11, Lead Shot • 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain • 02-59-01, Septic System • 02-60-01, Concrete Drain • 02-60-02, French Drain • 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain • 02-60-04, French Drain • 02-60-05, French Drain • 02-60-06, French Drain • 02-60-07, French Drain • 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall • 23-99-06, Grease Trap • 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of CAAs for the 13 CASs within CAU 562. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 27, 2009, through May 12, 2010, as set forth in the CAU 562 Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether COCs are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. A data quality assessment (DQA) performed on the CAU 562 data demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at 10 of the 13 CASs in CAU 562, and thus corrective action is required. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 562 is shown in Table ES-1. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 13 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 562. • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 02-26-11, 02-44-02, 02-59-01, 02-60-02, 02-60-03, 02-60-04, 02-60-05, 23-60-01, 23-99-06, and 25-60-04. The preferred CAAs were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposures to contaminated media to acceptable levels. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CASs 02-60-01, 02-60-06, and 02-60-07. • Clean closure is recommended for the remaining 10 CASs in CAU 562. • A Corrective Action Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection that contains a detailed description of the proposed actions that will be taken to implement the selected corrective actions.

  5. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013).Processing flowchart for each corridor:Ground control points (GCP, 20.3 cm square white targets, every 20 m) surveyed with RTK GPS. Acquisition of RGB pictures using a Kite-based platform. Structure from Motion based reconstruction using hundreds of pictures and GCP coordinates. Export of DEM and RGB mosaic in geotiff format (NAD 83, 2012 geoid, UTM zone 4 north) with pixel resolution of about 2 cm, and x,y,z accuracy in centimeter range (less than 10 cm). High-accuracy and high-resolution inside GCPs zone for L2 corridor (500x20m), AB corridor (500x40) DEM will be updated once all GCPs will be measured. Only zones between GCPs are accurate although all the mosaic is provided.

  6. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 switching system. This volume presents a brief discussion of the test events and the test results, and summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of the test program. Volume II is a detailed description of the test procedures, the test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. Volume II also presents a discussion of the conclusions and recommendations of the program. Volume III describes the post-test analysis of the measured electromagnetic fields and induced transients. Volume III also includes a comparison of the characteristic attributes of the various simulator environments.

  7. High-altitude-nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulation public health and safety considerations. Technical report, 1 Oct 89-31 May 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, K.

    1992-03-01

    The existence of electromagnetic fields external to the working volumes of high-altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) environment simulators has raised both environmental and public-health concerns regarding the safety of HEMP environment simulator operations. This report contains a review of what HEMP is, what its effects on defense systems are, and why and how HEMP environment simulation testing is conducted. The state of present knowledge concerning the external simulator fields and their possible effects on biological and electronic systems is summarized. Research initiatives are identified to aid in answering the most important questions regarding the continued environmental safety of HEMP simulator operations. These initiatives are intended to support (1) development of options for modification and/or relocation of HEMP environment simulator facilities and (2) determination of safe exposure levels for biological and electronic systems. Recommendations for specific DoD actions are given.

  8. Low-altitude remote sensing dataset of DEM and RGB mosaic for AB corridor on July 13 2013 and L2 corridor on July 21 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Baptiste Dafflon

    2015-04-07

    Low-altitude remote sensing dataset including DEM and RGB mosaic for AB (July 13 2013) and L2 corridor (July 21 2013).Processing flowchart for each corridor:Ground control points (GCP, 20.3 cm square white targets, every 20 m) surveyed with RTK GPS. Acquisition of RGB pictures using a Kite-based platform. Structure from Motion based reconstruction using hundreds of pictures and GCP coordinates. Export of DEM and RGB mosaic in geotiff format (NAD 83, 2012 geoid, UTM zone 4 north) with pixel resolution of about 2 cm, and x,y,z accuracy in centimeter range (less than 10 cm). High-accuracy and high-resolution inside GCPs zone for L2 corridor (500x20m), AB corridor (500x40) DEM will be updated once all GCPs will be measured. Only zones between GCPs are accurate although all the mosaic is provided.

  9. Correcting Quadrupole Roll in Magnetic Lenses with Skew Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walstrom, Peter Lowell

    2014-11-10

    Quadrupole rolls (i.e. rotation around the magnet axis) are known to be a significant source of image blurring in magnetic quadrupole lenses. These rolls may be caused by errors in mechanical mounting of quadrupoles, by uneven radiation-induced demagnetization of permanent-magnet quadrupoles, etc. Here a four-quadrupole ×10 lens with so-called ”Russian” or A -B B-A symmetry is used as a model problem. Existing SLAC 1/2 in. bore high-gradient quadrupoles are used in the design. The dominant quadrupole roll effect is changes in the first-order part of the transfer map (the R matrix) from the object to the image plane (Note effects on the R matrix can be of first order in rotation angle for some R-matrix elements and second order in rotation angle for other elements, as shown below). It is possible to correct roll-induced image blur by mechanically adjusting the roll angle of one or more of the quadrupoles. Usually, rotation of one quadrupole is sufficient to correct most of the combined effect of rolls in all four quadrupoles. There are drawbacks to this approach, however, since mechanical roll correction requires multiple entries into experimental area to make the adjustments, which are made according to their effect on images. An alternative is to use a single electromagnetic skew quadrupole corrector placed either between two of the quadrupoles or after the fourth quadrupole (so-called “non-local” correction). The basic feasibility of skew quadrupole correction of quadrupole roll effects is demonstrated here. Rolls of the third lens quadrupole of up to about 1 milliradian can be corrected with a 15 cm long skew quadrupole with a gradient of up to 1 T/m. Since the effect of rolls of the remaining three lens quadrupoles are lower, a weaker skew quadrupole can be used to correct them. Non-local correction of quadrupole roll effects by skew quadrupoles is shown to be about one-half as effective as local correction (i.e. rotating individual quadrupoles to zero roll angle or placing skew quadrupole correctors in the bores of main quadrupoles).

  10. Correction of Magnetization Sextupole and Decapole in a 5 Centimeter Bore SSC Dipole Using Passive Superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The Idea of Passive Superconductor Correction," presented aton the Fermilab Passive Superconductor Test," ICFA Workshop,methods of passive superconductor correction will reduce

  11. Higher order corrections in minimal supergravity models of inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrara, Sergio; Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Porrati, Massimo E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu E-mail: massimo.porrati@nyu.edu

    2013-11-01

    We study higher order corrections in new minimal supergravity models of a single scalar field inflation. The gauging in these models leads to a massive vector multiplet and the D-term potential for the inflaton field with a coupling g{sup 2} ? 10{sup ?10}. In the de-Higgsed phase with vanishing g{sup 2}, the chiral and vector multiplets are non-interacting, and the potential vanishes. We present generic manifestly supersymmetric higher order corrections for these models. In particular, for a supersymmetric gravity model ?R+R{sup 2} we derive manifestly supersymmetric corrections corresponding to R{sup n}. The dual version corresponds to a standard supergravity model with a single scalar and a massive vector. It includes, in addition, higher Maxwell curvature/scalar interaction terms of the Born-Infeld type and a modified D-term scalar field potential. We use the dual version of the model to argue that higher order corrections do not affect the last 60 e-foldings of inflation; for example the ?R{sup 4} correction is irrelevant as long as ? < 10{sup 24}.

  12. Corrective measures evaluation report for technical area-v groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witt, Johnathan L (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Orr, Brennon R. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Dettmers, Dana L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Howard, Hope (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

    2005-07-01

    This Corrective Measures Evaluation Report was prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent issued by the New Mexico Environment Department to document the process of selecting the preferred remedial alternative for contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V. Supporting information includes background information about the site conditions and potential receptors and an overview of work performed during the Corrective Measures Evaluation. Evaluation of remedial alternatives included identification and description of four remedial alternatives, an overview of the evaluation criteria and approach, qualitative and quantitative evaluation of remedial alternatives, and selection of the preferred remedial alternative. As a result of the Corrective Measures Evaluation, it was determined that monitored natural attenuation of all contaminants of concern (trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and nitrate) was the preferred remedial alternative for implementation as the corrective measure to remediate contaminated groundwater at Technical Area V of Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. Finally, design criteria to meet cleanup goals and objectives and the corrective measures implementation schedule for the preferred remedial alternative are presented.

  13. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trueb, P.; Dejoie, C.; Kobas, M.; Pattison, P.; Peake, D. J.; Radicci, V.; Sobott, B. A.; Walko, D. A.; Broennimann, C.

    2015-04-09

    PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanismmore »has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel.« less

  14. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danko, George (Reno, NV)

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  15. Characterization of quantum dynamics using quantum error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Omkar; R. Srikanth; S. Banerjee

    2015-01-27

    Characterizing noisy quantum processes is important to quantum computation and communication (QCC), since quantum systems are generally open. To date, all methods of characterization of quantum dynamics (CQD), typically implemented by quantum process tomography, are \\textit{off-line}, i.e., QCC and CQD are not concurrent, as they require distinct state preparations. Here we introduce a method, "quantum error correction based characterization of dynamics", in which the initial state is any element from the code space of a quantum error correcting code that can protect the state from arbitrary errors acting on the subsystem subjected to the unknown dynamics. The statistics of stabilizer measurements, with possible unitary pre-processing operations, are used to characterize the noise, while the observed syndrome can be used to correct the noisy state. Our method requires at most $2(4^n-1)$ configurations to characterize arbitrary noise acting on $n$ qubits.

  16. Differential equations to compute $\\hbar$ corrections of the trace formula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabor Vattay

    1994-09-19

    In this paper a new method for computation of higher order corrections to the saddle point approximation of the Feynman path integral is discussed. The saddle point approximation leads to local Schr\\"odinger problems around classical orbits. Especially, the saddle point approximation leads to Schr\\"odinger problems around classical periodic orbits when it is applied to the trace of Green's function. These local Schr\\"odinger problems, in semiclassical approximation, can be solved exactly on the basis of local analytic functions. Then the corrections of the semiclassical result can be treated perturbatively. The strength of the perturbation is proportional to $\\hbar$. The perturbation problem leads to ordinary differential equations. We propose these equations for numerical calculation of corrections, since they can easily be solved by computers. We give quantum mechanical generalizations of the semiclassical zeta functions. Two simple examples are included in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  17. Power corrections and renormalons in Drell-Yan production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Beneke; V. M Braun

    1995-06-30

    The resummed Drell-Yan cross section in the double-logarithmic approximation suffers from infrared renormalons. Their presence was interpreted as an indication for non-perturbative corrections of order $\\lqcd/(Q(1-z))$. We find that, once soft gluon emission is accurately taken into account, the leading renormalon divergence in the resummed cross section is cancelled by higher-order perturbative contributions in the exponent of the resummed cross section. From this evidence, `higher twist' corrections to the hard cross section in Drell-Yan production should therefore intervene only at order $\\lqcd^2/((Q^2 (1-z)^2)$ in the entire perturbative domain $Q (1-z) > \\lqcd$. We compare this result with hadronic event shape variables, comment on the potential universality of non-perturbative corrections to resummed cross sections, and on possible implications for phenomenology.

  18. Instanton corrections to the effective action of N=4 SYM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchi, Massimo; Wen, Congkao

    2015-01-01

    We compute the one-instanton effective action of N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with gauge group Sp(2N). The result can be written in a very compact and manifestly supersymmetric form involving an integral over the superspace of an irrational function of N=4 on-shell superfields. In the Coulomb branch, the instanton corrects both the MHV and next-to-next-MHV gluon couplings D^4F^{2n+2} and F^{2n+4} as well as their super-symmetrically related partners. We confirm at the non-perturbative level the non-renormalization theorems for MHV couplings F^{2n+2} that are expected to receive perturbative corrections only at n-loops. We compute also the one and two-loop corrections to the D^4F^4 coupling and show that its completion under SL(2,Z) duality is consistent with the one-instanton results of U(2) gauge group.

  19. Corrective measures evaluation work plan : Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater : revision 0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wymore, Ryan A.; Collins, Sue S.; Skelly, Michael Francis; Koelsch, Michael C.

    2004-12-01

    This document, which is prepared as directed by the Compliance Order on Consent (COOC) issued by the New Mexico Environment Department, outlines a process to evaluate remedial alternatives to identify a corrective measure for the Sandia National Laboratories Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater (TAG). The COOC provides guidance for implementation of a Corrective Measures Evaluation (CME) for TAG. This Work Plan documents an initial screening of remedial technologies and presents a list of possible remedial alternatives for those technologies that passed the screening. This Work Plan outlines the methods for evaluating these remedial alternatives and describes possible site-specific evaluation activities necessary to estimate remedy effectiveness and cost. These methods will be reported in the CME Report. This Work Plan outlines the CME Report, including key components and a description of the corrective measures process.

  20. The MX Factor

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MX Factor Test films played a strategic-planning role in the debates of the late 1970s and early 1980s about where and how to deploy the MX intercontinental ballistic missile...

  1. Power Factor Improvement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viljoen, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    and disadvantages of various locations in the electrical network are described including the cost of installation and network capacity improvement. Sizing of capacitors is also covered. Finally, some case studies involving power factor improvement are presented...

  2. Reducing Power Factor Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before PF 100142 0.70 or 70% After PF 100105 0.95 or 95% PB References: B.C. Hydro. Power Factor. The GEM Series. October 1989. Commonwealth Sprague Capacitor, Inc....

  3. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-10-01

    CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C • 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 • 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site • 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a • 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) • 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) • 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) • 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie • 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) • 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) • 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth • 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 • 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b • 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

  5. Electromagetic proton form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Y Hussein

    2006-10-31

    The electromagnetic form factors are crucial to our understanding of the proton internal structure, and thus provide a strong constraint of the distributions of the charge and magnetization current within the proton. We adopted the quark-parton model for calculating and understanding the charge structure of the proton interms of the electromagnetic form factors. A remarkable agreement with the available experimental evidence is found.

  6. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 383: Area E-Tunnel Sites, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-03-15

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 383, Area 12 E-Tunnel Sites, which is the joint responsibility of DTRA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, the DOE, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 383 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) and two adjacent areas: • CAS 12-06-06, Muckpile • CAS 12-25-02, Oil Spill • CAS 12-28-02, Radioactive Material • Drainage below the Muckpile • Ponds 1, 2, and 3 The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation to support the recommendation for closure with no further corrective action, by placing use restrictions at the three CASs and two adjacent areas of CAU 383.

  8. Power Corrections to Event Shapes in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Dasgupta; B. R. Webber

    1997-04-11

    We investigate the power-suppressed corrections to the mean values of various quantities that characterise the shapes of final states in deep inelastic lepton scattering. Our method is based on an analysis of one-loop Feynman graphs containing a massive gluon, which is equivalent to the evaluation of leading infrared renormalon contributions. As in $\\ee$ annihilation, we find that the leading corrections are proportional to $1/Q$. We give quantitative estimates based on the hypothesis of a universal low-energy effective coupling.

  9. Radiative corrections in fermion bags bound by Higgs boson exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Yu. Kuchiev; V. V. Flambaum

    2011-01-16

    Radiative corrections for several heavy fermions bound together via the Higgs boson exchange are studied. The fermion bags considered include 12, or fewer, fermions occupying the lowest S_{1/2} shell. It is shown that for `moderately heavy' fermions with masses 0.4< m c^2< 1 TeV the radiative corrections are small, 10^{-2}, and have an attractive nature. Therefore they do not put existence of the fermion bag in doubt. This proves that these fermion bags can exist in nature.

  10. Thermodynamically constrained correction to ab initio equations of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Martin; Mattsson, Thomas R.

    2014-07-07

    We show how equations of state generated by density functional theory methods can be augmented to match experimental data without distorting the correct behavior in the high- and low-density limits. The technique is thermodynamically consistent and relies on knowledge of the density and bulk modulus at a reference state and an estimation of the critical density of the liquid phase. We apply the method to four materials representing different classes of solids: carbon, molybdenum, lithium, and lithium fluoride. It is demonstrated that the corrected equations of state for both the liquid and solid phases show a significantly reduced dependence of the exchange-correlation functional used.

  11. Parton distributions in the presence of target mass corrections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. M. Steffens,M. D. Brown,W. Melnitchouk,S. Sanches

    2012-12-01

    We study the consistency of parton distribution functions in the presence of target mass corrections (TMCs) at low Q{sup 2}. We review the standard operator product expansion derivation of TMCs in both x- and moment-space, and present the results in closed form for all unpolarized structure functions and their moments. To avoid the unphysical region at x > 1 in the standard analysis, we propose an expansion of the target mass corrected structure functions order by order in M{sup 2}/Q{sup 2}, and assess the convergence properties of the resulting forms numerically.

  12. Holographic 1/Nc correction from the chiral condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Chanyong Park; Sunyoung Shin

    2010-10-06

    We investigate a gravity solution containing the gravitational backreaction of the massive scalar field dual to the chiral condensate, which corresponds to $1/N_c$ correction. In general, condensation changes the vacuum structure, so the present dual geometry is appropriate to describe the chiral condensate vacuum in the gauge theory side. After constructing the dual geometry numerically and applying the hard wall model we study the effect of the $1/N_c$ correction on the lightest meson spectra, which improves the values for lightest meson masses into the observations. In addition, we investigate the chiral condensate dependence the binding energy of heavy quarkonium.

  13. String Loop Corrections to Stable Non-BPS Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D. Lambert; I. Sachs

    2000-10-31

    We calculate the string loop corrections to the tachyon potential for stable non-BPS Dp-branes on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. We find a non-trivial phase structure and we show that, after tachyon condensation, the non-BPS Dp-branes are attracted to each other for p=0,1,2. We then identify the corresponding closed string boundary states together with the massless long range fields they excite. For p=3,4 the string loop correction diverge. We identify the massless closed string fields responsible for these divergencies and regularise the partition function using a Fischler-Susskind mechanism.

  14. Dose-to-water conversion for the backscatter-shielded EPID: A frame-based method to correct for EPID energy response to MLC transmitted radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwan, Benjamin J. O’Connor, Daryl J.; King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To develop a frame-by-frame correction for the energy response of amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs) to radiation that has transmitted through the multileaf collimator (MLC) and to integrate this correction into the backscatter shielded EPID (BSS-EPID) dose-to-water conversion model. Methods: Individual EPID frames were acquired using a Varian frame grabber and iTools acquisition software then processed using in-house software developed inMATLAB. For each EPID image frame, the region below the MLC leaves was identified and all pixels in this region were multiplied by a factor of 1.3 to correct for the under-response of the imager to MLC transmitted radiation. The corrected frames were then summed to form a corrected integrated EPID image. This correction was implemented as an initial step in the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model which was then used to compute dose planes in a water phantom for 35 IMRT fields. The calculated dose planes, with and without the proposed MLC transmission correction, were compared to measurements in solid water using a two-dimensional diode array. Results: It was observed that the integration of the MLC transmission correction into the BSS-EPID dose model improved agreement between modeled and measured dose planes. In particular, the MLC correction produced higher pass rates for almost all Head and Neck fields tested, yielding an average pass rate of 99.8% for 2%/2 mm criteria. A two-sample independentt-test and fisher F-test were used to show that the MLC transmission correction resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the mean and the standard deviation of the gamma values, respectively, to give a more accurate and consistent dose-to-water conversion. Conclusions: The frame-by-frame MLC transmission response correction was shown to improve the accuracy and reduce the variability of the BSS-EPID dose-to-water conversion model. The correction may be applied as a preprocessing step in any pretreatment portal dosimetry calculation and has been shown to be beneficial for highly modulated IMRT fields.

  15. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2004-05-03

    The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

  16. Effective temperature scale and bolometric corrections from 2MASS photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Masana; C. Jordi; I. Ribas

    2006-01-03

    This paper presents a method to determine effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters and bolometric corrections for population I and II FGK type stars based on V and 2MASS IR photometry. Accurate calibration is accomplished by using a sample of solar analogues, whose average temperature is assumed to be equal to the solar effective temperature of 5777 K. By taking into account all possible sources of error we estimate associated uncertainties better than 1% in effective temperature and in the range 1.0-2.5% in angular semi-diameter for unreddened stars. Comparison of our new temperatures with other determinations extracted from the literature indicates, in general, remarkably good agreement. These results suggest that the effective temperaure scale of FGK stars is currently established with an accuracy better than 0.5%-1%. The application of the method to a sample of 10999 dwarfs in the Hipparcos catalogue allows us to define temperature and bolometric correction (K band) calibrations as a function of (V-K), [m/H] and log g. Bolometric corrections in the V and K bands as a function of effective temperature, [m/H] and log g are also given. We provide effective temperatures, angular semi-diameters, radii and bolometric corrections in the V and K bands for the 10999 FGK stars in our sample with the corresponding uncertainties.

  17. Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Correcting vibration-induced performance degradation in enterprise servers Christine S. Chan.gross, kaylan.vaidyanathan}@oracle.com ABSTRACT Server fan subsystems are power-hungry and generate vibrations types of vibrations and quantify their effect on hard disks. We introduce a thermal and cooling

  18. Power Corrections to Event Shapes with Mass-Dependent Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicent Mateu; Iain W. Stewart; Jesse Thaler

    2013-02-06

    We introduce an operator depending on the "transverse velocity" r that describes the effect of hadron masses on the leading 1/Q power correction to event-shape observables. Here, Q is the scale of the hard collision. This work builds on earlier studies of mass effects by Salam and Wicke and of operators by Lee and Sterman. Despite the fact that different event shapes have different hadron mass dependence, we provide a simple method to identify universality classes of event shapes whose power corrections depend on a common nonperturbative parameter. We also develop an operator basis to show that at a fixed value of Q, the power corrections for many classic observables can be determined by two independent nonperturbative matrix elements at the 10% level. We compute the anomalous dimension of the transverse velocity operator, which is multiplicative in r and causes the power correction to exhibit non-trivial dependence on Q. The existence of universality classes and the relevance of anomalous dimensions are reproduced by the hadronization models in Pythia 8 and Herwig++, though the two programs differ in the values of their low-energy matrix elements.

  19. Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks Sebastian B. Thrun University procedures have been applied successfully to a variety of real­world scenarios, artificial neural networks that automatically compile neural networks into symbolic rules offer a promising perspective to overcome

  20. SA 113 (2009/05) Request to Correct Personal Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    the records you want corrected. For a complete listing of public bodies, consult the Directory of Public the Directory of Public Bodies on the FOIP website at foip.alberta.ca. FOR OFFICE USE ONLY Date Received Request number that relates to the records, such as your employee number, case number or other identification

  1. Logarithmic corrections to scaling in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dubrulle

    2001-01-04

    We use an analytic toy model of turbulent convection to show that most of the scaling regimes are spoiled by logarithmic corrections, in a way consistent with the most accurate experimental measurements available nowadays. This sets a need for the search of new measurable quantities which are less prone to dimensional theories.

  2. RCRA corrective action determination of no further action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    On July 27, 1990, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a regulatory framework (55 FR 30798) for responding to releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs) at facilities seeking permits or permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The proposed rule, `Corrective Action for Solid Waste Management Units at Hazardous Waste Facilities`, would create a new Subpart S under the 40 CFR 264 regulations, and outlines requirements for conducting RCRA Facility Investigations, evaluating potential remedies, and selecting and implementing remedies (i.e., corrective measures) at RCRA facilities. EPA anticipates instances where releases or suspected releases of hazardous wastes or constituents from SWMUs identified in a RCRA Facility Assessment, and subsequently addressed as part of required RCRA Facility Investigations, will be found to be non-existent or non-threatening to human health or the environment. Such releases may require no further action. For such situations, EPA proposed a mechanism for making a determination that no further corrective action is needed. This mechanism is known as a Determination of No Further Action (DNFA) (55 FR 30875). This information Brief describes what a DNFA is and discusses the mechanism for making a DNFA. This is one of a series of Information Briefs on RCRA corrective action.

  3. Improving STT-MRAM Density Through Multibit Error Correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    . Traditional methods enhance robustness at the cost of area/energy by using larger cell sizes to improve the thermal stability of the MTJ cells. This paper employs multibit error correction with DRAM to the read operation) through TX. A key attribute of an MTJ is the notion of thermal stability. Fig. 2

  4. A Visualization System for Correctness Proofs of Graph Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metaxas, Takis

    A Visualization System for Correctness Proofs of Graph Algorithms P.A. Gloor1, D.B. Johnson2, F. Makedon2, P. Metaxas3 Feb. 28, 1993 Running head: Proof Visualization of Graph Algorithms Correspondence proofs of graph algorithms. The system has been demonstrated for a greedy algorithm, Prim's algorithm

  5. Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – The Idaho site and its cleanup contractor have launched a series of corrective actions they will complete before safely resuming startup operations at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) following an incident in June that caused the new waste treatment facility to shut down.

  6. Path Length Correction for dE/dx Olushakin Olojo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Path Length Correction for dE/dx Olushakin Olojo Department of Mechanical Engineering Wayne State used in CLEO. Due to the recent use of Helium Propane gas in the drift chamber, it is now possible of 50­50% Argon­Ethane to 60­40% Helium­Propane in the CLEO drift chamber has reduced e#ects caused

  7. Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Pure recoil corrections to hydrogen energy levels. Krzysztof Pachucki Max--Planck--Institut F approximation for the hydrogenic energy levels we can assume that the mass of the nucleus is infinite, vacuum polarization, etc. For the precise determination of hydrogenic energy levels we have to include

  8. Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction David R. Bell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Ronald

    them. Econometric estimates of residential demand for water abound (Dalhuisen et al. 2003Urban Water Demand with Periodic Error Correction by David R. Bell and Ronald C. Griffin February, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. #12;Abstract Monthly demand for publicly supplied

  9. Bipolar expansions and overlap corrections to the electrostatic interaction energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Vaman

    2015-06-10

    We use the multipole technique to derive four equivalent expressions for the bipolar expansion of the inverse distance, valid in all the regions of configuration space. Using the first-order perturbation theory, we calculate the overlap correction to the long-range electrostatic energy between two hydrogen atoms and between a hydrogen atom and a proton.

  10. Complete three-loop QCD corrections to the decay H -> ??

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Maierhöfer; P. Marquard

    2012-12-26

    We present the result for the three-loop singlet QCD corrections to the decay of a Higgs boson into two photons and improve the calculation for the non-singlet case. With the new result presented, the decay width Gamma(H -> \\gamma \\gamma) is completely known at O(G_F \\alpha ^2 \\alpha_s^2, G_F \\alpha ^3).

  11. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K. (San Leandro, CA); Durbin, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Dolan, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  12. Energy efficiency of error correction for wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Havinga, Paul J.M.

    -control is an important issue for mobile computing systems. This includes energy spent in the physical radio transmission and Networking Conference 1999 [7]. #12;ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF ERROR CORRECTION FOR WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONA ­ 2 on the energy of transmission and the energy of redundancy computation. We will show that the computational cost

  13. Radiative recoil correction to the Lamb shift Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    analyzed the nuclear self­energy contribution and the corresponding definition of the nuclear mean square of the radiative recoil correction to hydrogenic energy levels in m 2 M ff (Z ff) 5 n 3 order is presented. The method bases on evaluation of the proton kinetic energy term on the electron state. The obtained result

  14. Exponentiated Electroweak Corrections in a Hadronic Event Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yost, Scott

    HERWIRI2: Exponentiated Electroweak Corrections in a Hadronic Event Generator Scott Yost integrated in the same event generator, e.g. NLO EWK + NLO QCD. Scott Yost HERWIRI2 ICHEP 2012 ­ Melbourne of the leading shower generators, HERWIG. · The structure is not tied to a particular shower, and our ultimate

  15. Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric Aydonat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najm, Farid N.

    Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric¸ Aydonat Department of ECE University University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada E-mail: f.najm@utoronto.ca Abstract--Power grid voltage verification has become a crucial step in reliable high-speed chip design. Power grid verification

  16. Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Relativistic and QED corrections for the Beryllium atom Krzysztof Pachucki #3; Institute are calculated for the ground state of the beryllium atom and its positive ion. A basis set of correlated of high precision theoretical predictions for energy levels of the beryllium atom and light ions. Our

  17. Inter-frame Motion Correction for MR Thermometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Inter-frame Motion Correction for MR Thermometry S. Suprijanto1 , M.W. Vogel3 , F.M. Vos1 , H.A. Vrooman2,3 , and A.M. Vossepoel1,2,3 1 Quantitative Imaging, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft with MRI to monitor changes in thermal therapy. Phase shift based MR thermome- try gives an estimate

  18. Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Displacement Correction Scheme for MR-Guided Interstitial Laser Therapy S. Suprijanto1 , M.W. Vogel[1,3]. In the absence of motion, MR thermometry based on phase imaging is quite accurate[12 , F.M. Vos1 , H.A. Vrooman2,3 , and A.M. Vossepoel1 1 Pattern Recognition Group, Department

  19. Stochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willsky, Alan S.

    . Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR) · Both maps will have edges #12;Stochastic Systems Group Outline 1. Introduction 2. MR measurement modelStochastic Systems Group MR Bias Correction and Reflectance and Illumination Separation Ayres Fan

  20. Selected CRC Polynomials Can Correct Errors and Thus Reduce Retransmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mache, Jens

    sensor networks, minimizing communication is crucial to improve energy consumption and thus lifetime Correction, Reliability, Network Protocol, Low Power Comsumption I. INTRODUCTION Error detection using Cyclic of retransmitting the whole packet - improves energy consumption and thus lifetime of wireless sensor networks

  1. Occam: Specification and Compiler Correctness Part I: The Primary Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Börger, Egon

    levels of abstrac- tion, and relate them by relative correctness proofs, aiming at a transparent. It is the other way round: . . . unless there is a prior, generally accepted mathematical definition of a language has to be transparent; the central common ideas should be recognizable by inspection, so to say

  2. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 214: BUNKERS AND STORAGE AREAS NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this Closure Report is to document that the closure of CAU 214 complied with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Corrective Action Plan closure requirements. The closure activities specified in the Corrective Action Plan were based on the approved corrective action alternatives presented in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Decision Document.

  3. ARM: SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1997-03-21

    SIRS: derived, correction of downwelling shortwave diffuse hemispheric measurements using Dutton and full algorithm

  4. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    1993-09-01

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  5. Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

  6. Complete electroweak one-loop radiative corrections to top-pair production at TESLA -- a comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Fleischer; T. Hahn; W. Hollik; T. Riemann; C. Schappacher; A. Werthenbach

    2002-09-19

    Electroweak one-loop radiative corrections to the process e^+ e^- -> t tbar are revisited. Two groups from Karlsruhe and Bielefeld/Zeuthen performed independent calculations of both (virtual and soft) QED contributions and weak virtual corrections. For the angular distribution an agreement of at least eight digits for the weak corrections and of at least seven digits for additional photonic corrections is established.

  7. ARM: Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Laura Riihimaki

    Broadband Radiometer Station (BRS) broadband shortwave and longwave 1-min radiation data with Dutton correction

  8. Relativistic corrections to $J/\\psi$ polarization in photo- and hadroproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhi-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We systematically calculate the relativistic corrections to the polarization variables of prompt $J/\\psi$ photoproduction and hadroproduction using the factorization formalism of nonrelativistic QCD. Specifically, we include the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[1]}$ and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[1]}$ color-singlet and the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$, ${}^1\\!S_{0}^{[8]}$, and ${}^3\\!P_{J}^{[8]}$ color-octet channels as well as the effects due to the mixing between the ${}^3\\!S_1^{[8]}$ and ${}^3\\!D_1^{[8]}$ channels. We provide all the squared hard-scattering amplitudes in analytic form. Assuming the nonrelativistic-QCD long-distance matrix elements to satisfy the velocity scaling rules, we find the relativistic corrections to be appreciable, especially at small transverse momentum $p_T$ and large inelasticity $z$. The results obtained here and in our previous work on the unpolarized yield [Phys. Rev. D 90, 014045 (2014)] will help to render global analyses of prompt $J/\\psi$ production data more complete and hopefully to shed light on the $J/\\psi$ p...

  9. K-corrections and filter transformations in the ultraviolet, optical, and near infrared

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Blanton; Sam Roweis

    2006-06-07

    Template fits to observed galaxy fluxes allow calculation of K-corrections and conversions among observations of galaxies at various wavelengths. We present a method for creating model-based template sets given a set of heterogeneous photometric and spectroscopic galaxy data. Our technique, non-negative matrix factorization, is akin to principle component analysis (PCA), except that it is constrained to produce nonnegative templates, it can use a basis set of models (rather than the delta function basis of PCA), and it naturally handles uncertainties, missing data, and heterogeneous data (including broad-band fluxes at various redshifts). The particular implementation we present here is suitable for ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations in the redshift range 0 base our templates on stellar population synthesis models, the results are intepretable in terms of approximate stellar masses and star-formation histories. We present templates fit with this method to data from GALEX, Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy and photometry, the Two-Micron All Sky Survey, the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe and the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey. In addition, we present software for using such data to estimate K-corrections and stellar masses.

  10. Planckian corrections to the Friedmann flat equations from thermodynamics at the apparent horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viaggiu, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we use our recently generalized black hole entropy formula to propose a quantum version of the Friedmann equations. In particular, starting from the differential version of the first law of thermodynamics, we are able to find planckian (non commutative) corrections to the Friedmann flat equations. The so modified equations are formally similar to the ones present in Gauss-Bonnet gravity, but in the ordinary 3+1 dimensions. As a consequence of these corrections, by considering negative fluctuations in the internal energy that are allowed by quantum field theory, our equations imply a maximum value both for the energy density $\\rho$ and for the Hubble flow $H$, i.e. the big bang is ruled out. Conversely, by considering positive quantum fluctuations, we found no maximum for $\\rho$ and $H$. Nevertheless, by starting with an early time energy density $\\rho\\sim 1/t^2$, we obtain a value for the scale factor $a(t)\\sim e^{\\sqrt{t}}$, implying a finite planckian universe at $t=0$, i.e. the point-like big...

  11. Electron cyclotron current drive modelling with parallel momentum correction for tokamaks and stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.; Marushchenko, N. B.

    2012-10-15

    The electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is described by the solution of a drift-kinetic equation (DKE) with the quasi-linear heating term which is highly localised in phase space. Within the adjoint approach, an equivalent DKE must be solved without this highly localised source, and the ECCD is described by a straightforward convolution in phase space. The parallel momentum correction technique [Maassberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 072504 (2009)] reduces the problem to the solution of a simplified mono-energetic DKE. The mono-energetic distribution functions are calculated by the DKES code [W. I. van Rij and S. P. Hirshman, Phys. Fluids B 1, 563 (1989)]. Parallel momentum correction, requiring only an energy-dependent weighting factor, is applied to these distribution functions allowing for the direct estimation of the EC-driven current. For small yet finite collisionalities, a rather simple model for ECCD is presented. In this approach, the symmetric portion of the electron distribution function with respect to v{sub Parallel-To} (the Ware pinch contribution) is neglected and an 'off-set' only in the passing particle domain adds to the collisionless (anti-symmetric) distribution function. For this approximation, only the mono-energetic parallel conductivity coefficient as function of the collisionality is needed. The impact of small yet finite collisionalities on ECCD is shown for X2- and O2-scenarios at W7-X.

  12. Multi-factor authentication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-10-21

    Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  13. Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

    2014-11-04

    We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

  14. Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Coalgate, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

  15. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Sites, Nevada with ROTC 1, Errata Sheet, Revision 0, January 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the seven CASs within CAU 139. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from June 26 through September 27, 2006, as set forth in the CAU 139 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP).

  16. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. B. Jackson

    2003-05-01

    The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.

  17. Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 340, Pesticide Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This Correction Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. As required by the FFACO (1996), this document provides or references all of the specific information for planning investigation activities associated with three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These CASs are collectively known as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 340, Pesticide Release Sites. According to the FFACO, CASs are sites that may require corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. These sites are CAS 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 (Q800) Pesticide Release Ditch; CAS 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and CAS 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage (Q15-11). The purpose of this CAIP for CAU 340 is to direct and guide the investigation for the evaluation of the nature and extent of pesticides, herbicides, and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that were stored, mixed, and/or disposed of at each of the CASs.

  18. The Dirac Form Factor Predicts the Pauli Form Factor in the Endpoint Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumeet Dagaonkar; Pankaj Jain; John P. Ralston

    2015-03-24

    We compute the momentum-transfer dependence of the proton Pauli form factor $F_{2}$ in the endpoint overlap model. We find the model correctly reproduces the scaling of the ratio of $F_{2}$ with the Dirac Form factor $F_{1}$ observed at the Jefferson Laboratory. The calculation uses the leading-power, leading twist Dirac structure of the quark light-cone wave function, and the same endpoint dependence previously determined from the Dirac form factor $F_{1}$. There are no parameters and no adjustable functions in the endpoint model's prediction for $F_{2}$. The model's predicted ratio $F_{2}(Q^{2})/F_{1}(Q^{2})$ is quite insensitive to the endpoint wave function, which explains why the observed ratio scales like $1/Q$ down to rather low momentum transfers. The endpoint model appears to be the only comprehensive model consistent with all form factor information as well as reproducing fixed-angle proton-proton scattering at large momentum transfer. Any one of the processes is capable of predicting the others.

  19. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. B. Campbell

    2002-06-01

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

  20. Fast Factoring of Integers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon Chalmers

    2005-09-20

    An algorithm is given to factor an integer with $N$ digits in $\\ln^m N$ steps, with $m$ approximately 4 or 5. Textbook quadratic sieve methods are exponentially slower. An improvement with the aid of an a particular function would provide a further exponential speedup.

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    1999-01-28

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

  2. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    PCA 3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization 3.15.2 Matrix concentration3.3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization . . . 3.4

  3. Asymptotic, multigroup flux reconstruction and consistent discontinuity factors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trahan, Travis J.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2015-05-12

    Recent theoretical work has led to an asymptotically derived expression for reconstructing the neutron flux from lattice functions and multigroup diffusion solutions. The leading-order asymptotic term is the standard expression for flux reconstruction, i.e., it is the product of a shape function, obtained through a lattice calculation, and the multigroup diffusion solution. The first-order asymptotic correction term is significant only where the gradient of the diffusion solution is not small. Inclusion of this first-order correction term can significantly improve the accuracy of the reconstructed flux. One may define discontinuity factors (DFs) to make certain angular moments of the reconstructed fluxmore »continuous across interfaces between assemblies in 1-D. Indeed, the standard assembly discontinuity factors make the zeroth moment (scalar flux) of the reconstructed flux continuous. The inclusion of the correction term in the flux reconstruction provides an additional degree of freedom that can be used to make two angular moments of the reconstructed flux continuous across interfaces by using current DFs in addition to flux DFs. Thus, numerical results demonstrate that using flux and current DFs together can be more accurate than using only flux DFs, and that making the second angular moment continuous can be more accurate than making the zeroth moment continuous.« less

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada: Revision No. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

    2003-12-22

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-21-003-TANL; 09-21-001-TA09; TA-19-002-TAB2; TA-21-002-TAAL; and 03-19-001. The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU. The corrective action alternative recommended for CAU 410 is Clean Closure; therefore, no corrective action or corrective action plan is required. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities.

  5. Semiclassical zero-temperature corrections to Schwarzschild spacetime and holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabbri, A.; Farese, S.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Sanchis-Alepuz, H.; Olmo, G.J.

    2006-05-15

    Motivated by the quest for black holes in anti-de Sitter braneworlds, and, in particular, by the holographic conjecture relating 5D classical bulk solutions with 4D quantum corrected ones, we numerically solve the semiclassical Einstein equations (backreaction equations) with matter fields in the (zero-temperature) Boulware vacuum state. In the absence of an exact analytical expression for in four dimensions we work within the s-wave approximation. Our results show that the quantum corrected solution is very similar to Schwarzschild spacetime until very close to the horizon, but then a bouncing surface for the radial function appears which prevents the formation of an event horizon. We also analyze the behavior of the geometry beyond the bounce, where a curvature singularity arises. In the dual theory, this indicates that the corresponding 5D static classical braneworld solution is not a black hole but rather a naked singularity.

  6. Multi-Step stochastic correction in dynamical fermion updating algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enno E. Scholz; Istvan Montvay

    2006-10-20

    The advantages of using Multi-Step corrections for simulations of lattice gauge theories with dynamical fermions will be discussed. This technique is suited for algorithms based on the Multi-Boson representation of the dynamical fermions as well as for the Hybrid Monte-Carlo (HMC) algorithm and variants of the latter, like the Polynomial-HMC. Especially the latter has the power to deal with an odd number of fermion fields--an essential feature necessary for realistic QCD-simulations with up-, down-, and strange-quarks. In particular, we will discuss the application of the multi-step (actually two-step) correction technique to a PHMC updating algorithm for twisted-mass Wilson fermions with non-degenerate fermion masses, as it was used in recent dynamical simulations for N_f=2+1+1 fermion flavors.

  7. Positive specific heat of the quantum corrected dilaton black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grumiller; W. Kummer; D. V. Vassilevich

    2003-06-20

    Path integral quantization of dilaton gravity in two dimensions is applied to the CGHS model to the first nontrivial order in matter loops. Our approach is background independent as geometry is integrated out exactly. The result is an effective shift of the Killing norm: the apparent horizon becomes smaller. The Hawking temperature which is constant to leading order receives a quantum correction. As a consequence, the specific heat becomes positive and proportional to the square of the black hole mass.

  8. Correcting Thermal Distribution Problems for a Large University Campus 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, H.; Deng, S.; Bruner, H. L.; Claridge, D. E.; Turner, W. D.

    2002-01-01

    display the same characteristics as the Butler building. In order to correct comfort complaints and flow problems, several emergency balances were performed over the years. This was only a temporary solution for the problems. After cold weather..., Utilities Office of Energy Management. We greatly appreciate the support for this work from the Office of Energy Management and the Continuous Commissioning Group, Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University. REFERENCES Deng, S., Liu, M...

  9. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  10. Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-12

    The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

  11. Vacuum-polarization corrections to the PNC amplitude in 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Walter R.

    |D|HF 6s Corrections to EPNC amplitude for 133 Cs Units: iea0 Ã? 10-11 (-QW /N) Type 7s|D|6s 7s|D|6s for 133 Cs, with RPA. Units: iea0 Ã? 10-11 (-QW /N) Type 7s|D|6s 7s|D|6s EPNC RPA -3.4570 1.2726 -0

  12. Power Law Corrections to BTZ Black Hole Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharm Veer Singh

    2014-11-14

    We study the quantum scalar field in the background of BTZ black hole and evaluate the entanglement entropy of the non-vacuum states. The entropy is proportional to the area of event horizon for the ground state, but the area law is violated in the case of non-vacuum states (first excited state and mixed states) and the corrections scale as power law.

  13. Strong gravitational lensing with Gauss-Bonnet correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, J.; Vaez, H. E-mail: h.vaez@umz.ac.ir

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the strong gravitational lensing in a five dimensional background with Gauss-Bonnet gravity, so that in 4-dimensions the Gauss-Bonnet correction disappears. By considering the logarithmic term for deflection angle, we obtain the deflection angle ?-circumflex and corresponding parameters ? and b-bar . Finally, we estimate some properties of relativistic images such as ?{sub ?}, s and r{sub m}.

  14. FTCP Corrective Action Plan - Revision 2 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111, 2015 FTCP Conference Call MinutesCorrective

  15. Real time detection and correction of distribution feeder operational problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subramanian, A.K.; Huang, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The paper presents a new technique that detects and corrects distribution operational problems using closed loop control of substation transformers, capacitors and reactors by an online computer. This allows the distribution system to be operated close to its capacity without sacrificing the quality of power supply. Such operations help defer the additional cost of installing new substations. The technique integrates the Distribution Feeder Analysis (DFA) and the Distribution Substation Control (DSC) functions to achieve this. The DFA function provides the topology and power flow results for the feeders using the substation real time measurements. It does not require feeder section measurements. The realtime feeder results are used in detecting any currently existing feeder operational problems such as feeder section voltages and currents outside their limits. The detected feeder problems are transformed into substation distribution bus objectives and then corrected by the DSC function using controls available at the substation. The DSC function has been performing successfully for several years at Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) in Washington, D.C. It uses a closed loop control scheme that controls the substation transformer taps and shunt capacitor and reactor breakers and optimizes the substation operation. By combining the DFA and DSC functions into a single function and with proper transformation of feeder problems into substation objectives, a new closed loop control scheme for the substation controls is achieved. This scheme corrects the detected feeder problems and optimizes the substation operation. This technique is implemented and tested using the actual substation and feeder models of PEPCO.

  16. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  17. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index Journal Cited Half-Life 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: CZECHOSLOVAK MATHEMATICAL JOURNAL Mark Journal Title ISSN Total Cites Impact Factor 5-Year Impact Factor Immediacy Index Citable Items

  18. The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A1 Collaboration; J. C. Bernauer; M. O. Distler; J. Friedrich; Th. Walcher; P. Achenbach C. Ayerbe Gayoso; R. Böhm; L. Debenjak; L. Doria; A. Esser; H. Fonvieille; M. Gómez Rodrígues de la Paz; J. M. Friedrich; M. Makek; H. Merkel; D. G. Middleton; U. Müller; L. Nungesser; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Sánchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; S. Širca; M. Weinriefer

    2014-07-29

    The paper describes a precise measurement of electron scattering off the proton at momentum transfers of $0.003 \\lesssim Q^2 \\lesssim 1$\\ GeV$^2$. The average point-to-point error of the cross sections in this experiment is $\\sim$ 0.37%. These data are used for a coherent new analysis together with all world data of unpolarized and polarized electron scattering from the very smallest to the highest momentum transfers so far measured. The extracted electric and magnetic form factors provide new insight into their exact shape, deviating from the classical dipole form, and of structure on top of this gross shape. The data reaching very low $Q^2$ values are used for a new determination of the electric and magnetic radii. An empirical determination of the Two-Photon-Exchange (TPE) correction is presented. The implications of this correction on the radii and the question of a directly visible signal of the pion cloud are addressed.

  19. CORRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT/CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 527: HORN SILVER MINE, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADDKR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 527: Horn Silver Mine, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996). Corrective Action Unit 527 is located within Area 26 of the NTS and consists of CAS 26-20-01, Contaminated Waste Dump No.1. This CADDKR refers to the site as CAU 527 or the Horn Silver Mine (HSM). This CADDKR provides or references the specific information necessary to support the closure of this CAU. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from November 12,2003 through January 21,2004. Additional sampling of liquid obtained from HSM-3 was conducted on May 3,2004. Corrective action investigation activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 527 (NNSAiNV, 2002a). Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities identified the explosive nitrobenzene as a contaminant of concern (COC) on the floor of the 500-foot drift (HSM No.2). No other COCs were identified in the rock samples collected during the investigation activities. The air samples collected from borings HSM-1, HSM-2, and HSM-3 showed volatile organic compounds (primarily gasoline-related contaminants) to be present above the acceptable residential exposure criteria in the boreholes. A conservative modeling effort demonstrated that these concentrations would not migrate to the surface at concentrations that will present an unacceptable risk to future land users. However, other COCs are assumed to exist based on historical documentation on the types of waste placed in the shaft; therefore, the mine including the 300- and 500-foot drifts is considered to be contaminated above action levels. Current results of the field investigation show there are no active transport mechanisms or exposure routes for the contaminants identified in the 500-foot drift. The analytical data did not show the migration of COCs beyond the floor of the 500-foot drift or from the air within the drift. On a conservative basis, the subsurface volume of the zone of contamination is limited to a depth from 150 ft to a maximum of 670 feet below ground surface extending to a radius of 300 feet from the mineshaft. Based on these data, a use restriction will be established for this volume of soil. In addition, the security of the mineshaft is maintained and does not allow unauthorized personnel to enter the vicinity of the mineshaft. Since the removal of the contaminants is not feasible, the close in place with administrative controls corrective action alternative is appropriate because it will prevent inadvertent contact with the subsurface COCs and meets all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site. Post-closure monitoring will be conducted for one year. This monitoring will include using the lysimeter at HSM-3 and the data logger to measure precipitation-induced vadose zone moisture flow through the rock beneath the waste shaft at the Horn Silver Mine. Results of the monitoring will be documented in a letter report at the end of one year, anticipated in June 2005. A copy of this report will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. After one year of monitoring, a determination will be made by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office if future monitoring is needed or if use restriction boundaries need to be adjusted. If a large enough pulse of water moves into the lysimeter, a sample will he collected for laboratory analysis. If there is not sufficient volume of liquid collected for a sample or if no COCs are detected in collected samples at the end of this time period, it is recommended that the monitoring wells at the HSM be sealed in accordance with the State of Nevada regulations.

  20. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2012-05-01

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham and Sam Marutzky

    2011-07-01

    This CADD/CAP follows the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) stage, which results in development of a set of contaminant boundary forecasts produced from groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the Frenchman Flat CAU. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located in the southeastern portion of the NNSS and comprises 10 underground nuclear tests. The tests were conducted between 1965 and 1971 and resulted in the release of radionuclides in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Two important aspects of the corrective action process are presented within this CADD/CAP. The CADD portion describes the results of the Frenchman Flat CAU data-collection and modeling activities completed during the CAI stage. The corrective action objectives and the actions recommended to meet the objectives are also described. The CAP portion describes the corrective action implementation plan. The CAP begins with the presentation of CAU regulatory boundary objectives and initial use restriction boundaries that are identified and negotiated by NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The CAP also presents the model evaluation process designed to build confidence that the flow and contaminant transport modeling results can be used for the regulatory decisions required for CAU closure. The first two stages of the strategy have been completed for the Frenchman Flat CAU. A value of information analysis and a CAIP were developed during the CAIP stage. During the CAI stage, a CAIP addendum was developed, and the activities proposed in the CAIP and addendum were completed. These activities included hydrogeologic investigation of the underground testing areas, aquifer testing, isotopic and geochemistry-based investigations, and integrated geophysical investigations. After these investigations, a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was developed to forecast contaminant boundaries that enclose areas potentially exceeding the Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards at any time within 1,000 years. An external peer review of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was completed, and the model was accepted by NDEP to allow advancement to the CADD/CAP stage. The CADD/CAP stage focuses on model evaluation to ensure that existing models provide adequate guidance for the regulatory decisions regarding monitoring and institutional controls. Data-collection activities are identified and implemented to address key uncertainties in the flow and contaminant transport models. During the CR stage, final use restriction boundaries and CAU regulatory boundaries are negotiated and established; a long-term closure monitoring program is developed and implemented; and the approaches and policies for institutional controls are initiated. The model evaluation process described in this plan consists of an iterative series of five steps designed to build confidence in the site conceptual model and model forecasts. These steps are designed to identify data-collection activities (Step 1), document the data-collection activities in the 0CADD/CAP (Step 2), and perform the activities (Step 3). The new data are then assessed; the model is refined, if necessary; the modeling results are evaluated; and a model evaluation report is prepared (Step 4). The assessments are made by the modeling team and presented to the pre-emptive review committee. The decision is made by the modeling team with the assistance of the pre-emptive review committee and concurrence of NNSA/NSO to continue data and model assessment/refinement, recommend additional data collection, or recommend advancing to the CR stage. A recommendation to advance to the CR stage is based on whether the model is considered to be sufficiently reliable for designing a monitoring system and developing effective institutional controls. The decision to advance to the CR stage or to return to step 1 of the process is then made by NDEP (Step 5).

  2. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-06-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during February 1999. Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected at 0.6-m (2-ft) intervals from the surface to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1999b). Soil sample results indicated that two locations in the bermed area contain total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel at concentrations of 124 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 377 mg/kg. This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). The TPH-impacted soil will be removed and disposed as part of the corrective action.

  3. Nuclear mass form factors from coherent photoproduction of $?^0$ mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Krusche

    2005-09-01

    Data for coherent photoproduction of $\\pi^0$ mesons from nuclei ($^{12}$C, $^{40}$Ca, $^{93}$Nb, $^{nat}$Pb), recently measured with the TAPS detector at the Mainz MAMI accelerator, have been analyzed in view of the mass form factors of the nuclei. The form factors have been extracted in plane wave approximation of the $A(\\gamma ,\\pi^0)A$ reaction and corrected for final state interaction effects with the help of distorted wave impulse approximations. Nuclear mass rms-radii have been calculated from the slope of the form factors for $q^2\\to 0$. Furthermore, the Helm model (hard sphere form factor folded with Gaussian) was used to extract diffraction radii from the zeroes of the form factor and skin thicknesses from the position and height of its first maximum. The diffraction radii from the Helm model agree with the corresponding charge radii obtained from electron scattering experiments within their uncertainties of a few per cent. The rms-radii from the slope of the form factors are systematically lower by up to 5% for PWIA and up to 10% for DWIA. Also the skin thicknesses extracted from the Helm model are systematically smaller than their charge counter parts.

  4. Master integrals for the four-loop Sudakov form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boels, Rutger; Yang, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The light-like cusp anomalous dimension is a universal function in the analysis of infrared divergences. In maximally ($\\mathcal{N}=4$) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory (SYM) in the planar limit, it is known, in principle, to all loop orders. The non-planar corrections are not known in any theory, with the first appearing at the four-loop order. Probably the simplest quantity which contains this correction is the four-loop two-point form factor of the stress tensor multiplet. This form factor was obtained in integrand form in a previous work for $\\mathcal{N}=4$ SYM, up to a single parameter. In this work, a reduction of the appearing integrals obtained by solving integration-by-parts (IBP) identities using (a tweaked version of) Reduze is reported. The form factor is shown to be independent of the remaining parameter at integrand level due to an intricate pattern of cancellations after IBP reduction. The appearing master integrals are cross-checked using algebraic techniques explored in the Mint package. The ...

  5. Efficient error correction for speech systems using constrained re-recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Gregory T

    2008-01-01

    Efficient error correction of recognition output is a major barrier in the adoption of speech interfaces. This thesis addresses this problem through a novel correction framework and user interface. The system uses constraints ...

  6. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide documentation and justification that no further corrective action is needed for the closure of CAU 571 based on the implementation of corrective actions. This includes a description of investigation activities, an evaluation of the data, and a description of corrective actions that were performed. The CAIP provides information relating to the scope and planning of the investigation. Therefore, that information will not be repeated in this document.

  7. Corrective Action Plan Addressing the Accident Investigation Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporate Culture | NationalCorrective

  8. ARM - Evaluation Product - HSRL Corrected for Ship Motion (HSRLSHIPCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected for Ship Motion

  9. ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR Corrected for Ship Motion (KAZRSHIPCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected for

  10. ARM - Evaluation Product - MPL Corrected for Ship Motion (MPLPOLFSSHIPCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected forCorrectionfor

  11. ARM - Evaluation Product - MWACR Corrected for Ship Motion (MWACRSHIPCOR)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENA Contacts ENAProductsHSRL Corrected

  12. ARM - PI Product - NSA AERI Hatch Correction Data Set

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMerged and corrected 915 MHz

  13. ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMerged and correctedProductsRadiosondes

  14. Truck fire Corrective Action Plan submitted to Carlsbad Field Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: April 15, 2014 Truck fire Corrective Action Plan

  15. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 523: Housekeeping Waste, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

    2003-11-01

    This closure report documents the closure activities conducted for Corrective Action Unit 523: Housekeeping Waste, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

  16. Recap Dictionaries Wildcard queries Edit distance Spelling correction Soundex Introduction to Information Retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nejdl, Wolfgang

    Dictionaries Wildcard queries Edit distance Spelling correction Soundex Skip pointers 16 28 72 5 51 98 2 4 8 16

  17. Study of fusion dynamics using Skyrme energy density formalism with different surface corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishwar Dutt; Narinder K. Dhiman

    2010-11-19

    Within the framework of Skyrme energy density formalism, we investigate the role of surface corrections on the fusion of colliding nuclei. For this, the coefficient of surface correction was varied between 1/36 and 4/36, and its impact was studied on about 180 reactions. Our detailed investigations indicate a linear relationship between the fusion barrier heights and strength of the surface corrections. Our analysis of the fusion barriers advocate the strength of surface correction of 1/36.

  18. Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured behind Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2014-11-01

    Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and in order to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the UV, visible or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental and theoretical methods we have found that the glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report for the first time that the measured reflectance intensity values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflectances arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are vertically shifted with intensity offsets in the hemispherical case leading to measured values up to ?6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ?3.8% too high for 10% reflecting materials, approximately correct for 40%- to 60%-diffuse reflecting surfaces, and ?1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for 99%-reflecting matte surfaces. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces as verified by both theory and experiment, and have some dependence on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300 to 2300 nm range.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2009-05-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557, Spills and Tank Sites, in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 557 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): • 01-25-02, Fuel Spill • 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST • 06-99-10, Tar Spills • 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to identify and provide the justification and documentation that supports the recommendation for closure of the CAU 557 CASs with no further corrective action. To achieve this, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted from May 5 through November 24, 2008. The CAI activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

  1. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2014-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. • The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. • CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  2. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Evenson

    2010-04-01

    Corrective Action Unit 560 comprises seven corrective action sites (CASs): •03-51-01, Leach Pit •06-04-02, Septic Tank •06-05-03, Leach Pit •06-05-04, Leach Bed •06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System •06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond •06-59-05, Control Point Septic System The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 560 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 7, 2008, through February 24, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and Record of Technical Change No. 1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. •If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 560 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: •No contamination exceeding the FALs was identified at CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04. •The soil at the base of the leach pit chamber at CAS 06-05-03 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 5 to 20 feet (ft) below ground surface. The contamination is confined laterally to the walls of the leach pit chamber and leach rock. The contamination present at CAS 06-05-03 within the leach pit was not feasible to remove. •The surface and subsurface soils within and surrounding the septic system at CAS 06-05-04 contained PCB concentrations above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg. The lateral and vertical extent of COCs was determined for this CAS. Contaminated soils were removed up to within 18 ft of the building. The remaining contamination is confined to subsurface soils adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162 and was not feasible to remove. •The solid materials within the septic tank and soils immediately surrounding the inlet end of the tank at CAS 06-59-03 contained benzo(a)pyrene above the FAL of 0.21 mg/kg. The soils, tank contents, and tank were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. •The solids contained within the septic tank and inlet pipe at CAS 06-59-05 contained the following contaminants above their respective FALs: PCBs, arsenic, lead, benzo(a)pyrene, and pesticides. The tank and inlet pipe contents were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following corrective action recommendations: •No further action for CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04, as no contaminants of potential concern were present that exceed FALs. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-03 under a corrective action with a use restriction (UR) for remaining PCB- and arsenic-impacted potential source material (PSM). The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •Closure in place for CAS 06-05-04 under a corrective action with a UR for remaining PCBs in soil adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. •No further action for CAS 06-59-0

  3. $?_{DIS}(?N)$, NLO Perturbative QCD and O(1 GeV) Mass Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kretzer; M. H. Reno

    2004-10-13

    The deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon cross section is one of the components of few GeV neutrino interactions. We present here our results for neutrino-isoscalar nucleon charged current scattering including perturbative next-to-leading order QCD corrections, target mass corrections, charm mass and lepton mass corrections.

  4. Correction To the Formula For the Total Frequency Integral of the Ion Velocity Spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killian, Thomas C.

    Correction To the Formula For the Total Frequency Integral of the Ion Velocity Spectrum Trevor integral of the ion velocity spectrum is incorrect, while the equation for the spectrum itself is correct, there are slightly different forms of this equation running around in which camera corrections and spatial integrals

  5. Recoil Corrections of Order $(Z?)^6(m/M)m$ to the Hydrogen Energy Levels Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael I. Eides; Howard Grotch

    1996-11-22

    The recoil correction of order $(Z\\alpha)^6(m/M)m$ to the hydrogen energy levels is recalculated and a discrepancy existing in the literature on this correction for the 1S energy level, is resolved. An analytic expression for the correction to the S-levels with arbitrary principal quantum number is obtained.

  6. DFD 2001, November 20 (San Diego) [KQ.1] Lubrication-correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ichiki, Kengo

    APS DFD 2001, November 20 (San Diego) [KQ.1] Lubrication-correction for many-particle systems-correction (APS DFD 2001) What is the lubrication-correction? a method to describe nearly touching particles expansion method" November 20, 2001 Page 2 #12;Introduction ­ Goal Goal of this work formulate a lubrication

  7. Both Complete and Correct? Multi-Objective Optimization of Touchscreen Keyboard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Both Complete and Correct? Multi-Objective Optimization of Touchscreen Keyboard Xiaojun Bi Tom@acm.org ABSTRACT Correcting erroneous input (i.e., correction) and completing a word based on partial input (i.e., completion) are two important "smart" capabilities of a modern intelligent touchscreen keyboard. However

  8. STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRAY-LIGHT CORRECTION IN MAGNETOGRAPH OBSERVATIONS USING THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD JONGCHUL CHAE1 June 1998; accepted 17 July 1998) Abstract. We have developed a method of stray-light correction which is applicable to filter-based magnetograph observations. Stray-light-corrected Stokes images are obtained

  9. Version 2.0 Finite nuclear mass corrections to electric and magnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    for the leading corrections to the relativistic contribution to energy, the transition electric dipole moment to rovibrational energies in diatomic molecules. 2 #12; Further examples are finite nuclear mass correctionsVersion 2.0 Finite nuclear mass corrections to electric and magnetic interactions in diatomic

  10. Tiled QR factorization algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwmeester, Henricus; Langou, Julien; Robert, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This work revisits existing algorithms for the QR factorization of rectangular matrices composed of p-by-q tiles, where p >= q. Within this framework, we study the critical paths and performance of algorithms such as Sameh and Kuck, Modi and Clarke, Greedy, and those found within PLASMA. Although neither Modi and Clarke nor Greedy is optimal, both are shown to be asymptotically optimal for all matrices of size p = q^2 f(q), where f is any function such that \\lim_{+\\infty} f= 0. This novel and important complexity result applies to all matrices where p and q are proportional, p = \\lambda q, with \\lambda >= 1, thereby encompassing many important situations in practice (least squares). We provide an extensive set of experiments that show the superiority of the new algorithms for tall matrices.

  11. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We compute the e?e? C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(?3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments ?n. To eliminate an O(?QCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switchmore »from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter ?1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in ?1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for ?s(mZ) and ?1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ? 2.5% at Q=mZ.« less

  12. Electroweak vacuum stability and finite quadratic radiative corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabella Masina; Germano Nardini; Mariano Quiros

    2015-07-07

    If the Standard Model (SM) is an effective theory, as currently believed, it is valid up to some energy scale $\\Lambda$ to which the Higgs vacuum expectation value is sensitive throughout radiative quadratic terms. The latter ones destabilize the electroweak vacuum and generate the SM hierarchy problem. For a given perturbative Ultraviolet (UV) completion, the SM cutoff can be computed in terms of fundamental parameters. If the UV mass spectrum involves several scales the cutoff is not unique and each SM sector has its own UV cutoff $\\Lambda_i$. We have performed this calculation assuming the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) is the SM UV completion. As a result, from the SM point of view, the quadratic corrections to the Higgs mass are equivalent to finite threshold contributions. For the measured values of the top quark and Higgs masses, and depending on the values of the different cutoffs $\\Lambda_i$, these contributions can cancel even at renormalization scales as low as multi-TeV, unlike the case of a single cutoff where the cancellation only occurs at Planckian energies, a result originally obtained by Veltman. From the MSSM point of view, the requirement of stability of the electroweak minimum under radiative corrections is incorporated into the matching conditions and provides an extra constraint on the Focus Point solution to the little hierarchy problem in the MSSM. These matching conditions can be employed for precise calculations of the Higgs sector in scenarios with heavy supersymmetric fields.

  13. Parametrizing and constraining scalar corrections to general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo C. Stein; Kent Yagi

    2014-02-24

    We parametrize a large class of corrections to general relativity which include a long-ranged gravitational scalar field as a dynamical degree of freedom in two ways: parametrizing the structure of the correction to the action, and parametrizing the scalar hair (multipole structure) that compact objects and black holes attain. The presence of this scalar hair violates the no-hair theorems present in general relativity, which leads to several important effects. The effects we consider are (i) the interaction between an isolated body and an external scalar field, (ii) the scalar multipole-multipole interaction between two bodies in a compact binary, (iii) the additional pericenter precession of a binary, (iv) the scalar radiation from a binary, and (v) the modification to the gravitational wave phase from a binary. We apply this framework to example theories including Einstein-dilaton-Gauss-Bonnet gravity and dynamical Chern-Simons gravity, and estimate the size of the effects. Finally, we estimate the bounds that can be placed on parameters of the theories from the precession of pulsar binaries and from gravitational waves.

  14. C -parameter distribution at N 3 LL ' including power corrections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoang, André H.; Kolodrubetz, Daniel W.; Mateu, Vicent; Stewart, Iain W.

    2015-05-01

    We compute the e?e? C-parameter distribution using the soft-collinear effective theory with a resummation to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading-log prime accuracy of the most singular partonic terms. This includes the known fixed-order QCD results up to O(?3s), a numerical determination of the two-loop nonlogarithmic term of the soft function, and all logarithmic terms in the jet and soft functions up to three loops. Our result holds for C in the peak, tail, and far tail regions. Additionally, we treat hadronization effects using a field theoretic nonperturbative soft function, with moments ?n. To eliminate an O(?QCD) renormalon ambiguity in the soft function, we switch from the MS¯ to a short distance “Rgap” scheme to define the leading power correction parameter ?1. We show how to simultaneously account for running effects in ?1 due to renormalon subtractions and hadron-mass effects, enabling power correction universality between C-parameter and thrust to be tested in our setup. We discuss in detail the impact of resummation and renormalon subtractions on the convergence. In the relevant fit region for ?s(mZ) and ?1, the perturbative uncertainty in our cross section is ? 2.5% at Q=mZ.

  15. Renormalisation Group Corrections to Neutrino Mass Sum Rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gehrlein, Julia; Spinrath, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino mass sum rules are an important class of predictions in flavour models relating the Majorana phases to the neutrino masses. This leads, for instance, to enormous restrictions on the effective mass as probed in experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay. While up to now these sum rules have in practically all cases been taken to hold exactly, we will go here beyond that. After a discussion of the types of corrections that could possibly appear and elucidating on the theory behind neutrino mass sum rules, we estimate and explicitly compute the impact of radiative corrections, as these appear in general and thus hold for whole groups of models. We discuss all neutrino mass sum rules currently present in the literature, which together have realisations in more than 50 explicit neutrino flavour models. We find that, while the effect of the renormalisation group running can be visible, the qualitative features do not change. This finding strongly backs up the solidity of the predictions derived in the l...

  16. Correction of the Chromaticity up to Second Order for MEIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. K. Sayed, S.A. Bogacz, P. Chevtsov

    2010-03-01

    The proposed electron collider lattice exhibits low ?- functions at the Interaction Point (IP) (?x?100mm ? ?y? 20 mm) and rather large equilibrium momentum spread of the collider ring (?p/p = 0.00158). Both features make the chromatic corrections of paramount importance. Here the chromatic effects of the final focus quadruples are cor- rected both locally and globally. Local correction features symmetric sextupole families around the IP, the betatron phase advances from the IP to the sextupoles are chosen to eliminate the second order chromatic aberration. Global interleaved families of sextupoles are placed in the figure-8 arc sections, and non-interleaved families at straight sec- tion making use of the freely propagated dispersion wave from the arcs. This strategy minimizes the required sex- tupole strength and eventually leads to larger dynamic aper- ture of the collider. The resulting spherical aberrations induced by the sextupoles are mitigated by design; the straight and arc sections optics features an inverse identity transformation between sextupoles in each pair.

  17. Duality Groups, Automorphic Forms and Higher Derivative Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neil Lambert; Peter West

    2007-02-21

    We study the higher derivative corrections that occur in type II superstring theories in ten dimensions or less. Assuming invariance under a discrete duality group G(Z) we show that the generic functions of the scalar fields that occur can be identified with automorphic forms. We then give a systematic method to construct automorphic forms from a given group G(Z) together with a chosen subgroup H and a linear representation of G(Z). This construction is based on the theory of non-linear realizations and we find that the automorphic forms contain the weights of G. We also carry out the dimensional reduction of the generic higher derivative corrections of the IIB theory to three dimensions and find that the weights of E_8 occur generalizing previous results of the authors on M-theory. Since the automorphic forms of this theory contain the weights of E_8 we can interpret the occurrence of weights in the dimensional reduction as evidence for an underlying U-duality symmetry.

  18. The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prime, Michael B; Kastengren, Alan L

    2010-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

  19. Kubo relations and radiative corrections for lepton number washout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Laine, M. E-mail: laine@itp.unibe.ch

    2014-05-01

    The rates for lepton number washout in extensions of the Standard Model containing right-handed neutrinos are key ingredients in scenarios for baryogenesis through leptogenesis. We relate these rates to real-time correlation functions at finite temperature, without making use of any particle approximations. The relations are valid to quadratic order in neutrino Yukawa couplings and to all orders in Standard Model couplings. They take into account all spectator processes, and apply both in the symmetric and in the Higgs phase of the electroweak theory. We use the relations to compute washout rates at next-to-leading order in g, where g denotes a Standard Model gauge or Yukawa coupling, both in the non-relativistic and in the relativistic regime. Even in the non-relativistic regime the parametrically dominant radiative corrections are only suppressed by a single power of g. In the non-relativistic regime radiative corrections increase the washout rate by a few percent at high temperatures, but they are of order unity around the weak scale and in the relativistic regime.

  20. Electrical and Production Load Factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, T.; Heffington, W. M.

    2009-01-01

    factors and operating hours of small and medium-sized industrial plants are analyzed to classify shift-work patterns and develop energy conservation diagnostic tools. This paper discusses two types of electric load factors for each shift... The purpose of this paper is to analyze operating hours of small and medium-sized manufacturing plants in the United States and develop ranges of load factors for use as diagnostic tools for effective energy management. Load factor is defined...

  1. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehlecke

    2005-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 552 is being investigated because man-made radionuclides and chemical contaminants may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. The CAI will be conducted following the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The DQOs are used to identify the type, amount, and quality of data needed to define the nature and extent of contamination and identify and evaluate the most appropriate corrective action alternatives for CAU 552. The primary problem statement for the investigation is: ''Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for CAS 12-23-05.'' To address this problem statement, the resolution of the following two decision statements is required: (1) The Decision I statement is: ''Is a contaminant present within the CAU at a concentration that could pose an unacceptable risk to human health and the environment?'' Any site-related contaminant detected at a concentration exceeding the corresponding preliminary action level (PAL), as defined in Section A.1.4.2, will be considered a contaminant of concern (COC). A COC is defined as a site-related constituent that exceeds the screening criteria (PAL). The presence of a contaminant within each CAS is defined as the analytical detection of a COC. (2) The Decision II statement is: ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs.'' This decision will be achieved by the collection of data that are adequate to define the extent of COCs. Decision II samples are used to determine the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination as well as the likelihood of COCs to migrate outside of the site boundaries. The migration pattern can be derived from the Decision II samples, since the analytical results of those samples will show how far the contamination has travelled in the time period since activities at the site ended. Most of the data necessary to resolve the decisions will be generated from the analysis of environmental samples collected during the CAI for CAU 552. The general purpose of the investigation is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COCs. (2) Determine the vertical and lateral extent of identified COCs. (3) Ensure sufficient data is collected to support the selection of a corrective action compliant with all NDEP, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA)'', and DOE requirements. In addition, data will be obtained to support (IDW) disposal and potential future waste management decisions.

  2. Nuclear physics in soft-wall AdS/QCD: Deuteron electromagnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Gutsche; Valery E. Lyubovitskij; Ivan Schmidt; Alfredo Vega

    2015-06-02

    We present a high-quality description of the deuteron electromagnetic form factors in a soft-wall AdS/QCD approach. We first propose an effective action describing the dynamics of the deuteron in the presence of an external vector field. Based on this action the deuteron electromagnetic form factors are calculated, displaying the correct 1/Q^10 power scaling for large Q^2 values. This finding is consistent with quark counting rules and the earlier observation that this result holds in confining gauge/gravity duals. The Q^2 dependence of the deuteron form factors is defined by a single and universal scale parameter kappa, which is fixed from data.

  3. Monte Carlo studies of the properties of the Majorana quantum error correction code: is self-correction possible during braiding?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio L. Pedrocchi; N. E. Bonesteel; David P. DiVincenzo

    2015-07-03

    The Majorana code is an example of a stabilizer code where the quantum information is stored in a system supporting well-separated Majorana Bound States (MBSs). We focus on one-dimensional realizations of the Majorana code, as well as networks of such structures, and investigate their lifetime when coupled to a parity-preserving thermal environment. We apply the Davies prescription, a standard method that describes the basic aspects of a thermal environment, and derive a master equation in the Born-Markov limit. We first focus on a single wire with immobile MBSs and perform error correction to annihilate thermal excitations. In the high-temperature limit, we show both analytically and numerically that the lifetime of the Majorana qubit grows logarithmically with the size of the wire. We then study a trijunction with four MBSs when braiding is executed. We study the occurrence of dangerous error processes that prevent the lifetime of the Majorana code from growing with the size of the trijunction. The origin of the dangerous processes is the braiding itself, which separates pairs of excitations and renders the noise nonlocal; these processes arise from the basic constraints of moving MBSs in 1D structures. We confirm our predictions with Monte Carlo simulations in the low-temperature regime, i.e. the regime of practical relevance. Our results put a restriction on the degree of self-correction of this particular 1D topological quantum computing architecture.

  4. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick K.

    2015-02-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550: Smoky Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 550 includes 19 corrective action sites (CASs), which consist of one weapons-related atmospheric test (Smoky), three safety experiments (Ceres, Oberon, Titania), and 15 debris sites (Table ES-1). The CASs were sorted into the following study groups based on release potential and technical similarities: • Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test • Study Group 2, Safety Experiments • Study Group 3, Washes • Study Group 4, Debris The purpose of this document is to provide justification and documentation supporting the conclusion that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 550 based on implementation of the corrective actions listed in Table ES-1. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed between August 2012 and October 2013 as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan. The approach for the CAI was to investigate and make data quality objective (DQO) decisions based on the types of releases present. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the DQO process. The CAU 550 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

  5. Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of the Human EyeHuman Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribak, Erez

    Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA aberration (LCA) and transverse chromatic aberration (TCA). In the presence of polychromatic light, these two types of chromatic aberrations have an impact on the retinal image. Studied isolated, both the LCA

  6. Page 1 of 8 NWPPC. 1989. Technical corrections to the protected areas data base and response to comments (89-19) Technical Corrections to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 8 NWPPC. 1989. Technical corrections to the protected areas data base and response to comments (89-19) Technical Corrections to the Protected Areas Data Base and Response to Comments BRrJR 89 to the protected areas data base and response to comments (89-19) #12;Page 3 of 8 NWPPC. 1989. Technical

  7. On the efficiency of nondegenerate quantum error correction codes for Pauli channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Bjork; Jonas Almlof; Isabel Sainz

    2009-05-19

    We examine the efficiency of pure, nondegenerate quantum-error correction-codes for Pauli channels. Specifically, we investigate if correction of multiple errors in a block is more efficient than using a code that only corrects one error per block. Block coding with multiple-error correction cannot increase the efficiency when the qubit error-probability is below a certain value and the code size fixed. More surprisingly, existing multiple-error correction codes with a code length equal or less than 256 qubits have lower efficiency than the optimal single-error correcting codes for any value of the qubit error-probability. We also investigate how efficient various proposed nondegenerate single-error correcting codes are compared to the limit set by the code redundancy and by the necessary conditions for hypothetically existing nondegenerate codes. We find that existing codes are close to optimal.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews

    2012-09-01

    CAU 366 comprises six corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 • 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 • 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A • 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B • 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C • 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAA) for the six CASs within CAU 366. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 12, 2011, to May 14, 2012, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites.

  9. Method and apparatus for optical phase error correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRose, Christopher; Bender, Daniel A.

    2014-09-02

    The phase value of a phase-sensitive optical device, which includes an optical transport region, is modified by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam such that the phase value is changed from a first phase value to a second phase value, where the second phase value is different from the first phase value. The portion of the optical transport region that is exposed to the laser beam can be a surface of the optical transport region or a portion of the volume of the optical transport region. In an embodiment of the invention, the phase value of the optical device is corrected by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam until the phase value of the optical device is within a specified tolerance of a target phase value.

  10. Quantum Mechanical Corrections to Simulated Shock Hugoniot Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, N; Reed, E; Fried, L E

    2009-07-17

    The authors present a straightforward method for the inclusion of quantum nuclear vibrational effects in molecular dynamics calculations of shock Hugoniot temperatures. Using a grueneisen equation of state and a quasi-harmonic approximation to the vibrational energies, they derive a simple, post-processing method for calculation of the quantum corrected Hugoniot temperatures. They have used our novel technique on ab initio simulations of both shock compressed water and methane. Our results indicate significantly closer agreement with all available experimental temperature data for these two systems. Our formalism and technique can be easily applied to a number of different shock compressed molecular liquids or covalent solids, and has the potential to decrease the large uncertainties inherent in many experimental Hugoniot temperature measurements of these systems.

  11. Higher Derivative Corrections to Manifestly Supersymmetric Nonlinear Realizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muneto Nitta; Shin Sasaki

    2014-11-05

    When global symmetries are spontaneously broken in supersymmetric vacua, there appear quasi-Nambu-Goldstone (NG) fermions as superpartners of NG bosons. In addition to these, there can appear quasi-NG bosons in general. The quasi-NG bosons and fermions together with the NG bosons are organized into chiral multiplets. K\\"ahler potentials of low-energy effective theories were constructed some years ago as supersymmetric nonlinear realizations. It is known that higher derivative terms in the superfield formalism often encounter with the auxiliary field problem; the auxiliary fields are acted by space-time derivatives and cannot be eliminated. In this paper, we construct higher derivative corrections to supersymmetric nonlinear realizations in the off-shell superfield formalism free from the auxiliary field problem. As an example, we present manifestly supersymmetric chiral Lagrangian.

  12. Bremsstrahlung function, leading Luscher correction at weak coupling and localization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonini, Marisa; Preti, Michelangelo; Seminara, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the near BPS expansion of the generalized cusp anomalous dimension with L units of R-charge. Integrability provides an exact solution, obtained by solving a general TBA equation in the appropriate limit: we propose here an alternative method based on supersymmetric localization.The basic idea is to relate the computation to the vacuum expectation value of certain 1/8 BPS Wilson loops with local operator insertions along the contour. These observables localize on a two-dimensional gauge theory on S^2, opening the possibility of exact calculations. As a test of our proposal, we reproduce the leading Luscher correction at weak coupling to the generalized cusp anomalous dimension. This result is also checked against a genuine Feynman diagram approach in N=4 Super Yang-Mills theory.

  13. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0 with Errata Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2005-12-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The corrective actions proposed in this document are according to the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1-1) listed below: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J- and K-Tunnels. A detailed discussion of the history of this CAU is presented in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada.'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This CADD/CR provides justification for the closure of CAU 309 without further corrective action. This justification is based on process knowledge and the results of the investigative activities conducted according to the CAIP (NNSA/NSO, 2004), which provides information relating to the history, planning, and scope of the investigation. Therefore, this information will not be repeated in this CADD/CR.

  14. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfred Wickline

    2008-03-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190, Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended January 2007). Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the following four corrective action sites (CASs): • 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge • 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall • 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System • 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 190 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from March 21 through June 26, 2007. All CAI activities were conducted as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 190 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs.

  15. Isospin violation and the proton's neutral weak magnetic form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randy Lewis; Nader Mobed

    1998-10-05

    The effects of isospin violation on the neutral weak magnetic form factor of the proton are studied using two-flavour chiral perturbation theory. The first nonzero contributions appear at O(p^4) in the small-momentum expansion, and the O(p^5) corrections are also calculated. The leading contributions from an explicit Delta(1232) isomultiplet are included as well. At such a high order in the chiral expansion, one might have expected a large number of unknown parameters to contribute. However, it is found that no unknown parameters can appear within loop diagrams, and a single tree-level counterterm at O(p^4) is sufficient to absorb all divergences. The momentum dependence of the neutral weak magnetic form factor is not affected by this counterterm.

  16. Triton Electric Form Factor at Low-Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Sadeghi

    2009-08-14

    Making use of the Effective Field Theory(EFT) expansion recently developed by the authors, we compute the charge form factor of triton up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). The three-nucleon forces(3NF) is required for renormalization of the three-nucleon system and it effects are predicted for process and is qualitatively supported by available experimental data. We also show that, by including higher order corrections, the calculated charge form factor and charge radius of $^3$H are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and the realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Urbana IX potential models calculations. This method makes possible a high precision few-body calculations in nuclear physics. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent.

  17. SU-E-T-417: A Method for Predicting and Correcting the Dosimetric Effect of a Radiotherapy Treatment Couch in Actual Treatment Position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, J; Shen, S; Wu, X; Huang, M; Benhabib, S; Cardan, R; Popple, R; Brezovich, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Although radiation attenuation by the treatment couch can be included in the calculation of radiotherapy dose, difference between planned and actual treatment couch positions can generate significant dose discrepancies. We propose a method to predict and correct the dosimetric effect of the couch in actual treatment position. Methods: The couch transmission factor, T, varies with beam angle, G, couch lateral position, x, and vertical position, y, i.e., T=T(x,y,G). If T(x,y,G) is known for a fixed couch vertical position y=h, the transmission of central-axis beam (CAX) T(x,y,G) can be obtained by T(x,y,G)=T(x{sup +},h,G), where x{sup +}=x-(y-h)tan(G) and G is the angle between the beam and the vertical axis. Similarly, the transmission of any off-CAX point can be obtained using a similar formula. We measured CAX couch transmission at a fixed couch vertical position over the couch lateral motion range for all gantry angles by continuously scanning rotating arc beams. A 2D couch transmission correction matrix can thus be generated from T(x,h,G) for each treatment field for the actual couch position. By applying the transmission correction matrix to the planned field dose, the couch effect can be predicted and corrected. To verify this method, we measured couch transmission T(x, y=10cm, G=225°)(225°=IEC 135°) and compared to that obtained from equivalent T(x{sup +}, y=3cm, G=225°) over the range of lateral motion with a step size of 2 cm . Results: The measured couch transmission factors T(x, y=10cm, G=225°) are in excellent agreement with those obtained from the equivalent T(x{sup +}, y=3cm, G=225°). The mean difference is 0.00406±0.00135. Conclusion: The couch transmission correction matrix for any couch position and beam angle can be obtained from one set of scanning measurements at a fixed couch vertical position. The dosimetric effect of the treatment couch can be predicted and corrected by applying the couch transmission correction to the planned dose.

  18. QCD Corrections to Pair Production of Type III Seesaw Leptons at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Ruiz

    2015-09-17

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s)$ rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy $SU(2)_L$ triplet leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13,$ 14, and 100 TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) $K$-factors span, approximately, $K^{NLO}=1.1 - 1.4$ for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range $m_T = 100~\\text{GeV}-2\\text{TeV}$. Total production cross sections exhibit a $^{+5\\%}_{-6\\%}$ scale dependence at 14 TeV and $\\pm1\\%$ at 100 TeV. The NLO differential $K$-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na\\"ive scaling by the total $K^{NLO}$ is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are large in TeV-scale dilepton systems. Discovery potential to heavy lepton pairs at 14 and 100 TeV is briefly explored: At the High-Luminosity LHC, we estimate a $4.8-6.3\\sigma$ discovery potential maximally for $m_T = 1.5-1.6~\\text{TeV}$ after 3000 fb$^{-1}$. With 300 (3000) fb$^{-1}$, there is $2\\sigma$ sensitivity up to $m_T = 1.3-1.4~\\text{TeV}~(1.7-1.8~\\text{TeV})$ in the individual channels. At 100 TeV and with 10 fb$^{-1}$, a $5\\sigma$ discovery can be achieved for $m_T=1.4-1.6~\\text{TeV}$.

  19. Correction of Wall Adhesion Effects in the Centrifugal Compression of Strong Colloidal Gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Buscall; Daniel R. Lester

    2014-10-09

    Several methods for measuring the compressive strength of strong particulate gels are available, including the centrifuge method, whereby the strength as a function of volume-fraction is obtained parametrically from the dependence of equilibrium sediment height upon acceleration. The analysis used conventionally due to Buscall & White (1987) ignores the possibility that the particulate network might adhere to the walls of the centrifuge tube, even though many types of cohesive particulate gel can be expected to. The neglect of adhesion is justifiable when the ratio of the shear to compressive strength is small, which it can be for many systems away from the gel-point, but never very near it. The errors arising from neglect of adhesion are investigated theoretically and quantified by synthesising equilibrium sediment height versus acceleration data for various degrees of adhesion and then analysing them in the conventional manner. Approximate correction factors suggested by dimensionless analysis are then tested. The errors introduced by certain other approximations made routinely in order to render the data-inversion practicable are analysed too. For example, it shown that the error introduced by treating the acceleration vector as approximately one-dimensional is minuscule for typical centrifuge dimensions, whereas making this assumption renders the data inversion tractable.

  20. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  1. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin Chang; Xiaohui Hu; Junfeng Sun; Yueling Yang

    2015-04-20

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{0}\\phi$ decay for instance, for probing hard-spectator scattering and annihilation contributions.

  2. Probing Spectator Scattering and Annihilation Corrections in $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Qin; Sun, Junfeng; Yang, Yueling

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the recent LHCb measurements on $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^{-}K^{*+}$ and $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $K^{\\pm}K^{*\\mp}$ decay modes, we revisit the $B_{s}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays within QCD factorization framework. The effects of hard-spectator scattering and annihilation corrections are studied in detail. After performing a $\\chi^2$-fit on the end-point parameters $X_A^{i,f}$ ($\\rho_A^{i,f}$, $\\phi_A^{i,f}$) and $X_H$ ($\\rho_H$, $\\phi_H$) with available data, it is found that although some possible mismatches exist, the universalities of $X_A^{i,f}$ and $X_H$ in $B_s$ and $B_{u,d}$ systems are still allowed within theoretical uncertainties and experimental errors. With the end-point parameters gotten from $B_{u,d}$ $\\to$ $PV$ decays, the numerical results and detailed analyses for the observables of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ ${\\to}$ $\\pi K^{\\ast}$, $\\rho K$, $\\pi\\rho$, $\\pi\\phi$ and $K\\phi$ decay modes are presented. In addition, we have identified a few useful observables, especially the ones of $\\bar{B}_{s}$ $\\to$ $\\pi^...

  3. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    USDOE/NV

    1999-07-01

    This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Such is the case for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The current scope of the Frenchman Flat CAI includes the development and use of a three-dimensional (3-D), numerical, CAU-scale groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The CAU model will be developed and used to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The scope of this CAI does not currently include any characterization activities; however, such activities will be conducted if the CAU model results indicate that further characterization information is needed to develop a sufficiently reliable CAU model. Two areas of importance to the CAU model are the model area and the investigation area. The CAU-model area will be selected to encompass the Frenchman Flat CAU and the region located immediately downgradient where contamination may migrate. The extent of the CAU-model area is dependent on the extent of contamination and is uncertain at this point. The extent of the investigation area is not expected to increase during the CAI.

  4. Addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. 0, November 2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE /NV

    2000-11-03

    This addendum to the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to determine the extent of contamination existing at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 321. This addendum was required when the extent of contamination exceeded the estimate in the original Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). Located in Area 22 on the Nevada Test Site, Corrective Action Unit 321, Weather Station Fuel Storage, consists of Corrective Action Site 22-99-05, Fuel Storage Area, was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility. This facility was operational from 1951 to 1958 and dismantled after 1958. Based on site history and earlier investigation activities at CAU 321, the contaminant of potential concern (COPC) was previously identified as total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics). The scope of this corrective action investigation for the Fuel Storage Area will include the selection of biased sample locations to determine the vertical and lateral extent of contamination, collection of soil samples using rotary sonic drilling techniques, and the utilization of field-screening methods to accurately determine the extent of COPC contamination. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives and be included in the revised CADD.

  5. TMD theory, factorization and evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Collins

    2013-07-10

    The concepts and methods of factorization using transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) parton densities and/or fragmentation functions are summarized.

  6. Filling factors and Braid group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington Cruz

    1998-02-25

    We extract the Braid group structure of a recently derived hierarchy scheme for the filling factors proposed by us which related the Hausdorff dimension, $h$, to statistics, $\

  7. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 568. Area 3 Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for the 14 CASs within CAU 568. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from April 2014 through May 2015, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 568: Area 3 Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the DQO process. The CAU 568 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated that the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the 14 CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 568: • No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-23-17, 03-23-22, 03-23-26. • Closure in place is the preferred corrective action for CAS 03-23-19; 03-45-01; the SE DCBs at CASs 03-23-20, 03-23-23, 03-23-31, 03-23-32, 03-23-33, and 03-23-34; and the Pascal-BHCA at CAS 03-23-31. • Clean closure is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-08-04, 03-23-30, and 03-26-04; and the four well head covers at CASs 03-23-20, 03-23-23, 03-23-31, and 03-23-33.

  8. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Patrick

    2013-11-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

  9. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

    2011-09-01

    Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

  10. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Strand

    2006-06-01

    Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

  11. Orbit correction in a linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Edmonds, C. S.; Kirkman, I. W.; Jones, J. K.; Muratori, B. D.; Garland, J. M.; Berg, J. S.

    2014-11-01

    In a linear non-scaling FFAG the large natural chromaticity of the machine results in a betatron tune that varies by several integers over the momentum range. Orbit correction is complicated by the consequent variation of the phase advance between lattice elements. Here we investigate how the correction of multiple closed orbit harmonics allows correction of both the COD and the accelerated orbit distortion over the momentum range.

  12. Orbit correction in a linear nonscaling fixed field alternating gradient accelerator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.; Edmonds, C. S.; Kirkman, I. W.; Jones, J. K.; Muratori, B. D.; Garland, J. M.; Berg, J. S.

    2014-11-20

    In a linear non-scaling FFAG the large natural chromaticity of the machine results in a betatron tune that varies by several integers over the momentum range. In addition, orbit correction is complicated by the consequent variation of the phase advance between lattice elements. Here we investigate how the correction of multiple closed orbit harmonics allows correction of both the COD and the accelerated orbit distortion over the momentum range.

  13. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-30

    This Corrective Action Plan has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996 as amended). CAU 366 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 11 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 · CAS 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 · CAS 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A · CAS 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B · CAS 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C · CAS 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D Site characterization activities were performed in 2011 and 2012, and the results are presented in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 366 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2012a). The following closure alternatives were recommended in the CADD: · No further action for CAS 11-23-01 · Closure in place for CASs 11-08-01, 11-08-02, 11-23-02, 11-23-03, and 11-23-04 The scope of work required to implement the recommended closure alternatives includes the following: · Non-engineered soil covers approximately 3 feet thick will be constructed at CAS 11-08-01 over contaminated waste dump (CWD) #1 and at CAS 11-08-02 over CWD #2. · FFACO use restrictions (URs) will be implemented for the areas where the total effective dose (TED) exceeds the final action level (FAL) of 25 millirems per Occasional Use Area year (mrem/OU-yr). The FAL is based on an assumption that the future use of the site includes occasional work activities and that workers will not be assigned to the area on a regular basis. A site worker under this scenario is assumed to be on site for a maximum of 80 hours per year for 5 years. The FFACO UR boundaries will encompass the areas where a worker would be exposed to 25 millirems of radioactivity per year if they are present for 80 hours per year. These boundaries will be defined as follows: – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-08-01 and CAS 11-08-02 within CWDs #1 and #2 at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the soil covers that will be constructed at CWD #1 and CWD #2. A geophysical survey revealed buried metallic debris outside the fence and adjacent to CWD #1. Therefore, the UR boundary for CWD #1 will be expanded to include the mound containing buried material. – It is assumed that radiological contaminants are present at CAS 11-23-02, CAS 11-23-03, and CAS 11-23-04, within the three High Contamination Area (HCA) boundaries associated with the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas at levels exceeding the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries will be established around the perimeters of the HCAs. The TED at an area of soil impacted by radiological debris outside the fence and adjacent to the 11c test area HCA exceeds the FAL of 25 mrem/OU-yr. Because the radiological impact from the debris at this location is visible on the aerial flyover radiological survey, all other areas within this isopleth of the flyover survey are conservatively also assumed to exceed the FAL. Therefore, the UR boundaries for the 11b, 11c, and 11d test areas will be expanded to include the areas within this isopleth. · The FFACO URs will all be located within the large Contamination Area (CA) that encompasses Plutonium Valley. Because access to the CA is limited and entry into the CA for post-closure inspections and maintenance would be impractical, UR warning signs will be posted along the existing CA fence. In accordance with the Soils Risk-Based Corrective Action Evaluation Process (NNSA/NSO, 2012b), an administrative UR will be implemented as a best management practice for the areas where the TED exceeds 25 millirems per Industrial Area year. This limit is based on continuous industrial use of the site and addresses exposure to industrial workers who would regularly be assigned to the work area for an entire career (250 days

  14. JNK-mediated turnover and stabilization of the transcription factor p45/NF-E2 during differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Ming-Daw

    of transcription factors is essential for correct programming of cell proliferation and differentiation. We have and nuclear hormones all play important roles in the maturation of erythroid cells. For exam- ple, it is known that signaling from the erythropoietin (Epo) receptor activates several pathways to promote cell proliferation

  15. Human Factors Analysis of Power System Visualizations Thomas J. Overbye Douglas A. Wiegmann Aaron M. Rich Yan Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Human Factors Analysis of Power System Visualizations Thomas J. Overbye Douglas A. Wiegmann Aaron M testing the usability of different power system visualizations. In particular, the ability of participants to assess and correct power system voltage problems was tested. Participants were divided into three groups

  16. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2014 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 241 0.400 0.430 0.024 42 8.9 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  17. Journal Information Journal Impact Factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krejcí, Pavel

    Journal Information Journal Impact Factor 5-Year Journal Impact Factor Journal Self Cites Journal Immediacy Index 2012 JCR Science Edition Journal: Applications of Mathematics Mark Journal Title ISSN Total- life APPL MATH-CZECH 0862-7940 240 0.222 0.549 0.054 37 7.3 >10.0 Cited Journal Citing Journal Source

  18. Evaluation of partial coherence correction in X-ray ptychography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burdet, Nicolas; Shi, Xiaowen; Parks, Daniel; Clark, Jesse N.; Huang, Xiaojing; Kevan, Stephen D.; Robinson, Ian K.

    2015-02-23

    Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CDI) and X-ray ptychography both heavily rely on the high degree of spatial coherence of the X-ray illumination for sufficient experimental data quality for reconstruction convergence. Nevertheless, the majority of the available synchrotron undulator sources have a limited degree of partial coherence, leading to reduced data quality and a lower speckle contrast in the coherent diffraction patterns. It is still an open question whether experimentalists should compromise the coherence properties of an X-ray source in exchange for a higher flux density at a sample, especially when some materials of scientific interest are relatively weak scatterers. Amore »previous study has suggested that in CDI, the best strategy for the study of strong phase objects is to maintain a high degree of coherence of the illuminating X-rays because of the broadening of solution space resulting from the strong phase structures. In this article, we demonstrate the first systematic analysis of the effectiveness of partial coherence correction in ptychography as a function of the coherence properties, degree of complexity of illumination (degree of phase diversity of the probe) and sample phase complexity. We have also performed analysis of how well ptychographic algorithms refine X-ray probe and complex coherence functions when those variables are unknown at the start of reconstructions, for noise-free simulated data, in the case of both real-valued and highly-complex objects.« less

  19. A note on holographic superconductors with Weyl Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Momeni; M. R. Setare

    2011-10-28

    We study analytical properties of the holographic superconductors with Weyl corrections. We describe the phenomena in the probe limit neglecting backreaction of the space-time. We observe that for the conformal dimension $\\triangle_{+}=3$, the minimum value of the critical temperature $T^{Min}_c$ at which condensation sets, can be obtained directly from the equations of motion as $T^{Min}_c\\approx 0.170845\\sqrt[3]{\\rho}$, which is in very good agreement with the numerical value $T^{Min}_c=0.170\\sqrt[3]{\\rho}$ [Phys.Lett.B697:153-158,2011]. This value of $T^{Min}_c$ corresponds to the value of the Weyl's coupling $\\gamma=-0.06$ in table (1) of [Phys.Lett.B697:153-158,2011]. We calculate the $T^{Min}_c\\approx 0.21408\\sqrt[3]{\\rho}$ for another Weyl's coupling $\\gamma=0.02$ and the the conformal dimension $\\triangle_{-}=1$. Further, we show that the critical exponent is $\\beta=1/2$. We observe that there is a linear relation between the charge density $\\rho$ and the chemical potential difference $\\mu-\\mu_c$ qualitatively matches the numerical curves.

  20. Post-Closure Inspection Letter Report for Corrective Action Units on the Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehlecke, Robert F.

    2013-05-28

    This letter serves as the post-closure inspection letter report for corrective action units on the Nevada Naational Security Site for calendar year 2012.