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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Optimizing Power Factor Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studied were 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 hours times each value of KW. The values of the capacitor cost parameters B and D were chosen to cover the range of costs suggested by capacitor suppliers and an electrical contractor. The values for B... plots correspond Power Factor Range: 0.5 to 1.0. to values of KW and KWH as shown in Fig. 5. The Figure 6; B ? $1,500; D ? $15 per kV I\\R. values of KWH are the products of the KW's and the hours. KWH/KII, hr 100 150 200 300 400 500 KII, kll...

Phillips, R. K.; Burmeister, L. C.

2

Solar Correction Factors of Building Envelope in Tebei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weather data, this paper compares the solar energy of a typical city, Lassa, in Tebei with that of another city that has the same degree-days of heating period, calculates the heating energy for the building, and proposes the solar correction factors...

Wang, D.; Tang, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Precision Corrections to Dispersive Bounds on Form Factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present precision corrections to dispersion relation bounds on form factors in bottom hadron semileptonic decays and analyze their effects on parameterizations derived from these bounds. We incorporate QCD two-loop and nonperturbative corrections to the two-point correlator, consider form factors whose contribution to decay rates is suppressed by lepton mass, and implement more realistic estimates of truncation errors associated with the parameterizations. We include higher resonances in the hadronic sum that, together with heavy quark symmetry relations near zero recoil, further tighten the sum rule bounds. Utilizing all these improvements, we show that each of the six form factors in B --> D l nu and B --> D^* l nu can be described with 3% or smaller precision using only the overall normalization and one unknown parameter. A similar one-coefficient parameterization of one of the Lambda_b --> Lambda_c l nu form factors, together with heavy quark symmetry relations valid to order 1/m^2, describes the differential baryon decay rate in terms of one unknown parameter and the phenomenologically interesting quantity (\\bar Lambda)_Lambda \\approx M_{Lambda_b} - m_b. We discuss the validity of slope-curvature relations derived by Caprini and Neubert, and present weaker, corrected relations. Finally, we present sample fits of current experimental B --> D^*l nu and B --> D l nu data to the improved one-parameter expansion.

C. Glenn Boyd; Benjamin Grinstein; Richard F. Lebed

1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Generalized Finite Source Calibration Factor: A Natural Improvement to the Finite Source Correction Factor for Uranium Holdup Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper proposes refinements to the finite source correction factor used in holdup measurements. Specifically it focuses on a more general method to estimate the average detector response for a finite source. This proposed method for the average detector response is based directly on the Generalized Geometry Holdup (GGH) assay method. First, the finite source correction factor as originally proposed is reviewed in this paper. Following this review the GGH assay method is described. Lastly, a new finite area calibration factor based on GGH is then proposed for finite point and line sources. As an alternative to the direct use of the finite arca calibration factor, finite source correction factors are also derived from this calibration factor. This new correction factor can be used in a manner similar to the finite source correction factor as currently implemented.

Gunn, C.A.; Oberer, R.B.; chiang, L.G.; Ceo, R.N.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

5

Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Radiation Dry Bias in the TWP-ICE Radiosonde Soundings Solar Zenith Angle Correction Factor Figure 3: Ratio of MWR TCWV to radiosonde derived TCWV, and the solar zenith angle at the radiosonde launch time (black dots). The dry bias observed in sonde TCWV values is mainly attributable to a dry RH bias near the surface The red dots show the 1000 hPa RH correction factors suggested by Voemel et al for sondes launched near noon (10-30 degree solar zenith angle), and at night time (90 degree zenith angle). The green line shows a modified RH correction factor which is a function of the solar zenith angle. ● During the day-time, the TCWV bias is significantly smaller when the zenith angle correction is applied than when no correction, or only the Crad and Ccal corrections are applied.

7

Design of a Boost Power Factor Correction Converter Using Optimization Techniques Sergio Busquets-Monge1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-end converter with an input electromagnetic interference filter. The system design variables are first correction, boost, electromagnetic interference, electromagnetic compatibility. Paper presented at PESC, June of a boost power factor correction front-end converter with an input electromagnetic interference filter

Lindner, Douglas K.

8

Power factor correction of an electrical drive system based on multiphase machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor correction of an electrical drive system based on multiphase machines Khoudir MAROUANI_tabache@yahoo.com Abstract--This paper deals with the energy efficiency improvement of an electrical drive which can be used both in wind energy conversion or motor drive applications. A power factor (PF) control scheme

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

9

Estimation of seasonal correction factors through Fourier decomposition analysisa new  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radon concentrations in homes have been shown to vary considerably with season. It is important to account for this by applying a correction factor to any home radon measurement of less than one year. To date, Irish radon measurement services have used correction factors based on data derived for the UK in the 1980s. In the absence of similar data for Ireland at the time, these were considered suitable for use due to the similarities between the climates, house types and lifestyles in the two countries. In order to better estimate the long-term radon concentration, measurements from 5640 Irish homes were used to derive a set of correction factors specifically for Ireland. These were generated by means of Fourier decomposition analysis and the new correction factors compared, using 95% confidence intervals, to those derived for the UK using the same analysis and to those currently in use for Ireland. In both cases, a significant difference was found between 10 of the 12 monthly seasonal correction factors. This paper presents the methods used in detail and the results of the analysis.

rlaith Burke; Stephanie Long; Patrick Murphy; Catherine Organo; David Fenton; Peter Anthony Colgan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

SU(3) Corrections to B -> D l nu Form Factors at O(1/M)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the O(1/M,m_s) heavy quark and SU(3) corrections to B_s -> D_s e nu form factors. In the limit of vanishing light quark mass, B_s -> D_s e nu form factors are given in terms of the the B -> D e nu form factors, the leading order chiral parameter g, and two O(1/M) chiral parameters $g_1$ and $g_2$. All the chiral parameters can be extracted, in principle, from other heavy meson decays. Analytic counterterms proportional to the strange quark mass are presented for completeness, but no predictive power remains when they are included. Anomalously large loop corrections warn of poor convergence of the heavy quark chiral symmetry expansion for these processes. This suggests that naive extrapolations of B \\to D form factors relying on heavy quark and chiral symmetries, as often used in monte carlo simulations of lattice QCD, may incur large errors.

C. Glenn Boyd; Benjamin Grinstein

1995-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Simulation of a Wireless Power Transfer System for Electric Vehicles with Power Factor Correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireless power transfer has been a popular topic of recent research. Most research has been done to address the limitations of coil-to-coil efficiency. However, little has been done to address the problem associated with the low input power factor with which the systems operate. This paper details the steps taken to analyze a wireless power transfer system from the view of the power grid under a variety of loading conditions with and without power factor correction.

Pickelsimer, Michael C [ORNL; Tolbert, Leon M [ORNL; Ozpineci, Burak [ORNL; Miller, John M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Comparative Study of Power Factor Correction Converters For Single Phase Half-Bridge Inverters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, telecommunication systems and medical equipment to overcome disruptions in utility power such as outage, voltage sag are extremely sensitive to cost. On-line systems are preferred where a highly reliable un- interruptible powerComparative Study of Power Factor Correction Converters For Single Phase Half-Bridge Inverters Gui

Tolbert, Leon M.

13

Power Factor correction capacitors for utilising power consumption in industrial plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Installation of capacitor banks proved to be cost effective approach to correct power factor in industrial plants. Optimum capacitance value that contributes to the maximum PF improvement varies from one system to another. Such value depends on the existing electrical system within the industrial plant. This paper provides industrial plants operators an optimisation model to correct and improve PF. This paper is supported by using both MATLAB programming and iteration loop technique. The Jordanian Petroleum Refinery Company is taken as a case study. Results indicate that PF improvement reached almost unity PF for this case, which yields to a reduction in the overall electricity bill.

Osama M. Aloquili; Nazih M. Abu-Shikhah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear recoil correction to the g factor of boron-like argon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The nuclear recoil effect to the g factor of boron-like ions is investigated. The one-photon-exchange correction to the nuclear recoil effect is calculated in the non-relativistic approximation for the nuclear recoil operator and in the Breit approximation for the interelectronic-interaction operator. The screening potential is employed to estimate the higher-order contributions. The updated g-factor values are presented for the ground 2P_1/2 and first excited 2P_3/2 states of B-like argon 40^Ar^13+, which are presently being measured by the ARTEMIS group at GSI.

Shchepetnov, Arseniy A; Volotka, Andrey V; Shabaev, Vladimir M; Tupitsyn, Ilya I; Plunien, Guenter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Estimation of Ground-Level Reflectivity Factor in Operational Weather Radar Networks Using VPR-Based Correction Ensembles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An operational method is presented that corrects the bias of radar-based quantitative precipitation estimations (QPE) in radar networks that is due to the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) factor. It is used in both rain and snowfall. ...

Jarmo Koistinen; Heikki Pohjola

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

17

Experimental setup for the determination of the correction factors of the neutron doseratemeters in fast neutron fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of the U-120 Cyclotron of the IFIN-HH allowed to perform a testing bench with fast neutrons in order to determine the correction factors of the doseratemeters dedicated to neutron measurement. This paper deals with researchers performed in order to develop the irradiation facility testing the fast neutrons flux generated at the Cyclotron. This facility is presented, together with the results obtain in determining the correction factor for a doseratemeter dedicated to the neutron dose equivalent rate measurement.

Iliescu, Elena; Bercea, Sorin; Dudu, Dorin; Celarel, Aurelia [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei, Reactorului 30 St, P.O.BOX MG-6,Magurele, cod 077125 (Romania)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Relative Response to Low-Energy Photons and Determination of Instrument Correction Factors for Portable Radiation Instrumentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

keV for the Eberline Teletector 6112B low and high-range detectors, respectively. A correction factor of 0.8 should be applied for photons below 120 keV for the Eberline RO-7-BM. For the Thermo Mk2 EPD, a correction factor of 1.25 should... energy model (left). Side view with the aluminum case removed (right).................................................................. 15 6 Front view of a Thermo MK2 electronic personal dosimeter (left). Disassembled view; the compensating...

Wagoner, David Andrew

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

19

Error Detection, Factorization and Correction for Multi-View Scene Reconstruction from Aerial Imagery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scene reconstruction from video sequences has become a prominent computer vision research area in recent years, due to its large number of applications in fields such as security, robotics and virtual reality. Despite recent progress in this field, there are still a number of issues that manifest as incomplete, incorrect or computationally-expensive reconstructions. The engine behind achieving reconstruction is the matching of features between images, where common conditions such as occlusions, lighting changes and texture-less regions can all affect matching accuracy. Subsequent processes that rely on matching accuracy, such as camera parameter estimation, structure computation and non-linear parameter optimization, are also vulnerable to additional sources of error, such as degeneracies and mathematical instability. Detection and correction of errors, along with robustness in parameter solvers, are a must in order to achieve a very accurate final scene reconstruction. However, error detection is in general difficult due to the lack of ground-truth information about the given scene, such as the absolute position of scene points or GPS/IMU coordinates for the camera(s) viewing the scene. In this dissertation, methods are presented for the detection, factorization and correction of error sources present in all stages of a scene reconstruction pipeline from video, in the absence of ground-truth knowledge. Two main applications are discussed. The first set of algorithms derive total structural error measurements after an initial scene structure computation and factorize errors into those related to the underlying feature matching process and those related to camera parameter estimation. A brute-force local correction of inaccurate feature matches is presented, as well as an improved conditioning scheme for non-linear parameter optimization which applies weights on input parameters in proportion to estimated camera parameter errors. Another application is in reconstruction pre-processing, where an algorithm detects and discards frames that would lead to inaccurate feature matching, camera pose estimation degeneracies or mathematical instability in structure computation based on a residual error comparison between two different match motion models. The presented algorithms were designed for aerial video but have been proven to work across different scene types and camera motions, and for both real and synthetic scenes.

Hess-Flores, M

2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of correction factors for landfill gas emission model suiting Indian condition to predict methane emission from landfills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methane emission from landfill gas emission (LandGEM) model was validated through the results of laboratory scale biochemical methane potential assay. Results showed that LandGEM model over estimates methane (CH4) emissions; and the true CH4 potential of waste depends on the level of segregation. Based on these findings, correction factors were developed to estimate CH4 emission using LandGEM model especially where the level of segregation is negligible or does not exist. The correction factors obtained from the study were 0.94, 0.13 and 0.74 for food waste, mixed un-segregated municipal solid waste (MSW) and vegetable wastes, respectively.

Avick Sil; Sunil Kumar; Jonathan W.C. Wong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Frequency Scalable Non-Linear Waveform Generator for Mixed-Simal Power-Factor-Correction IC Controller'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operates with a fixed switching frequency fs and variable duty ratio R, and can be analyzed using standard of a switching period, a fixed-frequency clock pulse sets the switch drive high. A signal proportionalFrequency Scalable Non-Linear Waveform Generator for Mixed-Simal Power-Factor-Correction IC

22

Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

Horn, Kevin M.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

23

Design of an input filter for power factor correction (PFC) AC to DC converters employing an active ripple cancellation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active input filter for power factor correction (PFC) circuit employing ripple current cancellation is proposed to reduce the filter`s size and cost.Switching ripple current can be filtered by an active circuit from the line current. A single stage passive filter with the active filter compensation circuit, a high filter can be synthesized to meet the electromagnetic interference (EMI) and power factor requirements. Analysis of the active filter and design procedure are detailed. Simulation result is presented to verify the high order filter characteristics of proposed scheme.

Lee, D.Y.; Cho, B.H. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Electrical Engineering Dept.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation with nonsquare grid blocks and anisotropic permeability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROFILES FROM RADIAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS P~ILITY RATIOS' h /ht STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FROM RADIAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS PERMEABILITY RATIOS, h /ht 0. 1 CORRECTION OF WELL CELL PRESSURE, pe, TO BOTTOMHOLE FLOWING PRESSURE, p f (after Ref. 3) 8 x 4... PENETRATION RATIOS, bx - 16, k /kh 0. 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FRON 3-D AREAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS CELL SIZES hp/ht 0 5 kz/kh 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE PROFILES FROM 3-D AREAL MODEL FOR VARIOUS CELL SIZES hp/ht 0 1 kz/kh 1 STEADY-STATE PRESSURE...

Kim, Dukmin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Impact of gamma-V vertex corrections on the V-P-gamma transition form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this paper is to present an effective field theory description of the conversion transition of the vector meson V into the pseudoscalar P and the lepton-pair l+l-. The normalized form factor for omega to pi^0 gamma^ast transition is presented and compared to the available data and to the predictions of other models.

Sergii Raspopov

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

SiC MOSFET Based Single Phase Active Boost Rectifier with Power Factor Correction for Wireless Power Transfer Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) technology is a novel research area in the charging technology that bridges the utility and the automotive industries. There are various solutions that are currently being evaluated by several research teams to find the most efficient way to manage the power flow from the grid to the vehicle energy storage system. There are different control parameters that can be utilized to compensate for the change in the impedance due to variable parameters such as battery state-of-charge, coupling factor, and coil misalignment. This paper presents the implementation of an active front-end rectifier on the grid side for power factor control and voltage boost capability for load power regulation. The proposed SiC MOSFET based single phase active front end rectifier with PFC resulted in >97% efficiency at 137mm air-gap and >95% efficiency at 160mm air-gap.

Onar, Omer C [ORNL] [ORNL; Tang, Lixin [ORNL] [ORNL; Chinthavali, Madhu Sudhan [ORNL] [ORNL; Campbell, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL; Miller (JNJ), John M. [JNJ-Miller PLC] [JNJ-Miller PLC

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Correction factors for the sun shield used with the Eppley pyranometer for the measurement of sky radiation under clear and partly cloudy skies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. That is to say, they are independent of variations in amount of cloud and angles of solar altitude and declination. If this is true, then the means of the various cells (see Appendix C) are equal. Two estimates of the variance of the population were obtained.... That is to say, they are independent of variations in amount of cloud and angles of solar altitude and declination. If this is true, then the means of the various cells (see Appendix C) are equal. Two estimates of the variance of the population were obtained...

Albro, William Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

28

Utilization of Wind Energy at High Altitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground based, wind energy extraction systems have reached their maximum capability. The limitations of current designs are: wind instability, high cost of installations, and small power output of a single unit. The wind energy industry needs of revolutionary ideas to increase the capabilities of wind installations. This article suggests a revolutionary innovation which produces a dramatic increase in power per unit and is independent of prevailing weather and at a lower cost per unit of energy extracted. The main innovation consists of large free-flying air rotors positioned at high altitude for power and air stream stability, and an energy cable transmission system between the air rotor and a ground based electric generator. The air rotor system flies at high altitude up to 14 km. A stability and control is provided and systems enable the changing of altitude. This article includes six examples having a high unit power output (up to 100 MW). The proposed examples provide the following main advantages: 1. Large power production capacity per unit - up to 5,000-10,000 times more than conventional ground-based rotor designs; 2. The rotor operates at high altitude of 1-14 km, where the wind flow is strong and steady; 3. Installation cost per unit energy is low. 4. The installation is environmentally friendly (no propeller noise). -- * Presented in International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference at Providence., RI, Aug. 16-19. 2004. AIAA-2004-5705. USA. Keyword: wind energy, cable energy transmission, utilization of wind energy at high altitude, air rotor, windmills, Bolonkin.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

29

Low-Altitude Laser Altimeter to Assist UAV Autolanding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project presents a low-altitude laser altimeter system to assist UAV autolanding. This system generates aircraft altitude and attitude estimates; it consists of laser illuminators, a digital imaging unit (image sensor, lens, and optical filter...

Bergmann, Nicholas M

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Altitude-Adjusted Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geomagnetic Coordinates: Definition and Functional Approximations S. G. Shepherd Thayer School of Engineering; Hanuise et al., 1993; Ruohoniemi and Baker, 1998; Cousins and Shepherd, 2010], magnetospheric pulsations- scale structures [Newell et al., 1991a, b; Sotirelis et al., 1998; Watanabe et al., 1998; Waters et al

Shepherd, Simon

31

An altitude and distance correction to the initial fluence distribution of TGFs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were made by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar34 Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the Gamma-ray Burst of Chemistry and Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa #12;2 Abstract. The initial fluence space and22 time. It varies with surface temperature, solar radiation, updrafts and atmospheric23 water

?stgaard, Nikolai

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vectors for Dyck paths, and the weighted average square norms... of the rise-by-altitude and level-by-altitude vectors for alternating Motzkin paths. We...

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude adapted states Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vectors for Dyck paths, and the weighted average square norms... of the rise-by-altitude and level-by-altitude vectors for alternating Motzkin paths. We...

34

Perturbative renormalization factors and O(a{sup 2}) corrections for lattice four-fermion operators with improved fermion/gluon actions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we calculate the corrections to the amputated Green's functions of four-fermion operators, in 1-loop lattice perturbation theory. One of the novel aspects of our calculations is that they are carried out to second order in the lattice spacing, O(a{sup 2}). We employ the Wilson/clover action for massless fermions (also applicable for the twisted mass action in the chiral limit) and a family of Symanzik improved actions for gluons. Our calculations have been carried out in a general covariant gauge. Results have been obtained for several popular choices of values for the Symanzik coefficients (Plaquette, Tree-level Symanzik, Iwasaki, TILW and DBW2 action). While our Green's function calculations regard any pointlike four-fermion operators which do not mix with lower dimension ones, we pay particular attention to {Delta}F=2 operators, both parity conserving and parity violating (F stands for flavor: S, C, B). By appropriately projecting those bare Green's functions we compute the perturbative renormalization constants for a complete basis of four-fermion operators and we study their mixing pattern. For some of the actions considered here, even O(a{sup 0}) results did not exist in the literature to date. The correction terms which we calculate (along with our previous O(a{sup 2}) calculation of Z{sub {Psi}}[M. Constantinou, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2009) 064.][M. Constantinou, P. Dimopoulos, R. Frezzotti, G. Herdoiza, K. Jansen, V. Lubicz, H. Panagopoulos, G. C. Rossi, S. Simula, F. Stylianou, and A. Vladikas, J. High Energy Phys. 08 (2010) 068.][C. Alexandrou, M. Constantinou, T. Korzec, H. Panagopoulos, and F. Stylianou (unpublished).]) are essential ingredients for minimizing the lattice artifacts which are present in nonperturbative evaluations of renormalization constants with the RI{sup '}-MOM method. Our perturbative results, for the matrix elements of {Delta}F=2 operators and for the corresponding renormalization matrices, depend on a large number of parameters: coupling constant, number of colors, lattice spacing, external momentum, clover parameter, Symanzik coefficients, gauge parameter. To make these results most easily accessible to the reader, we have included them in the distribution package of this paper, as an ASCII file named: 4-fermi.m; the file is best perused as Mathematica input. The main results of this work have been applied to improve nonperturbative estimates of the B{sub K}-parameter in N{sub F}=2 twisted mass lattice QCD [M. Constantinou, P. Dimopoulos, R. Frezzotti, K. Jansen, V. Gimenez, V. Lubicz, F. Mescia, H. Panagopoulos, M. Papinutto, G. C. Rossi, S. Simula, A. Skouroupathis, F. Stylianou, and A. Vladikas, arXiv:1009.5606.].

Constantinou, Martha; Panagopoulos, Haralambos; Skouroupathis, Apostolos; Stylianou, Fotos [Department of Physics, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia CY-1678 (Cyprus); Dimopoulos, Petros [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza, Universita di Roma Piazzale A. Moro, I-00185 Rome (Italy); Frezzotti, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di 'Tor Vergata' c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata' Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Lubicz, Vittorio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Roma Tre Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Roma Tre c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita Roma Tre Via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Rome (Italy)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Sequencing of 50 Human Exomes Reveals Adaptation to High Altitude  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1190371 Xin Yi Yu Liang Emilia Huerta-Sanchez Xin Jin Zha Xi Ping Cuo John E. Pool Xun Xu Hui Jiang Nicolas Vinckenbosch...Altitude Xin Yi, Yu Liang, Emilia Huerta-Sanchez, Xin Jin, Zha Xi Ping Cuo, John E. Pool, Xun Xu, Hui Jiang, Nicolas Vinckenbosch...

Xin Yi; Yu Liang; Emilia Huerta-Sanchez; Xin Jin; Zha Xi Ping Cuo; John E. Pool; Xun Xu; Hui Jiang; Nicolas Vinckenbosch; Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen; Hancheng Zheng; Tao Liu; Weiming He; Kui Li; Ruibang Luo; Xifang Nie; Honglong Wu; Meiru Zhao; Hongzhi Cao; Jing Zou; Ying Shan; Shuzheng Li; Qi Yang; Asan; Peixiang Ni; Geng Tian; Junming Xu; Xiao Liu; Tao Jiang; Renhua Wu; Guangyu Zhou; Meifang Tang; Junjie Qin; Tong Wang; Shuijian Feng; Guohong Li; Huasang; Jiangbai Luosang; Wei Wang; Fang Chen; Yading Wang; Xiaoguang Zheng; Zhuo Li; Zhuoma Bianba; Ge Yang; Xinping Wang; Shuhui Tang; Guoyi Gao; Yong Chen; Zhen Luo; Lamu Gusang; Zheng Cao; Qinghui Zhang; Weihan Ouyang; Xiaoli Ren; Huiqing Liang; Huisong Zheng; Yebo Huang; Jingxiang Li; Lars Bolund; Karsten Kristiansen; Yingrui Li; Yong Zhang; Xiuqing Zhang; Ruiqiang Li; Songgang Li; Huanming Yang; Rasmus Nielsen; Jun Wang; Jian Wang

2010-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

Optimal Countrates for Deadtime Corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high x-ray flux available at synchrotron radiation sources can cause nonlinearities in photon-counting detectors unless deadtime corrections are employed. We compute the uncertainties associated with several common deadtime-correction formulas. At lower countrates, statistical noise dominates the error in the measured countrates; at higher countrates, the dominating factors are saturation of the response and uncertainty in the value of the deadtime parameter. In between, a range of countrates exists in which the signal-to-noise ratio can be optimized for photon-counting experiments.

Walko, D. A.; Arms, D. A.; Dufresne, E. M.; Landahl, E. C.

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

37

Optimal Countrates for Deadtime Corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high x-ray flux available at synchrotron radiation sources can cause nonlinearities in photon-counting detectors unless deadtime corrections are employed. We compute the uncertainties associated with several common deadtime-correction formulas. At lower countrates, statistical noise dominates the error in the measured countrates; at higher countrates, the dominating factors are saturation of the response and uncertainty in the value of the deadtime parameter. In between, a range of countrates exists in which the signal-to-noise ratio can be optimized for photon-counting experiments.

Walko, D. A.; Arms, D. A.; Dufresne, E. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Landahl, E. C. [Department of Physics, DePaul University, Chicago, IL 60614 (United States)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Quantum Error Correction Beyond Completely Positive Maps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By introducing an operator sum representation for arbitrary linear maps, we develop a generalized theory of quantum error correction (QEC) that applies to any linear map, in particular maps that are not completely positive (CP). This theory of "linear quantum error correction" is applicable in cases where the standard and restrictive assumption of a factorized initial system-bath state does not apply.

A. Shabani; D. A. Lidar

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear correction factors from neutrino DIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions and we use this framework to analyze the consistency of neutrino DIS data with other nuclear data.

K. Kovarik

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude air travel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

km altitude. The cryosampler BONBON sampled air masses with very high molecular... by PV maps. Between 15 and 19 km altitude SPIRALE sampled outside vortex air as can be seen...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Strong Corrections to Inclusive B to X tau nu Decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the $\\alpha_s$ corrections to the form factors which parameterize the hadronic tensor relevant for inclusive semileptonic $B \\rightarrow X \\tau\\bar\

C. G. Boyd; Z. Guralnik; M. Schmaltz; F. J. Vegas

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Correcting Privacy Act Records  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Correcting-Privacy-Act-Records Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects &...

43

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering (Fourth printing) By Larry W. Mays Corrections as of 4 subcritical flow ..." Chapter

Mays, Larry W.

44

RHIC chromatic correction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chromaticity correction system, including the nonliner correction, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is presented. Expected multipoles in the superconducting magnets have shown the the octupole and decapole might be large enough to reduce the momentum aperture and introduce undesirable nonlinear chromatic behavior of the machine. Simulations of these conditions have been performed with the accelerator physics tracking code TEAPOT. The chromatic dependence curves were obtained by the least square fitting. A correction to the first and the second order terms were applied by using two sextupole and two octupole circuits. The decapole correction system has been applied to correct for the third order dependence on momentum. The long term tracking studies at injection did not include the decapole correction. The studies showed that the octupole correction system significantly improves the dynamical aperture at the injection. The decapole system would not be necessary at commissioning of the machine but the correction magnets will be available. At the top energy, as to be expected, the low beta quadrupoles are the dominant source of the nonlinear momentum dependence. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.; Tepikian, S.; Peggs, S.; Dell, G.F.; Satogata, T. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

1994-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

45

RHIC chromatic correction system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chromaticity correction system including the nonliner correction for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is presented. Expected multipoles in the superconducting magnets have shown the the octupole and decapole might be large enough to reduce the momentum aperture and introduce undesirable nonlinear chromatic behavior of the machine. Simulations of these conditions have been performed with the accelerator physics tracking code TEAPOT. The chromatic dependence curves were obtained by the least square fitting. A correction to the first and the second order terms were applied by using two sextupole and two octupole circuits. The decapole correction system has been applied to correct for the third order dependence on momentum. The long term tracking studies at injection did not include the decapole correction. The studies showed that the octupole correction system significantly improves the dynamical aperture at the injection. The decapole system would not be necessary at commissioning of the machine but the correction magnets will be available. At the top energy as to be expected the low beta quadrupoles are the dominant source of the nonlinear momentum dependence.

D. Trbojevic; J. Wei; S. Tepikian; S. Peggs; G. F. Dell; T. Satogata

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

RHIC chromatic correction system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chromaticity correction system, including the nonlinear correction, for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is presented. Expected multipoles in the superconducting magnets have shown that the octupole and decapole might be large enough to reduce the momentum aperture and introduce undesirable nonlinear chromatic behavior of the machine. Simulations of these conditions have been performed with the accelerator physics tracking code TEAPOT. The chromatic dependence curves were obtained by the least square fitting. A correction to the first and the second order terms were applied by using two sextupole and two octupole circuits. The decapole correction system has been applied to correct for the third order dependence on momentum. The long term tracking studies at injection did not include the decapole correction. The studies showed that the octupole correction system significantly improves the dynamical aperture at the injection. The decapole system would not be necessary at commissioning of the machine but the correction magnets will be available. At the top energy, as to be expected, the low beta quadrupoles are the dominant source of the nonlinear momentum dependence.

Trbojevic, D.; Wei, J.; Tepikian, S.; Peggs, S.; Dell, F.; Satogata, T.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Corrective and Preventive Action  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 8 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Corrective/Preventive Action Process Document Number: P-008 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): P-004 Business System Management Review, F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet or F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0310 Implemented Multiple reviewer of "Root Cause" into process. 08_0313 Changed verbiage in Process, Responsibility and Definitions for clarification. Assigned new Backup Document Owner.

48

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude muons deconvolved Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude muons deconvolved Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Muon pair production by photons in...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude nuclear explosion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nuclear explosion Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude nuclear explosion Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Imaging of the atmosphere...

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude simulation technologies Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Traffic Management Research and Development Seminar (ATM2009) A Comparison of Algorithm Generated Summary: and constrained simulations. Super-high altitude average (r)s are...

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude swimming kogata Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: plasma pressure gradients Consequences Currents, electric fields, Joule heating SWIM Chapman Conference... plasma motion At altitudes where ions are collisionally...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude sampling program Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

were always lower... in the horizontal plane, altitude, and time. These tools embrace a broad scope of applications. They include tools... for the metering and sequencing traffic...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude affects skill Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sensitive to global... , and they range in altitude from Jungfrau Mountain (3576 m) to Venice (53 m). Monthly averages at WMO stations Source: Collection: Geosciences 45...

54

From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to High-Altitude-Pilot Protection Suits- Mound Science and Energy Museum Programs Cover a Wide Range of Topics From Hydrogen Fuel Cells to...

55

Corrective Action Program Guide  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) organizations and contractors in the development, implementation, and followup of corrective action programs utilizing the feedback and improvement core safety function within DOE's Integrated Safety Management System. This Guide outlines some of the basic principles, concepts, and lessons learned that DOE managers and contractors might consider when implementing corrective action programs based on their specific needs. Canceled by DOE G 414.1-2B. Does not cancel other directives.

2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed from

Pasko, Victor

57

Simultaneous radio and satellite optical measurements of high-altitude sprite current and lightning continuing current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is tightly correlated with the low-altitude optical emissions from the lightning flash, indicatingSimultaneous radio and satellite optical measurements of high-altitude sprite current and lightning; accepted 18 July 2006; published 19 October 2006. [1] We report coordinated measurements of lightning

California at Berkeley, University of

58

Correction coil cable  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wire cable assembly adapted for the winding of electrical coils is taught. A primary intended use is for use in particle tube assemblies for the Superconducting Super Collider. The correction coil cables have wires collected in wire array with a center rib sandwiched therebetween to form a core assembly. The core assembly is surrounded by an assembly housing having an inner spiral wrap and a counter wound outer spiral wrap. An alternate embodiment of the invention is rolled into a keystoned shape to improve radial alignment of the correction coil cable on a particle tube in a particle tube assembly. 7 figs.

Wang, S.T.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Improved Gravimetric Terrain Corrections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......formulae are based on a flat-earth assumption. Our...2. Topography in the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia...Kananaskis Valley in the Rocky Mountains was used. The...terrain correction. In the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia...large, thg effect of a flat-earth approximation......

Y. C. Li; M. G. Sideris

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measuring Diversity on a Low-Altitude UAV in a Ground-to-Air Wireless 802.11 Mesh Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Diversity on a Low-Altitude UAV in a Ground-to-Air Wireless 802.11 Mesh Network H. T ground node and receivers on a small, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) in a 802.11 wireless as well. I. INTRODUCTION Small, low-altitude unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have reached a development

Kung, H. T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed low-altitude aeromagnetic survey of 576 line-mi (927 line-km) was completed over a portion of the Coso Hot Springs KGRA in September 1977. The survey has defined a pronounced magnetic low that could help delineate the geothermal system. The magnetic low has an areal extent of approximately 10 sq mi (26 sq km). Direct and indirect evidence indicates that this anomaly is due, in part, to magnetite destruction by hydrothermal solutions associated with the geothermal system. The anomaly

62

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude cognitive performance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cognitive performance Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude cognitive performance Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Rev 1.3 Jan 07...

63

High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed* Grenoble wind power using a kite-based system, and the proposed structures *Corresponding author Mariam.AHMED@g2

Boyer, Edmond

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - altitude test facility Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

test facility Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altitude test facility Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Rev 1.3 Jan 07 1999 AUTOPILOT...

65

Altitude acts as an environmental filter on phylogenetic composition, traits and diversity in bee communities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...150448 ) 11 Gotzenberger, L. , 2012 Ecological assembly rules in plant communities...flight: applications to micro-air vehicles. J. Exp. Biol. 202, 3439-3448...conclude that inherent phylogenetic and ecological species attributes at high altitudes...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Altitude and latitude variations in avionics SEU and atmospheric neutron flux  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct cause of single event upsets in SRAMs at aircraft altitudes by the atmospheric neutrons has previously been documented. The variation of the in-flight SEU rate with latitude is demonstrated by new data over a wide range of geographical locations. New measurements and models of the atmospheric neutron flux are also evaluated to characterize its variation with altitude, latitude and solar activity.

Normand, E.; Baker, T.J. (Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, WA (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering (Second printing) By Larry W. Mays Corrections as of 4, a supercritical flow ..." should read "Because yn subcritical flow ..." #12;Chapter 6 Page 141

Mays, Larry W.

68

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering (Third printing) By Larry W. Mays Corrections as of 4, a subcritical flow ..." Chapter 6 Page 141 Section 6.1, sixth line, "slit" should be "silt" #12;Page 148 Fourth

Mays, Larry W.

69

Relativistic electron flux comparisons at low and high altitudes with fast time resolution and broad spatial coverage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses are presented for the first high-time resolution multisatellite study of the spatial and temporal characteristics of a relativistic electron enhancement event with a rapid onset. Measurements of MeV electrons were made from two low-altitude polar orbiting satellites and three spacecraft at synchronous altitude. The electron fluxes observed by the low-altitude satellites include precipitating electrons in both the bounce and drift loss cones as well as electrons that are stably trapped, whereas the observations at geosynchronous altitude are dominated by the trapped population. The fluxes of >1 MeV electrons at low-satellite altitude over a wide range of L shells tracked very well the fluxes >0.93 MeV at synchronous altitude. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Imhof, W.L.; Gaines, E.E.; McGlennon, J.P. [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States)] [and others] [Lockheed Palo Alto Research Lab., CA (United States); and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plan for Corrective Action Unit 541: Small Boy Nevada National Security Site and Nevada Test and Training Range, Nevada Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Matthews, Patrick...

71

Nested Quantum Error Correction Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theory of quantum error correction was established more than a decade ago as the primary tool for fighting decoherence in quantum information processing. Although great progress has already been made in this field, limited methods are available in constructing new quantum error correction codes from old codes. Here we exhibit a simple and general method to construct new quantum error correction codes by nesting certain quantum codes together. The problem of finding long quantum error correction codes is reduced to that of searching several short length quantum codes with certain properties. Our method works for all length and all distance codes, and is quite efficient to construct optimal or near optimal codes. Two main known methods in constructing new codes from old codes in quantum error-correction theory, the concatenating and pasting, can be understood in the framework of nested quantum error correction codes.

Zhuo Wang; Kai Sun; Hen Fan; Vlatko Vedral

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

73

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections for Water Resources Engineering (First printing) By Larry W. Mays Corrections as of 4.8.2 should read, "Water flows in a rectangular channel ..." Chapter 3 Page 46 Delete second equal sign 5.3.1, steep S1 the type of flow is "subcritical" not "supercritical" Page 110 Figure 5

Mays, Larry W.

74

The dependence of contrail formation on the weather pattern and altitude in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cold ice-supersaturated air produce persistent con-3 trails which contribute to the climate impact of re-analysis data are8 used to produce a climatological assessment of conditions favorable for per-9-mean frequency of cold ice-supersaturated regions11 is highest near 300 hPa, and decreases with altitude

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

75

NOM Technical Memorandum ERL CLERL-25 SOLAR ALTITUDE EFFECTS ON ICE ALBEDO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOM Technical Memorandum ERL CLERL-25 SOLAR ALTITUDE EFFECTS ON ICE ALBEDO S. J. Bolsenga Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Ann Arbor, Michigan June 1979 UNITED STATES Nu. Machine plot of albedo (A) vs. true solar time (TST) for January 8, 1976. &chine plot of albedo (A) VS

76

Colonization of high altitudes by alien plants over the last two centuries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colonization of high altitudes by alien plants over the last two centuries Petr Pyseka,b,1 an elegant explana- tion for global patterns of alien species richness in mountain regions. These authors for explaining the patterns of alien species richness than dispersal processes or pre- adaptation of species

Kratochvíl, Lukas

77

OPTICAL, ELECTROMAGNETIC, AND SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONSPART II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONSPART...of the explosion of a nuclear device at very high...might accompany the nuclear explosions and might...temperature-limited vacuum noise diode and the...synchro- tron particle accelerator. The generation of...

Allen M. Peterson

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Lidar determination of altitude profile of the refraction index in electro-optical monitoring of the Earths atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generated data 1. Introduction Control of atmosphere pollution is a complex problem of environmental of the reconstruction of the individual contributions and the overall altitude pro- file of the refraction index of air the pollutants and obtain detailed information about the distri- bution of the substances both in altitude

79

Higher order 1/m corrections at zero recoil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The general structure of the 1/m corrections at zero recoil is studied. The relevant matrix elements are forward matrix elements of local higher dimensional operators and their time ordered products with higher order terms from the Lagrangian. These matrix elements may be classified in a simple way and the analysis at the nonrecoil point for the form factor of heavy quark currents simplifies drastically. The second order recoil corrections to the form factor hA1 of the axial vector current, relevant for the ?Vcb? determination from B?D* decays, are estimated to be -5%

Thomas Mannel

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with no formation damage, a fine grid radial simulation model with r-z geometry was run with different fractions of well penetration. The model was used to calculate accurate reference values of flowing bottomhole pressure, Pwf ~ The results are tabulated... equals the steady-state flowing pressure at a radial distance r 0 0. 2 ax, where ax is the dimension of a square cell. Based on this observation, Peaceman derived a new equation for the build-up time at' to be used in the matching process (see Fig. 6...

Fjerstad, Paul Albert

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Etiology of Presbyopia, Contributing Factors, and Future Correction Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Posters, and Lectures Presbyopia: Many Causes, Many Solutions (Now and In the Future) May 2012 Continued Education

Hickenbotham, Adam Lyle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Entropic corrections to Einstein equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considering the general quantum corrections to the area law of black hole entropy and adopting the viewpoint that gravity interprets as an entropic force, we derive the modified forms of Modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theory of gravitation and Einstein field equations. As two special cases we study the logarithmic and power-law corrections to entropy and find the explicit form of the obtained modified equations.

Hendi, S. H. [Physics Department, College of Sciences, Yasouj University, Yasouj 75914 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sheykhi, A. [Research Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics of Maragha (RIAAM), Maragha (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175-132, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Quantum corrections to nonlinear ion acoustic wave with Landau damping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum corrections to nonlinear ion acoustic wave with Landau damping have been computed using Wigner equation approach. The dynamical equation governing the time development of nonlinear ion acoustic wave with semiclassical quantum corrections is shown to have the form of higher KdV equation which has higher order nonlinear terms coming from quantum corrections, with the usual classical and quantum corrected Landau damping integral terms. The conservation of total number of ions is shown from the evolution equation. The decay rate of KdV solitary wave amplitude due to the presence of Landau damping terms has been calculated assuming the Landau damping parameter ?{sub 1}=?(m{sub e}/m{sub i}) to be of the same order of the quantum parameter Q=?{sup 2}/(24m{sup 2}c{sub s}{sup 2}L{sup 2}). The amplitude is shown to decay very slowly with time as determined by the quantum factor Q.

Mukherjee, Abhik; Janaki, M. S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India); Bose, Anirban [Serampore College, West Bengal (India)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

On the Quantum-Corrected Black Hole Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bekenstein-Hawking Black hole thermodynamics should be corrected to incorporate quantum gravitational effects. Generalized Uncertainty Principle(GUP) provides a perturbational framework to perform such modifications. In this paper we consider the most general form of GUP to find black holes thermodynamics in microcanonical ensemble. Our calculation shows that there is no logarithmic pre-factor in perturbational expansion of entropy. This feature will solve part of controversies in literatures regarding existence or vanishing of this pre-factor.

Kourosh Nozari; S. Hamid Mehdipour

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low-Altitude Airbursts and the Impact Threat - Final LDRD Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this nine-week project was to advance the understanding of low-altitude airbursts by developing the means to model them at extremely high resolution in order to span the scales of entry physics as well as blast wave and plume formation. Small asteroid impacts on Earth are a recognized hazard, but the full nature of the threat is still not well understood. We used shock physics codes to discover emergent phenomena associated with low-altitude airbursts such as the Siberian Tunguska event of 1908 and the Egyptian glass-forming event 29 million years ago. The planetary defense community is beginning to recognize the significant threat from such airbursts. Low-altitude airbursts are the only class of impacts that have a significant probability of occurring within a planning time horizon. There is roughly a 10% chance of a megaton-scale low-altitude airburst event in the next decade.The first part of this LDRD final project report is a preprint of our proceedings paper associated with the plenary presentation at the Hypervelocity Impact Society 2007 Symposium in Williamsburg, Virginia (International Journal of Impact Engineering, in press). The paper summarizes discoveries associated with a series of 2D axially-symmetric CTH simulations. The second part of the report contains slides from an invited presentation at the American Geophysical Union Fall 2007 meeting in San Francisco. The presentation summarizes the results of a series of 3D oblique impact simulations of the 1908 Tunguska explosion. Because of the brevity of this late-start project, the 3D results have not yet been written up for a peer-reviewed publication. We anticipate the opportunity to eventually run simulations that include the actual topography at Tunguska, at which time these results will be published.3

Boslough, Mark B.; Crawford, David A.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Brown, G.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Weiss, R.E. (Radiance Research, Seattle, WA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

High-altitude sleep disturbance: Results of the Groningen Sleep Quality Questionnaire survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To assess the Groningen Sleep Quality Scale (GSQS) for evaluation of high-altitude sleep (HAS) disturbance and employ GSQ questionnaire to describe HAS. Methods After the first nights stay at the altitude of 3500m, quality of sleep for 100 participants (age: 29.1311.01 years; 36 females/64 males) was assessed using the self-administered 15-item GSQS translated into Farsi. Results Mean GSQS score was 5.364.32; 38 (38%) participants had a score equal to or less than 2, and 46 (46%) participants had a score equal to or more than 6. A Cronbachs alpha of 0.90 was calculated for internal consistency. Waking up several times during the night was the most prevalent complaint during the first night of sleep, and absolute inability to sleep was the most uncommon problem. Conclusions HAS disturbance, which involved many of newcomers to a high altitude, had various harmful effects. For HAS research, GSQS was confirmed to be valid and reliable.

Sirous Jafarian; Farzam Gorouhi; Arsia Taghva; Jamshid Lotfi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

89

Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona Photo of a Parabolic-Trough Solar Water-Heating System Installed at the Federal Correctional Institution Facility north of...

90

Corrections APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOPHYSICS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES, BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction gene, MyHC-IIb, which is thought under most circumstances not to be expressed. The physiological

Spudich, James A.

91

Energy Efficiency In Correctional Facilities & Opportunities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency In Correctional Facilities & Opportunities for State Energy Office Engagement Energy Efficiency In Correctional Facilities & Opportunities for State Energy Office...

92

String-Corrected Black Holes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the geometry of four dimensional black hole solutions in the presence of stringy higher curvature corrections to the low energy effective action. For certain supersymmetric two charge black holes these corrections drastically alter the causal structure of the solution, converting seemingly pathological null singularities into timelike singularities hidden behind a finite area horizon. We establish, analytically and numerically, that the string-corrected two-charge black hole metric has the same Penrose diagram as the extremal four-charge black hole. The higher derivative terms lead to another dramatic effect -- the gravitational force exerted by a black hole on an inertial observer is no longer purely attractive! The magnitude of this effect is related to the size of the compactification manifold.

Hubeny, Veronika; Maloney, Alexander; Rangamani, Mukund

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

93

Decoupling correction system in RHIC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A global linear decoupling in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is going to be performed with the three families of skew quadrupoles. The operating horizontal and vertical betatron tunes in the RHIC will be separated by one unit ?x=28.19 and ?y=29.18. The linear coupling is corrected by minimizing the tune splitting ???the off diagonal matrix m (defined by Edwards and Teng). The skew quadrupole correction system is located close to each of the six interaction regions. A detail study of the system is presented by the use of the TEAPOT accelerator physics code.

D. Trbojevic; S. Tepikian; S. Peggs

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Decoupling correction system in RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global linear decoupling in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is going to be performed with the three families of skew quadrupoles. The operating horizontal and vertical betatron tunes in the RHIC will be separated by one unit v{sub x}=28.19 and v{sub y}=29.18. The linear coupling is corrected by minimizing the tune splitting Dn-the off diagonal matrix m. The skew quadrupole correction system is located close to the each of the six interaction regions. A detail study of the system is presented by the use of the TEAPOT accelerator physics code.

Trbojevic, D.; Tepikian, S.; Peggs, S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Human-UAV Coordinated Flight Path Planning of UAV Low-Altitude Penetration on Pop-Up Threats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human-UAV coordinated flight path planning of UAV low-altitude penetration on pop-up threats is a key technology achieving manned and ... of the flight path planning on pop-up threats. A lot of simulation studies...

Peng Ren; Xiao-guang Gao; Jun Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use advanced instrument and communication technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA's autonomous balloons, capable of crossing oceans and sampling at very low altitudes, use- grams. This paper traces the innovations in design and gains in capability of the autonomous Lagrangian

Businger, Steven

97

Federal Correctional Institution- Phoenix, Arizona  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A parabolic-trough solar water-heating system was installed at the Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) facility north of Phoenix, Arizona. This medium security prison for males has a current population of about 1,200 inmates and uses an average of 50,000 gallons of hot water per day for kitchen, shower, laundry, and sanitation needs.

98

Empirical Correction of XBT Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors use a collocation method between XBT and CTD/Ocean Station Data (OSD; including bottle cast and low-resolution CTD) from World Ocean Database 2005 (WOD2005) to statistically correct the XBT fall rate. An analysis of the annual median ...

M. Hamon; G. Reverdin; P.-Y. Le Traon

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Simultaneous phase and scatter correction for NMR datasets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has proven invaluable in the diverse field of chemometrics due to its ability to deliver information-rich spectral datasets of complex mixtures for analysis by techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA). However, NMR datasets present a unique challenge during preprocessing due to differences in phase offsets between individual spectra, thus complicating the correction of random dilution factors that may also occur. We show that simultaneously correcting phase and dilution errors in NMR datasets representative of metabolomics data yields improved cluster quality in PCA scores space, even with significant initial phase errors in the data.

Bradley Worley; Robert Powers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Corrections to kinetic measurements taken on a disk electrode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Below the limiting current, the rotating disk electrode has a nonuniform current distribution. When the nonuniformities are not explicitly accounted for, errors in values of kinetic parameters determined through measurements on a disk can result. In this analysis, valid for Tafel kinetics, correction factors are obtained as a function of the dimensionless average current density.It is assumed that ohmic corrections are made by the interruption of current. The results indicate that, under certain conditions, the errors are negligible and that the disk geometry, despite its nonuniformities, is adequate for the investigation of systems characterized by Tafel kinetics.

West, A.C.; Newman, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Correctional Institution - Phoenix, Arizona on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment

102

Decoupling correction system in RHIC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global linear decoupling in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is going to be performed with the three families of skew quadrupoles. The operating horizontal and vertical betatron tunes in the RHIC will be separated by one unit [nu][sub x]=28.19 and [nu][sub y]=29.18. The linear coupling is corrected by minimizing the tune splitting [Delta][nu]-the off diagonal matrix [bold m] (defined by Edwards and Teng). The skew quadrupole correction system is located close to each of the six interaction regions. A detail study of the system is presented by the use of the TEAPOT accelerator physics code. [copyright] 1994 American Institute of Physics

Trbojevic, D.; Tepikian, S.; Peggs, S. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

1994-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92). Depending on the sensor type and the radiosonde production date, one or more of the following three corrections were applied to the RH data: Temperature-Dependence correction (TD), Contamination-Dry Bias correction (C), Time Lag correction (TL). The estimated absolute accuracy of NIGHTTIME corrected and uncorrected Vaisala RH measurements, as determined by comparison to simultaneous reference-quality measurements from Holger Voemel's (CU/CIRES) cryogenic frostpoint hygrometer (CFH), is given by Miloshevich et al. (2006).

Miloshevich, Larry

104

Effect of wind and altitude on record performance in foot races, pole vault, and long jump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using only elementary physics one can estimate the effect of wind and altitude on performance in several track and field events. Experiments have shown that the power lost to aerodynamicdrag forces is about a tenth of the total power expended in running at sprint speeds. From this observation one can calculate the effect of wind or of air density changes on sprinting speed. In pole vaulting the sprinter converts his kinetic energy into potential energy to clear the bar. In long jumping he is a projectile but he is prevented from reaching his optimum distance expected for his initial velocity by the height which he can attain during his jump. For each of these events performance in moderate winds of 2.0 m/s or at altitudes comparable to Mexico City differ by several percent from performances at sea level or in still air. In longer running races and in bicycle races aerodynamic forces play an important role in racing strategy. However since the athletes perform in groups it is difficult to calculate the effect on individual performances.

Cliff Frohlich

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Development of ultra-thin polyethylene balloons for high altitude research upto mesosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ever since its inception four decades back, Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Hyderabad has been functioning with the needs of its user scientists at its focus. During the early nineties, when the X-ray astronomy group at TIFR expressed the need for balloons capable of carrying the X-ray telescopes to altitudes up to 42 km, the balloon group initiated research and development work on indigenous balloon grade films in various thickness not only for the main experiment but also in parallel, took up the development of thin films in thickness range 5 to 6 microns for fabrication of sounding balloons required for probing the stratosphere up to 42 km as the regular 2000 grams rubber balloon ascents could not reach altitudes higher than 38 km. By the year 1999, total indigenisation of sounding balloon manufacture was accomplished. The work on balloon grade ultra-thin polyethylene film in thickness range 2.8 to 3.8 microns for fabrication of balloons capable of penetrating mesosphere ...

Kumar, B Suneel; Ojha, D K; Peter, G Stalin; Vasudevan, R; Anand, D; Kulkarni, P M; Reddy, V Anmi; Rao, T V; Sreenivasan, S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

On-vehicle emission measurement of a light-duty diesel van at various speeds at high altitude  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As part of the research on the relationship between the speed of a vehicle operating at high altitude and its contaminant emissions, an on-vehicle emission measurement of a light-duty diesel van at the altitudes of 1000m, 2400m and 3200m was conducted. The test vehicle was a 2.8L turbocharged diesel Ford Transit. Its settings were consistent in all experiments. Regulated gaseous emissions, including CO, HC and NOx, together with particulate matter was measured at nine speeds ranged from 10kmh?1 to 90kmh?1 with 10kmh?1 intervals settings. At each speed, measurement lasted for at least 120s to ensure the sufficiency and reliability of the collected data. The results demonstrated that at all altitudes, CO and HC emissions decreased as the vehicle speed increased. However both \\{NOx\\} and PM increased with vehicle speed. In terms of the effects of altitude, an increase in CO, HC and PM was observed with the rising of altitude at each vehicle speed. \\{NOx\\} behaved different: emission of \\{NOx\\} initially increased as the vehicle was raised from 1000m to 2400m, but it decreased when the vehicle was further elevated to 3200m.

Xin Wang; Hang Yin; Yunshan Ge; Linxiao Yu; Zhenxian Xu; Chenglei Yu; Xuejiao Shi; Hongkun Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gamma-ray observatory begins gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the state of Puebla, Mexico August 21, 2013 New site to observe supernovas and supermassive black holes LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 21, 2013-The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma Ray Observatory has begun formal operations at its site in Mexico. HAWC is designed to study the origin of very high-energy cosmic rays and observe the most energetic objects in the known universe. This extraordinary observatory, using a unique detection technique that differs from the classical astronomical design of mirrors, - 2 - lenses, and antennae, is a significant boost to international scientific and technical knowledge. "The HAWC observatory will search for signals from dark matter and to study some

108

Definition: Corrective Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corrective Action Plan Corrective Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Corrective Action Plan A list of actions and an associated timetable for implementation to remedy a specific problem.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Corrective action and preventive action (CAPA, also called corrective action / preventive action) are improvements to an organization's processes taken to eliminate causes of non-conformities or other undesirable situations. CAPA is a concept within good manufacturing practice (GMP). It focuses on the systematic investigation of the root causes of non-conformities in an attempt to prevent their recurrence (for corrective action) or to prevent occurrence (for preventive action). Corrective actions are implemented in response to customer complaints,

109

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 547: Miscellaneous Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to present the corrective action alternatives (CAAs) evaluated for CAU 547, provide justification for selection of the recommended alternative, and describe the plan for implementing the selected alternative. Corrective Action Unit 547 consists of the following three corrective action sites (CASs): (1) CAS 02-37-02, Gas Sampling Assembly; (2) CAS 03-99-19, Gas Sampling Assembly; and(3) CAS 09-99-06, Gas Sampling Assembly. The gas sampling assemblies consist of inactive process piping, equipment, and instrumentation that were left in place after completion of underground safety experiments. The purpose of these safety experiments was to confirm that a nuclear explosion would not occur in the case of an accidental detonation of the high-explosive component of the device. The gas sampling assemblies allowed for the direct sampling of the gases and particulates produced by the safety experiments. Corrective Action Site 02-37-02 is located in Area 2 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and is associated with the Mullet safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U2ag on October 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 03-99-19 is located in Area 3 of the NNSS and is associated with the Tejon safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U3cg on May 17, 1963. Corrective Action Site 09-99-06 is located in Area 9 of the NNSS and is associated with the Player safety experiment conducted in emplacement borehole U9cc on August 27, 1964. The CAU 547 CASs were investigated in accordance with the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to determine and implement appropriate corrective actions for CAU 547. Existing radiological survey data and historical knowledge of the CASs were sufficient to meet the DQOs and evaluate CAAs without additional investigation. As a result, further investigation of the CAU 547 CASs was not required. The following CAAs were identified for the gas sampling assemblies: (1) clean closure, (2) closure in place, (3) modified closure in place, (4) no further action (with administrative controls), and (5) no further action. Based on the CAAs evaluation, the recommended corrective action for the three CASs in CAU 547 is closure in place. This corrective action will involve construction of a soil cover on top of the gas sampling assembly components and establishment of use restrictions at each site. The closure in place alternative was selected as the best and most appropriate corrective action for the CASs at CAU 547 based on the following factors: (1) Provides long-term protection of human health and the environment; (2) Minimizes short-term risk to site workers in implementing corrective action; (3) Is easily implemented using existing technology; (4) Complies with regulatory requirements; (5) Fulfills FFACO requirements for site closure; (6) Does not generate transuranic waste requiring offsite disposal; (7) Is consistent with anticipated future land use of the areas (i.e., testing and support activities); and (8) Is consistent with other NNSS site closures where contamination was left in place.

Mark Krauss

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

UAV Altitude Estimation by Mixed Stereoscopic Vision Damien Eynard and Pascal Vasseur and Cedric Demonceaux and Vincent Fremont  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UAV Altitude Estimation by Mixed Stereoscopic Vision Damien Eynard and Pascal Vasseur and C for an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) especially during critical maneuvers such as landing or steady flight estimation. Experimental results on real sequences of a small UAV demonstrate the effectiveness

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 340: Pesticide Release sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 340, the NTS Pesticide Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 340 is located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites: 23-21-01, Area 23 Quonset Hut 800 Pesticide Release Ditch; 23-18-03, Area 23 Skid Huts Pesticide Storage; and 15-18-02, Area 15 Quonset Hut 15-11 Pesticide Storage. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Corrective Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site.

DOE /NV

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Needed improvements in the development of systemic corrective actions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are indications that corrective actions, as implemented at Sandia National Laboratories are not fully adequate. Review of independent audits spanning multiple years provides evidence of recurring issues within the same or similar operations and programs. Several external audits have directly called into question the ability Sandia's assessment and evaluation processes to prevent recurrence. Examples of repeated findings include lockout/tagout programs, local exhaust ventilation controls and radiological controls. Recurrence clearly shows that there are underlying systemic factors that are not being adequately addressed by corrective actions stemming from causal analyses. Information suggests that improvements in the conduct of causal analyses and, more importantly, in the development of subsequent corrective actions are warranted. Current methodolgies include Management Oversight Risk Tree, developed in the early 1970s and Systemic Factors Analysis. Recommendations for improvements include review of other causal analysis systems, training, improved formality of operations, improved documentation, and a corporate method that uses truly systemic solutions. This report was written some years ago and is being published now to form the foundation for current, follow-on reports being developed. Some outdated material is recognized but is retained for report completeness.

Campisi, John A.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Phase and birefringence aberration correction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing phase conjugate mirror corrects phase aberrations of a coherent electromagnetic beam and birefringence induced upon that beam. The stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) phase conjugation technique is augmented to include Brillouin enhanced four wave mixing (BEFWM). A seed beam is generated by a main oscillator which arrives at the phase conjugate cell before the signal beams in order to initiate the Brillouin effect. The signal beam which is being amplified through the amplifier chain is split into two perpendicularly polarized beams. One of the two beams is chosen to be the same polarization as some component of the seed beam, the other orthogonal to the first. The polarization of the orthogonal beam is then rotated 90.degree. such that it is parallel to the other signal beam. The three beams are then focused into cell containing a medium capable of Brillouin excitation. The two signal beams are focused such that they cross the seed beam path before their respective beam waists in order to achieve BEFWM or the two signal beams are focused to a point or points contained within the focused cone angle of the seed beam to achieve seeded SBS, and thus negate the effects of all birefringent and material aberrations in the system.

Bowers, Mark (Modesto, CA); Hankla, Allen (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Thomas-Fermi model: The leading correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The correct treatment of strongly bound electrons is grafted smoothly onto the Thomas-Fermi computation of the total binding energy of neutral atoms. This provides a clearcut demonstration of the leading correction of relative order Z-13 which, with effects of relative order Z-23, gives an accurate account of the binding energy over a wide range of Z values. There is a brief discussion of relativistic corrections, with results that are somewhat at variance with previous numerical estimates.

Julian Schwinger

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Radiation damage of polyethylene exposed in the stratosphere at an altitude of 40 km  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Density Polyethylene (LDPE) films were exposed at an altitude of 40 km over a 3 day NASA stratospheric balloon mission from Alice Springs, Australia. The radiation damage, oxidation and nitration in the LDPE films exposed in stratosphere were measured using ESR, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy. The results were compared with those from samples stored on the ground and exposed in a laboratory plasma. The types of free radicals, unsaturated hydrocarbon groups, oxygen-containing and nitrogen-containing groups in LDPE film exposed in the stratosphere and at the Earth's surface are different. The radiation damage in films exposed in the stratosphere are observed in the entire film due to the penetration of high energy cosmic rays through their thickness, while the radiation damage in films exposed on the ground is caused by sunlight penetrating into only a thin surface layer. A similarly thin layer of the film is damaged by exposure to plasma due to the low energy of the plasma particles. The intensity of oxidation ...

Kondyurin, Alexey; Bilek, Marcela

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electrostatic plasma waves and HF auroral hiss generated at low altitude  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-amplitude (10 to 100 {mu}V m{sup {minus}1} Hz{sup {minus}1/2}) natural radio emissions in a wide frequency range (100 kHz up to 2 MHz) are frequently observed on board the AUREOL/ARCAD 3 satellite at high latitude and at altitudes between 400 and 2,000 km. The simultaneous measurement of the local cold plasma density allows the identification of cutoff and resonance frequencies. Three different kinds of wave are observed: (1) electrostatic emissions near the local value of the plasma frequency (f{sub p}), (2) electromagnetic whistler mode emissions, sometimes associated with type (1) emissions, and (3) electromagnetic Z mode emissions, also associated with type 1 emissions, but occurring more rarely than the whistler mode emissions and then only when f{sub p} is greater than the electron cyclotron frequency (f{sub ce}). These emissions are always associated with high levels of ELF electrostatic turbulence and a high flux of low-energy precipitating electrons, extending in energy down to the lower limit of the detectors ({approximately} 100 eV). The statistical distribution of the emissions in geomagnetic coordinates shows an occurrence greater than 80% in the polar cusp region and between 25% and 60% in the nightside auroral zone. A generation mechanism for such emissions is proposed, based on the calculation of the growth rate of the kinetic Cherenkov instability, associated with a beamlike suprathermal tail in the parallel distribution of the bulk electron population.

Beghin, C.; Rauch, J.L. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans (France)); Bosqued, J.M. (Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France))

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Weather-Corrected Performance Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) system performance depends on both the quality of the system and the weather. One simple way to communicate the system performance is to use the performance ratio (PR): the ratio of the electricity generated to the electricity that would have been generated if the plant consistently converted sunlight to electricity at the level expected from the DC nameplate rating. The annual system yield for flat-plate PV systems is estimated by the product of the annual insolation in the plane of the array, the nameplate rating of the system, and the PR, which provides an attractive way to estimate expected annual system yield. Unfortunately, the PR is, again, a function of both the PV system efficiency and the weather. If the PR is measured during the winter or during the summer, substantially different values may be obtained, making this metric insufficient to use as the basis for a performance guarantee when precise confidence intervals are required. This technical report defines a way to modify the PR calculation to neutralize biases that may be introduced by variations in the weather, while still reporting a PR that reflects the annual PR at that site given the project design and the project weather file. This resulting weather-corrected PR gives more consistent results throughout the year, enabling its use as a metric for performance guarantees while still retaining the familiarity this metric brings to the industry and the value of its use in predicting actual annual system yield. A testing protocol is also presented to illustrate the use of this new metric with the intent of providing a reference starting point for contractual content.

Dierauf, T.; Growitz, A.; Kurtz, S.; Cruz, J. L. B.; Riley, E.; Hansen, C.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Beam quality corrections for parallel-plate ion chambers in electron reference dosimetry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current dosimetry protocols (AAPM, IAEA, IPEM, DIN) recommend parallel-plate ionization chambers for dose measurements in clinical electron beams. This study presents detailed Monte Carlo simulations of beam quality correction factors for four different types of parallel-plate chambers: NACP-02, Markus, Advanced Markus and Roos. These chambers differ in constructive details which should have notable impact on the resulting perturbation corrections, hence on the beam quality corrections. The results reveal deviations to the recommended beam quality corrections given in the IAEA TRS-398 protocol in the range of 0%2% depending on energy and chamber type. For well-guarded chambers, these deviations could be traced back to a non-unity and energy-dependent wall perturbation correction. In the case of the guardless Markus chamber, a nearly energy-independent beam quality correction is resulting as the effects of wall and cavity perturbation compensate each other. For this chamber, the deviations to the recommended values are the largest and may exceed 2%. From calculations of type-B uncertainties including effects due to uncertainties of the underlying cross-sectional data as well as uncertainties due to the chamber material composition and chamber geometry, the overall uncertainty of calculated beam quality correction factors was estimated to be

K Zink; J Wulff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Correction of X-Band Radar Observation for Propagation Effects Based on the Self-Consistency Principle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New algorithms for rain attenuation correction of reflectivity factor and differential reflectivity are presented. Following the methodology suggested for the first time by Gorgucci et al., the new algorithms are developed based on the self-...

Eugenio Gorgucci; V. Chandrasekar; Luca Baldini

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Politically Correct Nuclear Energy Plant Andrew C. Kadak Massachusetts Institute of Technology - Small is Beautiful · Nuclear Energy - But Getting Better #12;Politically Correct ! · Natural Safety is a bad idea. · There is no new nuclear energy plant that is competitive at this time. · De-regulation did

123

Fuel cell flooding detection and correction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

DiPierno Bosco, Andrew (Rochester, NY); Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY)

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory C. Bernard and E.D. Freeland perturbation theory including electromagnetism, and discuss the extent to which quenched-photon simulations can-lat]17Nov2010 #12;Electromagnetic Corrections in Staggered Chiral Perturbation Theory E.D. Freeland 1

Bernard, Claude

125

Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" Correction Sheet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrections to "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" 1 Correction Sheet After our paper "Proving Safety Properties of the Steam Boiler Controller" went already to print, Myla address http://theory.lcs.mit.edu/tds/boiler.html. Following are the corrections to these errors and some

Lynch, Nancy

126

Regenerative fuel cells for High Altitude Long Endurance Solar Powered Aircraft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) unmanned missions appear to be feasible using a lightweight, high efficiency, span-loaded, Solar Powered Aircraft (SPA) which includes a Regenerative Fuel Cell (RFC) system and novel tankage for energy storage. An existing flightworthy electric powered flying wing design was modified to incorporate present and near-term technologies in energy storage, power electronics, aerodynamics, and guidance and control in order to design philosophy was to work with vendors to identify affordable near-term technological opportunities that could be applied to existing designs in order to reduce weight, increase reliability, and maintain adequate efficiency of components for delivery within 18 months. The energy storage subsystem for a HALE SPA is a key driver for the entire vehicle because it can represent up to half of the vehicle weight and most missions of interest require the specific energy to be considerably higher than 200 W-hr/kg for many cycles. This stringent specific energy requirement precludes the use of rechargeable batteries or flywheels and suggests examination of various RFC designs. An RFC system using lightweight tankage, a single fuel cell (FC) stack, and a single electrolyzer (EC) stack separated by the length of a spar segment (up to 39 ft), has specific energy of {approximately}300 W-hr/kg with 45% efficiency, which is adequate for HALE SPA requirements. However, this design has complexity and weight penalties associated with thermal management, electrical wiring, plumbing, and structural weight. A more elegant solution is to use unitized RFC stacks (reversible stacks that act as both FCs and ECs) because these systems have superior specific energy, scale to smaller systems more favorably, and have intrinsically simpler thermal management.

Mitlitsky, F.; Colella, N.J.; Myers, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, C.J. [Aero Vironment, Inc., Monrovia, CA (United States)

1993-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nonperturbative QCD corrections to electroweak observables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonperturbative QCD corrections are important to many low-energy electroweak observables, for example the muon magnetic moment. However, hadronic corrections also play a significant role at much higher energies due to their impact on the running of standard model parameters, such as the electromagnetic coupling. Currently, these hadronic contributions are accounted for by a combination of experimental measurements and phenomenological modeling but ideally should be calculated from first principles. Recent developments indicate that many of the most important hadronic corrections may be feasibly calculated using lattice QCD methods. To illustrate this, we will examine the lattice computation of the leading-order QCD corrections to the muon magnetic moment, paying particular attention to a recently developed method but also reviewing the results from other calculations. We will then continue with several examples that demonstrate the potential impact of the new approach: the leading-order corrections to the electron and tau magnetic moments, the running of the electromagnetic coupling, and a class of the next-to-leading-order corrections for the muon magnetic moment. Along the way, we will mention applications to the Adler function, the determination of the strong coupling constant and QCD corrections to muonic-hydrogen.

Dru B Renner, Xu Feng, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Douglas Factors  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as Douglas Factors and have been incorporated into the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Personnel Management System and various FAA Labor Agreements.

129

Empirical Screening Correction for M-Subshell Internal Conversion Coefficients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The only theoretical values which are available for coefficients of internal conversion in the M shell have been calculated without the inclusion of screening, and they are in disagreement with experimental values by factors as large as 3. From the comparison of these theoretical values with new accurate measurements on the M-subshell electron lines of the M4 transitions occuring in the decay of Te121m and of Te123m, it was possible to effect a tentative semiempirical screening correction. Essentially, this is the replacement of the nuclear charge Z for the evaluation of the coefficient by ZeffM=Z-?i, where ?i=7.0,7.9,and10.0 for MI(3s), MII,III(3p), and MIV,V(3d) electrons, respectively. This correction to the theoretical values is found to produce agreement with other experimental M conversion results, both measured in this work and taken from the literature, over a wide range of multipolarities and of Z and energy values. The nonspecific characteristic of the correction is interpreted to mean that the screening is chiefly an effect on the electron wave functions of the initial bound states of the atom.

Y. Y. Chu and M. L. Perlman

1964-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

Second Order Geodesic Corrections to Cosmic Shear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the impact of second order corrections to the geodesic equation governing gravitational lensing. We start from the full second order metric, including scalar, vector and tensor perturbations, and retain all relevant contributions to the cosmic shear corrections that are second order in the gravitational potential. The relevant terms are: the nonlinear evolution of the scalar gravitational potential, the Born correction, and lens-lens coupling. No other second order terms contribute appreciably to the lensing signal. Since ray-tracing algorithims currently include these three effects, this derivation serves as rigorous justification for the numerical predictions.

S. Dodelson; E. W. Kolb; S. Matarrese; A. Riotto; P. Zhang

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Perimeter security for Minnesota correctional facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past few years, the Minnesota Department of Corrections, assisted by Sandia National Laboratories, has developed a set of standards for perimeter security at medium, close, and maximum custody correctional facilities in the state. During this process, the threat to perimeter security was examined and concepts about correctional perimeter security were developed. This presentation and paper will review the outcomes of this effort, some of the lessons learned, and the concepts developed during this process and in the course of working with architects, engineers and construction firms as the state upgraded perimeter security at some facilities and planned new construction at other facilities.

Crist, D. [Minnesota Department of Corrections, St. Paul, MN (United States); Spencer, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE /NV

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

133

Errata Corrections as of February 7, 2012  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Case Data spreadsheet files for the Credit Cap 2.1 and Credit Cap 3.0 tables, data for "Total Penalty" (line 2846) and "CES Payments" (lines 2867 through 2875) were corrected...

134

Thomas-Fermi model: The second correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple derivation is given for the first quantum correction to the Thomas-Fermi kinetic energy. Its application to the total binding energy of neutral atoms exploits the technique for handling strongly bound electrons that was developed in a preceding paper, and justifies the numerical value of the second correction adopted there. A proposal is made for extrapolating this improved description to the outer regions of the atom.

Julian Schwinger

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Bounding Heavy Meson Form Factors Using Inclusive Sum Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We utilize inclusive sum rules to construct both upper and lower bounds on the form factors for B to D, D*, rho, pi, omega, K and K* semi-leptonic and radiative decays. We include the leading nonperturbative 1/E corrections and point out cases when alpha_s corrections are equally important. We compute the alpha_s correction to the lower bound on the B to D* form factor f(w) at zero recoil, thereby constraining its normalization f(1) to within 6-8% of the upper bound. We show that the B to rho form factor a_+ is suppressed at small momentum transfer by either a factor of 1/E or alpha_s. These bounds can be used to rule out phenomenological models as well as to determine values for the CKM matrix elements once radiative corrections are included.

C. Glenn Boyd; Ira Z. Rothstein

1996-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

136

Anisotropic geometrical-spreading correction for wide-azimuth P-wave reflections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic geometrical-spreading correction for wide-azimuth P-wave reflections Xiaoxia Xu1 spreading in stratified azi- muthally anisotropic media. The P-wave geometrical-spreading factor systems, nonhydrostatic stresses, or dipping trans- versely isotropic layers e.g., shales . The inversion

Tsvankin, Ilya

137

Correction schemes to improve the dynamical aperture of the Main Injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tracking simulations have revealed that the dominant factors limiting the dynamical aperture of the Main Injector are the large octupole component and the random errors in the recycled Main Ring quadrupoles. This paper describes a correction scheme that reduces the effect of these errors on the performance of the Fermilab Main Injector, especially for the slow extraction operation.

Mishra, C.S.; Harfoush, F.A.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tonopah Test Range Environmental Restoration Corrective Action Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the status (closed, closed in place, or closure in progress) of the Corrective Action Sites and Corrective Action Units at the Tonopah Test Range

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

140

2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For...

142

Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions...

143

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP)...

144

Wing Mounted Ice Penetrating Radar Array for a Medium Altitude Long Endurance Remote Aircraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Axis psi cyF Compressive Yield Stress Allowable psi DF Drag Force lbs suF Shear Ultimate Stress Allowable psi tuF Tensile Ultimate Stress Allowable psi tyF Tensile Yield Stress Allowable psi FS Factor of Safety (~) G Shear Modulus psi 12G...

Grorud, Dustin

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Errata Corrections as of October 25, 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Corrections as of October 25, 2011 Corrections as of October 25, 2011 1. On Figure 4 of page 6, the axis labels were changed to reflect that the difference between HCES and Reference case natural gas prices is shown on the left-hand axis, and the difference between HCES and Reference case electricity prices is shown on the right-hand axis. 2. On Figure 7 of page 9, the axis label was corrected from 2009 dollars to 2005 dollars. 3. The following sentence was added to the Background section on page 1 in order to clarify that intra-utility credit trading was specified in Chairman Hall's request: "The HCES will apply to utilities in the aggregate; utilities may trade compliance credits with other utilities." 4. In summary tables B1 through B5, the units label for sulfur dioxide emissions, nitrogen oxide

146

Hardware-efficient autonomous quantum error correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new method to autonomously correct for errors of a logical qubit induced by energy relaxation. This scheme encodes the logical qubit as a multi-component superposition of coherent states in a harmonic oscillator, more specifically a cavity mode. The sequences of encoding, decoding and correction operations employ the non-linearity provided by a single physical qubit coupled to the cavity. We layout in detail how to implement these operations in a practical system. This proposal directly addresses the task of building a hardware-efficient and technically realizable quantum memory.

Zaki Leghtas; Gerhard Kirchmair; Brian Vlastakis; Robert Schoelkopf; Michel Devoret; Mazyar Mirrahimi

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, February 2001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended Corrective Action Alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 490 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah Test Range and is approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (located southwest of Area 3); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area (located west of Main Lake); 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard (located north of the northwest corner of Area 3); and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area (located south of the Area 9 Compound on the TTR). A Corrective Action Investigation was performed in July and August 2000, and analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified in soil at the Gun Propellant Burn Area or the Station 44 Burn Area; therefore, there is no need for corrective actions at these two sites. Five soil samples at the Fire Training Area and seven at the Sandia Service Yard exceeded PALs for total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel. Upon the identification of COCs specific to CAU 490, Corrective Action Objectives were developed based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the TTR, with the following three CAAs under consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure In Place - No Further Action With Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred choice for CAU 490 was Alternative 3. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated soils at this site.

DOE /NV

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

FTCP Corrective Action Plan- Revision 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

January 2007 FTCP Corrective Action Plan, Revision 1, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004- 1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations

149

FTCP Corrective Action Plan- Revision 2  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

March 2009 FTCP Corrective Action Plan, Revision 2, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations

150

Ostrogradsky's Hamilton formalism and quantum corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of a simple scalar field theory it is demonstrated that the Lagrange formalism and Ostrogradsky's Hamilton formalism in the presence of higher derivatives, in general, do not lead to the same results. While the two approaches are equivalent at the classical level, differences appear due to the quantum corrections.

J. Gegelia; S. Scherer

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At the precision reached in current lattice QCD calculations, electromagnetic effects are becoming numerically relevant. We will present preliminary results for electromagnetic corrections to light hadron masses, based on simulations in which a $\\mathrm{U}(1)$ degree of freedom is superimposed on $N_f=2+1$ QCD configurations from the BMW collaboration.

A. Portelli; S. Drr; Z. Fodor; J. Frison; C. Hoelbling; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Kurth; L. Lellouch; T. Lippert; K. K. Szab; A. Ramos

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

PROPERTIES OF UMBRAL DOTS FROM STRAY LIGHT CORRECTED HINODE FILTERGRAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution blue continuum filtergrams from Hinode are employed to study the umbral fine structure of a regular unipolar sunspot. The removal of scattered light from the images increases the rms contrast by a factor of 1.45 on average. Improvement in image contrast renders identification of short filamentary structures resembling penumbrae that are well separated from the umbra-penumbra boundary and comprise bright filaments/grains flanking dark filaments. Such fine structures were recently detected from ground-based telescopes and have now been observed with Hinode. A multi-level tracking algorithm was used to identify umbral dots (UDs) in both the uncorrected and corrected images and to track them in time. The distribution of the values describing the photometric and geometric properties of UDs is more easily affected by the presence of stray light while it is less severe in the case of kinematic properties. Statistically, UDs exhibit a peak intensity, effective diameter, lifetime, horizontal speed, and a trajectory length of 0.29I{sub QS}, 272 km, 8.4 minutes, 0.45 km s{sup -1}, and 221 km, respectively. The 2 hr 20 minute time sequence depicts several locations where UDs tend to appear and disappear repeatedly with various time intervals. The correction for scattered light in the Hinode filtergrams facilitates photometry of umbral fine structure, which can be related to results obtained from larger telescopes and numerical simulations.

Louis, Rohan E.; Mathew, Shibu K.; Bayanna, A. Raja [Udaipur Solar Observatory, Physical Research Laboratory, Dewali, Badi Road, Udaipur, Rajasthan 313004 (India); Rubio, Luis R. Bellot [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Apartado de Correos 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Ichimoto, Kiyoshi [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8417 (Japan); Ravindra, B., E-mail: eugene@prl.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, II Block, Koramangla, Bangalore 560034 (India)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION;UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN

Oliver, Douglas L.

154

Relativistic corrections to heavy quark fragmentation to S-wave heavy mesons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relativistic corrections of order v2 to the fragmentation functions for the heavy quark to S-wave heavy quarkonia are calculated in the framework of the nonrelativistic quantum chromodynamics factorization formula. We derive the fragmentation functions by using the Collins-Soper definition in both the Feynman gauge and the axial gauge. We also extract them through the process Z0?Hqq in the limit MZ/m??. We find that all results obtained by these two different methods and in different gauges are the same. We estimate the relative size of the relativistic corrections to the fragmentation functions.

Wen-long Sang, Lan-fei Yang, and Yu-qi Chen

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062

156

Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power factor is a way of measuring the percentage of reactive power in an electrical system. Reactive power represents wasted energy--electricity that does no useful work because the electrical current is out of phase with the voltage. Reactive power is used by inductive loads (such as, motors, transformers, fluorescent lights, arc welders and induction furnaces) to sustain their magnetic fields. Electric systems with many motors exhibit low power factors, increased conductor and transformer losses, and lower voltages. Utilities must supply both active and reactive power and compensate for these losses. Power factor can be improved by the addition of shunt capacitors. Capacitors act in opposition to inductive loads, thereby minimizing the reactive power required to serve them. In raising the power factor, shunt capacitors release energy to the system, reduce system losses, and ultimately decrease power costs. Improving system power factor can reduce reactive and active power losses for both industry and utilities through the addition of shunt capacitors. This Guide Book gives electric utility technical staff, industrial end-users, consultants and BPA employees a step-by-step method for evaluating the cost effectiveness of installing power factor correction capacitors in an industrial plant.

Electrotek Concepts.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Higher-Order Corrections to Timelike Jets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a simple formalism for the evolution of timelike jets in which tree-level matrix element corrections can be systematically incorporated, up to arbitrary parton multiplicities and over all of phase space, in a way that exponentiates the matching corrections. The scheme is cast as a shower Markov chain which generates one single unweighted event sample, that can be passed to standard hadronization models. Remaining perturbative uncertainties are estimated by providing several alternative weight sets for the same events, at a relatively modest additional overhead. As an explicit example, we consider Z {yields} q{bar q} evolution with unpolarized, massless quarks and include several formally subleading improvements as well as matching to tree-level matrix elements through {alpha}{sub s}{sup 4}. The resulting algorithm is implemented in the publicly available VINCIA plugin to the PYTHIA8 event generator.

Giele, W.T.; /Fermilab; Kosower, D.A.; /Saclay, SPhT; Skands, P.Z.; /CERN

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Stabilizer Formalism for Operator Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operator quantum error correction is a recently developed theory that provides a generalized and unified framework for active error correction and passive error avoiding schemes. In this Letter, we describe these codes using the stabilizer formalism. This is achieved by adding a gauge group to stabilizer codes that defines an equivalence class between encoded states. Gauge transformations leave the encoded information unchanged; their effect is absorbed by virtual gauge qubits that do not carry useful information. We illustrate the construction by identifying a gauge symmetry in Shors 9-qubit code that allows us to remove 3 of its 8 stabilizer generators, leading to a simpler decoding procedure and a wider class of logical operations without affecting its essential properties. This opens the path to possible improvements of the error threshold of fault-tolerant quantum computing.

David Poulin

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Factorized soft graviton theorems at loop level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the low-energy behavior of scattering amplitudes involving gravitons at loop level in four dimensions. The single-graviton soft limit is controlled by soft operators which have been argued to separate into a factorized piece and a non-factorizing infrared divergent contribution. In this note we show that the soft operators responsible for the factorized contributions are strongly constrained by gauge and Poincare invariance under the assumption of a local structure. We show that the leading and subleading orders in the soft-momentum expansion can not receive radiative corrections. The first radiative correction occurs for the sub-subleading soft graviton operator and is one-loop exact. It depends on only two undetermined coefficients which should reflect the field content of the theory under consideration.

Broedel, Johannes; Plefka, Jan; Rosso, Matteo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

High altitude balloon flights of position sensitive CdZnTe detectors for high energy X-ray astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a semiconductor detector well suited for high energy X-ray astronomy. The High-Energy X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HEXIS) program is developing this technology for use in a hard X-ray all-sky survey and as a focal plane imager for missions such as FAR_XITE and Constellation X. We have designed a novel electrode geometry that improves interaction localization and depth of interaction determination. The HEXIS program has flown two high altitude balloon payloads from Ft. Summer NM to investigate background properties and shielding effects on a position sensitive CZT detector in the energy range of 20350 keV.

Kimberly R. Slavis; Paul Dowkontt; Fred Duttweiler; John Epstein; Paul L. Hink; George L. Huszar; Philippe C. Leblanc; James L. Matteson; Robert T. Skelton; Ed Stephan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tensor Networks and Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We establish several relations between quantum error correction (QEC) and tensor network (TN) methods of quantum many-body physics. We exhibit correspondences between well-known families of QEC codes and TNs, and demonstrate a formal equivalence between decoding a QEC code and contracting a TN. We build on this equivalence to propose a new family of quantum codes and decoding algorithms that generalize and improve upon quantum polar codes and successive cancellation decoding in a natural way.

Andrew J. Ferris and David Poulin

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electroweak Corrections to the Top Quark Decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated the one-loop electroweak corrections to the decay t-> bW+, including the counterterm for the CKM matrix elements V(tb). Previous calculations used an incorrect delta V(tb) that led to a gauge dependent amplitude. However, since the contribution stemming from delta V(tb) is small, those calculations only underestimate the width by roughly one part in 10^5.

S. M. Oliveira; L. Bruecher; R. Santos; A. Barroso

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effects of altitude and fuel oxygen content on the performance of a high pressure common rail diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The change of intake oxygen content caused by altitude variation and the change of fuel oxygen content both affect the performance of diesel engines. In this paper, comparative experiments were performed on a high pressure common rail diesel engine fueled with pure diesel and biodieselethanoldiesel (abbreviated as BED) blends with oxygen content of 2%, 2.5%, and 3.2% in mass percentage at different atmospheric pressures of 81kPa, 90kPa, and 100kPa. Moreover, in order to study the effect of different fuel blends with the same oxygen content on the performance of the diesel engine, tests were conducted on the diesel engine fueled with the BED blend and a biodieseldiesel (abbreviated as BD) blend at 81kPa ambient pressure. The experimental results indicate that the influence of altitude variation on the full-load engine brake torque is not significant when the pure diesel fuel is used. With the increase of BED fuel oxygen content, the engine brake torque reduces. When the pure diesel fuel is used, with the increase of atmospheric pressure, the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) decreases. As the fuel oxygen content increases, there is no significant difference in brake specific fuel consumption of the BED blends. And the values of brake specific energy consumption (BSEC) gradually decrease. Soot emissions of the diesel engine decrease with the increase of atmospheric pressure and fuel oxygen content. The effect of soot emission reduction by increasing the oxygen content of the fuel is more significant than the effect of increasing atmospheric pressure. The effects of BD and BED fuels with basically the same oxygen content on the full-load performance, fuel economy, and soot emissions of the diesel engine are different. The BSFC and soot emissions of the BED fuel are lower than those of the BD fuel.

Shaohua Liu; Lizhong Shen; Yuhua Bi; Jilin Lei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Empirical correction of a toy climate model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improving the accuracy of forecast models for physical systems such as the atmosphere is a crucial ongoing effort. The primary focus of recent research on these highly nonlinear systems has been errors in state estimation, but as that error has been successfully diminished, the role of model error in forecast uncertainty has duly increased. The present study is an investigation of an empirical model correction procedure involving the comparison of short forecasts with a reference truth system during a training period, in order to calculate systematic (1) state-independent model bias and (2) state-dependent error patterns. An estimate of the likelihood of the latter error component is computed from the current state at every time step of model integration. The effectiveness of this technique is explored in a realistic scenario, in which the model is structurally different (in dynamics, dimension, and parametrization) from the target system. Results suggest that the correction procedure is more effective for reducing error and prolonging forecast usefulness than parameter tuning. However, the cost of this increase in average forecast accuracy is the creation of substantial qualitative differences between the dynamics of the corrected model and the true system. A method to mitigate dynamical ramifications and further increase forecast accuracy is presented.

Nicholas A. Allgaier; Kameron D. Harris; Christopher M. Danforth

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

165

Clean slate corrective action investigation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Slate sites discussed in this report are situated in the central portion of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), north of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on the northwest portion of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) which is approximately 390 kilometers (km) (240 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. These sites were the locations for three of the four Operation Roller Coaster experiments. These experiments evaluated the dispersal of plutonium in the environment from the chemical explosion of a plutonium-bearing device. Although it was not a nuclear explosion, Operation Roller Coaster created some surface contamination which is now the subject of a corrective action strategy being implemented by the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) activities will be conducted at three of the Operation Roller Coaster sites. These are Clean Slate 1 (CS-1), Clean Slate 2 (CS-2), and Clean Slate 3 (CS-3) sites, which are located on the TTR. The document that provides or references all of the specific information relative to the various investigative processes is called the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP). This CAIP has been prepared for the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) by IT Corporation (IT).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Perturbative Roughness Corrections to Electromagnetic Casimir Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perturbative corrections to the Casimir free energy due to macroscopic roughness of dielectric interfaces are obtained in the framework of an effective low-energy field theory. It describes the interaction of electromagnetic fields with materials whose plasma frequency $\\omega_p$ determines the low-energy scale. The na\\"ive perturbative expansion of the single-interface scattering matrix in the variance of the profile is sensitive to short wavelength components of the roughness correlation function. We introduce generalized counter terms that subtract and correct these high-momentum contributions to the loop expansion. To leading order the counter terms are determined by the phenomenological plasmon model. The latter is found to be consistent with the low-energy description. The proximity force approximation is recovered in the limit of long correlation length and gives the upper limit for the roughness correction to the Casimir force. The renormalized low-energy theory is insensitive to the high-momentum behavior of the roughness correlation function. Predictions of the improved theory are compared with those of the unrenormalized model and with experiment. The Casimir interaction of interfaces with low levels of roughness is found to be well reproduced by that of flat parallel plates with the measured reflection coefficients at a distance that is slightly less than the mean separation of the rough surfaces.

Hua Yao Wu; Martin Schaden

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

Unified and Generalized Approach to Quantum Error Correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a unified approach to quantum error correction, called operator quantum error correction. Our scheme relies on a generalized notion of a noiseless subsystem that is investigated here. By combining the active error correction with this generalized noiseless subsystems method, we arrive at a unified approach which incorporates the known techniquesi.e., the standard error correction model, the method of decoherence-free subspaces, and the noiseless subsystem methodas special cases. Moreover, we demonstrate that the quantum error correction condition from the standard model is a necessary condition for all known methods of quantum error correction.

David Kribs; Raymond Laflamme; David Poulin

2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139, Waste Disposal Sites, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 139 consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 139 consists of the following CASs: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Details of the site history and site characterization results for CAU 139 are provided in the approved Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006) and in the approved Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to present the detailed scope of work required to implement the recommended corrective actions as specified in Section 4.0 of the approved CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The approved closure activities for CAU 139 include removal of soil and debris contaminated with plutonium (Pu)-239, excavation of geophysical anomalies, removal of surface debris, construction of an engineered soil cover, and implementation of use restrictions (URs). Table 1 presents a summary of CAS-specific closure activities and contaminants of concern (COCs). Specific details of the corrective actions to be performed at each CAS are presented in Section 2.0 of this report.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 563, Septic Systems, is located in Areas 3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 563 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) below: 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Alfred Wickline

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A single wind-mediated mechanism explains high-altitude non-goal oriented headings and layering of nocturnally migrating insects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 14 A single wind-mediated mechanism explains high-altitude...remained a mystery. Here we show how a wind-mediated mechanism accounts for the common...cue, thus adding their air speed to the wind speed and significantly increasing their...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electroweak Radiative Corrections to Muon Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electroweak radiative corrections to muon capture on nuclei are computed and found to be sizable. They enhance the capture rates for hydrogen and helium by 2.8% and 3.0% respectively. As a result, the value of the induced pseudoscalar coupling, g_P^exp, extracted from a recent hydrogen 1S singlet capture experiment is increased by about 21% to g_P^exp = 7.3 +/- 1.2 and brought into good agreement with the prediction of chiral perturbation theory, g_P^theory=8.2 +/- 0.2. Implications for helium capture rate predictions are also discussed.

A. Czarnecki; W. J. Marciano; A. Sirlin

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Automation of one-loop QCD corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the complete automation of the computation of one-loop QCD corrections, including UV renormalization, to an arbitrary scattering process in the Standard Model. This is achieved by embedding the OPP integrand reduction technique, as implemented in CutTools, into the MadGraph framework. By interfacing the tool so constructed, which we dub MadLoop, with MadFKS, the fully automatic computation of any infrared-safe observable at the next-to-leading order in QCD is attained. We demonstrate the flexibility and the reach of our method by calculating the production rates for a variety of processes at the 7 TeV LHC.

Valentin Hirschi; Rikkert Frederix; Stefano Frixione; Maria Vittoria Garzelli; Fabio Maltoni; Roberto Pittau

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

175

Kirchhoff voltage law corrected for radiating circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a circular loop composed by a RLC is put to oscillate, the oscillation will eventually vanish in an exponentially decaying current, even considering superconducting wires, due to the emission of electric and magnetic dipole radiation. In this work we propose a modification on the Kirchhoff voltage law by adding the radiative contributions to the energy loss as an effective resistance, whose value is relatively small when compared to typical resistance value, but fundamental to describe correctly real circuits. We have also analysed the change in the pattern of the radiation spectra emitted by the circuit as we vary both the effective and electrical resistance.

Lara, Vitor

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Global Orbit Corrections Keith Symon LS-I0l  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Orbit Corrections Keith Symon LS-I0l November 1987 K. Symon I. Introduction. There are various reasons for preferring local (e.g., three-bump) orbit correction methods to global...

177

Logarithmic correction in the deformed AdS5 model to produce the heavy quark potential and QCD beta function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the holographic QCD model, which contains a quadratic term -?z2 and a logarithmic term -c0log?[(zIR-z)/zIR] with an explicit infrared cutoff zIR in the deformed AdS5 warp factor. We investigate the heavy-quark potential for three cases, i.e., with only a quadratic correction, with both quadratic and logarithmic corrections, and with only a logarithmic correction. We solve the dilaton field and dilation potential from the Einstein equation and investigate the corresponding beta function in the Grsoy-Kiritsis-Nitti framework. Our studies show that in the case with only a quadratic correction, a negative ? or the Andreev-Zakharov model is favored to fit the heavy-quark potential and to produce the QCD beta function at 2-loop level; however, the dilaton potential is unbounded in the infrared regime. One interesting observation for the case of positive ? is that the corresponding beta function exists in an infrared fixed point. In the case with only a logarithmic correction, the heavy-quark Cornell potential can be fitted very well, the corresponding beta function agrees with the QCD beta function at 2-loop level reasonably well, and the dilaton potential is bounded from below in the infrared. At the end, we propose a more compact model which has only a logarithmic correction in the deformed warp factor and has less free parameters.

Song He, Mei Huang, and Qi-Shu Yan

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cold quark matter, quadratic corrections, and gauge/string duality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We make an estimate of the quadratic correction in the pressure of cold quark matter using gauge/string duality.

Oleg Andreev

2010-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Correctness of linear logic proof structures is NL-complete  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide new correctness criteria for all fragments (multiplicative, exponential, additive) of linear logic. We use these criteria for proving that deciding the correctness of a linear logic proof structure is NL-complete. Keywords: Complexity classes, Correctness criteria, Linear logic, Nondeterministic logspace

Paulin Jacob De Naurois; Virgile Mogbil

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES), Correctional Managed Health Care (CMHC) Health Services staff should access their CMHC e-mail daily when on HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR USE WITHIN THE CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION NUMBER: C 1

Oliver, Douglas L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Record of Technical Change - Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Record of Technical Change, Technical Change No. CAP-1, dated April 13, 2005 for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0, September 2004, DOE/NV--1003.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

183

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

ERRATA SHEET for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 2.1.1.3 of the Table of Contents reference on Page v and on Page 12 of the Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada erroneously refers to the Nevada Environmental Policy Act Determination. The correct title of the referenced document is the National Environmental Policy Act Determination.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

JF: Tropospheric Path Delay Correction Phase Correction Experiments at Chajnantor and Mauna Kea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by fluctuations in atmospheric water vapour, presents a major challenge for the next generation of millimeter correction of atmospheric phase fluctuations. Instrumentation To test the water line radiometry technique, we Kea, Hawaii. Thus, these water line radiometers view the same path through the atmosphere

Groppi, Christopher

186

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes process requirements and responsibilities for DOE line managers to develop and implement corrective actions to effectively resolve safety findings arising from: Findings as identified by the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Environment, Safety and Health and Emergency Management assessments; Judgments of Need as identified by Type A accident investigations: Other sources as directed by the Secretary or Deputy Secretary, including crosscutting safety findings. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide

187

ARM - PI Product - Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH ProductsRadiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Radiosondes Corrected for Inaccuracy in RH Measurements 2000.01.01 - 2005.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description Corrections for inaccuracy in Vaisala radiosonde RH measurements have been applied to ARM SGP radiosonde soundings. The magnitude of the corrections can vary considerably between soundings. The radiosonde measurement accuracy, and therefore the correction magnitude, is a function of atmospheric conditions, mainly T, RH, and dRH/dt (humidity gradient). The corrections are also very sensitive to the RH sensor type, and there are 3 Vaisala sensor types represented in this dataset (RS80-H, RS90, and RS92).

188

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes process requirements and responsibilities for DOE line managers to develop and implement corrective actions to effectively resolve safety findings arising from: Findings as identified by the Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance Environment, Safety and Health and Emergency Management assessments; Judgments of Need as identified by Type A accident investigations: Other sources as directed by the Secretary or Deputy Secretary, including crosscutting safety findings. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide

189

Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) The CATS web-based database is used to enter, track, and report the status of corrective actions developed and implemented in the DOE Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) to effectively resolve and prevent recurrence of reported findings. The web-site includes guidance for accessing, reviewing and editing the database. NOTICE: Because of the potential sensitive nature of some information in Corrective Action Plans (CAPs) that is placed in the Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS), DOE is limiting access to the CATS web site. Members of the public cannot access the CATS web site at this time. DOE regrets any inconvenience caused by this decision in

190

Radiative corrections to lepton-lepton scattering Physik-Department T39, Technische Universitat Munchen, D-85747 Garching, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the tree diagrams and the one-loop diagrams. Infrared finiteness of these virtual radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy cut-off . We evaluate discrepancies for the ratio of the proton electric and magnetic form factors Gp E/Gp M as determined

Weise, Wolfram

191

PLEASE RETURN TO PDCC FOR CORRECTIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PLEASE PLEASE RETURN TO PDCC FOR CORRECTIONS ~ F : S : R : D R : C ~ H : R : o L N : S F T I L : E M. se~;/:~~;: : : : : :::::EHC~DATA : B : E ~ H ~ '"" ENVIRON SAFETY & HEALTH :::s ~ FSRD NOTEBOOKS SAFETY & HEALTH BEH ~ ~ READING FILE ENVIR COMPLIANCE BEH '\.. ....... ~ DOE/P&CD: French/Sislrunk DCa WASTE MGMT & TREATMENT BEH § ~ DOE/HQ: J. Wagoner DHQ PROCUREMENT BPO ::::s ~ 1-~~~~~~~~~~+~+~t---t~TM-Al-E-B-E-RL-IN-E-------+-B-ET-+-+-+-:-::-~-:-~-~ A-A:-T-~N-~-:~-:-AN-T-IO-N~~-t-:-:-~+-~t--I ~ ~ ... S-IT-E-S:-1-5-8-N-FS-S------.,I--+--+-+P-R-O-JE-C-T-C-a-N-T-R-O-LS~~~~-+~BP";;C+~-+-~"I ~

192

Quantum Error Correction with magnetic molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum algorithms often assume independent spin qubits to produce trivial $|\\uparrow\\rangle=|0\\rangle$, $|\\downarrow\\rangle=|1\\rangle$ mappings. This can be unrealistic in many solid-state implementations with sizeable magnetic interactions. Here we show that the lower part of the spectrum of a molecule containing three exchange-coupled metal ions with $S=1/2$ and $I=1/2$ is equivalent to nine electron-nuclear qubits. We derive the relation between spin states and qubit states in reasonable parameter ranges for the rare earth $^{159}$Tb$^{3+}$ and for the transition metal Cu$^{2+}$, and study the possibility to implement Shor's Quantum Error Correction code on such a molecule. We also discuss recently developed molecular systems that could be adequate from an experimental point of view.

Jos J. Baldov; Salvador Cardona-Serra; Juan M. Clemente-Juan; Luis Escalera-Moreno; Alejandro Gaita-Ario; Guillermo Mnguez Espallargas

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

193

Final Report: Correctness Tools for Petascale Computing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the course of developing parallel programs for leadership computing systems, subtle programming errors often arise that are extremely difficult to diagnose without tools. To meet this challenge, University of Maryland, the University of WisconsinMadison, and Rice University worked to develop lightweight tools to help code developers pinpoint a variety of program correctness errors that plague parallel scientific codes. The aim of this project was to develop software tools that help diagnose program errors including memory leaks, memory access errors, round-off errors, and data races. Research at Rice University focused on developing algorithms and data structures to support efficient monitoring of multithreaded programs for memory access errors and data races. This is a final report about research and development work at Rice University as part of this project.

Mellor-Crummey, John [Rice University

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

194

Analysis of silicon carbide based semiconductor power devices and their application in power factor correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. Material technologies superior to Si are needed for future power device developments. Silicon Carbide (SiC) based semiconductor devices...

Durrani, Yamin Qaisar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Mixed-SignalASIC Power-Factor-Correction(PFC) Controller for High Frequency Switching Rectifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regan Zane and Dragan MaksimoviC ColoradoPower Electronics Center (CoPEC) Department of Electrical-chip controller block dia- gram is described, and the fundamental analog and digital op- erating blocks proliferationof electronic systems throughout the home andof- ficeplacesnew constraints on front-end AC

196

Advance Three Phase Power Factor Correction Schemes for Utility Interface of Power Electronic Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, battery chargers and data centers etc. Also, high voltage DC (HVDC) systems employ rectifiers to convert ac input to DC output. HVDC is one example of the application of AC/DC conversion, in power system also, grid tie of two different power...

Albader, Mesaad

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

197

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

David A. Strand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Corrective action decision document, Second Gas Station, Tonopah test range, Nevada (Corrective Action Unit No. 403)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for Second Gas Station (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] No. 403) has been developed for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Nevada Environmental Restoration Project to meet the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as stated in Appendix VI, {open_quotes}Corrective Action Strategy{close_quotes} (FFACO, 1996). The Second Gas Station Corrective Action Site (CAS) No. 03-02-004-0360 is the only CAS in CAU No. 403. The Second Gas Station CAS is located within Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), west of the Main Road at the location of former Underground Storage Tanks (USTs) and their associated fuel dispensary stations. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, by air and approximately 56 km (35 mi) southeast of Tonopah, Nevada, by road. The TTR is bordered on the south, east, and west by the Nellis Air Force Range and on the north by sparsely populated public land administered by the Bureau of Land Management and the U.S. Forest Service. The Second Gas Station CAS was formerly known as the Underground Diesel Tank Site, Sandia Environmental Restoration Site Number 118. The gas station was in use from approximately 1965 to 1980. The USTs were originally thought to be located 11 meters (m) (36 feet [ft]) east of the Old Light Duty Shop, Building 0360, and consisted of one gasoline UST (southern tank) and one diesel UST (northern tank) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The two associated fuel dispensary stations were located northeast (diesel) and southeast (gasoline) of Building 0360 (CAU 423). Presently the site is used as a parking lot, Building 0360 is used for mechanical repairs of vehicles.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ARM - Evaluation Product - Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsCorrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates ProductsCorrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Raw moments from the scanning ARM precipitation radars (SAPRs) are subject to a number of instrumental and atmospheric phenomena that must be retrieved and corrected for. The Corrected Moments in Antenna Coordinates (CMAC) value-added product contains both raw data and fields that have been processed to: · correct for velocity aliasing · unfold and generate a cross-polarimetric phase difference that is monotonically increasing, removing impulses caused by non-uniform beam filling and phase shift on backscatter · recalculate specific differential phase using a 20-point Sobel filter on

200

Spin-wave-induced correction to the conductivity of ferromagnets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We calculate the correction to the conductivity of a disordered ferromagnetic metal due to spin-wave-mediated electron-electron interactions. This correction is the generalization of the Altshuler-Aronov correction to spin-wave-mediated interactions. We derive a general expression for the conductivity correction to lowest order in the spin-wave-mediated interaction and for the limit that the exchange splitting ? is much smaller than the Fermi energy. For a clean ferromagnet with ??el/??1, with ?el being the mean time for impurity scattering, we find a correction ????T5/2 at temperatures T above the spin-wave gap. In the opposite, dirty limit, ??el/??1, the correction is a nonmonotonous function of temperature.

J. Danon; A. Ricottone; P. W. Brouwer

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: 06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area 09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

Alfred Wickline

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 560 is located in Areas 3 and 6 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 560 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 03-51-01, Leach Pit 06-04-02, Septic Tank 06-05-03, Leach Pit 06-05-04, Leach Bed 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 22, 2008, by representatives from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 560.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada, Rev. No.: 3 with Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447, Project Shoal Area (PSA)-Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). Corrective Action Unit 447 is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, approximately 48 kilometers (30 miles) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for CAU 447, as provided in the FFACO. Corrective Action Unit 447 consists of two corrective action sites (CASs): CAS 57-49-01, Emplacement Shaft, and CAS 57-57-001, Cavity. The emplacement shaft (CAS-57-49-01) was backfilled and plugged in 1996 and will not be evaluated further. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at PSA. The original Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for the PSA was approved in September 1996 and described a plan to drill and test four characterization wells, followed by flow and transport modeling (DOE/NV, 1996). The resultant drilling is described in a data report (DOE/NV, 1998e) and the data analysis and modeling in an interim modeling report (Pohll et al., 1998). After considering the results of the modeling effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the degree of uncertainty in transport predictions for PSA remained unacceptably large. As a result, a second CAIP was developed by DOE and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in December 1998 (DOE/NV, 1998a). This plan prescribed a rigorous analysis of uncertainty in the Shoal model and quantification of methods of reducing uncertainty through data collection. This analysis is termed a Data Decision Analysis (Pohll et al., 1999a) and formed the basis for a second major characterization effort at PSA (Pohll et al., 1999b). The details for this second field effort are presented in an Addendum to the CAIP, which was approved by NDEP in April 1999 (DOE/NV, 1999a). Four additional characterization wells were drilled at PSA during summer and fall of 1999; details of the drilling and well installation are in IT Corporation (2000), with testing reported in Mihevc et al. (2000). A key component of the second field program was a tracer test between two of the new wells (Carroll et al., 2000; Reimus et al., 2003). Based on the potential exposure pathways, two corrective action objectives were identified for CAU 447: Prevent or mitigate exposure to groundwater contaminants of concern at concentrations exceeding regulatory maximum contaminant levels or risk-based levels; and Reduce the risk to human health and the environment to the extent practicable. Based on the review of existing data, the results of the modeling, future use, and current operations at PSA, the following alternatives have been developed for consideration at CAU 447: Alternative 1--No Further Action; Alternative 2--Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls; and Alternative 3--Contaminant Control. The corrective action alternatives were evaluated based on the approach outlined in the ''Focused Evaluation of Selected Remedial Alternatives for the Underground Test Area'' (DOE/NV, 1998b). Each alternative was assessed against nine evaluation criteria. These criteria include overall protection of human health and the environment;

Tim Echelard

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spatial Corrections of ROSAT HRI Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray observations with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) often have spatial smearing on the order of 10 arcsec (Morse 1994). This degradation of the intrinsic resolution of the instrument (5 arcsec) can be attributed to errors in the aspect solution associated with the wobble of the space craft or with the reacquisition of the guide stars. We have developed a set of IRAF/PROS and MIDAS/EXSAS routines to minimize these effects. Our procedure attempts to isolate aspect errors that are repeated through each cycle of the wobble. The method assigns a 'wobble phase' to each event based on the 402 second period of the ROSAT wobble. The observation is grouped into a number of phase bins and a centroid is calculated for each sub-image. The corrected HRI event list is reconstructed by adding the sub-images which have been shifted to a common source position. This method has shown approx. 30% reduction of the full width half maximum (FWHM) of an X-ray observation of the radio galaxy 3C 120. Additional examples are presented.

D. E. Harris; J. D. Silverman; G. Hasinger; I. Lehmann

1998-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Factor Compensation (PFC) Power Factor Compensation The power factor (PF) is defined as the ratio between the active power and the apparent power of a system. If the current and voltage are periodic with period , and [ ), then the active power is defined by ( ) ( ) (their inner product

Knobloch,Jürgen

206

Electroweak corrections to decays involving a charged Higgs boson  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present complete one-loop radiative corrections to the decay rate of a top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark, and for the decay of a charged Higgs boson into leptons. The results are discussed in the framework of the two-Higgs-boson extension of the standard model suggested by supersymmetry. The effect of electroweak corrections after exclusion of universal corrections ?r is found to decrease the partial width of the top quark typically by 5%.

Andrzej Czarnecki

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

CORRECTIONS TO A BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM FOR TWO-WAY ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRECTIONS TO A BOUSSINESQ SYSTEM FOR TWO-WAY. PROPAGATION OF NONLINEAR DISPERSIVE WAVES. Page 211, line 20: ?x = ?t + O(?,...

2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Parallel Line Search Subspace Correction Method for Composite ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 7, 2014 ... Abstract: In this paper, we investigate a parallel subspace correction framework for composite convex optimization. The variables are first...

Qian Dong

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Proposed Rule Correction, Federal Register, 75 FR 66008, October...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

a correction to the notice of proposed rulemaking for Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings,...

210

Corrections to the Bjorken and Voloshin sum rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate near zero recoil the order $\\alpha_s$ corrections to the Bjorken and Voloshin sum rules that bound the $B\\to D^{(*)}\\ell\\bar\

C. Glenn Boyd; Zoltan Ligeti; Ira Z. Rothstein; Mark B. Wise

1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

211

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145: Wells and Storage Holes. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 145 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. One conceptual site model with three release scenario components was developed for the six CASs to address all releases associated with the site. The sites will be investigated based on data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 24, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQOs process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 145.

David A. Strand

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units is listed in Appendix III of the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) which was agreed to by the state of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). CAU 543 sites are located in Areas 6 and 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 543 consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): CAS 06-07-01, Decon Pad; CAS 15-01-03, Aboveground Storage Tank; CAS 15-04-01, Septic Tank; CAS 15-05-01, Leachfield; CAS 15-08-01, Liquid Manure Tank; CAS 15-23-01, Underground Radioactive Material Area; and CAS 15-23-03, Contaminated Sump, Piping. All Area 15 CASs are located at the former U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm, which operated from 1963 to 1981 and was used to support animal experiments involving the uptake of radionuclides. Each of the Area 15 CASs, except CAS 15-23-01, is associated with the disposal of waste effluent from Building 15-06, which was the primary location of the various tests and experiments conducted onsite. Waste effluent disposal from Building 15-06 involved piping, sumps, outfalls, a septic tank with leachfield, underground storage tanks, and an aboveground storage tank (AST). CAS 15-23-01 was associated with decontamination activities of farm equipment potentially contaminated with radiological constituents, pesticides, and herbicides. While the building structures were removed before the investigation took place, all the original tanks, sumps, piping, and concrete building pads remain in place. The Area 6 CAS is located at the Decontamination Facility in Area 6, a facility which operated from 1971 to 2001 and was used to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, clothing, and other materials that had become contaminated during nuclear testing activities. The CAS includes the effluent collection and distribution systems for Buildings 6-605, 6-606, and 6-607, which consists of septic tanks, sumps, piping, floor drains, drain trenches, cleanouts, and a concrete foundation. Additional details of the site history are provided in the CAU 543 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2004a), and the CAU 543 Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (NNSA/NSO, 2005).

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Security Protocols and Their Correctness 1 L. C. Paulson Security Protocols and Their Correctness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Secrecy: who can receive it? Threats: Active attacker Careless & compromised agents . . . NO code and Their Correctness 7 L. C. Paulson Lowe's Attack in Detail 67 8 9 @A BC¨D E F 8 CG H I 6QP 7 @ R 8 S 9 TA BC¨D E F 8 CG H U VP 7 T 9 @ R 8 S A BC¨D E FD WCG H X V7 @ 9 8A BC¨D E FD WCG H X Y7 8 9 @A BC¨D WCG H I YP 7

Paulson, Lawrence C.

214

The orifice expansion correction for a 50 mm line size at various diameter ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expansion coefficient or factor for a compressible flowmeter corrects for the change in pressure and density as the fluid is accelerated through the flowmeter. The expansion correction currently in use in the United States and also in other countries was developed over fifty years ago by Buckingham and Bean. More recent work reported by Kinghorn shows the equation currently in use to be in error. This paper describes the results of a test program to determine the expansion factors for flange-tapped sharp-edged orifices with diameter ratios between 0.242 and 0.726 in a nominal 50 mm (2 inch) line. Critical flow Venturis are used as the reference standards and dry air as the flowing fluid. The ratio of differential pressure to inlet static pressure is varied over a range of zero to about 0.2 at a constant Reynolds number. The expansion factor is determined form the apparent change in discharge coefficient at a constant Reynolds number.

Seidl, W. [Colorado Engineering Experiment Station, Inc., Nunn, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Self-interaction corrections in density functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-interaction corrections for Kohn-Sham density functional theory are reviewed for their physical meanings, formulations, and applications. The self-interaction corrections get rid of the self-interaction error, which is the sum of the Coulomb and exchange self-interactions that remains because of the use of an approximate exchange functional. The most frequently used self-interaction correction is the Perdew-Zunger correction. However, this correction leads to instabilities in the electronic state calculations of molecules. To avoid these instabilities, several self-interaction corrections have been developed on the basis of the characteristic behaviors of self-interacting electrons, which have no two-electron interactions. These include the von Weizscker kinetic energy and long-range (far-from-nucleus) asymptotic correction. Applications of self-interaction corrections have shown that the self-interaction error has a serious effect on the states of core electrons, but it has a smaller than expected effect on valence electrons. This finding is supported by the fact that the distribution of self-interacting electrons indicates that they are near atomic nuclei rather than in chemical bonds.

Tsuneda, Takao, E-mail: ttsuneda@yamanashi.ac.jp [Fuel Cell Nanomaterials Center, University of Yamanashi, Kofu 400-0021 (Japan)] [Fuel Cell Nanomaterials Center, University of Yamanashi, Kofu 400-0021 (Japan); Hirao, Kimihiko [Computational Chemistry Unit, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)] [Computational Chemistry Unit, RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Quantum Error Correction of Continuous Variable States against Gaussian Noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a continuous variable error correction protocol that can correct the Gaussian noise induced by linear loss on Gaussian states. The protocol can be implemented using linear optics and photon counting. We explore the theoretical bounds of the protocol as well as the expected performance given current knowledge and technology.

T. C. Ralph

2011-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

Correctness of Source-Level Safety Policies Ewen Denney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

safety policy. Recent work has thus concentrated on ways to guarantee the correctness of safety policies safety policies [13]. However, all these approaches work on the object code level, and cannot di- rectlyCorrectness of Source-Level Safety Policies Ewen Denney and Bernd Fischer QSS / RIACS NASA Ames

218

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall provide Connecticut Department of Correction (CDOC) inmates with basic concepts related to preventive health maintenance, including health education services and training in self-care

Oliver, Douglas L.

219

Construction of Anatomically Correct Models of Mouse Brain Networks 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Construction of Anatomically Correct Models of Mouse Brain Networks 1 B. H. McCormick a, W. Koh a Y and Public Health, Texas A&M University, 4458 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4458 Abstract The Mouse Brain Web, a federated database, provides for the construction of anatomically correct models of mouse brain

Choe, Yoonsuck

220

Audio quality for a simple forward error correcting code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio quality for a simple forward error correcting code Yvan Calas LIRMM - University the audio quality offered by a simple Forward Error Correction (FEC) code used in audio applications like Freephone or Rat. This coding technique consists in adding to every audio packet a redundant information

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 263: Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, March 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 263, the Area 25 Building 4839 Leachfield, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the US Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 263 is comprised of the Corrective Action Site 25-05-04 sanitary leachfield and associated collection system. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1998d). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at Leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 263. Corrective Action Unit 263 is located southwest of Building 4839, in the Central Propellant Storage Area. Operations in Building 4839 from 1968 to 1996 resulted in effluent releases to the leachfield and associated collection system. In general, effluent released to the leachfield consisted of sanitary wastewater from a toilet, urinal, lavatory, and drinking fountain located within Building 4839. The subsurface soils in the vicinity of the collection system and leachfield may have been impacted by effluent containing contaminants of potential concern generated by support activities associated with the Building 4839 operations.

ITLV

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program." Guidance on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) More Documents & Publications Application of NEPA to CERCLA and RCRA Cleanup Actions

223

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Guidance on NEPA Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) This guidance results from the work of a Task Team formed by DOE's Environmental Management's NEPA Compliance Officer to study streamlining the NEPA process for RCRA corrective actions, in response to a recommendation in the National Academy of Sciences Report on "Improving the Environment: An Evaluation of DOE'S Environmental Management Program." Guidance on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review for Corrective Actions under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) More Documents & Publications Application of NEPA to CERCLA and RCRA Cleanup Actions

224

Calibration data for improved correction of uvw propeller anemometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind turbine test programs sponsored by the US DOE in the late 1980s called for measurement of three-dimensional turbulent wind with an accuracy not previously required. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified the need for more complete, more highly resolved, and more accurate calibrations to provide the new level of measurement capability. The uvw propeller anemometer, became the object of a unique calibration effort at a large wind tunnel at Colorado State University. A uvw anemometer, will all three propellers active, was installed in the wind tunnel on a digitally stepped two-axis rotary platform placed just below the tunnel floor. The azimuth and elevation of the anemometer in a steady wind at each of a selected set of speeds was stepped through a complete test program using a digital computer as controller and a digital data acquisition system to sample and filter the data. Tests were run using polypropylene and carbon fiber propellers. In addition, the effects of attaching shaft extensions'' to the polypropylene propellers were measured. Calibrations for the polypropylene four-blade propeller provide an improved level of detail and repeatability. The uvw propeller anemometer is quite accurate at all wind angles and speeds to be experienced in wind energy studies, including winds blowing at right angles to the axis of rotation of a propeller. The new correction factors derived from these data eliminate previous difficulties in accuracy and speed of data reduction from voltages to wind speed components. Calibration data for a carbon-fiber thermoplastic propeller are presented with resolution similar to that for the polypropylene propellers. 8 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

Connell, J.R. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)); Morris, V.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Explain cosmic acceleration? First, correct Einstein  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In creating his gravitational field equations Einstein unjustifiedly assumed that inertial mass, and its energy equivalent, is a source of gravity. Denying this assumption allows modifying the field equations to a form in which a positive cosmological constant appears as a uniform density of gravitationally repulsive matter. This repulsive matter is identified as the back sides of the 'drainholes' (called by some 'traversable wormholes') introduced by the author in 1973, which attract on the high, front sides and repel more strongly on the low, back sides. The field equations with a scalar field added produce cosmological models that 'bounce' off a positive minimum of the scale factor and accelerate throughout history. The 'dark drainholes' that radiate nothing visible are hypothesized to constitute the 'dark matter' inferred from observation, their excess of negative active mass over positive active mass driving the accelerating expansion. For a universe with spatial curvature zero, and the ratio of scale fa...

Ellis, H G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A PM10 emission factor for free stall dairies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately 1840 head of milking cattle. The field sampling results were used in the EPA approved dispersion model Industrial Source Complex Short Term version 3 (ISCST-v3) to estimate emission fluxes and ultimately a seasonally corrected emission factor for a...

Goodrich, Lee Barry

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

227

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 18-22-05, Drum 18-22-06, Drums (20) 18-22-08, Drum 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

Patrick Matthews

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Errata Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's corrective action alternative recommendation for each of the corrective action sites (CASs) within Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. An evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of current and future operations at each CAS, and a detailed comparative analysis of potential corrective action alternatives were used to determine the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. There are six CASs in CAU 204, which are all located between Areas 1, 2, 3, and 5 on the NTS. The No Further Action alternative was recommended for CASs 01-34-01, 02-34-01, 03-34-01, and 05-99-02; and a Closure in Place with Administrative Controls recommendation was the preferred corrective action for CASs 05-18-02 and 05-33-01. These alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated as well as applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media at CAU 204.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151, Septic Systems and Discharge Area, is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). CAU 151 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557 is located in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 01-25-02, Fuel Spill 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST 06-99-10, Tar Spills 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 3, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 557. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 557 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological survey at CAS 25-25-18. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Alfred Wickline

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 139 is comprised of the seven corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-35-01, Burn Pit; (2) 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; (3) 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; (4) 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; (5) 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; (6) 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and (7) 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives with the exception of CASs 09-23-01 and 09-34-01. Regarding these two CASs, CAS 09-23-01 is a gravel gertie where a zero-yield test was conducted with all contamination confined to below ground within the area of the structure, and CAS 09-34-01 is an underground detection station where no contaminants are present. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the other five CASs where information is insufficient. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 4, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 139.

Grant Evenson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Management of corrective action wastes pursuant to proposed Subpart S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 3004(u) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), owners/operators of permitted or interim status treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are required to perform corrective action to address releases of hazardous waste or hazardous constituents from solid waste management units (SWMUs). On July 27, 1990, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed specific corrective action requirements under Part 264, Subpart S of Title 40 of the code of Federal Regulations (CFR). One portion of this proposed rule, addressing requirements applicable to corrective action management units (CAMUs) and temporary units (TUs), was finalized on February 16, 1993 (58 FR 8658 et seq.). (CAMUs and TUs are RCRA waste management units that are specifically designated for the management of corrective action wastes). Portions of the proposed Subpart S rule that address processes for the investigation and cleanup of releases to environmental media have not yet been finalized. EPA and authorized State agencies, however, are currently using the investigation and cleanup procedures of the proposed rule as a framework for implementation of RCRA`s corrective action requirements. The performance of corrective action cleanup activities generates wastes that have to be characterized and managed in accordance with applicable RCRA requirements. This Information Brief describes these requirements. It is one of a series of information Briefs on RCRA Corrective Action.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 562: Waste Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 562 is located in Areas 2, 23, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 562 is comprised of the 13 corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 02-26-11, Lead Shot 02-44-02, Paint Spills and French Drain 02-59-01, Septic System 02-60-01, Concrete Drain 02-60-02, French Drain 02-60-03, Steam Cleaning Drain 02-60-04, French Drain 02-60-05, French Drain 02-60-06, French Drain 02-60-07, French Drain 23-60-01, Mud Trap Drain and Outfall 23-99-06, Grease Trap 25-60-04, Building 3123 Outfalls These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 11, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 562. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 562 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the nature and extent of any contamination released by each CAS. Collect samples of source material to determine the potential for a release. Collect samples of potential remediation wastes. Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; DOE, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Alfred Wickline

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Power Corrections in Electron-Positron Annihilation: Experimental Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental studies of power corrections with e+e- data are reviewed. An overview of the available data for jet and event shape observables is given and recent analyses based on the Dokshitzer-Marchesini-Webber (DMW) model of power corrections are summarised. The studies involve both distributions of the observables and their mean values. The agreement between perturbative QCD combined with DMW power corrections and the data is generally good, and the few exceptions are discussed. The use of low energy data sets highlights deficiencies in the existing calculations for some observables. A study of the finiteness of the physical strong coupling at low energies using hadronic $\\tau$ decays is shown.

Kluth, S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Power Corrections in Electron-Positron Annihilation: Experimental Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental studies of power corrections with e+e- data are reviewed. An overview of the available data for jet and event shape observables is given and recent analyses based on the Dokshitzer-Marchesini-Webber (DMW) model of power corrections are summarised. The studies involve both distributions of the observables and their mean values. The agreement between perturbative QCD combined with DMW power corrections and the data is generally good, and the few exceptions are discussed. The use of low energy data sets highlights deficiencies in the existing calculations for some observables. A study of the finiteness of the physical strong coupling at low energies using hadronic $\\tau$ decays is shown.

Stefan Kluth

2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

236

Quantum Corrections in String Compactifications on SU(3) Structure Geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate quantum corrections to the classical four-dimensional low-energy effective action of type II string theory compactified on SU(3) structure geometries. Various methods previously developed for Calabi-Yau compactifications are adopted to determine - under some simple assumptions about the low-energy degrees of freedom - the leading perturbative corrections to the moduli space metrics in both alpha' and the string coupling constant. We find - in complete analogy to the Calabi-Yau case - that the corrections take a universal form dependent only on the Euler characteristic of the six-dimensional compact space.

Mariana Grana; Jan Louis; Ulrich Theis; Daniel Waldram

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Corrections to the Electroweak Effective Action at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate contributions to the finite temperature effective action for the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) at $\\O(g^4)$, {\\it i.e.} at second order in $(g^2 T/\\M)$ and all orders in $(g^2 T^2/\\M^2)$. This requires plasma-mass corrections in the calculation of the effective potential, inclusion of the ``lollipop'' diagram, and an estimate of derivative corrections. We find the EWPT remains too weakly first-order to drive baryogenesis. We calculate some one loop kinetic energy corrections using both functional and diagrammatic methods; these may be important for saddlepoint configurations such as the bounce or sphaleron.

C. G. Boyd; D. E. Brahm; S. D. H. Hsu

1992-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 365: Baneberry Contamination Area, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 365 comprises one corrective action site (CAS), CAS 08-23-02, U-8d Contamination Area. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for the CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 6, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for the Baneberry site. The primary release associated with Corrective Action Unit 365 was radiological contamination from the Baneberry nuclear test. Baneberry was an underground weapons-related test that vented significant quantities of radioactive gases from a fissure located in close proximity to ground zero. A crater formed shortly after detonation, which stemmed part of the flow from the fissure. The scope of this investigation includes surface and shallow subsurface (less than 15 feet below ground surface) soils. Radionuclides from the Baneberry test with the potential to impact groundwater are included within the Underground Test Area Subproject. Investigations and corrective actions associated with the Underground Test Area Subproject include the radiological inventory resulting from the Baneberry test.

Patrick Matthews

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Litchfield Correctional Center Sector Geothermal energy Type District Heating Location Susanville, California Coordinates 40.4162842°, -120.6530063° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

240

Purchasing Power Parity: Error Correction Models and Structural Breaks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines purchasing power parity (PPP) behavior using error correction models (ECM) and allowing for structural breaks. We distinguish four different objectives: first, this paper examines which var...

Amalia Morales Zumaquero; Rodrigo Peruga Urrea

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

CONCEPTUAL: A Network Correctness and Performance Testing Language Scott Pakin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONCEPTUAL: A Network Correctness and Performance Testing Language Scott Pakin CCS-3: Modeling by a running application. Con- sider, for example, a bandwidth benchmark, which purport- edly measures data

242

Correction for energy of large nuclei in Brueckner's theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper supplements the calculation of corrections giving the difference between the true energy of the atomic nucleus and its model, performed by various authors according to Brueckner's theory. It is seen tha...

A. Kujanov-Zentkov

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Black hole quantum tunnelling and black hole entropy correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parikh-Wilczek tunnelling framework, which treats Hawking radiation as a tunnelling process, is investigated again. As the first order correction, the log-corrected entropy-area relation naturally emerges in the tunnelling picture if we consider the emission of a spherical shell. The second order correction of the emission rate for the Schwarzschild black hole is calculated too. In this level, the result is still in agreement with the unitary theory, however, the entropy of the black hole will contain three parts: the usual Bekenstein-Hawking entropy, the logarithmic term and the inverse area term. In our results the coefficient of the logarithmic term is -1. Apart from a coefficient, Our correction to the black hole entropy is consistent with that of loop quantum gravity.

Jingyi Zhang

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Robotic Ureteral Reimplant Surgery to Correct Reflux Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atala et al. initially described the laparoscopic approach for the correction of vesicoureteral reflux over a decade ago in animals [1]. The technique was subsequently modified by several other investigators i...

Craig A. Peters; Ryan P. Smith

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Face recognition with disparity corrected gabor phase differences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the relative relevance of Gabor amplitudes and phases for face recognition. We propose an algorithm to reliably estimate offset point disparities from phase differences and show that disparity-corrected Gabor phase differences are well suited ...

Manuel Gnther; Dennis Haufe; Rolf P. Wrtz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Correctness of depiction in planar diagrams of spatial figures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that it is possible to decide whether a given planar diagram correctly depicts the spatial figure consisting of a planar quadrangle together with its shadow in another plane.

P. L. Robinson

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

Unconditionally Stable Pressure-Correction Schemes for a Linear ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FSI problem with a fixed interface, and prove rigorously that they are ... on the standard pressure-correction which leads to poor accuracy at the open ... in a two

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Computer correction of resistance errors in polarization data. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RESIST is a short microcomputer program that detects and corrects resistance (IR) errors in cathodic polarization data. It requires a minute or less to calculate the corrosion rate, the cathodic Tafel constant, and the resistance.

Gandhi, R.H.; Greene, N.D.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reactive scattering in the bending-corrected rotating linear model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the theory and applications of the Bending-Corrected Rotating Linear Model (BCRLM) to problems in the quantum description of reactions between atoms and diatomic molecules. 110 refs.

Walker, R.B.; Hayes, E.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

SCALE-CORRECTED ENSEMBLE KALMAN FILTER FOR OBSERVATIONS OF PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to introduce bias in production forecasts. The Scale-Corrected Ensemble Kalman Filter (SCEnKF) is a method is pressure at time t. Reservoir production properties at time t, such as gas-oil ratio (gor), bottom hole

Eidsvik, Jo

251

Correction for King, Introduction: energy for a sustainable future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for King, Introduction: energy for a sustainable future David A. King Correction for Introduction: energy for a sustainable future by David A. King...1954) Introduction: energy for a sustainable future BY DAVID A. KING...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 573: Alpha Contaminated Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 573 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 573 is a grouping of sites where there has been a suspected release of contamination associated with non-nuclear experiments and nuclear testing. This document describes the planned investigation of CAU 573, which comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An error correcting procedure for imperfect supervised, nonparametric classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN ERROR CORRECTING PROCEDJJRE FOR IMPERFECTI, Y SUPERVISED, NONPARAMETRIC CLASSIFICATION A Thesis by DENNIS RAY FERRELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...) (Head f Depart en ) (Member) (Member) PE y (Memb ei) (Member) August 1973 ABSTRACT An Error Correcting Procedure For Imperfectly Supervised, Nonparametric Classification (August 1973) Dennis Ray Ferrell, B. S. , I, omar University Directed by...

Ferrell, Dennis Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Effect of absorptive corrections on inclusive parton distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of absorptive corrections due to parton recombination on the parton distributions of the proton. A more precise version of the GLRMQ equations, which account for non-linear corrections to DGLAP evolution, is derived. An analysis of HERA F_2 data shows that the small-x gluon distribution is enhanced at low scales when the absorptive effects are included, such that a negative gluon distribution at 1 GeV is no longer required.

G. Watt; A. D. Martin; M. G. Ryskin

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of absorptive corrections on inclusive parton distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the effect of absorptive corrections due to parton recombination on the parton distributions of the proton. A more precise version of the GLRMQ equations, which account for non-linear corrections to DGLAP evolution, is derived. An analysis of HERA F_2 data shows that the small-x gluon distribution is enhanced at low scales when the absorptive effects are included, such that a negative gluon distribution at 1 GeV is no longer required.

Watt, G; Ryskin, M G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hole Self-Energy Corrections in the Brueckner Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To study corrections to hole propagators in Brueckner theory, an extension of the Hugenholtz convolution theorem is proved. An integral equation is derived for a class of Brueckner hole corrections and approximate solutions are obtained, one of which gives the usual prescription that makes holes propagate on the energy shell. The derivation shows which class of diagrams are included in this prescription and suggests that a more accurate treatment might be needed.

J. Nuttall

1966-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Cosmic dynamics with entropy corrected holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the model of holographic dark energy with logarithmic correction to its energy density. This modification is motivated from the loop quantum gravity corrections to the entropy-area law. We also consider an interaction between dark energy and dark matter. The behavior of the Hubble parameter (specially in the late time) is studied. Besides, conditions under which an accelerated universe can decelerate and also successive acceleration-deceleration phases can be occurred in the evolution of the universe is investigated.

Sadjadi, H Mohseni

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

Chitanvis, S M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Systematic quantum corrections to screening in thermonuclear fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a series expansion of the plasma screening length away from the classical limit in powers of $\\hbar^{2}$. It is shown that the leading order quantum correction increases the screening length in solar conditions by approximately 2% while it decreases the fusion rate by approximately $ 0.34%$. We also calculate the next higher order quantum correction which turns out to be approximately 0.05%.

Shirish M. Chitanvis

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

Simultaneous observations of H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions at two altitudes by the Akebono and dynamics explorer 1 satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report simultaneous observations of H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions from the suprathermal ion mass spectrometer (SMS) on Akebono and the energetic ion composition spectrometer (EICS) on Dynamics Explorer 1. These observations were made simultaneously above and below regions of ion acceleration on auroral and polar cap magnetic field lines. The evening auroral zone data reported here directly confirm the existence of an ionospheric preenergization mechanism for oxygen ions. The preenergized oxygen ions have characteristic energies of the order of 10 eV and are transported to altitudes of several thousand kilometers where they acquire significant additional energy. Nearly simultaneous observations of O{sup +} ions on polar cap field lines near the cusp/cleft region reveal two distinct populations. The first population is energized at altitudes of a few thousand kilometers and transported up and into the polar cap by the combination of the effects of the gradient in the magnetic field and the prevailing magnetospheric convection field. The second population has significantly more energy than the first. This second population could arise through several mechanisms, which are identified and discussed. The data presented illustrate that the creation (energization) and transport of streams of upflowing ions in the polar cap is more complex than previously anticipated and point to the importance and present limited knowledge of ionospheric processes responsible for the pre-energization of oxygen ions. 44 refs., 6 refs., 2 tabs.

Peterson, W.K. [Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Yau, A.W.; Whalen, B.A. [National Research Council, Ontario (Canada)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Jump to: navigation, search Name NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Facility NCCI Gardner Dept of Correction Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Department of Corrections - Division of Capital Asset Management for the Commonwealth of MA Developer Department of Corrections - Division of Capital Asset Management for the Commonwealth of MA Energy Purchaser Distributed generation - net metered Location Westminster MA Coordinates 42.5800093°, -71.93783283° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5800093,"lon":-71.93783283,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Relativistic corrections and non-Gaussianity in radio continuum surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forthcoming radio continuum surveys will cover large volumes of the observable Universe and will reach to high redshifts, making them potentially powerful probes of dark energy, modified gravity and non-Gaussianity. We consider the continuum surveys with LOFAR, WSRT and ASKAP, and examples of continuum surveys with the SKA. We extend recent work on these surveys by including redshift space distortions and lensing convergence in the radio source auto-correlation. In addition we compute the general relativistic (GR) corrections to the angular power spectrum. These GR corrections to the standard Newtonian analysis of the power spectrum become significant on scales near and beyond the Hubble scale at each redshift. We find that the GR corrections are at most percent-level in LOFAR, WODAN and EMU surveys, but they can produce O(10%) changes for high enough sensitivity SKA continuum surveys. The signal is however dominated by cosmic variance, and multiple-tracer techniques will be needed to overcome this problem. The GR corrections are suppressed in continuum surveys because of the integration over redshift we expect that GR corrections will be enhanced for future SKA HI surveys in which the source redshifts will be known. We also provide predictions for the angular power spectra in the case where the primordial perturbations have local non-Gaussianity. We find that non-Gaussianity dominates over GR corrections, and rises above cosmic variance when f{sub NL}?>5 for SKA continuum surveys.

Maartens, Roy [Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Cape Town 7535 (South Africa); Zhao, Gong-Bo; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Raccanelli, Alvise, E-mail: Roy.Maartens@port.ac.uk, E-mail: Gong-bo.Zhao@port.ac.uk, E-mail: David.Bacon@port.ac.uk, E-mail: Kazuya.Koyama@port.ac.uk, E-mail: alvise@caltech.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91109 (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed.

FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

264

Power Factor Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power factor control is a necessary ingredient in any successful Energy Management Program. Many companies are operating with power factors of 70% or less and are being penalized through the electrical utility bill. This paper starts by describing...

Viljoen, T. A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370, T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, located in Area 4 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 370 due to the implementation of the corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from June 25, 2008, through April 2, 2009, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site and Record of Technical Change No. 1.

Patrick Matthews

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Harmonic mean, the Gamma factor and Speed of Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relationship between the harmonic mean and special relativity is concisely elucidated. The arguments in favor and against SRT are explored. It is shown that the ratio of the speed of light to the harmonic mean of the onward and return speeds of light in a moving frame under Newtonian mechanics, when equitably distributed between space and time as a correction, leads to the Lorentz transformation. This correction implies an apparent contraction of objects and time dilation. However, the symmetry of the onward and inverse transformations give a different meaning to the gamma factor

Chandru Iyer

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190 is located in Areas 11 and 14 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge; (2) 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall; (3) 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System; and (4) 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area. These sites are being investigated because existing information is insufficient on the nature and extent of potential contamination to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI). The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on August 24, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 190. The scope of the CAU 190 CAI includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling; (2) Conduct radiological and geophysical surveys; (3) Perform field screening; (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (5) If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the lateral and vertical extent of the contamination; (6) Collect samples of source material, if present, to determine the potential for a release; (7) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes; and (8) Collect quality control samples. This Corrective Action Investigation Document (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy, and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the FFACO, this CAIP will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval.

Wickline, Alfred

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 563: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU)563, Septic Systems, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended January 2007). The corrective action sites (CASs) for CAU 563 are located in Areas3 and 12 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and are comprised of the following four sites: 03-04-02, Area 3 Subdock Septic Tank 03-59-05, Area 3 Subdock Cesspool 12-59-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Septic Tanks 12-60-01, Drilling/Welding Shop Outfalls The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the four CASs within CAU 563. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from July 17 through November 19, 2007, as set forth in the CAU 563 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2007). Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the contaminants of concern (COCs) for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 563 and required the evaluation of CAAs. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 563 revealed the following: CASs 03-04-02, 03-59-05, and 12-60-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. CAS 12-59-01 contains arsenic and chromium contamination above FALs in surface and near-surface soils surrounding a stained location within the site. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at CAS 12-59-01, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 563.

Grant Evenson

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, CAU 232 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 232. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the July 1999 corrective action investigation (CAI) activities disclosed no evidence of contamination at the site. Contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) addressed during the CAI included total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, total herbicides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline and diesel/oil range), polychlorinated biphenyls, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data confirmed that none of the COPCs identified exceeded preliminary action levels outlined in the CAIP; therefore, no corrective actions were necessary for CAU 232. After the CAI, best management practice activities were completed and included installation of a fence and signs to limit access to the lagoons, cementing Manhole No. 2 and the diverter box, and closing off influent and effluent ends of the sewage lagoon piping. As a result of the CAI, the DOE/NV recommended that: (1) no further actions were required; (2) no Corrective Action Plan would be required; and (3) no use restrictions were required to be placed on the CAU.

US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 240, Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, which is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

DOE/NV

1999-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

273

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 528, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination (PCBs), Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in the southwestern portion of Area 25 on the NTS in Jackass Flats (adjacent to Test Cell C [TCC]), CAU 528 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-27-03, Polychlorinated Biphenyls Surface Contamination. Test Cell C was built to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (operational between 1959 and 1973) activities including conducting ground tests and static firings of nuclear engine reactors. Although CAU 528 was not considered as a direct potential source of PCBs and petroleum contamination, two potential sources of contamination have nevertheless been identified from an unknown source in concentrations that could potentially pose an unacceptable risk to human health and/or the environment. This CAU's close proximity to TCC prompted Shaw to collect surface soil samples, which have indicated the presence of PCBs extending throughout the area to the north, east, south, and even to the edge of the western boundary. Based on this information, more extensive field investigation activities are being planned, the results of which are to be used to support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

Prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) in computed tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Image quality in computed tomography (CT) often suffers from artifacts which may reduce the diagnostic value of the image. In many cases, these artifacts result from missing or corrupt regions in the projection data, e.g., in the case of metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts. The authors propose a generalized correction method for different kinds of artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data by making use of available prior knowledge to perform data completion. Methods: The proposed prior-based artifact correction (PBAC) method requires prior knowledge in form of a planning CT of the same patient or in form of a CT scan of a different patient showing the same body region. In both cases, the prior image is registered to the patient image using a deformable transformation. The registered prior is forward projected and data completion of the patient projections is performed using smooth sinogram inpainting. The obtained projection data are used to reconstruct the corrected image. Results: The authors investigate metal and truncation artifacts in patient data sets acquired with a clinical CT and limited angle artifacts in an anthropomorphic head phantom data set acquired with a gantry-based flat detector CT device. In all cases, the corrected images obtained by PBAC are nearly artifact-free. Compared to conventional correction methods, PBAC achieves better artifact suppression while preserving the patient-specific anatomy at the same time. Further, the authors show that prominent anatomical details in the prior image seem to have only minor impact on the correction result. Conclusions: The results show that PBAC has the potential to effectively correct for metal, truncation, and limited angle artifacts if adequate prior data are available. Since the proposed method makes use of a generalized algorithm, PBAC may also be applicable to other artifacts resulting from missing or corrupt data.

Heuer, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.heusser@dkfz-heidelberg.de; Brehm, Marcus [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ritschl, Ludwig [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustrae 31, 90451 Nrnberg (Germany)] [Ziehm Imaging GmbH, Donaustrae 31, 90451 Nrnberg (Germany); Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrie, Marc [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexanderUniversity (FAU) of ErlangenNrnberg, Henkestrae 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)] [Medical Physics in Radiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany and Institute of Medical Physics, FriedrichAlexanderUniversity (FAU) of ErlangenNrnberg, Henkestrae 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Corrective action investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 342, the Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (FTP), which is located in Area 23 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 88 km (55 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of CAS 23-56-01. The FTP is an area approximately 100 m by 140 m (350 ft by 450 ft) located west of the town of Mercury, Nevada, which was used between approximately 1965 and 1990 to train fire-fighting personnel (REECo, 1991; Jacobson, 1991). The surface and subsurface soils in the FTP have likely been impacted by hydrocarbons and other contaminants of potential concern (COPC) associated with burn activities and training exercises in the area.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The role of research evidence in school improvement : a case study of corrective action schools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

knowledge, and innovation through the social networks inand innovation diffused throughout corrective action schools through socialand innovation diffused throughout corrective action schools through social

Salas, Minerva

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based...

279

ARM - Evaluation Product - KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections ProductsKAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : KAZR and MWACR Ship Motion Corrections 2012.09.22 - 2013.01.08 Site(s) MAG General Description The second ARM mobile facility has been configured to take advantage of ship-board deployments. At issue is how the motion at sea during these deployments affects the vertically-pointing cloud radars. Two radars of this type - the Ka-band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) and the Marine W-band ARM Cloud Radar (MWACR) - are instruments used in ARM's first ship-based field campaign. Each of these radars requires post-processing to account for the ship's motion across the open ocean. The primary adjustments that must be

280

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Instrument Series: Microscopy Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aberration-Corrected Aberration-Corrected Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscope EMSL's aberration-corrected Titan 80-300(tm) scanning/transmission electron microscope (S/TEM) provides high-resolution imaging with sub-angstrom resolution and spectroscopic capabilities. This state-of-the-art instrument is equipped with a Schottky field-emission electron source, an electron gun monochromator, CEOS hexapole spherical aberration corrector for the probe-forming lens, high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector, an X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and a high-resolution Gatan Imaging Filter (GIF). The selection of electron energy between 80 kV and 300 kV enables optimized imaging for a variety of samples, including electron beam sensitive materials. Research Applications

282

Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility Idaho Site Launches Corrective Actions Before Restarting Waste Treatment Facility September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. Pictured here is the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit's off-gas filter following the June incident. A view of the process piping installations prior to startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit.

283

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work Quality Assurance Program Undergoes Sound Changes to Ensure Safe, Correct Work August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Completing the world's largest nuclear cleanup safely and correctly is EM's priority. In support of that central mission, EM recently made changes that strengthen its corporate quality assurance program, marking the first revisions to the quality program since EM established it in 2008. The program provides the foundation for achieving quality through a consistent approach to all mission-related work across the EM complex. EM believes the changes greatly advance EM's quality assurance program, serving to enhance the abilities of EM employees and contractors to ensure

284

On Corrections to the Born-Oppenheimer Approximation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents a new approach for treating the coupling of electrons and nuclei in quantum mechanical calculations for molecules and condensed matter. It includes the standard "Born-Oppenheimer approximation" as a special case but treats both adiabatic and non-adiabatic corrections using perturbation theory. The adiabatic corrections include all terms that do not explicitly involve the nuclear wavefunctions, so that the nuclei move on a single electronic potential surface. The non-adiabatic corrections, which allow the nuclei to move on more than one potential surface, include coupling between the electronic and nuclear wavefunctions. The method is related to an approach first proposed by Born and Huang, but it differs in the methodology and in the definition of the electronic wavefunctions and potential surfaces. A simple example is worked out to illustrate the mechanics of the technique. The report also includes a review of previous work.

Gerald I. Kerley

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Interacting entropy-corrected holographic Chaplygin gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Holographic dark energy (HDE), presents a dynamical view of dark energy which is consistent with the observational data and has a solid theoretical background. Its definition follows from the entropy-area relation $S(A)$, where $S$ and $A$ are entropy and area respectively. In the framework of loop quantum gravity, a modified definition of HDE called "entropy-corrected holographic dark energy" (ECHDE) has been proposed recently to explain dark energy with the help of quantum corrections to the entropy-area relation. Using this new definition, we establish a correspondence between modified variable Chaplygin gas, new modified Chaplygin gas and the viscous generalized Chaplygin gas with the entropy corrected holographic dark energy and reconstruct the corresponding scalar potentials which describe the dynamics of the scalar field.

M. Umar Farooq; Muneer A. Rashid; Mubasher Jamil

2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAU 104 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These 15 CASs include releases from 30 atmospheric tests conducted in the approximately 1 square mile of CAU 104. Because releases associated with the CASs included in this CAU overlap and are not separate and distinguishable, these CASs are addressed jointly at the CAU level. The purpose of this CADD/CAP is to evaluate potential corrective action alternatives (CAAs), provide the rationale for the selection of recommended CAAs, and provide the plan for implementation of the recommended CAA for CAU 104. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 4, 2011, through May 3, 2012, as set forth in the CAU 104 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

Patrick Matthews

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 565: Stored Samples, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 565 is located in Area 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 565 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS) listed--CAS 26-99-04, Ground Zero Soil Samples. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend closure of CAU 565. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating closure objectives and selecting the appropriate corrective action. The results of the field investigation will support closure and waste management decisions that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on June 1, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was utilized to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate closure for CAU 565. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to this CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 565 includes the following activities: (1) Remove stored samples, shelves, and debris from the interior of Building 26-2106. (2) Perform field screening on stored samples, shelves, and debris. (3) Dispose of stored samples, shelves, and debris. (4) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes. (5) Conduct radiological surveys of Building 26-2106 in accordance with the requirements in the ''NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual'' to determine if there is residual radiological contamination that would prevent the release of the building for unrestricted use. This Corrective Action Investigation has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Wickline, Alfred; McCall, Robert

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. 0)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 409 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1; TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2; and RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site. The Septic Sludge Disposal Pits are located near Bunker Two, close to Area 3, on the Tonopah Test Range. The Battery Dump Site is located at the abandoned Cactus Repeater Station on Cactus Peak. The Cactus Repeater Station was a remote, battery-powered, signal repeater station. The two Septic Sludge Disposal Pits were suspected to be used through the late 1980s as disposal sites for sludge from septic tanks located in Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern are the same for the disposal pits and include: volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides (including plutonium and depleted uranium). The Battery Dump Site consists of discarded lead-acid batteries and associated construction debris, placing the site in a Housekeeping Category and, consequently, no contaminants are expected to be encountered during the cleanup process. The corrective action the at this CAU will include collection of discarded batteries and construction debris at the Battery Dump Site for proper disposal and recycling, along with photographic documentation as the process progresses. The corrective action for the remaining CASs involves the collection of background radiological data through borings drilled at undisturbed locations near the area of the disposal pits; field screening samples for radiological constituents; analysis for geotechnical/hydrologic parameters of samples beneath the disposal pits; and bioassessment samples, if VOC or TPH contamination concentrations exceed field-screening levels. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Environmental Assessment for Prposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for for Proposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures at the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Plant Amarillo, Texas February 2007 BWXT Pantex, L.L.C. Pantex Plant P.O. Box 30020 Amarillo, Texas 79120 P A N T E X P L A N T U.S. Department of Energy/ National Nuclear Security Administration February 2007 Environmental Assessment for Proposed Perched Groundwater Corrective Measures i TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES ..........................................................................................................................................iii LIST OF TABLES............................................................................................................................................iii

291

Isospin-mixing corrections for fp-shell Fermi transitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Isospin-mixing corrections for superallowed Fermi transitions in fp-shell nuclei are computed within the framework of the shell model. The study includes three nuclei that are part of the set of nine accurately measured transitions as well as five cases that are expected to be measured in the future at radioactive-beam facilities. We also include some new calculations for C10. With the isospin-mixing corrections applied to the nine accurately measured ft values, the conserved-vector-current hypothesis and the unitarity condition of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix are tested.

W. E. Ormand and B. A. Brown

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Douglas Factors  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Douglas Factors Douglas Factors The Merit Systems Protection Board in its landmark decision, Douglas vs. Veterans Administration, 5 MSPR 280, established criteria that supervisors must consider in determining an appropriate penalty to impose for an act of employee misconduct. These twelve factors are commonly referred to as "Douglas Factors: (1) The nature and seriousness of the offense, and its relation to the employee's duties, position, and responsibilities, including whether the offense was intentional or technical or inadvertent, or was committed maliciously or for gain, or was frequently repeated; (2) the employee's job level and type of employment, including supervisory or fiduciary role,

293

Meson electromagnetic form factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electromagnetic structure of the pseudoscalar meson nonet is completely described by the sophisticated Unitary&Analytic model, respecting all known theoretical properties of the corresponding form factors.

Stanislav Dubnicka; Anna Z. Dubnickova

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

295

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 504: 16a-Tunnel Muckpile, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) was prepared by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 504, 16a-Tunnel Muckpile. This CADD/CR is consistent with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 504 is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 16-06-01, Muckpile 16-23-01, Contaminated Burial Pit 16-23-02, Contaminated Area 16-99-01, Concrete Construction Waste Corrective Action Site 16-23-01 is not a burial pit; it is part of CAS 16-06-01. Therefore, there is not a separate data analysis and assessment for CAS 16-23-01; it is included as part of the assessment for CAS 16-06-01. In addition to these CASs, the channel between CAS 16-23-02 (Contaminated Area) and Mid Valley Road was investigated with walk-over radiological surveys and soil sampling using hand tools. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure in place with use restrictions for CAU 504. A CADD was originally submitted for CAU 504 and approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). However, following an agreement between NDEP, DTRA, and the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office to change to a risk-based approach for assessing the corrective action investigation (CAI) data, NDEP agreed that the CAU could be re-evaluated using the risk-based approach and a CADD/CR prepared to close the site.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The general purpose of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective action alternatives (CAAs) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 543: Liquid Disposal Units, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. Located in Areas 6 and 15 on the NTS, CAU 543 is comprised of a total of seven corrective action sites (CASs), one in Area 6 and six in Area 15. The CAS in Area 6 consists of a Decontamination Facility and its components which are associated with decontamination of equipment, vehicles, and materials related to nuclear testing. The six CASs in Area 15 are located at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Farm and are related to waste disposal activities at the farm. Sources of possible contamination at Area 6 include potentially contaminated process waste effluent discharged through a process waste system, a sanitary waste stream generated within buildings of the Decon Facility, and radiologically contaminated materials stored within a portion of the facility yard. At Area 15, sources of potential contamination are associated with the dairy operations and the animal tests and experiments involving radionuclide uptake. Identified contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and radionuclides. Three corrective action closure alternatives - No Further Action, Close in Place, or Clean Closure - will be recommended for CAU 543 based on an evaluation of all the data quality objective-related data. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron experiments : data processing and spatial corrections.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The YALINA-Booster experiments and analyses are part of the collaboration between Argonne National Laboratory of USA and the Joint Institute for Power & Nuclear Research - SOSNY of Belarus for studying the physics of accelerator driven systems for nuclear energy applications using low enriched uranium. The YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly is utilized for studying the kinetics of accelerator driven systems with its highly intensive D-T or D-D pulsed neutron source. In particular, the pulsed neutron methods are used to determine the reactivity of the subcritical system. This report examines the pulsed-neutron experiments performed in the YALINA-Booster facility with different configurations for the subcritical assembly. The 1141 configuration with 90% U-235 fuel and the 1185 configuration with 36% or 21% U-235 fuel are examined. The Sjoestrand area-ratio method is utilized to determine the reactivities of the different configurations. The linear regression method is applied to obtain the prompt neutron decay constants from the pulsed-neutron experimental data. The reactivity values obtained from the experimental data are shown to be dependent on the detector locations inside the subcritical assembly and the types of detector used for the measurements. In this report, Bell's spatial correction factors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo model to remove the detector dependences. The large differences between the reactivity values given by the detectors in the fast neutron zone of the YALINA-Booster are reduced after applying the spatial corrections. In addition, the estimated reactivity values after the spatial corrections are much less spatially dependent.

Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Computing nonnegative tensor factorizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 19, 2006 ... Keywords N-dimensional arrays, tensors, nonnegative tensor factorization, alternating ..... for each A(n)) are standard nonnegative linear least-squares problems over the vector ..... interface (lsNTF) implements the nonnegative tensor factorization for N = 3 and relies on .... and inaccurate measurements.

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks Sebastian B. Thrun University procedures have been applied successfully to a variety of real­world scenarios, artificial neural networks for extracting symbolic knowledge from Backpropagation­style artificial neural networks. It does

Clausen, Michael

300

NMO correction in anisotropic media using ray velocity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......methods consisting of anisotropic NMO correction (Alkhalifah...Fig. 3(b), from Shale limestone . Figure 3...Taylor sandstone, (b) Shale limestone from Thomsen...Fig. 4 compares two anisotropic NMO methods assuming...bottom of Dog Creek shale layer located at a depth......

M. Sadri; M. A. Riahi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Quantum error correction with degenerate codes for correlated noise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We introduce a quantum packing bound on the minimal resources required by nondegenerate error-correction codes for any kind of noise. We prove that degenerate codes can outperform nondegenerate ones in the presence of correlated noise, by exhibiting examples where the quantum packing bound is violated.

Chiribella, Giulio [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St. North, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Macchiavello, Chiara; Perinotti, Paolo [Quit group, Dipartimento di Fisica 'A. Volta', via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); INFN Sezione di Pavia, via Bassi 6, I-27100 Pavia (Italy)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Exploring aberration-corrected electron microscopy for compound semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......at atomic dimensions. Cryst. Res. Technol. (2005) 40:149-160. doi:10.1002/crat.200410318 . 26 Thust A , Overwijk M H F, Coene W M N, Lentzen M. Numerical correction of lens aberrations in phase-retrieval HRTEM. Ultramicroscopy (1996......

David J. Smith; Toshihiro Aoki; John Mardinly; Lin Zhou; Martha R. McCartney

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric Aydonat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Grid Correction Using Sensitivity Analysis Meric¸ Aydonat Department of ECE University University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario, Canada E-mail: f.najm@utoronto.ca Abstract--Power grid voltage verification has become a crucial step in reliable high-speed chip design. Power grid verification

Najm, Farid N.

304

Quantum Bohm correction to polarization spectrum of graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, by using a quantum hydrodynamic plasma model which incorporates the important quantum statistical pressure and electron diffraction force, we present the corrected plasmon dispersion relation for graphene which includes a k{sup 4} quantum term arising from the collective electron density wave interference effects. This correction may well describe the shortcoming of the previous results based on the classical hydrodynamics and confirms that the quantum hydrodynamic model may be as effective as the random phase approximation in successful description of the collective density excitations in quantum plasmas. It is clearly observed that the quantum correction due to the collective interaction of electron waves gives rise to significant contribution in the dispersion behavior of the collective plasmon density waves in a wide range of wavelength, as a fundamental property of the monolayer atom-thick graphene. It is revealed that the plasmon density-perturbation linear phase-speed in graphene possesses some universal minimum characteristic value, in the absence of an external magnetic field. It is further remarked that such correction also has important effect on the dielectric function, hence on the impurity screening, in graphene.

Akbari-Moghanjoughi, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 51745-406 Tabriz, Iran and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 51745-406 Tabriz, Iran and International Centre for Advanced Studies in Physical Sciences and Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ecoulements multiphasiques TD1: tension de surface: Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecoulements multiphasiques TD1: tension de surface: Correction UMPC. NSF16. 2009-2010 Jérôme Hoepffner & Arnaud Antkowiak Ex1: Variation de la tension de surface et mouvements Film1: On chauffe la fluide qui les supporte. Schéma: Analyse: Nous avons vu en cours que la tension de surface pouvait varier

Hoepffner, Jérôme

306

Enclosure 3 Error # Error Description Correction Originator Responsibility Status  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(brucite and magnesite)." DOE should correct these statements to clarify that organic ligands were PABC, and that the solubilities were calculated assuming equilibrium with brucite and hydromagnesite equilibrium with Mg-bearing minerals (brucite and hydromagnesite)." EPA LANL-Reed Revised text included in 1st

307

Envelope/phase delays correction in an EER radio architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Envelope/phase delays correction in an EER radio architecture Jean-François BERCHER and Corinne -- In this paper we consider the sensitivity of a transmitter based on EER radio architecture to time mismatches the interest of this approach. I. INTRODUCTION Envelope Elimination and restoration (EER) was developed by Kahn

Bercher, Jean-François

308

Ocean effect correction in global inversion of geomagnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data: dcorr = dobs ­ ( F(mi) ­ F'(mi) ) ·invert corrected data: mi+1 = F'-1 (dcorr ) ·repeat until |mi+1 - mi | mi+1 ­ mi = F'-1 ( dobs ­ F(mi) ) ·then if mi+1 ­ mi 0, also mi F-1 (dobs ) Inverse problem with an approximate forward operator #12

Cerveny, Vlastislav

309

Political Correctness in the Science Classroom Noretta Koertge,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Political Correctness in the Science Classroom Noretta Koertge, Professor emeritus in History from the author Prepared for the American Enterprise Institute Conference, "Reforming the Politically and universalism would seem to inhibit the invasion by the local political agendas that are so influential

Koertge, Noretta

310

Information-theoretic corrections to black hole area quantisation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear corrections are proposed to the discrete equispaced area spectrum of quantum black holes obtained previously in some quantisation schemes. It is speculated that such a modified spectrum might be related to the fine structure found using the loop quantum gravity approach.

Rajesh R Parwani

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

311

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CONNECICUT HEALTH CENTER CORRECTIONAL MANAGED HEALTH CARE POLICY AND PROCEDURES Managed Health Care (CMHC) shall ensure that newly admitted inmates to Connecticut Department include, but is not limited to, emergency health care, sick call, access to medication, dental and mental

Oliver, Douglas L.

312

The Ground State Energy of Heavy Atoms: the Leading Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For heavy atoms (large atomic number $Z$) described by no-pair operators in the Furry picture we find the ground state's leading energy correction. We compare the result with (semi-)empirical values and Schwinger's prediction showing more than qualitative agreement.

Michael Handrek; Heinz Siedentop

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

313

Modeling boundary measurements of scattered light using the corrected  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to numerical solutions of the radiative transport equation. © 2012 Optical Society of America OCIS codes: (170Adams and B. J. Tromberg, "Boundary conditions for the diffusion equation in radiative transfer," J. Opt. Soc element method to solve the diffusion equation. We show that this corrected diffusion approximation models

Kim, Arnold D.

314

Power Corrections to Event Shapes with Mass-Dependent Operators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce an operator depending on the "transverse velocity" r that describes the effect of hadron masses on the leading 1/Q power correction to event-shape observables. Here, Q is the scale of the hard collision. This work builds on earlier studies of mass effects by Salam and Wicke and of operators by Lee and Sterman. Despite the fact that different event shapes have different hadron mass dependence, we provide a simple method to identify universality classes of event shapes whose power corrections depend on a common nonperturbative parameter. We also develop an operator basis to show that at a fixed value of Q, the power corrections for many classic observables can be determined by two independent nonperturbative matrix elements at the 10% level. We compute the anomalous dimension of the transverse velocity operator, which is multiplicative in r and causes the power correction to exhibit non-trivial dependence on Q. The existence of universality classes and the relevance of anomalous dimensions are reproduced by the hadronization models in Pythia 8 and Herwig++, though the two programs differ in the values of their low-energy matrix elements.

Vicent Mateu; Iain W. Stewart; Jesse Thaler

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

QED Corrections to Planck's Radiation Law and Photon Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Leading corrections to Planck's formula and photon thermodynamics arising from the pair-mediated photon-photon interaction are calculated. This interaction is attractive and causes an increase in occupation number for all modes. Possible consequences, including the role of the cosmic photon gas in structure formation, are considered.

M. Hossein Partovi

1993-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Model based Open-loop Correction of Heliostat Tracking Errors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The heliostat field is by far the most expensive part of a typical Central Receiver (CR) plant. To achieve high conversion efficiencies, heliostats with very high tracking accuracy are needed, but errors are introduced due to manufacturing-, installation- and alignment tolerances as well control system granularity. Mechanical error profiles are unique for every heliostat and cause tracking errors that vary over the course of days and seasons and therefore cannot be corrected by once-off angle offset corrections. Developments in microcontroller technology drives decentralization of CR control systems. Powerful open-loop error correction algorithms can run on low cost heliostat local controllers, enabling high tracking accuracy from lower cost heliostats with reduced tolerances. A prototype array of 18 heliostats, each 1 ft2 in size, was constructed to validate the field control system functionality and final tracking accuracy. Tests were conducted at SU's solar laboratory with an 18m tower and heliostat slant ranges of around 40 m. Prototype experiments indicate a daily open-loop RMS normal vector tracking error below 1 mrad. Strong correlation exists between successive days residual error curves, indicating that further model refinements may be possible, including frequency spectrum analysis (using FFT) to identify and correct for mechanism-specific periodic drivetrain errors.

K. Malan; P. Gauch

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decays of intermediate vector bosons, radiative corrections and QCD jets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate decay properties of the intermediate vector bosons W and Z0. QED and QCD radiative corrections to leptonic and hadronic decay modes are calculated. Implications of the results for decay widths, branching ratios, determination of the number of neutrino species, e-?-? universality and properties of hadronic jets produced in W and Z0 decays are examined.

David Albert; William J. Marciano; Daniel Wyler; Zohreh Parsa

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Convergence properties of the local defect correction method for parabolic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and, for a one-dimensional heat equation, we study its properties analytically. Numerical experiment of adaptive grid techniques. In adaptive grid methods, a fine grid spacing and a relatively small time step requirements are minimized. An adaptive grid technique of particular interest is the Local Defect Correction

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

319

(This page intentionally left blank.) Corrective Action Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Radiation Protection....................................................................34 Finding C4#12;(This page intentionally left blank.) #12;#12;#12;Corrective Action Plan to the Independent line from "Develop plan to communicate action D1-3" to "Develop plan to communicate action D1-2" 4

320

Corrections Notice, Federal Register, 71 FR 10097, February 28, 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Document displays a correction notice pertaining to Energy Conservation Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings, which was published in the Federal Register on February 28, 2006.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Correction to Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov Newcastle University techniques helps to deliver systems that are free from engineer- ing defects. A code generator quickly, consistently and reproducibly. Com- monly, a code generator is a program constructed informally

Southampton, University of

323

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Record of Technical Change for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 140: Waste Dumps, Burn Pits, and Storage Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV--963-Rev 2, dated November 2004).

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

NNLO QCD corrections to Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion can be used to test the trilinear Higgs self-coupling and the $VVHH$ $(V=Z,W)$ quartic gauge interactions. In this paper we present the calculations of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to the SM Higgs boson pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders with the center-of-mass energy of $14~{\\rm TeV}$, $33~{\\rm TeV}$ and $100~{\\rm TeV}$ by using the structure function approach, and study the residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, parton distribution functions and $\\alpha_s$ on the total cross section. We also provide the distributions of transverse momenta, rapidities, invariant mass and azimuthal angle separations of final products. We observe a considerable quantitative reduction in the scale uncertainty due to the NNLO QCD corrections, and find that the total cross section is sensitive to the trilinear Higgs self-coupling.

Liu-Sheng, Ling; Wen-Gan, Ma; Lei, Guo; Wei-Hua, Li; Xiao-Zhou, Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NNLO QCD corrections to Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurement of the Higgs pair production via vector boson fusion can be used to test the trilinear Higgs self-coupling and the $VVHH$ $(V=Z,W)$ quartic gauge interactions. In this paper we present the calculations of the next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the SM Higgs boson pair production via vector boson fusion at hadron colliders with the center-of-mass energy of $14$, $33$, and $100 {\\rm TeV}$ by using the structure function approach, and study the residual uncertainties from the factorization/renormalization scale, parton distribution functions and $\\alpha_s$ on the total cross section. We also provide the distributions of transverse momenta, rapidities, invariant mass and azimuthal angle separations of final Higgs bosons. We observe a considerable quantitative reduction in the scale uncertainty due to the next-to-next-to-leading-order QCD corrections, and find that the total cross section is sensitive to the trilinear Higgs self-coupling.

Ling Liu-Sheng; Zhang Ren-You; Ma Wen-Gan; Guo Lei; Li Wei-Hua; Li Xiao-Zhou

2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

Electron cyclotron current drive modelling with parallel momentum correction for tokamaks and stellarators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is described by the solution of a drift-kinetic equation (DKE) with the quasi-linear heating term which is highly localised in phase space. Within the adjoint approach, an equivalent DKE must be solved without this highly localised source, and the ECCD is described by a straightforward convolution in phase space. The parallel momentum correction technique [Maassberg et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 072504 (2009)] reduces the problem to the solution of a simplified mono-energetic DKE. The mono-energetic distribution functions are calculated by the DKES code [W. I. van Rij and S. P. Hirshman, Phys. Fluids B 1, 563 (1989)]. Parallel momentum correction, requiring only an energy-dependent weighting factor, is applied to these distribution functions allowing for the direct estimation of the EC-driven current. For small yet finite collisionalities, a rather simple model for ECCD is presented. In this approach, the symmetric portion of the electron distribution function with respect to v{sub Parallel-To} (the Ware pinch contribution) is neglected and an 'off-set' only in the passing particle domain adds to the collisionless (anti-symmetric) distribution function. For this approximation, only the mono-energetic parallel conductivity coefficient as function of the collisionality is needed. The impact of small yet finite collisionalities on ECCD is shown for X2- and O2-scenarios at W7-X.

Maassberg, H.; Beidler, C. D.; Marushchenko, N. B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Closure report for housekeeping category, Corrective Action Unit 354, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report summarizes the corrective actions which were completed at the Corrective Action Sites within Corrective Action Unit 354 at the Nevada Test Site. Current site descriptions, observations and identification of wastes removed are included on FFACO Corrective Action Site housekeeping closure verification forms.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Quasiballistic correction to the density of states in three-dimensional metal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the exchange correction to the density of states in three-dimensional metal near the Fermi energy. In the ballistic limit, when the distance to the Fermi level exceeds the inverse transport relaxation time 1/?, we find the correction linear in the distance from the Fermi level. By a large parameter ?F?, this ballistic correction exceeds the diffusive correction obtained earlier.

A. A. Koulakov

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Accelerating RCRA corrective action: The principles of the DOE approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is involved in the remediation of environmental contamination at many of its facilities under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). RCRA`s corrective action provisions were established by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA). In response to the HSWA mandate, EPA established a program for the conduct of RCRA corrective action that was similar to that established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). In addition, EPA developed and implemented its ``stabilization`` initiative as a means of quickly addressing immediate risks posed by releases until long term solutions can be applied. To improve the efficiency of environmental restoration at its facilities, DOE is developing guidance and training programs on accelerated environmental restoration under RCRA. A RCRA guidance document, entitled ``Accelerating RCRA Corrective Action at DOE Facilities,`` is currently being developed by DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance. The new guidance document will outline a decision-making process for determining if acceleration is appropriate for individual facilities, for identifying, evaluating, and selecting options for program acceleration, and for implementing selected acceleration options. The document will also discuss management and planning strategies that provide a firm foundation for accelerating RCRA corrective action. These strategies include a number of very basic principles that have proven effective at DOE and other federal facilities, as well as some new approaches. The purpose of this paper is to introduce DOE`s new guidance document, discuss the general approach presented in the guidance for accelerating RCRA corrective action, and to emphasize some of the more important principles of effective management and planning.

Kimmell, T.A.; Green, D.R.; Ranek, N.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Coalgate, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics for FRW Cosmology with Power-Law Entropy Correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we have considered the power law correction of entropy on the horizon. If the flat FRW Universe is filled with the n components fluid with interactions, the GSL of thermodynamics for apparent and event horizons have been investigated for equilibrium and non-equilibrium cases. If we consider a small perturbation around the de Sitter space-time, the general conditions of the validity of GSL have been found. Also if a phantom dominated Universe has a polelike type scale factor, the validity of GSL has also been analyzed. Further we have obtained constraints on the power-law parameter {\\alpha} in the phantom and quintessence dominated regimes. Finally we obtain conditions under which GSL breaks down in a cosmological background.

Ujjal Debnath; Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ibrar Hussain; Mubasher Jamil; Ratbay Myrzakulov

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Corrected form of the first law of thermodynamics for regular black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show by explicit computations that there is a superficial inconsistency between the conventional first law of black hole thermodynamics and Bekenstein-Hawking area law for three types of regular black holes. The corrected form of the first law for these regular black holes is given. The derivation relies on the general structure of the energy-momentum tensor of the matter fields. When the black hole mass parameter $M$ is included in the energy-momentum tensor, the conventional form of the first law should be modified with an extra factor. In this case, the black hole mass $M$ can no longer be considered as the internal energy of the regular black holes.

Ma, Meng-Sen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Algebraic and information-theoretic conditions for operator quantum error correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operator quantum error correction is a technique for robustly storing quantum information in the presence of noise. It generalizes the standard theory of quantum error correction, and provides a unified framework for topics such as quantum error correction, decoherence-free subspaces, and noiseless subsystems. This paper develops (a) easily applied algebraic and information-theoretic conditions that characterize when operator quantum error correction is feasible; (b) a representation theorem for a class of noise processes that can be corrected using operator quantum error correction; and (c) generalizations of the coherent information and quantum data processing inequality to the setting of operator quantum error correction.

Nielsen, Michael A.; Poulin, David [School of Physical Sciences, University of Queensland, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Algebraic and information-theoretic conditions for operator quantum error correction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Operator quantum error correction is a technique for robustly storing quantum information in the presence of noise. It generalizes the standard theory of quantum error correction, and provides a unified framework for topics such as quantum error correction, decoherence-free subspaces, and noiseless subsystems. This paper develops (a) easily applied algebraic and information-theoretic conditions that characterize when operator quantum error correction is feasible; (b) a representation theorem for a class of noise processes that can be corrected using operator quantum error correction; and (c) generalizations of the coherent information and quantum data processing inequality to the setting of operator quantum error correction.

Michael A. Nielsen and David Poulin

2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Spirit Level to Be Fixed to a Quadrant for Taking a Meridional Altitude at Sea, When the Horizon is Not Visible. By John Hadley, Esq; V. Pr. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Fixed to a Quadrant for Taking a Meridional Altitude at Sea, When the Horizon is Not Visible. By John Hadley, Esq; V. Pr. R. S. John Hadley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1733-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Sites, Nevada with ROTC 1, Errata Sheet, Revision 0, January 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative (CAA) for the seven CASs within CAU 139. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from June 26 through September 27, 2006, as set forth in the CAU 139 Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP).

Grant Evenson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219: Septic Systems and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 219, Septic Systems and Injection Wells, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 219 is located in Areas 3, 16, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 219 is comprised of the six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 03-11-01, Steam Pipes and Asbestos Tiles; (2) 16-04-01, Septic Tanks (3); (3) 16-04-02, Distribution Box; (4) 16-04-03, Sewer Pipes; (5) 23-20-01, DNA Motor Pool Sewage and Waste System; and (6) 23-20-02, Injection Well. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

David A. Strand

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 486: Double Tracks RADSAFE Area Nellis Air Force Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Units consist of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 486, the Double Tracks Radiological Safety (RADSAFE) Area (DTRSA) which is located on the Nellis Air Force Range 71North (N), west of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range Complex, is approximately 255 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 486 is comprised of CAS 71-23-001-71DT consisting of two areas of concern referred to as the vehicle decontamination area and the animal burial pit. The DTRSA is located on the west side of the Cactus Range approximately 8 km (5 mi) southwest of the Cactus Spring gate at the intersection of the Cactus Spring Road and the Double Tracks Control Point Road (Figure 1-2). The DTRSA was used during May 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, personnel, and animals from the Double Tracks test. The DTRSA is one of three areas identified as a potential location for the disposal of radioactively contaminated materials from the Double Tracks experiment. The other two locations are the Cactus Spring Waste Trenches (CAU 426) and the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (CAU 407), both of which have been investigated. The surface and subsurface soils are likely to have been impacted by plutonium and other contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) associated with decontamination activities at this site.

IT Las Vegas

1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 487: Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, January 2001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 487, Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 487 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS), RG 26-001-RGRV, Thunderwell Site. The site is located in the northwest portion of the TTR, Nevada, approximately five miles northwest of the Area 3 Control Point and closest to the Cactus Flats broad basin. Historically, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico used CAU 487 in the early to mid-1960s for a series of high explosive tests detonated at the bottom of large cylindrical steel tubes. Historical photographs indicate that debris from these tests and subsequent operations may have been scattered and buried throughout the site. A March 2000 walk-over survey and a July 2000 geophysical survey indicated evidence of buried and surface debris in dirt mounds and areas throughout the site; however, a radiological drive-over survey also performed in July 2000 indicated that no radiological hazards were identified at this site. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that detonation activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern into the surface/subsurface soil including total volatile and total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and high explosives. Therefore, the scope of corrective action field investigation will involve excavation, drilling, and extensive soil sampling and analysis activities to determine the extent (if any) of both the lateral and vertical contamination and whether or not any such contamination extends beyond the historical boundaries of the site. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

340

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 335 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs). The CAU is located in the Well 3 Yard in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. Historical records indicate that the Drain Pit (CAS 06-23-03) received effluent from truck-washing; the Drums/Oil Waste/Spill (CAS 06-20-01) consisted of four 55-gallon drums containing material removed from the Cased Hole; and the Cased Hole (CAS 06-20-02) was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris. These drums were transported to the Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in July 1991; therefore, they are no longer on site and further investigation or remediation efforts are not required. Consequently, CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action and details of this decision will be described in the Closure Report for this CAU. Any spills that may have been associated with this CAS will be investigated and addressed under CAS 06-20-02. Field investigation efforts will be focused on the two remaining CASs. The scope of the investigation will center around identifying any contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) and, if present, determining the vertical and lateral extent of contamination. The COPCs for the Drain Pit include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline-and diesel-range organics), ethylene glycol monobutyl ether, polychlorinated biphenyls, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and radionuclides. The COPCs for the Cased Hole include: total volatile/ semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel-range organics only), and total Resource Conservation an d Recovery Act metals. Both biased surface and subsurface soil sampling will be conducted, augmented by visual inspection, video surveys, and electromagnetic surveys. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Two-Factor Authentication  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Two-Factor Authentication (2FA) is a system wherein two different methods are used to authenticate an individual. 2FA is based on something you know (a secret PIN) and something you have (an...

343

factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

36 36 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142253836 Varnish cache server factors Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago)

344

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The general purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technically viable corrective actions. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the following three corrective action sites (CASs) in Area 12 of the NTS: (1) CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; (2) CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and (3) CAS 12-28-01, I-, J-, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Site 12-06-09 consists of a muckpile and debris located on the hillside in front of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels on the eastern slopes of Rainier Mesa in Area 12. The muckpile includes mining debris (muck) and debris generated during the excavation and construction of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-08-02, CWD, consists of a muckpile and debris and is located on the hillside in front of the re-entry tunnel for K-Tunnel. For the purpose of this investigation CAS 12-28-01 is defined as debris ejected by containment failures during the Des Moines and Platte Tests and the associated contamination that is not covered in the two muckpile CASs. This site consists of debris scattered south of the I-, J-, and K-Tunnel muckpiles and extends down the hillside, across the valley, and onto the adjacent hillside to the south. In addition, the site will cover the potential contamination associated with ''ventings'' along the fault, fractures, and various boreholes on the mesa top and face. One conceptual site model was developed for all three CASs to address possible contamination migration pathways associated with CAU 309. The data quality objective (DQO) process was used to identify and define the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the corrective action process. The DQO process addresses the primary problem that sufficient information is not available to determine the appropriate corrective action for the CAU. Due to the practical constraints posed by steep slopes on and around the CAU 309 muckpiles, a conservative, simplifying strategy was developed to resolve the presence and nature of contaminants. This strategy includes the use of historical data from similar sites (i.e., previously investigated NTS muckpiles) and the collection of samples from accessible areas of the muckpiles. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous investigations of similar sites, contaminants of potential concern for CAU 309 collectively include radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel range only), polychlorinated biphenyls, ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' metals, volatile organic compounds, and semivolatile organic compounds.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Scatter factors assessment in microbeam radiation therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The success of the preclinical studies in Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) paved the way to the clinical trials under preparation at the Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Within this framework, an accurate determination of the deposited dose is crucial. With that aim, the scatter factors, which translate the absolute dose measured in reference conditions (2 x 2 cm{sup 2} field size at 2 cm-depth in water) to peak doses, were assessed. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed with two different widely used codes, PENELOPE and GEANT4, for the sake of safety. The scatter factors were obtained as the ratio of the doses that are deposited by a microbeam and by a field of reference size, at the reference depth. The calculated values were compared with the experimental data obtained by radiochromic (ISP HD-810) films and a PTW 34070 large area chamber. Results: The scatter factors for different microbeam field sizes assessed by the two MC codes were in agreement and reproduced the experimental data within uncertainty bars. Those correction factors were shown to be non-negligible for the future MRT clinical settings: an average 30% lower dose was deposited by a 50 {mu}m microbeam with respect to the reference conditions. Conclusions: For the first time, the scatter factors in MRT were systematically studied. They constitute an essential key to deposit accurate doses in the forthcoming clinical trials in MRT. The good agreement between the different calculations and the experimental data confirms the reliability of this challenging micrometric dose estimation.

Prezado, Y.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sanchez, M. [Laboratoire Imagerie et Modelisation en Neurobiologie et Cancerologie IMNC-UMR 8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Campus Universitaire, Bat. 440, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Servicio de Radiofisica, Complejo Hospitalario de Santiago de Compostela, Rua Choupana S/N, 15706 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

2009 Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) Corrective Action Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

O. Box 5400 O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 The Honorable A.I. Eggenberger Chairman, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue NW, Suite 700 Washington D.C. 20004-2901 Dear Mr. Chairman: MAR 1 9 2009 Enclosed is the Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) Corrective Action Plan, Revision 2, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004-1. This plan has been updated to identify that all Department corrective actions to improve recruiting, developing, training, qualifying, maintaining proficiency of, and retaining technical personnel to safely accomplish DOE's mission have been completed. This revised

348

2007 Federal Technical Capabilities Program (FTCP) Corrective Action Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7,2007 7,2007 The Honorable A. J. Eggenberger Chairman, Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue NW, Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004-290 1 Dear Mr. Chairman: Enclosed is Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Corrective Action Plan, Revision 1, which is Deliverable B for Commitment 13 in the Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan to Improve Oversight of Nuclear Operations, Revision 2, issued in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2004- 1. This plan has been updated to identify the completed and remaining Department corrective actions to improve recruiting, developing, training, qualifying, maintaining proficiency of, and retaining technical personnel to safely accomplish DOE'S mission. The plan is approved and issued for implementation, effective

349

Higher Derivative Corrections to Non-Abelian Vortex Effective Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a systematic method to calculate higher derivative corrections to low-energy effective theories of solitons, which are in general non-linear sigma models on the moduli spaces of the solitons. By applying it to the effective theory of a single BPS non-Abelian vortex in U(N) gauge theory with N fundamental Higgs fields, we obtain four derivative corrections to the effective sigma model on the moduli space C \\times CP^{N-1}. We compare them with the Nambu-Goto action and the Faddeev-Skyrme model. We also show that Yang-Mills instantons/monopoles trapped inside a non-Abelian vortex membrane/string are not modified in the presence of higher derivative terms.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

350

Corrective Action Management Units and Temporary Units. RCRA Information Brief  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On February 16, 1993 the EPA published a final rule that allows either the EPA Regional Administrator or the authorized State to designate areas as corrective action management units (CAMUs) at hazardous waste management facilities for the specific purpose of managing remediation waste that has been generated as part of the facility`s corrective action activities. According to the rule, placement of remediation wastes into or within a CAMU does not constitute land disposal of hazardous waste and is not subject to RCRA land disposal restrictions. In addition, waste disposal units located within CAMUs are not required to be designed in accordance with RCRA minimum technological requirements applicable to land disposal units. This Information Brief explains the advantages of a CAMU designation, defines a Temporary Unit (TU) and explains the advantages of a TU designation. The process for initiating a CAMU or TU designation is described for DOE sites and interim status facilities.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermalization, Error Correction, and Memory Lifetime for Ising Anyon Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider two-dimensional lattice models that support Ising anyonic excitations and are coupled to a thermal bath. We propose a phenomenological model for the resulting short-time dynamics that includes pair creation, hopping, braiding, and fusion of anyons. By explicitly constructing topological quantum error-correcting codes for this class of system, we use our thermalization model to estimate the lifetime of the quantum information stored in the encoded spaces. To decode and correct errors in these codes, we adapt several existing topological decoders to the non-Abelian setting. We perform large-scale numerical simulations of these two-dimensional Ising anyon systems and find that the thresholds of these models range from 13% to 25%. To our knowledge, these are the first numerical threshold estimates for quantum codes without explicit additive structure.

Courtney G. Brell; Simon Burton; Guillaume Dauphinais; Steven T. Flammia; David Poulin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

LINEAR COUPLING CORRECTION WITH N-TURN MAPS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The linear one-turn map of a storage ring contains coupling information on which a correction algorithm can be based. In principal, the one-turn matrix can be fitted from turn-by-turn data of beam position monitors after a kick was applied. However, the so obtained coupling information often sinks into the noise floor. The signal-to-noise ratio of the coupling information can be greatly enhanced by fitting maps for larger turn numbers N, equal to half the beat period. With the so obtained N-turn map an automated global coupling correction is possible without the need for a tune change. This is demonstrated for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider where the algorithm is implemented for operational use at injection.

FISCHER,W.

2003-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

353

Circumference Correction Chicanes for Damping Rings P. Emma, T. Raubenheimer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Circumference Correction Chicanes for Circumference Correction Chicanes for Damping Rings P. Emma, T. Raubenheimer August 14,1998 1 Introduction Several large low-emittance damping rings are presently being designed to meet the requirements of future linear colliders. These rings tend to have relatively large circumferences ∼300 m so that they can damp many trains of bunches at the same time. With the large circumference, the path length around the ring may become quite sensitive to thermal and ground motion effects. In addition, most of the rings include damping wigglers whose path length varies with their strength. In e-/e+ storage rings, the beam revolution time is determined by the rf frequency. Thus, a change in the nominal path length will cause a change in both the beam energy and the

354

2010 Joint Effectiveness Review of Hanford Bldg 336 Corrective Actions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Joint Assessment of the Effectiveness of Corrective Actions for the Building 336 Accident, July 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), and the Richland Operations Office (RL) performed a joint effectiveness assessment of the corrective actions taken by Washington Closure Hanford, LLC (WCH) in response to the Building 336 Fall Event. The review was conducted from July 12-21, 2010, by a team consisting of four HSS and six RL personnel. The scope of the assessment included evaluation of work control, fall protection, quality assurance, and conduct of operations. Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) were generated for each functional area. The CRADs focused on the Judgments of Need (JONs) from the July 2009 Building 336 Fall

355

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada: Revision No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 410: Waste Disposal Trenches, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 410 consists of five Corrective Action Sites (CASs): TA-21-003-TANL; 09-21-001-TA09; TA-19-002-TAB2; TA-21-002-TAAL; and 03-19-001. The CADD and CR have been combined into one report because no further action is recommended for this CAU. The corrective action alternative recommended for CAU 410 is Clean Closure; therefore, no corrective action or corrective action plan is required. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

356

Correcting Aberrations in Complex Magnet Systems for Muon Cooling Channels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Designing and simulating complex magnet systems needed for cooling channels in both neutrino factories and muon colliders requires innovative techniques to correct for both chromatic and spherical aberrations. Optimizing complex systems, such as helical magnets for example, is also difficult but essential. By using COSY INFINITY, a differential algebra based code, the transfer and aberration maps can be examined to discover what critical terms have the greatest influence on these aberrations.

J.A. Maloney, B. Erdelyi, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Scott Correction and the Quasi-classical Limit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

\\IlQc ) = EQc + O(Z5/3) EQc :'0 (\\II, HQC w) = E + O(Z5/3) where E ~ Z7/3 and the Scott correction is O(Z2(H) >I> E(Z) == E (N = Z, Z) VIe will henceforth take N = Z without further comment. To describe) #12;mE SCOTT CORRECIlON AND THE QUASI-ClASSICAL UMJT Note that the Euler-Lagrange equations

Makarov, Nikolai

358

Final voluntary release assessment/corrective action report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Carlsbad Area Office (DOE-CAO) has completed a voluntary release assessment sampling program at selected Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This Voluntary Release Assessment/Corrective Action (RA/CA) report has been prepared for final submittal to the Environmental protection Agency (EPA) Region 6, Hazardous Waste Management Division and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) Hazardous and Radioactive Materials Bureau to describe the results of voluntary release assessment sampling and proposed corrective actions at the SWMU sites. The Voluntary RA/CA Program is intended to be the first phase in implementing the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) and corrective action process at the WIPP. Data generated as part of this sampling program are intended to update the RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA) for the WIPP (Assessment of Solid Waste Management Units at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), NMED/DOE/AIP 94/1. This Final Voluntary RA/CA Report documents the results of release assessment sampling at 11 SWMUs identified in the RFA. With this submittal, DOE formally requests a No Further Action determination for these SWMUs. Additionally, this report provides information to support DOE`s request for No Further Action at the Brinderson and Construction landfill SWMUs, and to support DOE`s request for approval of proposed corrective actions at three other SWMUs (the Badger Unit Drill Pad, the Cotton Baby Drill Pad, and the DOE-1 Drill Pad). This information is provided to document the results of the Voluntary RA/CA activities submitted to the EPA and NMED in August 1995.

NONE

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

359

Effects of lump characteristics on plutonium self absorption correction methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation study has been undertaken to assess the robustness of several published Pu self-absorption correction methods against variation in size, shape, density etc. for use in the gamma assay of nuclear waste. The correction methods studied are a numerical plutonium self absorption correction (PuSAC) technique, the Fleissner 2-line, Fleissner 3-line and Infinite Energy Extrapolation methods with both linear and polynomial extrapolation to 1/E=0. The performance of these methods has been compared for a limited set of measured encapsulated PuO{sub 2} sources plus a range of modelled unencapsulated Pu lumps. An indication of the magnitude of the uncertainties of the numerical PuSAC method has been determined for cases of blind assays where the Pu material, shape and distribution are unknown with the aim of ultimately applying it to real waste. The importance of the range of Pu lumps used in the baseline modelled dataset has been examined. Data are presented to illustrate how the uncertainties in the method are affected by the shape, composition, density, number and mass distribution of Pu particles in a sample for a given modelled base dataset. (authors)

Curtis, D. C.; Wormald, M. R. [Canberra UK Ltd (United Kingdom); Croft, S. [Canberra Industries Inc., 800 Research Parkway, Meriden, CT 06450 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Real time detection and correction of distribution feeder operational problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents a new technique that detects and corrects distribution operational problems using closed loop control of substation transformers, capacitors and reactors by an online computer. This allows the distribution system to be operated close to its capacity without sacrificing the quality of power supply. Such operations help defer the additional cost of installing new substations. The technique integrates the Distribution Feeder Analysis (DFA) and the Distribution Substation Control (DSC) functions to achieve this. The DFA function provides the topology and power flow results for the feeders using the substation real time measurements. It does not require feeder section measurements. The realtime feeder results are used in detecting any currently existing feeder operational problems such as feeder section voltages and currents outside their limits. The detected feeder problems are transformed into substation distribution bus objectives and then corrected by the DSC function using controls available at the substation. The DSC function has been performing successfully for several years at Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) in Washington, D.C. It uses a closed loop control scheme that controls the substation transformer taps and shunt capacitor and reactor breakers and optimizes the substation operation. By combining the DFA and DSC functions into a single function and with proper transformation of feeder problems into substation objectives, a new closed loop control scheme for the substation controls is achieved. This scheme corrects the detected feeder problems and optimizes the substation operation. This technique is implemented and tested using the actual substation and feeder models of PEPCO.

Subramanian, A.K.; Huang, J.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

$\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry and radiative corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The $\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry is compatible with current neutrino oscillation data and easily realized under family symmetries. We prove that this symmetry preserves $\\theta_{23}=45^\\circ$, $\\delta=\\pm90^\\circ$, $\\rho,\\sigma=0,90^\\circ$, and can be embedded into the seesaw mechanism. The $\\mu$-$\\tau$ reflection symmetry preserved at a high energy scale $\\Lambda_\\text{FS}$ will be broken by radiative corrections and result in deviations of $\\theta_{23}$ from $45^\\circ$ and $\\delta$ from $\\pm90^\\circ$ at the electroweak scale. We develop an analytical method to derive the corrections to all the mixing parameters. We perform a numerical analysis in the MSSM for $\\delta=-90^\\circ$ at $\\Lambda_\\text{FS}$, and observe that $\\theta_{23}>45^\\circ$ in the normal mass ordering, $\\theta_{23}<45^\\circ$ in the inverted mass ordering, and the sizable correction to $\\delta$ prefers a negative sign. These deviations have definite directions and can be tested in the future neutrino oscillation experiments.

Zhou, Ye-Ling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 550: Smoky Contamination Area Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 is located in Areas 7, 8, and 10 of the Nevada National Security Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 550, Smoky Contamination Area, comprises 19 corrective action sites (CASs). Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plumes, it was determined that some of the CAS releases are co-located and will be investigated as study groups. This document describes the planned investigation of the following CASs (by study group): (1) Study Group 1, Atmospheric Test - CAS 08-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T-2C; (2) Study Group 2, Safety Experiments - CAS 08-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-8B - CAS 08-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T-8A - CAS 08-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site T-8C; (3) Study Group 3, Washes - Potential stormwater migration of contaminants from CASs; (4) Study Group 4, Debris - CAS 08-01-01, Storage Tank - CAS 08-22-05, Drum - CAS 08-22-07, Drum - CAS 08-22-08, Drums (3) - CAS 08-22-09, Drum - CAS 08-24-03, Battery - CAS 08-24-04, Battery - CAS 08-24-07, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-24-08, Batteries (3) - CAS 08-26-01, Lead Bricks (200) - CAS 10-22-17, Buckets (3) - CAS 10-22-18, Gas Block/Drum - CAS 10-22-19, Drum; Stains - CAS 10-22-20, Drum - CAS 10-24-10, Battery. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each study group. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 31, 2012, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 550. The potential contamination sources associated with the study groups are from nuclear testing activities conducted at CAU 550. The DQO process resulted in an assumption that the total effective dose (TED) within the default contamination boundary of CAU 550 exceeds the final action level and requires corrective action. The presence and nature of contamination outside the default contamination boundary at CAU 550 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the TED at sample locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample location will be used to measure external radiological dose. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each group of CASs.

Grant Evenson

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CADD/CAP follows the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) stage, which results in development of a set of contaminant boundary forecasts produced from groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling of the Frenchman Flat CAU. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located in the southeastern portion of the NNSS and comprises 10 underground nuclear tests. The tests were conducted between 1965 and 1971 and resulted in the release of radionuclides in the subsurface in the vicinity of the test cavities. Two important aspects of the corrective action process are presented within this CADD/CAP. The CADD portion describes the results of the Frenchman Flat CAU data-collection and modeling activities completed during the CAI stage. The corrective action objectives and the actions recommended to meet the objectives are also described. The CAP portion describes the corrective action implementation plan. The CAP begins with the presentation of CAU regulatory boundary objectives and initial use restriction boundaries that are identified and negotiated by NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The CAP also presents the model evaluation process designed to build confidence that the flow and contaminant transport modeling results can be used for the regulatory decisions required for CAU closure. The first two stages of the strategy have been completed for the Frenchman Flat CAU. A value of information analysis and a CAIP were developed during the CAIP stage. During the CAI stage, a CAIP addendum was developed, and the activities proposed in the CAIP and addendum were completed. These activities included hydrogeologic investigation of the underground testing areas, aquifer testing, isotopic and geochemistry-based investigations, and integrated geophysical investigations. After these investigations, a groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was developed to forecast contaminant boundaries that enclose areas potentially exceeding the Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards at any time within 1,000 years. An external peer review of the groundwater flow and contaminant transport model was completed, and the model was accepted by NDEP to allow advancement to the CADD/CAP stage. The CADD/CAP stage focuses on model evaluation to ensure that existing models provide adequate guidance for the regulatory decisions regarding monitoring and institutional controls. Data-collection activities are identified and implemented to address key uncertainties in the flow and contaminant transport models. During the CR stage, final use restriction boundaries and CAU regulatory boundaries are negotiated and established; a long-term closure monitoring program is developed and implemented; and the approaches and policies for institutional controls are initiated. The model evaluation process described in this plan consists of an iterative series of five steps designed to build confidence in the site conceptual model and model forecasts. These steps are designed to identify data-collection activities (Step 1), document the data-collection activities in the 0CADD/CAP (Step 2), and perform the activities (Step 3). The new data are then assessed; the model is refined, if necessary; the modeling results are evaluated; and a model evaluation report is prepared (Step 4). The assessments are made by the modeling team and presented to the pre-emptive review committee. The decision is made by the modeling team with the assistance of the pre-emptive review committee and concurrence of NNSA/NSO to continue data and model assessment/refinement, recommend additional data collection, or recommend advancing to the CR stage. A recommendation to advance to the CR stage is based on whether the model is considered to be sufficiently reliable for designing a monitoring system and developing effective institutional controls. The decision to advance to the CR stage or to return to step 1 of the process is then made by NDEP (Step 5).

Irene Farnham and Sam Marutzky

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Apparatus And Method For Temperature Correction And Expanded Count Rate Of Inorganic Scintillation Detectors The present invention includes an apparatus and corresponding method for temperature correction and count rate expansion of inorganic scintillation detectors. A temperature sensor is attached to an inorganic scintillation detector. The inorganic scintillation detector, due to interaction with

366

Multi-factor authentication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection and deterrence of spoofing of user authentication may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a hardware device for authenticating a user of the hardware device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes an internal physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware device, which generates a PUF value. Combining logic is coupled to receive the PUF value, combines the PUF value with one or more other authentication factors to generate a multi-factor authentication value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the multi-factor authentication value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the hardware device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

Hamlet, Jason R; Pierson, Lyndon G

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 372 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 10, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; Desert Research Institute, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 372.

Patrick Matthews

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the top quark associated with $?$ production via model-independent flavor-changing neutral-current couplings at hadron colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the complete next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to the top quark associated with $\\gamma$ production induced by model-independent $tq\\gamma$ and $tqg$ flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) couplings at hadron colliders, respectively. We also consider the mixing effects between the $tq\\gamma$ and $tqg$ FCNC couplings for this process. Our results show that, for the $tq\\gamma$ couplings, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% and 40% at the Tevatron and LHC, respectively. Including the contributions from the $tq\\gamma$, $tqg$ FCNC couplings and their mixing effects, the NLO QCD corrections can enhance the total cross sections by about 50% for the $tu\\gamma$ and $tug$ FCNC couplings, and by about the 80% for the $tc\\gamma$ and $tcg$ FCNC couplings at the LHC, respectively. Moreover, the NLO corrections reduce the dependence of the total cross section on the renormalization and factorization scale significantly. We also evaluate the NLO corrections for several important kinematic distributions.

Yue Zhang; Bo Hua Li; Chong Sheng Li; Jun Gao; Hua Xing Zhu

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

A new high performance AC to DC rectifier with input power factor correction and harmonic reduction capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many conventional switching power supplies in data processing equipment and low power motor drive systems operate by rectifying the input ac line voltage and filtering it with large electrolytic capacitors. Because this process involves both...

Martinez, Roberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

370

Theoretical full power correction factors as related to changes in ambient temperature, pressure and absolute humidity for aircraft turbine engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

turbine or jet engine since it is based on the actual thermodynamic Brayton cycle. ACKNOHLEDGEMEHTS Assistance and advice from many people have contributed greatly to this research. The Author is grateful to Professor Stanley H. Lowy from... The nature of the probj em Objectives Background 1 3 4 4 7 1I EFFECTS OF STATE POINT VARIATIONS ? General ? Variations of inlet state points with temperature and pressure III IDEAL AND ACTUAL CYCLE ANALYSIS 21 General Variations of power...

Raphael, Michel Antoun

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Public Health FAT FACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: THE UNITED STATES SPENDS MORE ON HEALTH CARE THAN ANY OTHER COUNTRY. YET WE CONTINUE TO FALL FAR BEHIND States spends an astonishing percent of our gross domestic product on health care--significantly moreColumbia Public Health HOT TOPIC Climate Change FAT FACTORS Obesity Prevention BOOK SMART

Qian, Ning

372

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Factors Affecting Photosynthesis! Temperature Eppley (1972) Light Sverdrup's Critical Depth-493, but the general concept is still valid! ! #12;PB opt & Temperature! #12;Photosynthesis & Temperature! Remember: in the laboratory, we can measure photosynthesis versus irradiance (PvsE) and calculate Ek, Pmax, and alpha

Kudela, Raphael M.

373

Material Effects and Detector Response Corrections for Bunch Length Measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A typical diagnostic used to determine the bunch length of ultra-short electron bunches is the auto-correlation of coherent transition radiation. This technique can produce artificially short bunch length results due to the attenuation of low frequency radiation if corrections for the material properties of the Michelson interferometer and detector response are not made. Measurements were taken using FTIR spectroscopy to determine the absorption spectrum of various materials and the response of a Molectron P1-45 pyroelectric detector. The material absorption data will be presented and limitations on the detector calibration discussed.

Zacherl, W.; Blumenfeld, I.; Berry, M.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Kirby, N.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

374

3D Flat Holography: Entropy and Logarithmic Corrections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the leading corrections to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the Flat Space Cosmological (FSC) solutions in 3D flat spacetimes, which are the flat analogues of the BTZ black holes in AdS3. The analysis is done by a computation of density of states in the dual 2D Galilean Conformal Field Theory and the answer obtained by this matches with the limiting value of the expected result for the BTZ inner horizon entropy as well as what is expected for a generic thermodynamic system. Along the way, we also develop other aspects of holography of 3D flat spacetimes.

Arjun Bagchi; Rudranil Basu

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

NLO QCD CORRECTIONS TO HADRONIC HIGGS PRODUCTION WITH HEAVY QUARKS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of a Higgs boson in association with a pair of t{bar t} or b{bar b} quarks plays a very important role at both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. The theoretical prediction of the corresponding cross sections has been improved by including the complete next-to-leading order QCD corrections. After a brief description of the most relevant technical aspects of the calculation, we review the results obtained for both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider.

DAWSON,S.; JACKSON,C.; ORR,L.; REINA,L.; WACHEROTH,D.

2003-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Topological Quantum Computation and Error Correction by Biological Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Topological examination of phospholipid dynamics in the Far from Equilibrium state has demonstrated that metabolically active cells use waste heat to generate spatially patterned membrane flows by forced convection and shear. This paper explains the resemblance between this nonlinear membrane model and Witten Kitaev type Topological Quantum Computation systems, and demonstrates how this self-organising membrane enables biological cells to circumvent the decoherence problem, perform error correction procedures, and produce classical level output as shielded current flow through cytoskeletal protein conduit. Cellular outputs are shown to be Turing compatible as they are determined by computable in principle hydromagnetic fluid flows, and importantly, are Adaptive from an Evolutionary perspective.

J T Lofthouse

2005-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

377

A proof of Scott's correction for Matter Pedro Balodis Matesanz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Fermi theory (TF in the next), distances scale as the 1=3 power of the nuclear average charge Z, i.e, we would) such that E Q R;Z;N := inf 2H; k k=1 h ; HR;Z;N i H #21; M X j=1 E Q (Z j ) + cZ 7=3 M X j=1 Z 1=3 ? j #1A proof of Scott's correction for Matter Pedro Balodis Matesanz January 2002 Abstract In this paper

378

Quantum corrections to classical evaluation of nonadiabatic transition rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently developed quantum correction approach is applied to evaluating the nonadiabatic quantum-mechanical transition rate between Born-Oppenheimer states of a subsystem embedded in a thermal bath of harmonic oscillators. In the first-order perturbation theory, the nonadiabatic rate can be expressed in terms of a quantum-mechanical correlation function, which can be estimated directly from classical data. Application to a popular spin-boson model shows that our results are in excellent agreement with the exact quantum-mechanical results.

Kim, Hyojoon; Rossky, Peter J. [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Institute for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

379

Closed orbit related problems: Correction, feedback, and analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Orbit correction - moving the orbit to a desired orbit, orbit stability - keeping the orbit on the desired orbit using feedback to filter out unwanted noise, and orbit analysis - to learn more about the model of the machine, are strongly interrelated. They are the three facets of the same problem. The better one knows the model of the machine, the better the predictions that can be made on the behavior of the machine (inverse modeling) and the more accurately one can control the machine. On the other hand, one of the tools to learn more about the machine (modeling) is to study and analyze the orbit response to {open_quotes}kicks.{close_quotes}

Bozoki, E.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

"Nucleon-Structural" Corrections to First Forbidden Unique Beta Transitions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coupling of leptons to a conserved isovector current is shown to result in a small change in the shape of the electron momentum spectrum in forbidden unique beta transitions. The experimental advantages and disadvantages of studying such nucleon-structural effects in forbidden unique transitions rather than in allowed transitions, as suggested by Gell-Mann, are discussed. To facilitate the computations, the betadecay interaction Hamiltonian is written in a form in which the terms leading to the "nucleon-structural" corrections associated with the coupling of the leptons to a conserved isovector current and the terms leading to effects of comparable order of magnitude are simply identified.

J. F. Dreitlein

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

QCD corrections to Higgs-boson decay and jet analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have calculated, within the framework of an on-shell renormalization scheme, the first-order QCD corrections to the rate of Higgs-boson decay to heavy quarks. Our analytic results are in complete agreement with those of Braaten and Leveille. We have also considered the Sterman-Weinberg jet structure for two- and three-jet decays of the Higgs boson. Here our results differ somewhat from those of Braaten and Leveille so we discuss the origin of this discrepancy; we extend their work by keeping the quark mass in the jet formulation.

Pat Kalyniak; Nita Sinha; Rahul Sinha; John N. Ng

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Instanton correction, wall crossing and mirror symmetry of Hitchin's moduli spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study two instanton correction problems of Hitchin's moduli spaces along with their wall crossing formulas. The hyperkahler metric of a Hitchin's moduli space can be put into an instanton-corrected form according to ...

Lu, Wenxuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

OPTIMAL ERROR ESTIMATES FOR CORRECTED TRAPEZOIDAL ERIK TALVILA AND MATTHEW WIERSMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OPTIMAL ERROR ESTIMATES FOR CORRECTED TRAPEZOIDAL RULES ERIK TALVILA AND MATTHEW WIERSMA Abstract WIERSMA Here, B(x, y) = (x)(y)/(x + y) is the beta function. See [4, Theorem 3.22]. (This corrects

Talvila, Erik

384

Calculated corrections to superallowed Fermi beta decay: New evaluation of the nuclear-structure-dependent terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is accurate calculations for the radiative and isospin symmetry-breaking corrections that must be applied to the experimental data. We present a new and consistent set of calculations for the nuclear-structure-dependent components of these corrections...

Towner, IS; Hardy, John C.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - adaptive aberration correction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

de Murcia Collection: Engineering ; Physics 36 Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of the Human EyeHuman Eye Summary:...

386

Efficient error correction for speech systems using constrained re-recognition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient error correction of recognition output is a major barrier in the adoption of speech interfaces. This thesis addresses this problem through a novel correction framework and user interface. The system uses constraints ...

Yu, Gregory T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 571: Area 9 Yucca Flat Plutonium Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide documentation and justification that no further corrective action is needed for the closure of CAU 571 based on the implementation of corrective actions. This includes a description of investigation activities, an evaluation of the data, and a description of corrective actions that were performed. The CAIP provides information relating to the scope and planning of the investigation. Therefore, that information will not be repeated in this document.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit560 comprises seven corrective action sites (CASs): 03-51-01, Leach Pit 06-04-02, Septic Tank 06-05-03, Leach Pit 06-05-04, Leach Bed 06-59-03, Building CP-400 Septic System 06-59-04, Office Trailer Complex Sewage Pond 06-59-05, Control Point Septic System The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 560 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 7, 2008, through February 24, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit560: Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, and Record of Technical Change No.1. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 560 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. The following contaminants were determined to be present at concentrations exceeding their corresponding FALs: No contamination exceeding the FALs was identified at CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and06-59-04. The soil at the base of the leach pit chamber at CAS06-05-03 contains arsenic above the FAL of 23 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 5 to 20 feet (ft) below ground surface. The contamination is confined laterally to the walls of the leach pit chamber and leach rock. The contamination present at CAS 06-05-03 within the leach pit was not feasible to remove. The surface and subsurface soils within and surrounding the septic system at CAS 06-05-04 contained PCB concentrations above the FAL of 0.74 mg/kg. Thelateral and vertical extent of COCs was determined for this CAS. Contaminated soils were removed up to within 18 ft of the building. The remaining contamination is confined to subsurface soils adjacent to and beneath BuildingCP-162 and was not feasible to remove. The solid materials within the septic tank and soils immediately surrounding the inlet end of the tank at CAS 06-59-03 contained benzo(a)pyrene above the FAL of 0.21 mg/kg. The soils, tank contents, and tank were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. The solids contained within the septic tank and inlet pipe at CAS 06-59-05 contained the following contaminants above their respective FALs: PCBs, arsenic, lead, benzo(a)pyrene, and pesticides. The tank and inlet pipe contents were removed. Materials remaining at this CAS do not contain contamination exceeding FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following corrective action recommendations: No further action for CASs 03-51-01, 06-04-02, and 06-59-04, as no contaminants of potential concern were present that exceed FALs. Closure in place for CAS 06-05-03 under a corrective action with a use restriction (UR) for remaining PCB- and arsenic-impacted potential source material (PSM). The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Closure in place for CAS 06-05-04 under a corrective action with a UR for remaining PCBs in soil adjacent to and beneath Building CP-162. The UR form and map have been filed in the NNSA/NSO Facility Information Management System, the FFACO database, and NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. No further action for CAS 06-59-0

Grant Evenson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Intensity-Value Corrections for Integrating Sphere Measurements of Solid Samples Measured behind Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate and calibrated directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra of solids are important for both in situ and remote sensing. Many solids are in the form of powders or granules and in order to measure their diffuse reflectance spectra in the laboratory, it is often necessary to place the samples behind a transparent medium such as glass for the UV, visible or near-infrared spectral regions. Using both experimental and theoretical methods we have found that the glass (fused quartz in our case) leads to artifacts in the reflectance values. We report for the first time that the measured reflectance intensity values, for both hemispherical and diffuse reflectance, are distorted by the additional reflectances arising at the air-quartz and sample-quartz interfaces. The values are dependent on the sample reflectance and are vertically shifted with intensity offsets in the hemispherical case leading to measured values up to ?6% too high for a 2% reflectance surface, ?3.8% too high for 10% reflecting materials, approximately correct for 40%- to 60%-diffuse reflecting surfaces, and ?1.5% too low for 99% reflecting Spectralon surfaces. For the case of diffuse-only reflectance, the measured values are uniformly too low due to the polished glass, with differences of nearly 6% for 99%-reflecting matte surfaces. The deviations arise from the added reflections from the quartz surfaces as verified by both theory and experiment, and have some dependence on sphere design. Empirical correction factors were implemented into post-processing software to redress the artifact for hemispherical and diffuse reflectance data across the 300 to 2300 nm range.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Redding, Rebecca L.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Myers, Tanya L.; Stephan, Eric G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 523: Housekeeping Waste, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure report documents the closure activities conducted for Corrective Action Unit 523: Housekeeping Waste, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Interacting entropy-corrected agegraphic Chaplygin gas model of dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we consider the interacting agegraphic dark energy models with entropy correction terms due to loop quantum gravity. We study the correspondence between the Chaplygin gas energy density with the interacting entropy-corrected agegraphic dark energy models in non-flat FRW universe. We reconstruct the potentials and the dynamics of the interacting entropy-corrected agegraphic scalar field models. This model is also extended to the interacting entropy-corrected agegraphic generalized Chaplygin gas dark energy.

M. Malekjani; A. Khodam-Mohammadi

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 557, Spills and Tank Sites, in Areas 1, 3, 6, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 557 comprises the following corrective action sites (CASs): 01-25-02, Fuel Spill 03-02-02, Area 3 Subdock UST 06-99-10, Tar Spills 25-25-18, Train Maintenance Bldg 3901 Spill Site The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to identify and provide the justification and documentation that supports the recommendation for closure of the CAU 557 CASs with no further corrective action. To achieve this, a corrective action investigation (CAI) was conducted from May 5 through November 24, 2008. The CAI activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 557: Spills and Tank Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada.

Alfred Wickline

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 567: Miscellaneous Soil Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 567 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. The corrective actions implemented at CAU 567 were developed based on an evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, the assumed presence of COCs at specific locations, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the CAAs. The CAAs were selected on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The implemented corrective actions meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The CAAs meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site. Based on the implementation of these corrective actions, the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 567. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection issue a Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office for closure of CAU 567. CAU 567 be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

Matthews, Patrick

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. CAU 105 comprises the following five corrective action sites (CASs): -02-23-04 Atmospheric Test Site - Whitney Closure In Place -02-23-05 Atmospheric Test Site T-2A Closure In Place -02-23-06 Atmospheric Test Site T-2B Clean Closure -02-23-08 Atmospheric Test Site T-2 Closure In Place -02-23-09 Atmospheric Test Site - Turk Closure In Place The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 105 based on the implementation of the corrective actions. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 22, 2012, through May 23, 2013, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 105: Area 2 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites; and in accordance with the Soils Activity Quality Assurance Plan, which establishes requirements, technical planning, and general quality practices.

Matthews, Patrick

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Spectral method for the correction of the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors: A comparison study of calibration procedures and validation in Cerenkov light-dominated situations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purposes of this work were: (1) To determine if a spectral method can accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) for situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and (2) to develop a procedural guideline for accurately determining the calibration factors of PSDs. Methods: The authors demonstrate, by using the equations of the spectral method, that the condition for accurately correcting the effect of Cerenkov light is that the ratio of the two calibration factors must be equal to the ratio of the Cerenkov light measured within the two different spectral regions used for analysis. Based on this proof, the authors propose two new procedures to determine the calibration factors of PSDs, which were designed to respect this condition. A PSD that consists of a cylindrical polystyrene scintillating fiber (1.6 mm{sup 3}) coupled to a plastic optical fiber was calibrated by using these new procedures and the two reference procedures described in the literature. To validate the extracted calibration factors, relative dose profiles and output factors for a 6 MV photon beam from a medical linac were measured with the PSD and an ionization chamber. Emphasis was placed on situations where the Cerenkov light is dominant over the scintillation light and on situations dissimilar to the calibration conditions. Results: The authors found that the accuracy of the spectral method depends on the procedure used to determine the calibration factors of the PSD and on the attenuation properties of the optical fiber used. The results from the relative dose profile measurements showed that the spectral method can correct the Cerenkov light effect with an accuracy level of 1%. The results obtained also indicate that PSDs measure output factors that are lower than those measured with ionization chambers for square field sizes larger than 25x25 cm{sup 2}, in general agreement with previously published Monte Carlo results. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the spectral method can be used to accurately correct the Cerenkov light effect in PSDs. The authors confirmed the importance of maximizing the difference of Cerenkov light production between calibration measurements. The authors also found that the attenuation of the optical fiber, which is assumed to be constant in the original formulation of the spectral method, may cause a variation of the calibration factors in some experimental setups.

Guillot, Mathieu; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis; Beddar, Sam; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Department of Radiation Physics, Unit 94, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec, Quebec G1K 7P4 (Canada) and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec, Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

PPPL Corrective Action Plan 11/23/2011 Page 1 of 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PPPL Corrective Action Plan 11/23/2011 Page 1 of 4 22 November 2011 PUPPPL Corrective, please contact Ron Strykowsky at rstrykow@pppl.gov CAR01: Acceleration of schedule and added scope will be approved by DOEPSO and DOEOFES. #12;PPPL Corrective Action Plan 11/23/2011 Page 2 of 4 CAR02

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

397

proovread: large-scale high-accuracy PacBio correction through iterative short read consensus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......proovread, a hybrid correction pipeline...hardware and infrastructure from a laptop...the existing hybrid correction programs...or computer grids, providing dozens...SR data for hybrid correction has...existing computer infrastructure. Therefore...running in a grid infrastructure......

Thomas Hackl; Rainer Hedrich; Jrg Schultz; Frank Frster

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Intensity of the Soft and Hard Component of the Cosmic Radiation as a Function of Altitude at Geomagnetic Latitudes of 28N, 41N, and 55N  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Counter telescopes have been flown with plastic balloons to a maximum altitude of 94,000 ft. Intensity vs pressure curves have been obtained at geomagnetic latitudes of ?=55?,41?,and28? for the total cosmic radiation and for the components capable of traversing several thickness of lead. The energy spectrum of primary cosmic-ray particles has been derived from the extrapolation of the intensity of the total radiation to the top of the atmosphere. The integral momentum spectrum of the total primary radiation is given by N(>pcZe)=0.49(pcZe)-1.0. The results show that the radiation originating from primaries in the energy range 1 to 4 Bev (cut-off energies at ?=55?and41?) is predominantly of a nucleonic nature. The absence of an appreciable electronic component can be explained by assuming that, close to the top of the atmosphere, electrons originate predominantly from the decay of neutral mesons and that, within this energy range, the over-all probability of nucleon emission is greater than that of meson production. In sharp contrast, the soft component originating from primaries in the range from 4 to 8 Bev (cut-off at ?=41?and28?) multiplies rapidly in the atmosphere. This large transition effect in air with a maximum at about 10 cm Hg pressure is very characteristic of electron showers. It is concluded that the probability of neutral mesons being produced is comparatively high at primary energies between 4 and 8 Bev. At energies higher than 8 Bev this effect is even more pronounced, due to the contribution of the plural and multiple production of mesons.

Marcello L. Vidale

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Galaxy rotation curves from general relativity with renormalization group corrections  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the application of quantum corrections computed using renormalization group arguments in the astrophysical domain and show that, for the most natural interpretation of the renormalization group scale parameter, a gravitational coupling parameter G varying 10{sup ?7} of its value across a galaxy (which is roughly a variation of 10{sup ?12} per light-year) is sufficient to generate galaxy rotation curves in agreement with the observations. The quality of the resulting fit is similar to the Isothermal profile quality once both the shape of the rotation curve and the mass-to-light ratios are considered for evaluation. In order to perform the analysis, we use recent high quality data from nine regular disk galaxies. For the sake of comparison, the same set of data is modeled also for the Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) and for the recently proposed Scalar Tensor Vector Gravity (STVG). At face value, the model based on quantum corrections clearly leads to better fits than these two alternative theories.

Rodrigues, Davi C.; Letelier, Patricio S. [Departamento de Matemtica Aplicada, IMECC, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Shapiro, Ilya L., E-mail: davi@ime.unicamp.br, E-mail: letelier@ime.unicamp.br, E-mail: shapiro@fisica.ufjf.br [Departamento de Fsica, ICE, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The contour method cutting assumption: error minimization and correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently developed contour method can measure 2-D, cross-sectional residual-stress map. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contours of the new surfaces created by the cut, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, are then measured and used to calculate the original residual stresses. The precise nature of the assumption about the cut is presented theoretically and is evaluated experimentally. Simply assuming a flat cut is overly restrictive and misleading. The critical assumption is that the width of the cut, when measured in the original, undeformed configuration of the body is constant. Stresses at the cut tip during cutting cause the material to deform, which causes errors. The effect of such cutting errors on the measured stresses is presented. The important parameters are quantified. Experimental procedures for minimizing these errors are presented. An iterative finite element procedure to correct for the errors is also presented. The correction procedure is demonstrated on experimental data from a steel beam that was plastically bent to put in a known profile of residual stresses.

Prime, Michael B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kastengren, Alan L [ANL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The electric and magnetic form factors of the proton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper describes a precise measurement of electron scattering off the proton at momentum transfers of $0.003 \\lesssim Q^2 \\lesssim 1$\\ GeV$^2$. The average point-to-point error of the cross sections in this experiment is $\\sim$ 0.37%. These data are used for a coherent new analysis together with all world data of unpolarized and polarized electron scattering from the very smallest to the highest momentum transfers so far measured. The extracted electric and magnetic form factors provide new insight into their exact shape, deviating from the classical dipole form, and of structure on top of this gross shape. The data reaching very low $Q^2$ values are used for a new determination of the electric and magnetic radii. An empirical determination of the Two-Photon-Exchange (TPE) correction is presented. The implications of this correction on the radii and the question of a directly visible signal of the pion cloud are addressed.

A1 Collaboration; J. C. Bernauer; M. O. Distler; J. Friedrich; Th. Walcher; P. Achenbach C. Ayerbe Gayoso; R. Bhm; L. Debenjak; L. Doria; A. Esser; H. Fonvieille; M. Gmez Rodrgues de la Paz; J. M. Friedrich; M. Makek; H. Merkel; D. G. Middleton; U. Mller; L. Nungesser; J. Pochodzalla; M. Potokar; S. Snchez Majos; B. S. Schlimme; S. irca; M. Weinriefer

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Determination of prescription dose for Cs-131 permanent implants using the BED formalism including resensitization correction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The current widely used biological equivalent dose (BED) formalism for permanent implants is based on the linear-quadratic model that includes cell repair and repopulation but not resensitization (redistribution and reoxygenation). The authors propose a BED formalism that includes all the four biological effects (4Rs), and the authors propose how it can be used to calculate appropriate prescription doses for permanent implants with Cs-131. Methods: A resensitization correction was added to the BED calculation for permanent implants to account for 4Rs. Using the same BED, the prescription doses with Au-198, I-125, and Pd-103 were converted to the isoeffective Cs-131 prescription doses. The conversion factor F, ratio of the Cs-131 dose to the equivalent dose with the other reference isotope (F{sub r}: with resensitization, F{sub n}: without resensitization), was thus derived and used for actual prescription. Different values of biological parameters such as ?, ?, and relative biological effectiveness for different types of tumors were used for the calculation. Results: Prescription doses with I-125, Pd-103, and Au-198 ranging from 10 to 160 Gy were converted into prescription doses with Cs-131. The difference in dose conversion factors with (F{sub r}) and without (F{sub n}) resensitization was significant but varied with different isotopes and different types of tumors. The conversion factors also varied with different doses. For I-125, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 0.51/0.46, for fast growing tumors, and 0.88/0.77 for slow growing tumors. For Pd-103, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.25/1.15 for fast growing tumors, and 1.28/1.22 for slow growing tumors. For Au-198, the average values of F{sub r}/F{sub n} were 1.08/1.25 for fast growing tumors, and 1.00/1.06 for slow growing tumors. Using the biological parameters for the HeLa/C4-I cells, the averaged value of F{sub r} was 1.07/1.11 (rounded to 1.1), and the averaged value of F{sub n} was 1.75/1.18. F{sub r} of 1.1 has been applied to gynecological cancer implants with expected acute reactions and outcomes as expected based on extensive experience with permanent implants. The calculation also gave the average Cs-131 dose of 126 Gy converted from the I-125 dose of 144 Gy for prostate implants. Conclusions: Inclusion of an allowance for resensitization led to significant dose corrections for Cs-131 permanent implants, and should be applied to prescription dose calculation. The adjustment of the Cs-131 prescription doses with resensitization correction for gynecological permanent implants was consistent with clinical experience and observations. However, the Cs-131 prescription doses converted from other implant doses can be further adjusted based on new experimental results, clinical observations, and clinical outcomes.

Luo, Wei, E-mail: wei.luo@uky.edu; Molloy, Janelle; Aryal, Prakash; Feddock, Jonathan; Randall, Marcus [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40536 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

8, 75097554, 2008 Low altitude  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cain 3 , J. Holloway 4 , J. A. Neuman 4 , T. Ryerson 5 , F. Flocke 6 , J. de Gouw 4 , E. Atlas7 , S in trace gas concentrations during transport were reproduced using a photochemical trajectory model/industrial regions can have large-scale impacts on levels of O3, particles, and other trace constituents downwind

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

An Illustration of the Corrective Action Process, The Corrective Action Management Unit at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Management Units (CAMUs) were established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to streamline the remediation of hazardous waste sites. Streamlining involved providing cost saving measures for the treatment, storage, and safe containment of the wastes. To expedite cleanup and remove disincentives, EPA designed 40 CFR 264 Subpart S to be flexible. At the heart of this flexibility are the provisions for CAMUs and Temporary Units (TUs). CAMUs and TUs were created to remove cleanup disincentives resulting from other Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste provisions--specifically, RCRA land disposal restrictions (LDRs) and minimum technology requirements (MTRs). Although LDR and MTR provisions were not intended for remediation activities, LDRs and MTRs apply to corrective actions because hazardous wastes are generated. However, management of RCRA hazardous remediation wastes in a CAMU or TU is not subject to these stringent requirements. The CAMU at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM) was proposed through an interactive process involving the regulators (EPA and the New Mexico Environment Department), DOE, SNL/NM, and stakeholders. The CAMU at SNL/NM has been accepting waste from the nearby Chemical Waste Landfill remediation since January of 1999. During this time, a number of unique techniques have been implemented to save costs, improve health and safety, and provide the best value and management practices. This presentation will take the audience through the corrective action process implemented at the CAMU facility, from the selection of the CAMU site to permitting and construction, waste management, waste treatment, and final waste placement. The presentation will highlight the key advantages that CAMUs and TUs offer in the corrective action process. These advantages include yielding a practical approach to regulatory compliance, expediting efficient remediation and site closure, and realizing potentially significant cost savings compared to off-site disposal. Specific examples of CA MU advantages realized by SNL/NM will be presented along with the above highlighted process improvements, Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) performance, and associated lessons learned.

Irwin, M.; Kwiecinski, D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

Many Factors Affect MPG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy Many Factors Affect Fuel Economy How You Drive Vehicle Maintenance Fuel Variations Vehicle Variations Engine Break-In Vehicles in traffic Quick acceleration and heavy braking can reduce fuel economy by up to 33 percent on the highway and 5 percent around town. New EPA tests account for faster acceleration rates, but vigorous driving can still lower MPG. Excessive idling decreases MPG. The EPA city test includes idling, but more idling will lower MPG. Driving at higher speeds increases aerodynamic drag (wind resistance), reducing fuel economy. The new EPA tests account for aerodynamic drag up to highway speeds of 80 mph, but some drivers exceed this speed. Cold weather and frequent short trips can reduce fuel economy, since your engine doesn't operate efficiently until it is warmed up. In colder

406

Human Factors Review Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R. (eds.)

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 145: Wells and Storage Holes, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with ROTC No. 1 and Addendum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 145, Wells and Storage Holes in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 145 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 03-20-01, Core Storage Holes; (2) 03-20-02, Decon Pad and Sump; (3) 03-20-04, Injection Wells; (4) 03-20-08, Injection Well; (5) 03-25-01, Oil Spills; and (6) 03-99-13, Drain and Injection Well. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the six CASs within CAU 145. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 1, 2005, through November 8, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 145 Corrective Action Investigation Plan and Record of Technical Change No. 1. Analytes detected during the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) were evaluated against appropriate final action levels to identify the contaminants of concern for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified contaminants of concern at one of the six CASs in CAU 145 and required the evaluation of corrective action alternatives. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 145 revealed the following: CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13 do not contain contamination; and CAS 03-25-01 has pentachlorophenol and arsenic contamination in the subsurface soils. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations at the six CASs, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for CAU 145. No further action is the preferred corrective action for CASs 03-20-01, 03-20-02, 03-20-04, 03-20-08, and 03-99-13. Close in place is the preferred corrective action for CAS 03-25-01. The preferred corrective action alternatives were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. The alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The alternatives meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 145.

David Strand

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Lowest-order relativistic corrections to the fundamental limits of nonlinear-optical coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of small relativistic corrections to the off-resonant polarizability, hyperpolarizability, and second hyperpolarizability are investigated. Corrections to linear and nonlinear optical coefficients are demonstrated in the three-level ansatz, which includes corrections to the Kuzyk limits when scaled to semi-relativistic energies. It is also shown that the maximum value of the hyperpolarizability is more sensitive than the maximum polarizability or second hyperpolarizability to lowest-order relativistic corrections. These corrections illustrate how the intrinsic nonlinear-optical response is affected at semi-relativistic energies.

Nathan J. Dawson

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

GUP-Corrected Thermodynamics for all Black Objects and the Existence of Remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the universality of the entropy-area relation of a black hole, and the fact that the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) adds a logarithmic correction term to the entropy in accordance with most approaches to quantum gravity, we argue that the GUP-corrected entropy-area relation is universal for all black objects. This correction to the entropy produces corrections to the thermodynamics. We explicitly calculate these corrections for two types of black holes: Reissner--Nordstr\\"{o}m and Kerr black holes, and we find that both produce a remnant.

Faizal, Mir

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This CAIP presents a plan to investigate the nature and extent of the contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at CAU 135. The purpose of the corrective action investigation described in this CAIP is to: (1) Identify the presence and nature of COPCs; (2) Determine the location of radiological contamination within the vault and determine the extent of COPCs in the sump area and on the floor; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAS 25-02-01. This CAIP was developed using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) (EPA, 1994) process to clearly define the goals for collecting environmental data, to determine data uses, and to design a data collection program that will satisfy these uses. A DQO scoping meeting was held prior to preparation of this plan; a brief summary of the DQOs is presented in Section 3.4. A more detailed summary of the DQO process and results is included in Appendix A.

DOE/NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Nuclear mass form factors from coherent photoproduction of $?^0$ mesons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data for coherent photoproduction of $\\pi^0$ mesons from nuclei ($^{12}$C, $^{40}$Ca, $^{93}$Nb, $^{nat}$Pb), recently measured with the TAPS detector at the Mainz MAMI accelerator, have been analyzed in view of the mass form factors of the nuclei. The form factors have been extracted in plane wave approximation of the $A(\\gamma ,\\pi^0)A$ reaction and corrected for final state interaction effects with the help of distorted wave impulse approximations. Nuclear mass rms-radii have been calculated from the slope of the form factors for $q^2\\to 0$. Furthermore, the Helm model (hard sphere form factor folded with Gaussian) was used to extract diffraction radii from the zeroes of the form factor and skin thicknesses from the position and height of its first maximum. The diffraction radii from the Helm model agree with the corresponding charge radii obtained from electron scattering experiments within their uncertainties of a few per cent. The rms-radii from the slope of the form factors are systematically lower by up to 5% for PWIA and up to 10% for DWIA. Also the skin thicknesses extracted from the Helm model are systematically smaller than their charge counter parts.

B. Krusche

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of the Human EyeHuman Eye  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA of theModeling Measuring and Correcting the LCA aberration (LCA) and transverse chromatic aberration (TCA). In the presence of polychromatic light, these two types of chromatic aberrations have an impact on the retinal image. Studied isolated, both the LCA

Ribak, Erez

413

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 224, Decon Pad and Septic Systems, in Areas 2, 3, 5, 6, 11, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 224 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 02-04-01, Septic Tank (Buried); (2) 03-05-01, Leachfield; (3) 05-04-01, Septic Tanks (4)/Discharge Area; (4) 06-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (3); (5) 06-05-01, Leachfield; (6) 06-17-04, Decon Pad and Wastewater Catch; (7) 06-23-01, Decon Pad Discharge Piping; (8) 11-04-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (9) 23-05-02, Leachfield. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for the nine CASs within CAU 224. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from August 10, 2004, through January 18, 2005, as set forth in the CAU 224 Corrective Action Investigation Plan.

David A. Strand

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

2006 Faculty of Science Handbook errata The following are corrections to the printed version of the 2006 Faculty of Science Handbook. Corrections are arranged by Chapter,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 2006 Faculty of Science Handbook errata The following are corrections to the printed version of the 2006 Faculty of Science Handbook. Corrections are arranged by Chapter, and then by page number 12 Physics Major is offered at the Advanced level. Page 48 Bachelor of Science and Technology (BST

Du, Jie

415

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 516: Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office's (NNSA/NSO's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 516, Septic Systems and Discharge Points, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 516 consists of six Corrective Action Sites: 03-59-01, Building 3C-36 Septic System; 03-59-02, Building 3C-45 Septic System; 06-51-01, Sump Piping, 06-51-02, Clay Pipe and Debris; 06-51-03, Clean Out Box and Piping; and 22-19-04, Vehicle Decontamination Area. Located in Areas 3, 6, and 22 of the NTS, CAU 516 is being investigated because disposed waste may be present without appropriate controls, and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present or migrating at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information and process knowledge on the expected nature and extent of contamination of CAU 516 are insufficient to select preferred corrective action alternatives; therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Sites Office

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

Correction for Liechti et al., Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition Lowers Mortality and Brain Injury in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2014 correction Author Corrections Correction for Liechti et al., Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition Lowers Mortality and Brain Injury in Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis Fabian D. Liechti a b Denis Grandgirard a David Leppert c Stephen L. Leib a...

Fabian D. Liechti; Denis Grandgirard; David Leppert; Stephen L. Leib

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Success factors of energy efficiency measures in buildings in Norway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of the study was to identify factors and parameters, which could contribute to the successful implementation of energy efficiency measures in buildings, and to find which parameters introduce uncertainties in achieving the planned energy savings. A database of 41 buildings was developed for the analysis. The database contained information related to buildings, energy efficiency measures, and energy use over several years. A presentation method for the persistence of the energy efficiency measures was introduced. Through the energy performance contract, energy savings of 30% of the total energy use were suggested on average. The results showed that the success factors of the energy efficiency measures were: previous energy use, project cost, consultant experience and engagement, and implementation of a good operation plan. The persistence of the energy efficiency measures was influenced by the achieved savings in the first year, the guaranty period, and the implementation of the operation measures. Uncertainties in the presented results were induced by the following factors: temperature correction method, difference in reported building area, correctness of the information regarding the implemented measures, and calculation method. The uncertainty due to lack of information or not delivering the operation measures was about 20% of the total energy use.

Natasa Nord; Stine Fjrli Sjthun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 371, Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe, located within Areas 11 and 18 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 comprises two corrective action sites (CASs): 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 371 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of closure in place with administrative controls was implemented at both CASs. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 8, 2009, through February 16, 2010, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides and investigation of other releases (migration in washes and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 371 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the dataset is acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. Radiological doses exceeding the FAL of 25 millirem per year were not found to be present in the surface soil. However, it was assumed that radionuclides are present in subsurface media within the Johnnie Boy crater and the fissure at Pin Stripe. Due to the assumption of radiological dose exceeding the FAL, corrective actions were undertaken that consist of implementing a use restriction and posting warning signs at each site. These use restrictions were recorded in the FFACO database; the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Facility Information Management System; and the NNSA/NSO CAU/CAS files. Therefore, NNSA/NSO provides the following recommendations: No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 371. A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 371. Corrective Action Unit 371 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

Patrick Matthews

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CAU 366 comprises six corrective action sites (CASs): 11-08-01, Contaminated Waste Dump #1 11-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump #2 11-23-01, Radioactively Contaminated Area A 11-23-02, Radioactively Contaminated Area B 11-23-03, Radioactively Contaminated Area C 11-23-04, Radioactively Contaminated Area D The purpose of this CADD is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of corrective action alternatives (CAA) for the six CASs within CAU 366. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 12, 2011, to May 14, 2012, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites.

Patrick Matthews

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Method and apparatus for optical phase error correction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The phase value of a phase-sensitive optical device, which includes an optical transport region, is modified by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam such that the phase value is changed from a first phase value to a second phase value, where the second phase value is different from the first phase value. The portion of the optical transport region that is exposed to the laser beam can be a surface of the optical transport region or a portion of the volume of the optical transport region. In an embodiment of the invention, the phase value of the optical device is corrected by laser processing. At least a portion of the optical transport region is exposed to a laser beam until the phase value of the optical device is within a specified tolerance of a target phase value.

DeRose, Christopher; Bender, Daniel A.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

None

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Orbit correction using virtual monitors at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An orbit correction algorithm is developed to achieve the following goals for the CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab.: (1) Pre-processing of orbit input to account for estimated misalignment and monitor errors. (2) Automatic elimination of blind spots caused by response matrix degeneracy. (3) Transparency of exception handling to interchangeable generic steering engines. (4) CEBAF-specific demands on control of injection angle, path length, orbit effects on optics, simultaneous multiple pass steering, and orbit control at un-monitored locations. All of the above can be accomplished by the introduction of virtual monitors into the processed input orbit, whose theoretical basis is to be discussed in this report. Implementation of all or part of these features and operational experience during the CEBAF variable energy runs will also be discussed.

Chao, Yu-Chiu; Bowling, B.; Witherspoon, S.; Zeijts, J. van; Watson, W.A. III

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Integration of RCRA corrective action with Clean Water Act compliance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic fibers manufacturing facility is implementing an integrated phased program to upgrade its existing wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) to comply with both the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The existing WWTP consists of an influent settling basin, two equalization basins, two aeration basins with low- and high-speed aerators, three secondary clarifiers, post-aeration, and belt filter press dewatering with on-site landfilling. The existing WWTP will be replaced with a tank-based system that will include equalization, biological treatment, clarification, effluent filtration, and effluent diffusion. RCRA regulatory compliance incorporated the Corrective Action Program, the Toxicity Characteristic Rule, the Land Disposal Restrictions, and closure/postclosure requirements. Clean Water Act compliance incorporated the Organic Chemicals, Plastics, and Synthetic Fibers (OCPSF) effluent guidelines, effluent toxicity and general water quality requirements. Logistically, project implementation involved fast-track design and construction, close regulatory interface, and maintenance of production process continuity.

Cable, J.K.; Starlin, L.A.; Giltner, J.A.: Futch, R.S.; Ballard, R.W. (CH2M Hill, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Vorticity Preserving Flux Corrected Transport Scheme for the Acoustic Equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long term research goals are to develop an improved cell-centered Lagrangian Hydro algorithm with the following qualities: 1. Utilizes Flux Corrected Transport (FCT) to achieve second order accuracy with multidimensional physics; 2. Does not rely on the one-dimensional Riemann problem; and 3. Implements a form of vorticity control. Short term research goals are to devise and implement a 2D vorticity preserving FCT solver for the acoustic equations on an Eulerian mesh: 1. Develop a flux limiting mechanism for systems of governing equations with symmetric wave speeds; 2. Verify the vorticity preserving properties of the scheme; and 3. Compare the performance of the scheme to traditional MUSCL-Hancock and other algorithms.

Lung, Tyler B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roe, Phil [University of Michigan; Morgan, Nathaniel R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Environmental Assisted Quantum Information Correction for Continuous Variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum information protocols are inevitably affected by decoherence which is associated with the leakage of quantum information into an environment. In this paper we address the possibility of recovering the quantum information from an environmental measurement. We investigate continuous variable quantum information, and we propose a simple environmental measurement that under certain circumstances fully restores the quantum information of the signal state although the state is not reconstructed with unit fidelity. We implement the protocol for which information is encoded into conjugate quadratures of coherent states of light and the noise added under the decoherence process is of Gaussian nature. The correction protocol is tested using both a deterministic as well as a probabilistic strategy. The potential use of the protocol in a continuous variable quantum key distribution scheme as a means to combat excess noise is also investigated.

Metin Sabuncu; Radim Filip; Gerd Leuchs; Ulrik L. Andersen

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

426

Accurate light-time correction due to a gravitating mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work arose as an aftermath of Cassini's 2002 experiment \\cite{bblipt03}, in which the PPN parameter $\\gamma$ was measured with an accuracy $\\sigma_\\gamma = 2.3\\times 10^{-5}$ and found consistent with the prediction $\\gamma =1$ of general relativity. The Orbit Determination Program (ODP) of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which was used in the data analysis, is based on an expression for the gravitational delay which differs from the standard formula; this difference is of second order in powers of $m$ -- the sun's gravitational radius -- but in Cassini's case it was much larger than the expected order of magnitude $m^2/b$, where $b$ is the ray's closest approach distance. Since the ODP does not account for any other second-order terms, it is necessary, also in view of future more accurate experiments, to systematically evaluate higher order corrections and to determine which terms are significant. Light propagation in a static spacetime is equivalent to a problem in ordinary geometrical optics; Fermat's action functional at its minimum is just the light-time between the two end points A and B. A new and powerful formulation is thus obtained. Asymptotic power series are necessary to provide a safe and automatic way of selecting which terms to keep at each order. Higher order approximations to the delay and the deflection are obtained. We also show that in a close superior conjunction, when $b$ is much smaller than the distances of A and B from the Sun, of order $R$, say, the second-order correction has an \\emph{enhanced} part of order $m^2R/b^2$, which corresponds just to the second-order terms introduced in the ODP. Gravitational deflection of the image of a far away source, observed from a finite distance from the mass, is obtained to $O(m^2)$.

Neil Ashby; Bruno Bertotti

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

427

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 190, Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (1996, as amended January 2007). Corrective Action Unit 190 is comprised of the following four corrective action sites (CASs): 11-02-01, Underground Centrifuge 11-02-02, Drain Lines and Outfall 11-59-01, Tweezer Facility Septic System 14-23-01, LTU-6 Test Area The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 190 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from March 21 through June 26, 2007. All CAI activities were conducted as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 190: Contaminated Waste Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective process: Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 190 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the data quality objective data needs.

Alfred Wickline

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 370: T-4 Atmospheric Test Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 370 is located in Area 4 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 370 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 04-23-01, Atmospheric Test Site T-4. This site is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and/or implement a corrective action. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The investigation results may also be used to evaluate improvements in the Soils Project strategy to be implemented. The site will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 10, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Desert Research Institute; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 370. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to the CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 370 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Perform field screening. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, collect samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste including debris deemed to be potential source material, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Pat Matthews

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO,1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following 12 corrective action sites: 02-09-48, Area 2 Mud Plant #1 02-09-49, Area 2 Mud Plant #2 02-99-05, Mud Spill 03-09-02, Mud Dump Trenches 04-44-02, Mud Spill 04-99-02, Mud Spill 12-09-01, Mud Pit 12-09-04, Mud Pit 12-09-08, Mud Pit 12-30-14, Cellar 12-99-07, Mud Dump 15-09-01, Mud Pit The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 234 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. If contaminants of concern are present, determine their extent. Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 234 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Attenuation of ultraviolet radiation in mountain lakes: Factors ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-altitude lakes are exposed to high fluence rates of solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR; 290400 nm) ... Rimouski, Quebec, G5L 3A1 Canada (isabelle laurion@.

1910-00-90T23:59:59.000Z

431

Minimizing the Lead-Acid Battery Bank Capacity through a Solar PV - Wind Turbine Hybrid System for a high-altitude village in the Nepal Himalayas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Of the estimated 1.6-2 billion people who lacked access to electricity at the end of the last millennium, millions have gained access to basic indoor lighting through off grid solar PV home systems with lead acid battery storage over the last decade. In Nepal, through government subsidy programs and INGO/NGO projects, around 350,000 solar PV home systems have been installed since 2001, mainly in remote, high altitude Himalayan communities. The author's field experience shows that within 6-24 months, 50-70% of the solar PV home systems are either not properly functioning, or not working at all. This is mainly due to substandard equipment, lack of user awareness, inability to maintain their systems, as well as the nonexistence of after sales services. Thus, an estimated 250,000 dead, flooded lead-acid batteries are either unsafely disposed of or lying around, posing huge potential hazards for people and the unique yet fragile Himalayan ecosystem. The research conducted demonstrates that by tapping into more than one renewable energy resource, converting the local available solar and wind resources into electricity through a solar PV - wind turbine hybrid RAPS (Remote Area Power Supply) system, the lead-acid battery bank capacity can be minimized by 57%, compared to an equivalent energy generating solar PV RAPS system, without jeopardizing, or reducing the village's load demands. This project shows that wind and solar resources are complimentary to each other over several hours in an average day. Thus, by utilizing both of the local wind and solar resources and converting them into electricity to meet the loads directly or to store into the lead-acid battery bank, it allows an average of 3-4hours longer electricity generation per day. This enables the design of smaller battery bank capacities for hybrid RAPS systems without limiting the end users energy services. Hence, long-term health risks to the people, as well as environmental damage to the delicate and exceptional Himalayan flora and fauna through disposed dead lead-acid batteries, is reduced.

Zahnd Alex; Angel Clark; Wendy Cheung; Linda Zou; Jan Kleissl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

22 - Conversion Factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter details the viscosity and pressure conversion chart. To convert absolute or dynamic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column then multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also explains that to convert kinematic viscosity from one set of units to another, one must locate the given set of units in the left-hand column and multiply the numerical value by the factor shown horizontally to the right-hand side, under the set of units desired. The chapter also defines how the conversion from natural gas to other fuels has progressed from possibility to reality for many companies and will become necessary for many others in months and years ahead. Fuels that are considered practical replacements for gas include coal, heavy fuel oils, middle distillates (such as kerosinetypeturbo fuel and burner fuel oils) and liquefied petroleum gas.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 371: Johnnie Boy Crater and Pin Stripe Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 371 is located in Areas 11 and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 371 is comprised of the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 11-23-05, Pin Stripe Contamination Area 18-45-01, U-18j-2 Crater (Johnnie Boy) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 19, 2008, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 371. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 371 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Measure in situ external dose rates using thermoluminescent dosimeters or other dose measurement devices. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal dose rates. Combine internal and external dose rates to determine whether total dose rates exceed final action levels (FALs). Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine whether chemical contaminants are present at concentrations exceeding FALs. If contamination exceeds FALs, define the extent of the contamination exceeding FALs. Investigate waste to determine whether potential source material is present. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy; and U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval of the plan.

Patrick Matthews

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed for Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The Frenchman Flat CAU is located along the eastern border of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and includes portions of Areas 5 and 11. The Frenchman Flat CAU constitutes one of several areas of the Nevada Test Site used for underground nuclear testing in the past. The nuclear tests resulted in groundwater contamination in the vicinity as well as downgradient of the underground test areas. The CAIP describes the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) to be conducted at the Frenchman Flat CAU to evaluate the extent of contamination in groundwater due to the underground nuclear testing. The Frenchman Flat CAI will be conducted by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project which is a part of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Environmental Restoration Project. The CAIP is a requirement of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996 ) agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Based on the general definition of a CAI from Section IV.14 of the FFACO, the purpose of the CAI is ''...to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities...'' (FFACO, 1996). However, for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs, ''...the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use.'', as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). According to the UGTA strategy (Appendix VI of the FFACO), the CAI of a given CAU starts with the evaluation of the existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Such is the case for the Frenchman Flat CAU. The current scope of the Frenchman Flat CAI includes the development and use of a three-dimensional (3-D), numerical, CAU-scale groundwater flow and contaminant transport model to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The CAU model will be developed and used to predict the location of the contaminant boundary. The scope of this CAI does not currently include any characterization activities; however, such activities will be conducted if the CAU model results indicate that further characterization information is needed to develop a sufficiently reliable CAU model. Two areas of importance to the CAU model are the model area and the investigation area. The CAU-model area will be selected to encompass the Frenchman Flat CAU and the region located immediately downgradient where contamination may migrate. The extent of the CAU-model area is dependent on the extent of contamination and is uncertain at this point. The extent of the investigation area is not expected to increase during the CAI.

USDOE/NV

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Corrective action investigation plan: Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit, Corrective Action Unit 332. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains a detailed description and plan for an environmental investigation of the Area 2 Photo Skid 16 Wastewater Pit. The site is located in Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site. The Photo Skid Wastewater Pit was used for disposal of photochemical process waste, and there is a concern that such disposal may have released photochemicals and metals to the soil beneath the pit and adjacent to it. The purpose of this investigation is to identify the presence and nature of contamination present in and adjacent to the wastewater pit and to determine the appropriate course of environmental response action for the site. The potential courses of action for the site are clean closure through remediation, closure in place (with or without remediation), or no further action.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Order-v4 relativistic corrections to ? inclusive decay into a charm pair  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we determine the short-distance coefficients for ? inclusive decay into a charm pair through relative order v4 within the framework of nonrelativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formula. The short-distance coefficient of the order-v4 color-singlet NRQCD matrix element is obtained through matching the decay rate of bb(S1[1]3)?ccgg in full QCD to that in NRQCD. The double and single IR divergences appearing in the decay rate are exactly canceled through the next-to-next-to-leading-order renormalization of the operator O(S1[8]3) and the next-to-leading-order renormalization of the operators O(PJ[8]3). To investigate the convergence of the relativistic expansion arising from the color-singlet contributions, we study the ratios of the order-v2 and -v4 color-singlet short-distance coefficients to the leading-order one. Our results indicate that though the order-v4 color-singlet short-distance coefficient is quite large, the relativistic expansion for the color-singlet contributions in the process ??cc+X converges well due to a small value of v. In addition, we extrapolate the value of the mass ratio of the charm quark to the bottom quark, and find the relativistic corrections rise quickly with increase of the mass ratio.

Wen-Long Sang, Hai-Ting Chen, and Yu-Qi Chen

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

Exposure factors handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document provides a summary of the available data on various factors used in assessing human exposure including drinking-water consumption, consumption rates of broad classes of food including fruits, vegetables, beef, dairy products, and fish; soil ingestion; inhalation rate; skin area; lifetime; activity patterns; and body weight. Additionally, a number of specific exposure scenarios are identified with recommendations for default values to use when site-specific data are not available. The basic equations using these parameters to calculate exposure levels are also presented for each scenario. Default values are presented as ranges from typical to reasonable worst case and as frequency distributions where appropriate data were available. Finally, procedures for assessing the uncertainties in exposure assessments are also presented with illustrative examples. These procedures include qualitative and quantitative methods such as Monte Carlo and sensitivity analysis.

Konz, J.J.; Lisi, K.; Friebele, E.; Dixon, D.A.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 204: Storage Bunkers, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (December 2002, Revision No.: 0), Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 204 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 204 is located on the Nevada Test Site approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which include: 01-34-01, Underground Instrument House Bunker; 02-34-01, Instrument Bunker; 03-34-01, Underground Bunker; 05-18-02, Chemical Explosives Storage; 05-33-01, Kay Blockhouse; 05-99-02, Explosive Storage Bunker. Based on site history, process knowledge, and previous field efforts, contaminants of potential concern for Corrective Action Unit 204 collectively include radionuclides, beryllium, high explosives, lead, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons, silver, warfarin, and zinc phosphide. The primary question for the investigation is: ''Are existing data sufficient to evaluate appropriate corrective actions?'' To address this question, resolution of two decision statements is required. Decision I is to ''Define the nature of contamination'' by identifying any contamination above preliminary action levels (PALs); Decision II is to ''Determine the extent of contamination identified above PALs. If PALs are not exceeded, the investigation is completed. If PALs are exceeded, then Decision II must be resolved. In addition, data will be obtained to support waste management decisions. Field activities will include radiological land area surveys, geophysical surveys to identify any subsurface metallic and nonmetallic debris, field screening for applicable contaminants of potential concern, collection and analysis of surface and subsurface soil samples from biased locations, and step-out sampling to define the extent of contamination, as necessary. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

NNSA /NSO

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's selection of recommended corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 127: Areas 25 and 26 Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 127 consists of twelve corrective action sites (CASs). Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from February 24, 2003, through May 2, 2003, with additional sampling conducted on June 6, 2003, June 9, 2003, and June 24, 2003. Analytes detected during these investigation activities were evaluated against preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern (COCs) for each CAS, resulting in the determination that only two of the CASs did not have COCs exceeding regulatory levels. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the CAI, review of future and current operations in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential CAAs, the following alternatives were developed for consideration: (1) No Further Action is the preferred corrective action for the two CASs (25-02-13, 26-02-01) identified with no COCs; (2) Clean Closure is the preferred corrective action for eight of the CASs (25-01-05, 25-23-11, 25-12-01, 25-01-06, 26-01-01, 26-01-02, 26-99-01, 26-23-01); and (3) Closure in Place is the preferred corrective action for the remaining two CASs (25-01-07, 25-02-02). These three alternatives were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. Additionally, these alternatives meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the sites at CAU 127 and will reduce potential future exposure pathways to the contaminated media.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 166 is located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is comprised of the seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: (1) 02-42-01, Cond. Release Storage Yd - North; (2) 02-42-02, Cond. Release Storage Yd - South; (3) 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; (4) 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; (5) 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; (6) 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and (7) 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 28, 2006, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; and Bechtel Nevada. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 166. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS. The scope of the CAI for CAU 166 includes the following activities: (1) Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. (2) Conduct radiological surveys. (3) Perform field screening. (4) Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine if contaminants of concern are present. (5) If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. (6) Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management and minimization purposes. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'', this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, and field work will commence following approval.

David Strand

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "altitude correction factor" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 570: Area 9 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The purpose of the CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed.

Matthews, Patrick

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 106: Area 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises four corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 05-20-02, Evaporation Pond; (2) 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able; (3) 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area; (4) 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area. The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation that no further corrective action is needed for CAU 106 based on the implementation of corrective actions. The corrective action of clean closure was implemented at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05, while no corrective action was necessary at CASs 05-20-02 and 05-23-05. Corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from October 20, 2010, through June 1, 2011, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites. The approach for the CAI was divided into two facets: investigation of the primary release of radionuclides, and investigation of other releases (mechanical displacement and chemical releases). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process. The CAU 106 dataset of investigation results was evaluated based on a data quality assessment. This assessment demonstrated the dataset is complete and acceptable for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Investigation results were evaluated against final action levels (FALs) established in this document. A radiological dose FAL of 25 millirem per year was established based on the Industrial Area exposure scenario (2,250 hours of annual exposure). The only radiological dose exceeding the FAL was at CAS 05-45-05 and was associated with potential source material (PSM). It is also assumed that additional PSM in the form of depleted uranium (DU) and DU-contaminated debris at CASs 05-45-04 and 05-45-05 exceed the FAL. Therefore, corrective actions were undertaken at these CASs that consisted of removing PSM and collecting verification samples. Results of verification samples show that remaining soil does not contain contamination exceeding the FALs. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective actions are necessary for CAU 106. (2) A Notice of Completion to NNSA/NSO is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 106. (3) Corrective Action Unit 106 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO.

Patrick Matthews and Dawn Peterson

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Metallophilic interactions from dispersion-corrected density-functional theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, we present the first comprehensive study of metallophilic (aurophilic) interactions using dispersion-corrected density-functional theory. Dispersion interactions (an essential component of metallophilicity) are treated using the exchange-hole dipole moment (XDM) model. By comparing against coupled-cluster benchmark calculations on simple dimers, we show that LC-?PBE-XDM is a viable functional to study interactions between closed-shell transition metals and that it performs uniformly better than second-order Mller-Plesset theory, the basic computational technique used in previous works. We apply LC-?PBE-XDM to address several open questions regarding metallophilicity, such as the interplay between dispersion and relativistic effects, the interaction strength along group 11, the additivity of homo- and hetero-metallophilic effects, the stability of [E(AuPH{sub 3}){sub 4}]{sup +} cations (E = N, P, As, Sb), and the role of metallophilic effects in crystal packing. We find that relativistic effects explain the prevalence of aurophilicity not by stabilizing metal-metal contacts, but by preventing gold from forming ionic structures involving bridge anions (which are otherwise common for Ag and Cu) as a result of the increased electron affinity of the metal. Dispersion effects are less important than previously assumed and their stabilization contribution is relatively independent of the metal.

Otero-de-la-Roza, Alberto, E-mail: aoterodelaroza@ucmerced.edu; Mallory, Joel D.; Johnson, Erin R., E-mail: ejohnson29@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

Trapped Ion Quantum Error Correcting Protocols Using Only Global Operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum error-correcting codes are many-body entangled states that are prepared and measured using complex sequences of entangling operations. Each element of such an entangling sequence introduces noise to delicate quantum information during the encoding or reading out of the code. It is important therefore to find efficient entangling protocols to avoid the loss of information. Here we propose an experiment that uses only global entangling operations to encode an arbitrary logical qubit to either the five-qubit repetition code or the five-qubit code, with a six-ion Coulomb crystal architecture in a Penning trap. We show that the use of global operations enables us to prepare and read out these codes using only six and ten global entangling pulses, respectively. The proposed experiment also allows the acquisition of syndrome information during readout. We provide a noise analysis for the presented protocols, estimating that we can achieve a six-fold improvement in coherence time with noise as high as $\\sim 1\\%$ on each entangling operation.

Joseph F. Goodwin; Benjamin J. Brown; Graham Stutter; Howard Dale; Richard C. Thompson; Terry Rudolph

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

Light-by-light scattering single-logarithmic corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider three-loop radiative-recoil corrections to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by the gauge invariant set of diagrams with virtual light-by-light scattering block. These corrections are enhanced by the large logarithms of the electron-muon mass ratio. We present the results of an analytic calculation of the single-logarithmic radiative-recoil corrections of order ?2(Z?)(m/M)EF to hyperfine splitting in muonium generated by these diagrams.

Michael I. Eides and Valery A. Shelyuto

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Reed-Solomon error-correction as a software patch mechanism.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explores how error-correction data generated by a Reed-Solomon code may be used as a mechanism to apply changes to an existing installed codebase. Using the Reed-Solomon code to generate error-correction data for a changed or updated codebase will allow the error-correction data to be applied to an existing codebase to both validate and introduce changes or updates from some upstream source to the existing installed codebase.

Pendley, Kevin D.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

XAFS Debye-Waller factors for Zn metalloproteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An accurate and practical method for the calculation and use of thermal x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) Debye-Waller factors (DWFs) in active sites of metalloproteins is presented. These factors are calculated on model clusters within the local density functional approximation with nonlocal corrections. The DWFs are mapped out and parametrized as a function of the first shell distance and an angle (where applicable), for all significant single and multiple scattering paths, as well as the sample temperature. This approach is applied to the biologically essential but spectroscopically silent Zn{sup +2} active sites composed of histidines, cysteines, and carboxylate ligands in homogeneous and heterogeneous environments. Detailed analysis of the relative scattering paths for Zn metalloproteins using projected vibrational density of states further explain why these paths are not detectable by XAFS for first shell metal-ligand distances above a 'cutoff' value.

Dimakis, Nicholas; Bunker, Grant [Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, Illinois 60616-3793 (United States)

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Triton Electric Form Factor at Low-Energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the Effective Field Theory(EFT) expansion recently developed by the authors, we compute the charge form factor of triton up to next-to-next-to-leading order (N$^2$LO). The three-nucleon forces(3NF) is required for renormalization of the three-nucleon system and it effects are predicted for process and is qualitatively supported by available experimental data. We also show that, by including higher order corrections, the calculated charge form factor and charge radius of $^3$H are in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data and the realistic Argonne $v_{18}$ two-nucleon and Urbana IX potential models calculations. This method makes possible a high precision few-body calculations in nuclear physics. Our result converges order by order in low energy expansion and also cut-off independent.

H. Sadeghi

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospherically corrected aviris Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: atmospherically corrected aviris Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 NASA Airborne AVIRIS and DCS Remote Sensing of Coral Reefs Liane Guild a, Summary:...

450

Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip Arthroplasty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eccentricity Error Correction for Automated Estimation of Polyethylene Wear after Total Hip. Wire markers are typically attached to the polyethylene acetabular component of the prosthesis so

St Andrews, University of

451

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuation correction application Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SPECT imaging. Summary: the attenuation correction in the case of 3D attenuated ray transform with a parallel geometry. We suppose... be jointly acquired on dedicated systems....

452

Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIA3 Correction-solution partielle des Feuilles 1 à 8 Exercice 1.1 : Solutions : Df = R+ Dg = Rn 5

Mas, André

453

Energy Efficiency In Correctional Facilities & Opportunities for State Energy Office Engagement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on Energy Efficiency in Correctional Facilities & Opportunities for State Energy Office Engagement

454

Errata Sheet for the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 528  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Errata sheet for DOE/NV--1165, "Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 528: Polychlorinated Biphenyls Contamination, Nevada Test Site, Nevada," Revision 0

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

455

New Methods in Motion Tracking to Generate Motion-Corrected Tomographi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search New Methods in Motion Tracking to Generate Motion-Corrected Tomographic Images Oak Ridge National Laboratory...

456

Correction: p73 is a human p53-related protein that can induce apoptosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... .10.1038/21710 Correction p73 is a human p53-related protein that can induce apoptosisChristine A. JostC A

Christine A. Jost; Maria C. Marin; William G. Kaelin Jr

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

457

Supersymmetric Electroweak Corrections to Single Top Quark Production at the Fermilab Tevatron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated the $O(\\alpha_{ew} M_t^2/M_W^2)$ supersymmetric electroweak corrections to single top quark production via $q\\bar q' \\to t\\bar b$ at the Fermilab Tevatron in the minimal supersymmetric model. The supersymmetric electroweak corrections to the cross section are a few percent for $tan \\beta> 1$, and can exceed 10% for $tan\\beta<1$. The combined effects of SUSY electroweak corrections and the Yukawa corrections can exceed 10% for favorable parameter values, which might be observable at a high-luminosity Tevatron.

Chong Sheng Li; Robert J. Oakes; Jin Min Yang

1996-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric corrected satellite Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Satellites already measure sea surface temperature, rainfall, sea level, surface wind, and ocean... , then study the return pulses to measure and correct for the effects...

459

Power corrections in heavy-to-light decays at large recoil energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I briefly present recent work on QCD power corrections in heavy-to-light meson decays, using an effective field theory approach.

M. Diehl

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Field of view extension and truncation correction for MR-based human attenuation correction in simultaneous MR/PET imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In quantitative PET imaging, it is critical to accurately measure and compensate for the attenuation of the photons absorbed in the tissue. While in PET/CT the linear attenuation coefficients can be easily determined from a low-dose CT-based transmission scan, in whole-body MR/PET the computation of the linear attenuation coefficients is based on the MR data. However, a constraint of the MR-based attenuation correction (AC) is the MR-inherent field-of-view (FoV) limitation due to static magnetic field (B{sub 0}) inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. Therefore, the MR-based human AC map may be truncated or geometrically distorted toward the edges of the FoV and, consequently, the PET reconstruction with MR-based AC may be biased. This is especially of impact laterally where the patient arms rest beside the body and are not fully considered. Methods: A method is proposed to extend the MR FoV by determining an optimal readout gradient field which locally compensates B{sub 0} inhomogeneities and gradient nonlinearities. This technique was used to reduce truncation in AC maps of 12 patients, and the impact on the PET quantification was analyzed and compared to truncated data without applying the FoV extension and additionally to an established approach of PET-based FoV extension. Results: The truncation artifacts in the MR-based AC maps were successfully reduced in all patients, and the mean body volume was thereby increased by 5.4%. In some cases large patient-dependent changes in SUV of up to 30% were observed in individual lesions when compared to the standard truncated attenuation map. Conclusions: The proposed technique successfully extends the MR FoV in MR-based attenuation correction and shows an improvement of PET quantification in whole-body MR/PET hybrid imaging. In comparison to the PET-based completion of the truncated body contour, the proposed method is also applicable to specialized PET tracers with little uptake in the arms and might reduce the computation time by obviating the need for iterative calculations of the PET emission data beyond those required for reconstructing images.

Blumhagen,