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1

Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

Langner, G.H. Jr.

1991-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

RADIATIOh RESEARCH 142,61-69 (1995) The Biological Effectiveness of Radon-ProgenyAlpha Particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for uranium miners or on data derived from A-bomb sur- vivors; comparison of domestic radon risk estimates studied. (d)The conversion from effective dose per unit exposure in a mine to effective dose per unit

Brenner, David Jonathan

3

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

Radon detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

6

Countries Diesel Prices Excluding Taxes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

excluding taxes) excluding taxes) Date Belgium France Germany Italy Netherlands UK US 01/13/14 3.56 3.46 3.55 3.80 3.63 3.57 3.40 01/06/14 3.70 3.49 3.62 3.82 3.63 3.55 3.43 12/30/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.42 12/23/13 NA NA NA NA NA NA 3.39 12/16/13 3.63 3.50 3.71 3.85 3.71 3.56 3.38 12/9/13 3.83 3.53 3.77 3.86 3.72 3.57 3.39 12/2/13 3.70 3.46 3.75 3.80 3.67 3.53 3.40 11/25/13 3.60 3.38 3.74 3.75 3.61 3.48 3.36 11/18/13 3.74 3.36 3.67 3.70 3.55 3.45 3.33 11/11/13 3.57 3.34 3.57 3.66 3.51 3.42 3.34 11/4/13 3.60 3.36 3.65 3.69 3.58 3.43 3.37 10/28/13 3.60 3.48 3.71 3.84 3.67 3.53 3.38 10/21/13 3.64 3.50 3.75 3.84 3.70 3.54 3.40 10/14/13 3.70 3.45 3.74 3.82 3.70 3.51 3.40 10/7/13 3.63 3.46 3.75 3.83 3.70 3.52 3.41

7

Study of alpha background in a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alpha background, specifically from radon and its progeny in the uranium and thorium chains, has been a major issue in dark matter detectors. This work focuses on alpha background presence in the DMTPC experiment by examining ...

Yegoryan, Hayk

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Radon Binding to Water-Soluble Cryptophane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon Binding to Water-Soluble Cryptophane. Summary: Collaboration on investigating the thermodynamics of radon binding ...

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

9

Montana Radon Control Act (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Radon Control Act regulates the emission of radon, the gaseous decay products of uranium or thorium. The Act addresses operator certification of radon-producing facilities, testing and...

10

Environmental Assessment for moving the Pacific Northwest Laboratory radon generators from Life Sciences Laboratory II, Richland North Area, to Life Sciences Laboratory I, 300 Area, and their continued use in physical and biological research  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) radon generators are a core resource of the overall U. S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Radon Research Program and are administratively controlled within the ``Radon Hazards in Homes`` project. This project primarily focuses on radon exposures of animals and addresses the major biologic effects and factors influencing risks of indoor radon exposures. For example, the ``Mechanisms of Radon Injury`` and ``In vivo/In vitro Radon-Induced Cellular Damage`` projects specifically address the cytogenetic and DNA damage produced by radon exposure as part of a larger effort to understand radon carcinogenesis. Several other ongoing PNL projects, namely: ``Biological Effectiveness of Radon Alpha Particles: A Microbeam Study of Dose Rate Effects,`` ``Laser Measurements of Pb-210,`` ``Radon Transport Modeling in Soils,`` ``Oncogenes in Radiation Carcinogenesis,`` ``Mutation of DNA Targets,`` ``Dosimetry of Radon Progeny,`` and ``Aerosol Technology Development`` also use the radon exposure facilities in the conduct of their work. While most, but not all, studies in the PNL Radon Research Program are funded through DOE`s Office of Health and Environmental Research, PNL also has ongoing collaborative radon studies with investigators worldwide; many of these use the radon exposure facilities. The purpose of the proposed action is to provide for relocation of the radon generators to a DOE-owned facility and to continue to provide a controlled source of radon-222 for continued use in physical and biological research.

Nelson, I.C.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Radon measurements at the FEMP  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radon monitoring activities at the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have been conducted extensively since the early 1980`s. Monitoring has been conducted at ambient concentration levels (< 1 pCi/L Rn-222), inside buildings, and at significantly elevated levels (hundreds of thousands pCi/L Rn-222) within the K-65 silo that store concentrated radium bearing wastes. The purpose of this paper/presentation is to present and discuss some of the difficulties encountered/solutions (e.g. reliability, detection limits, affects of environmental factors, data transfer, etc.) that have been discovered while taking measurements using both alpha track-etch passive integrating detectors and alpha scintillation real-time detectors. A short summary and conclusion section is provided following each topic presented.

Tomczak, L.M.; Daniels, R.D.; Dennis, C.; Glassey, H.G.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Selasky, J.A. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States). Fernald Environmental Management Project; Spitz, H.B.; Roush, K. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Attachment of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The daughter products of radon gas are now recognized as a significant contributor to radiation exposure to the general public. It is also suspected that a synergistic effect exists with the combination cigarette smoking and radon exposure. We have conducted an experimental investigation to determine the physical nature of radon progeny interactions with cigarette smoke aerosols. The size distributions of the aerosols are characterized and attachment rates of radon progeny to cigarette-smoke aerosols are determined. Both the mainstream and sidestream portions of the smoke aerosol are investigated. Unattached radon progeny are very mobile and, in the presence of aerosols, readily attach to the particle surfaces. In this study, an aerosol chamber is used to contain the radon gas, progeny and aerosol mixture while allowing the attachment process to occur. The rate of attachment is dependent on the size distribution, or diffusion coefficient, of the radon progeny as well as the aerosol size distribution. The size distribution of the radon daughter products is monitored using a graded-screen diffusion battery. The diffusion battery also enables separation of the unattached radon progeny from those attached to the aerosol particles. Analysis of the radon decay products is accomplished using alpha spectrometry. The aerosols of interest are size fractionated with the aid of a differential mobility analyzer and cascade impactor. The measured attachment rates of progeny to the cigarette smoke are compared to those found in similar experiments using an ambient aerosol. The lowest attachment coefficients observed, {approximately}10{sup {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s, occurred for the ambient aerosol. The sidestream and mainstream smoke aerosols exhibited higher attachment rates in that order. The results compared favorably with theories describing the coagulation process of aerosols.

Biermann, A.H.; Sawyer, S.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Home radon monitor modeled after the common smoke detector  

SciTech Connect

The EPA has declared that five million or so of the nation`s 80 million homes may have indoor radon levels that pose an unacceptably high risk of lung cancer to occupants. They estimate that four times as many people die from radon-induced lung cancers as from fires in the home. Therefore the EPA has recommended that all homes be tested and that action be taken to reduce the radon concentration in homes that test above the 4 pCi/L level. The push to have homeowners voluntarily test for elevated radon levels has been only marginally successful. A reliable, inexpensive, and accurate in-home radon monitor designed along the same general lines as a home smoke detector might overcome much of the public reluctance to test homes for radon. Such a Home Radon Monitor (HRM) is under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. To be acceptable to the public, HRMs should have the following characteristics in common with smoke detectors: low cost, small size, ease of installation and use, low maintenance, and high performance. Recent advances in Long-Range Alpha Detection technology are being used in the design of a HRM that should meet or exceed all these characteristics. A proof-of-principle HRM detector prototype has been constructed and results from tests of this prototype will be presented.

Bolton, R.D.; Arnone, G.J.; Johnson, J.P.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort  

SciTech Connect

High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

Braeuner, Elvira V., E-mail: ole@cancer.dk [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Danish Building Research Institute, Aalborg University (Denmark); Andersen, Claus E. [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark)] [Center for Nuclear Technologies, Radiation Research Division, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde (Denmark); Sorensen, Mette [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark) [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Gravesen, Peter [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ulbak, Kaare [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark)] [National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark); Hertel, Ole [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Pedersen, Camilla [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark); Overvad, Kim [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark)] [Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus (Denmark); Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

The High-Radon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

indoor radon concentrations across the United States. The purpose of this work is to help state and other agencies identify high-radon counties and areas more precisely so that...

16

Influence of local geology on the concentration of indoor radon in Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 58,000 indoor radon measurements are available for homes in Maryland. A comparative study between compilations of activated-charcoal and alpha-track measurements of indoor radon in zip-code-size geographic areas indicated that both of these methods are useful and are equally able to estimate regional indoor radon. Indoor radon measurements compiled according to zip code areas can be used to create state-size radon hazard maps. In Maryland the area with the highest indoor radon (mostly composed of zip code areas that average over 8 pCi/L) is the western half of the Piedmont Province and the eastern side of the Coastal Plain Province. The eastern half of the Piedmont and the eastern half of the Valley and Ridge mostly have intermediate and high indoor radon levels (4--8 and >8 pCi/L). The Blue Ridge, western side of the Valley and Ridge, and Plateau Province each has relatively few zip code areas, but the data suggest a range from low to high indoor radon levels. The western side of the Coastal Plain has the lowest indoor radon (most of the zip code areas average less than 4 pCi/L).

Mose, D.G.; Mushrush, G.W. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). Chemistry Dept.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

_._-l"." _._-l"." .-_ "...",.,~~-- ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter Measurements at and near the Former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey F. F. Haywood P. T. Perdue D. J . Chris tian R. W . Leggett H. W . Dickson T. E. Myric k ,--___ . . . ^.. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical information Service US. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A04 Microfiche A01 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United StatesGovernment. Neither theU nited States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

18

Recent radon transient experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radon transient analysis is being developed as a method complementary to pressure transient analysis for evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. The method is based on the observations of Stoker and Kruger (1975) that radon concentration in produced geothermal fluids is related to geothermal reservoir type, production flow rates, and time. Stoker and Kruger showed that radon concentrations were markedly different in vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated systems, and varied not only among wells of different flow rate in an individual reservoir, but also varied timewise in individual wells. The potential uses of radon as an internal tracer for geothermal reservoir engineering were reviewed by Kruger, Stoker, and Umana (1977). Also included were results of the first transient test performed with rapid flow rate change in a vapor-dominated field. The results of the next four radon-flow rate transient experiments were summarized by Kruger (1978) in which effects of well interference and startup production in a new well were demonstrated. Four of these first five radon transient experiments have been carried out in vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and Serrazzano in Italy. The systematics of the transients of radon concentration following abrupt changes in flow rate is being evaluated by Warren and Kruger (1978). The fifth test was at the HGP-A well in Hawaii, the first transient test in a liquid-dominated reservoir. Three additional radon transient tests have been carried out, each in a different type of geothermal resource. The first test was in a petrothermal resource, the reservoir created by hydraulic fracturing by LASL in the hot, dry rock experiment in New Mexico. The results of this first 75-day production test of continuous forced circulation, during January-April, 1978, are given by Tester, et al (1978). The results of the radon concentration measurements made during this test are summarized by Kruger, Cederberg, and Semprini (1978). The second test was a second transient test at the HGP-A well in the liquid-dominated reservoir at Pohoiki, Hawaii, and the third test was a second transient test at the Grottitana well in the Serrazzano field at Larderello, Italy. The general observations of these tests are listed in Table 1. A summary of each of these three tests follows. During the LASL hot dry rock flow test, five samples of recirculating production fluid were obtained by wellhead sampling. Two samples were obtained during the following shutin and venting periods of the test, and one sample of makeup water was analyzed during the test.

Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Cederberg, G.; Macias, L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Radon: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, with the support of the Department of Energy, has developed a computerized database to manage research information in the area of building ventilation and indoor air quality. This literature survey contains references pertaining to the physical properties of radon and its daughters, instrumentation for their measurement, health effects, surveys and measurements, and regulatory information. The references in the bibliography are sequenced in alphabetical order and abstracts are included when supplied by the author. The objective of this report is to disseminate the bibliographic references compiled at the laboratory relating to radon research portion of the program. Interested database users are encouraged to contact the laboratory to receive instructions for direct database acess. A flyer describing the database is supplied at the end of the bibliography and a brief overview of the Radon Research porgram is given.

Lepman, S.R.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Beta/alpha continuous air monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

1988-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCH HOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12564 Extended Summary INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCHNO. W-7405-ENG-48. INSTRUMENTATION FOR A RADON RESEARCHradon daughters. The system's instrumentation is capable of

Nazaroff, W.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

World History Of Radon Research And Measurement From The Early 1900's To Today  

SciTech Connect

In 1900, Dorn discovered the emanation in the uranium series that eventually became the well-known gas {sup 222}Rn. From 1900 through 1908, it was demonstrated that {sup 222}Rn is a radioactive gas found in tap water, highly condensable at low temperatures with a half-life of approximately 3.7 days and can be collected on charcoal by adsorption. Although, radon was discovered in 1900, the effects of prolonged exposure had been suspected and noted 300 years earlier among underground miners who developed lung cancer. During the period from 1924-1932, it was suggested that radon was the cause of high lung cancer incidence. In 1951, researchers at the university of Rochester N.Y. pointed out that the lung cancer health hazard was from the alpha radiation dose delivered by the radon decay products that deposited in the respiratory tract. The findings of the BEIR Committee Report VI, which was based on epidemiological studies in different groups of mines in the 1950's and 1960's and on laboratory studies, showed that from 60,000 miners over 2,600 developed lung cancer where only 750 were expected.Since 1998, the epidemiological study conducted in Iowa US, showed beyond any reasonable doubt that radon decay products cause lung cancer among women who lived at least twenty years in their homes. This paper will cover early radon measurements in soil, building material, ground water and in different air environments such as in the atmosphere, caves spas, underground mines and in residential indoor air environment. Radon measurements were conducted in many areas for diagnostic purposes. Radon was used as natural tracer to study air masses, vertical diffusion, and atmospheric studies, in earthquake prediction, and as a geological indicator for radium and uranium. In the early radon measurements, electroscopes, electrometers and primitive ionization chambers were used for many years. In the 1940's fast pulse ionization chambers replaced total ionization chambers. From the mid 1950's onwards a variety of radon measuring instruments were developed to assess the radon and radon decay product exposure to underground miners, workers at contaminated sites with uranium and radium tailings and to the general public in residential buildings. In the last twenty years, new instruments and methods were developed to measure radon by using grab, integrating and continuous modes of sampling. The most common are scintillation cell monitors, activated carbon collectors, electret ionization chambers, alpha track detectors, pulse and current ionization chambers and solid-state alpha detectors.

George, A. C. [201-27 26th Avenue Bayside NY 11360 (United States)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha and beta activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha and beta sources, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations. Use of the current algorithm is therefore not recommended for assay applications and so use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha and beta activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 dpm level.

Robert Hayes

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

24

Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment of Air Filter Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of a large number of air sample filters was undertaken using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. Samples were only measured after air flow through the filters had ceased. Use of a commercial radon stripping algorithm was implemented to discriminate anthropogenic alpha activity on the filters from the radon progeny. When uncontaminated air filters were evaluated, the results showed that there was a time-dependent bias in both average estimates and measurement dispersion of anthropogenic activity estimates with the relative bias being small compared to the dispersion, indicating that the system would not give false positive indications for an appropriately set decision level. By also measuring environmental air sample filters simultaneously with electroplated alpha filters, use of the radon stripping algorithm demonstrated a number of substantial unexpected deviations from calibrated values indicating that the system would give false negative indications. Use of the current algorithm is, therefore, not recommended for general assay applications. Use of the PIPS detector should only be utilized for gross counting without appropriate modifications to the curve-fitting algorithm. As a screening method, the radon stripping algorithm might be expected to see elevated alpha activities on air sample filters (not due to radon progeny) around the 200 disintegrations per minute level.

Robert Hayes

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Indoor air radon  

SciTech Connect

This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references.

Cothern, C.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Carrying the Ball on Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Carrying the Ball on Radon Part one of two parts Radon gas was "discovered" as an important environmental issue in the mid-1980s, when levels 1,000 times the average of about 1.5 picocuries/liter (pCi/l) were found in homes in the eastern United States. Radon is present in all homes, and even in outdoor air, because it is a gaseous decay product of radium naturally present in the soil. Since even an average indoor exposure to radon's own decay products-isotopes of polonium, bismuth, and lead-was estimated to cause a 0.1 to 1% risk of lung cancer, depending on whether one smoked, these high levels sounded an immediate alarm. By the mid-1980s, scientists had already proven that indoor radon levels 10 to 100 times the average-an unacceptable amount-occurred in homes in

27

Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii Abstract Rates of ground radon emanation, inthe Puna geothermal area on the lower east riftof Kilauea volcano, were measured by alpha particle sensitive cellulose nitrate films. The survey successfully defined an area of thermal significance associated with the rift structure,and suggests that a thermally driven ground gas convection system exists within, and peripheralto, the rift. This type of survey was found suitable for the basaltic island environment characteristic of Hawaii and is now used in Hawaii as a routine geothermal exploration technique. Author Malcolm E. Cox Published Journal

28

BM: excluded-speakers = 3080 3094 3095 3105 3112 3113 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BM: excluded-speakers = 3080 3094 3095 3105 3112 3113 3114 3126 3147 3190 3205 3208 3212 3231 3237 3240 3242 3277 3314 3334 3352 ...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OF A PASSIVE RADON DECAY PRODUCTS MONITOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electret-based passive air samplers have been used in United Kingdom and elsewhere for quantitative sampling for airborne dust. Alpha electret ion chambers (EIC) have been used for quantitative measurement of deposited alpha emitting isotopes. These two well documented principles are combined to create a passive radon progeny monitor. Large area (50 cm2) electret charged to 500 to 2000 volts collect airborne radon decay products and the collected sample is "viewed " and measured by an alpha EIC. Such collection and measurement continues for the entire period of sampling, providing an integrated signal to the electret in alpha EIC. The present work is of exploratory nature and provides the responses of three different sizes of collection electrets. Results are also compared with a simple passive device with no collecting electret. The study provides data for optimization of the design depending upon the requirement. Study is limited to a typical home with equilibrium ratios from 40 to 60%. This method can be used for both short term and long term monitoring of RDP in working level units.

F. Stieff

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

It's Elemental - The Element Radon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

present within homes. Radon seeps into houses as a result of the decay of radium, thorium or uranium ores underground and varies greatly from location to location. On average,...

31

Urine Test Strips to Exclude Cerebral Spinal Fluid Blood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two Pearson Chi-Square tests. The first compared samplesO riginal R esearch Urine Test Strips to Exclude CerebralBayer Multistix ® urine test strips are designed to test

Marshall, Robin A; Hejamanowski, Chris

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Radon emanometry as a geothermal exploration technique; theory and an example from Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four radon survey lines were established over the geothermal field of Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA. The radon flux was determined using the Westinghouse Alpha 2 system which measures the flux at each station over a period of 30 days using an alpha-sensitive dosimeter. The method was very successful in locating mapped fault systems that communicate with the structurally controlled geothermal reservoir. It is concluded that this method, coupled with a structural analysis, can be useful as a site-specific exploration tool, particularly in locating exploration holes in known geothermal areas.

Nielson, D.L.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A Radon Progeny Deposition Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Guiseppe, V. E. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Elliott, S. R.; Hime, A.; Rielage, K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Westerdale, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

34

A radon progeny deposition model  

SciTech Connect

The next generation low-background detectors operating underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. Although the radioactive decays of airborne radon (particularly {sup 222}Rn) and its subsequent progeny present in an experiment are potential backgrounds, also problematic is the deposition of radon progeny on detector materials. Exposure to radon at any stage of assembly of an experiment can result in surface contamination by progeny supported by the long half life (22 y) of {sup 210}Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. An understanding of the potential surface contamination from deposition will enable requirements of radon-reduced air and clean room environments for the assembly of low background experiments. It is known that there are a number of environmental factors that govern the deposition of progeny onto surfaces. However, existing models have not explored the impact of some environmental factors important for low background experiments. A test stand has been constructed to deposit radon progeny on various surfaces under a controlled environment in order to develop a deposition model. Results from this test stand and the resulting deposition model are presented.

Rielage, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Steven R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hime, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiseppe, Vincent E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Westerdale, S. [MIT

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Air pollution uncertainty exists in radon measurements  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses radon which is a colorless, odorless gas formed by the decay of radium and uranium that has been shown to cause lung cancer. Progress has been made in ensuring the accuracy of home radon measurements. According to this report, however, radon measurements are uncertain because the ability of the devices that measure radon and the companies analyzing the devices' readings varies and homeowners may not be following EPA's recommended testing procedures. Several possible causes for the uncertainty in radon measurements are cited.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Characterizing the source of radon indoors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Average indoor radon concentrations range over more than two orders of magnitude, largely because of variability in the rate at which radon enters from building materials, soil, and water supplies. Determining the indoor source magnitude requires knowledge of the generation of radon in source materials, its movement within materials by diffusion and convection, and the means of its entry into buildings. This paper reviews the state of understanding of indoor radon sources and transport. Our understanding of generation rates in and movement through building materials is relatively complete and indicates that, except for materials with unusually high radionuclide contents, these sources can account for observed indoor radon concentrations only at the low end of the range observed. Our understanding of how radon enters buildings from surrounding soil is poorer, however recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that soil may be the predominant source in many cases where the indoor radon concentration is high. 73 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

Nero, A.V.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny's atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Radon emanation and transport in porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified model of radon emanation and transport has been devel oped that combines the RAECOM model for diffusive transport with new mathematical models of advecti ve transport, moisture effects, and radon emanation. The model accounts for advective depletion in radon source regions, and for the effects of varying moistures on radon emanation, diffusion, and advecti ve transport rates. Radon transport in gas- and water-fill ed pore space is characterized, and exchange between the phases is considered. Correlations are a1 so given for diffusion and permea bil ity coefficients. The model provides a comprehensive assessment of source potent i a1 s for indoor radon accumul ation based on soil moistures, radium, emanation, and advection of soil gas.

Venn C. Rogers; Kirk K. Nielson

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA » National NEPA » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX) - Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is typically required. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations Part 1021, National Environmental Policy Act Implementing Procedures, Appendices A and B to Subpart D, list DOE's categorical exclusions. Appendix A classes of actions are those actions considered to be general agency actions, such as awarding a contract or hiring personnel. Appendix B classes of actions

40

Radon measurement in schools: Revised edition  

SciTech Connect

The report provides school administrators and facilities managers with instructions on how to test for the presence of radon. The findings from EPA's comprehensive studies of radon measurements in schools have been incorporated into these recommendations. The report supersedes Radon Measurements in Schools- An Interim Report (EPA 520/1-89-010). However, it does not invalidate tests in the process of being conducted under the interim report.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Measurement of Indoor Radon-222 and Radon-220 Concentrations in Central Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A passive-type radon/thoron detector was used for measuring indoor radon and thoron concentrations at 90 dwellings in Aichi and Gifu prefectures in central Japan during 90 days from December, 2006 to March, 2007. The radon and thoron concentrations were 21.1 Bq/m3 and 25.1 Bq/m3, respectively. The dose due to radon and thoron in dwellings was roughly evaluated as 0.7 mSv/y and 2.4 mSv/y, respectively. The examination of the geological factor and house condition having an effect on indoor radon concentration was performed.

Oka, Mitsuaki; Shimo, Michikuni [Graduate School of Health Science, Fujita Health University 1-98, Dengakugakubo, Kutsukake, Tyoake, Aichi, 470-1192 (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiromichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences 4-9-1, Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Use of MCNPX for Alpha Spectrometry Simulations of a Continuous Air Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if the alpha energy spectrum in a Passive Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector, as modeled by MCNPX [1], can be used to design a radon stripping algorithm for a continuous air monitor (CAM). This stripping algorithm would be employed to discriminate naturally occurring radioisotopes from the anthropogenic for nuclear safety -related applications. It is hoped that using an algorithm based on MCNPX simulations, the CAM will not be prone to false alarms when radon levels are dynamic as identified in other CAM systems [2,3]. This work is focused on the design of the next generation air particulate detector (NGAPD) for the United States Navy. The primary isotope of interest is Co-60. This radionuclide emits a beta with an average energy of 96 keV. Therefore, once deposited on the CAM filter, it will produce a beta continuum seen by the PIPS detector. In addition, as radon progeny is deposited on the air filter, these will give rise to characteristic alpha peaks and a beta continuum. This is primarily an issue in port-or land-based applications. Ultimately, measurement of a radon alpha spectrum is desired to predict the amount of beta activity which would be measured from the radon progeny decay chains. All excess beta activity could then be attributed to anthropogenic sources once the radon progeny contributions have been stripped out.

Robert Hayes, Craig Marianno

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Glossary Term - Alpha Decay  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universe Previous Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Universe) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Alpha Particle) Alpha Particle Alpha Decay Alpha Decay Diagram Alpha decay is one...

44

Radon Monitoring Results BPA Residential Weatherization Program, Report Number 1.  

SciTech Connect

In October 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began offering free radon monitoring to participants of its regionwide Residential Weatherization Program. The purpose of the radon monitoring is to provide information to participating homeowners or consumers on the average radon concentrations within their residences. This radon concentration information and other information on indoor air quality (IAQ) is provided to assist homeowners on their decision to install ''house-tightening'' weatherization measures. This radon report will present background information on why BPA decided to offer radon monitoring, the procedures used for monitoring, the extent of BPA radon monitoring in the region, and results of this monitoring. Subsequent BPA radon monitoring reports will be produced on a quarterly basis which will include a brief narrative on the radon monitoring and provide a summary of the radon data received to date.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

47

Resolving the radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, houses  

SciTech Connect

The article discusses resolution of a radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, where significantly elevated radon concentrations were found in several adjacent houses. The U.S. EPA screened 56 of the houses and selected 10 for demonstration of radon reduction techniques. Each of the 10 houses received an intensive radon diagnostic evaluation before a house-specific radon reduction plan was developed. Before and after the plans were implemented, radon concentrations were determined by charcoal canisters and continuous radon monitors. A variety of sealing and subslab depressurization techniques were applied to the 10 houses. Radon concentrations were reduced by over 95% in all 10 houses. Five meetings were held to explain to homeowners the radion reduction techniques being implemented and to answer questions of homeowners interested in applying similar radon reduction efforts to their houses.

Osborne, M.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

"ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" "Sourcekey","WCESTP11","WCESTP11","WCESTP21","WCESTP21","WCESTP31","WCESTP31","WCESTP41","WCESTP41","WCESTP51","WCESTP51","WCESTUS1","WCESTUS1" "Date","Weekly East Coast (PADD 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly East Coast (PADD 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Midwest (PADD 2) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Midwest (PADD 2) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly West Coast (PADD 5) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly West Coast (PADD 5) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly U.S. Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly U.S. Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)"

49

Glossary Term - Alpha Particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decay Previous Term (Alpha Decay) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Atomic Number) Atomic Number Alpha Particle alphaparticle.gif Produced during alpha decay, an alpha particle is a...

50

Health effects of radon in air  

SciTech Connect

Widely accepted risk estimates for exposure to radon in homes are derived largely from studies of miners. These include large groups of US Czechoslovakian, and Canadian uranium miners, Newfoundland fluorspar miners, and Swedish iron, lead, and zinc miners, all of which give roughly consistent results, with the excess risk of lung cancer increasing linearly with the exposure to radon. The authors have studied correlations between average radon levels and lung cancer rates in counties of the US. One study based on 50,000 purchased measurements in the main living areas of houses in which there have been no previous measurements involves 310 counties. It gives a weak but statistically significant negative correlation between mean radon levels and lung cancer rates for both females and males, whereas the usual risk estimates predict a large positive correlation.

Cohen, B.L. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres  

SciTech Connect

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the [sup 218]Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of [center dot]OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO[sub 2] ethylene, and H[sub 2]S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H[sub 2]O and NH[sub 3] in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of [sup 218]Po[sub x][sup +] in O[sub 2] at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited [sup 210]Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Indoor air quality environmental information handbook: radon  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a long-standing interest in investigating the impact of energy conservation measures on indoor air quality. The Office of Environmental Analysis has prepared this handbook in an effort to bring together available information on the impact of radon and its decay products on residential indoor air quality and on human health. The handbook is designed to enhance the understanding of the current state-of-knowledge regarding indoor radon for both homeowners and technical persons with an interest in indoor air quality issues. It provides the technical reader with a comprehensive review and reference source on the sources of radon and its transport mechanisms; reported indoor concentrations; building, and meteorological effects on radon concentration; models for predicting indoor concentrations; health effects and standards; and control technologies. The major questions and concerns of homeowners regarding the issue of indoor radon are addressed in a separate section entitled Radon in the Home: A Primer for Homeowners. This section also provides a starting point for readers desiring a general overview of the subject.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Radon emanation coefficients for phosphogysum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is a by-product of the phosphate fertilizer industry which is stockpiled in large quantities world-wide. Phosphogypsum consists mainly of dihydrate gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O) but also contains elevated concentrations of {sup 226}Ra and other inorganic species which originate from the processing of phosphate rock. {sup 222}Rn gas is the first decay product of {sup 226}Ra and has been identified as one of the major environmental concerns associated with phosphogypsum. This study was conducted to determine effects of particle size, weathering, and moisture content on the {sup 222}Rn emanation coefficient ({epsilon}) for phosphogypsums. Practical conclusions from this study are discussed, such as the effects of a repository of a phosphogypsum site on radon emanation. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Rutherford, P.M.; Dudas, M.J. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Arocena, J.M. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)]|[Univ. of Northern British Columbia (Canada)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Public policy model for the indoor radon problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is developed that predicts the shift in distributions of indoor radon concentrations and potential risk reduction resulting from a program of homeowner sampling and remediation in a region. Indoor radon concentrations for a region are represented ...

M. J. Small; C. A. Peters

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The generalized Radon transform: Sampling, accuracy and memory considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generalized Radon (or Hough) transform is a well-known tool for detecting parameterized shapes in an image. The Radon transform is a mapping between the image space and a parameter space. The coordinates of a point in the latter correspond to the ... Keywords: Efficient implementation, Error estimation, Hough transform, Image analysis, Multi-dimensional image, Parameterized shape detection, Radon transform

Cris L. Luengo Hendriks; Michael van Ginkel; Piet W. Verbeek; Lucas J. van Vliet

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nuclear Track Detector Characterization via Alpha-Spectrometry for Radioprotection Use  

SciTech Connect

Solid Nuclear Track Detectors (SNTDs), CR-39 type, are usually adopted to monitor radon gas concentrations. In order to characterize the detectors according to track geometrical parameters, detectors were irradiated inside a vacuum chamber by alpha particles at twelve energy values, obtained by different Mylar foils in front of a {sup 241}Am source. The alpha energy values were verified using a Si detector. After the exposure to the alpha particles, the detectors were chemically etched to enlarge the tracks, which were then analyzed by means of a semiautomatic system composed of an optical microscope equipped with a CCD camera connected to a personal computer to store images. A suitable routine analyzed the track parameters: major and minor axis length and mean grey level, allowing us to differentiate tracks according to the incident alpha energy and then to individuate the discrimination factors for radon alpha tracks. The combined use of geometrical and optical parameters allows one to overcome the ambiguity in the alpha energy determination due to the non-monotonicity of each parameter versus energy. After track parameter determination, a calibration procedure was performed by means of a radon chamber. The calibration was verified through an inter-comparing survey.

Morelli, D.; Imme, G.; Catalano, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sezione di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy); Aranzulla, M. [Istituto Nazionale Geofisica e Vulcanologia - Sezione di Catania, piazza Roma, 2- 95127 Catania (Italy); Tazzer, A. L. Rosselli; Mangano, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Catania, via S. Sofia, 64- 95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Study of the radon released from open drill holes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radon emanating from three open drill holes was measured at a site of known uranium mineralization in the Red Desert of south central Wyoming. The radon flux from the soil and drill holes was measured by the accumulator method with activated charcoal cartridges. The surface soil was found to release radon at an average rate of 0.41 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec; the radon emanating from the holes was more variable than that from the soil. The three holes studied released an average of 47 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec of radon. This average is equivalent to the radon released to the atmosphere by 14.5 ft/sup 2/ of soil. The data indicate that the radon emanated from an open drill hole is not as significant as other possible activities at a drill site (i.e. digging a trench or drilling a hole) or from household activities involving the usage of water.

Pacer, J C

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Assessment of potential radiological population health effects from radon in liquefied petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) contains varying amounts of radon-222 which becomes dispersed within homes when LPG is used in unvented appliances. Radon-222 decays to alpha-emitting daughter products which are associated with increased lung cancer when inhaled and deposited in the respiratory system. The average dose equivalents to the bronchial epithelium from the use of LPG in unvented kitchen ranges and space heaters are estimated to be about 0.9 and 4.0 mrem/year, respectively. When extrapolated to the United States population at risk, the estimated tracheobronchial dose equivalents are about 20,000 and 10,000 person-rems/year for these appliances, or a total of about 30,000 person-rems/year. These doses are very small compared to other natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation. It is estimated that these low doses would result in less than one lung cancer a year for the total U.S. population. Consequently, the use of LPG containing radon-222 does not contribute significantly to the incidence of lung cancer in the United States.

Gesell, T.F.; Johnson, R.H. Jr; Bernhardt, D.E.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Radon free storage container and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

Langner, Jr., G. Harold (Mack, CO); Rangel, Mark J. (Austin, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1991--June 30, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of the 28 month grant current grant to Clarkson University to study the chemical and physical behavior of the polonium 218 atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. Two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical process that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. This report describes the progress toward achieving these objectives.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

An Experiment with Depressurization Tests as Indicators of Radon Availability in Six New Jersey Houses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Indicators of Radon Availability in 6 New Jersey HousesAS INDICATORS OF RADON AVAILABILITY IN 6 NEW JERSEY HOUSESas Indicators of Radon Availability in 6 New Jersey Houses

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

64

Mainstreaming the e-excluded in Europe: strategies, good practices and some ethical issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

E-inclusion is getting a lot of attention in Europe these days. The European Commission and EU Member States have initiated e-inclusion strategies aimed at reaching out to the e-excluded and bringing them into the mainstream of society and the economy. ... Keywords: E-excluded, E-inclusion, E-inclusion strategies, Good practice, Strategies

David Wright; Kush Wadhwa

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Reassessing Radon in Drinking Water: Searching for Perspective on Radiation Risks Speaker(s): Richard Sextro Date: October 27, 1998 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3148 Although most of the exposures to radon and its radioactive decay products arise from indoor airborne radon originating in the soil adjacent to buildings, some contact with radon can occur due to its presence in drinking water. The exposures and health risks associated with radon dissolved in drinking water are typically much smaller, although the magnitude of the exposures and risks have been uncertain and the subject of some controversy. The 1996 Amendments to the (U.S.) Safe Drinking Water Act required the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to contract with the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to re-evaluate the risks associated with

66

Multidimensional simulation of radon diffusion through earthen covers  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document applications of the RADMD model used at PNL to perform analyses of radon diffusion through uranium mill tailings cover systems. The accuracy of the numerical formulation of the RADMD model was demonstrated through a comparison with a two-dimensional analytic solution to the radon diffusion equation. Excellent agreement was obtained between two-dimensional radon concentration profiles predicted by RADMD and those obtained with the analytic solution. A simulation was made of radon diffusion into a test canister using the two dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The radon flux profile was computed and illustrates the effects of the canister on the surface radon flux. The influence of the canister on the radon flux was shown to be significant under certain circumstances. Defects in earthen cover systems were evaluated using the three dimensional capabilities of RADMD. The results support the expectation that defective covers can increase the surface flux from a covered talings pile. Compared to a cover with no defects, radon flux could be elevated by as much as a factor of three when 20% of the radon control layer area contained pockets of reduced moisture. The effects of temporal and spatial variations in moisture content have been modeled by coupling RADMD with a variable saturated flow model. Two dimensional simulations were made of the time dependence of radon flux from a tailings site before and after cover placement. The results demonstrated the expected flux reduction produced by a thick earthen cover. Time dependence of the radon flux after cover placement was attributed to slight changes in moisture content of the cover material with time. The particular cover studied had a compacted clay layer that effectively attenuated the radon.

Mayer, D.W.; Gee, G.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A remark on primitive cycles and the Radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the use of Brylinski's Radon transform elucidates some points of the Green-Griffiths approach to the Hodge conjecture.

Beilinson, Alexander

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Comparison of five-minute radon-daughter measurements with long-term radon and radon-daughter concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Five-minute air filter radon daughter measurements were made in 84 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, in which annual average radon daughter concentrations have been determined from six 100-hour Radon Progeny Integrating Sampling Unit (RPISU) measurements. Averaging radon concentrations were also determined in 50 of these buildings using Terradex Track Etch detectors. The standard deviation of the difference between the (natural) logarithms of the RPISU annual averages and the logarithms of the air filter measurements (SD-ln) was found to be 0.52. This SD-ln is considerably smaller than the SD-ln of 0.71 between the RPISU annual averages and the air filter measurements reported by ALARA at Grand Junction, Colorado; presumably because a considerable number of air filter measurements in Edgemont were disregarded because of short turnover times or high wind speeds. Using the SD-ln of 0.52 it can be calculated that there would only be a 5% probability in Edgemont that the RPISU annual average would be greater than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were equal to 0.010 WL. This indicates that the procedure used in Edgemont of clearing buildings from remedial action if the five-minute measurement were less than 0.010 WL was reasonable. There was about a 28% probability that the RPISU annual average would be less than 0.015 WL if the five-minute measurement were 0.033 WL, indicating that the procedure of performing an engineering assessment if the average of two five-minute measurements was greater than 0.033 WL was also reasonable. Comparison indicates that the average of two RPISU measurements taken six months apart would provide a dependable estimate of the annual average.

Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.2 - Is the Waste Non-excluded Solid Waste...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 - Is the Waste Non-excluded Solid Waste < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections...

70

GRR/Elements/18-CA-a.4 - Is the Waste a Non-excluded Hazardous...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 - Is the Waste a Non-excluded Hazardous Waste < GRR | Elements Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of...

71

Radon release and dispersion from an open pit uranium mine  

SciTech Connect

Radon-222 flux from representative sections of the United Nuclear St. Anthony open-pit mine complex was measured. The collected radon was adsorbed on activated charcoal and the radon activity was measured by gamma spectroscopy. System design, calibration, and the procedure to determine radon flux density (pCi/m/sup 2/.s) are described. A continuous series of radon flux densities were measured over a 5-month period at a control point in the mine. The average flux density at the control point was 1.9 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. A close correlation between radon flux density variations and changes in barometric pressure was observed by a comparison of meteorological data and average daily radon flux density measured at the control point. The release rate from each section of the mine was calculated from the average radon flux density and the area of the section, as determined from enlarged aerial photographs. The average radon flux density for eight locations over the ore-bearing section was 7.3 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average flux density for four locations over undisturbed topsoil was 0.17 pCi/m/sup 2/.s. The average Ra-226 content of ten samples taken from the ore-bearing region was 102 pCi/g ore. The ratio of radon flux density to radium content (specific flux) was 0.072. The release rate from the entire St. Anthony open pit was determined to be 3.5 x 10/sup 5/ pCi/s. This rate is comparable to the natural release of radon from one square mile of undisturbed topsoil. 16 refs., 31 figs., 11 tabs.

Kisieleski, W.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

RESIDENTIAL RADON EXPOSURE AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS: A PILOT STUDY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Proceedings are divided into two volumes this year. The first volume is dedicated to papers concentrating on radon-related health concerns, outreach and theoretical models. The second volume focuses on surveys and practical applications associated with radon testing and mitigation.

Carolyn Allen President; James F. Burkhart; Andreus George; Phil Jenkins; Dan Steck; William Brodhead; Gary Hodgden; Leo Moorman; Dave Wilson; John S. Neuberger; Niaman Nazir; John Keighley; Sharon Lynch; Butterfield Wade G. Hill

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Resolving the radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey houses. Published paper, April-December 1986  

SciTech Connect

The paper discusses the resolution of a radon problem in Clinton, New Jersey, where significantly elevated radon concentrations were found in several adjacent houses. The U.S. EPA screened 56 of the houses and selected 10 for demonstration of radon-reduction techniques. Each of the 10 houses received an intensive radon diagnostic evaluation before a house-specific radon reduction plan was developed. Before and after the plans were implemented, radon concentrations were determined by charcoal canisters and continuous radon monitors. A variety of sealing and sub-slab depressurization techniques were applied to the 10 houses. Radon concentrations were reduced by over 95% in all 10 houses. Five meetings were held to explain to homeowners the radon reduction techniques being implemented and to answer questions of homeowners interested in applying similar radon-reduction efforts to their houses.

Osborne, M.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations  

SciTech Connect

A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optimistic biases in public perceptions of the risk from radon  

SciTech Connect

Survey data were obtained from a random sample of 657 homeowners in New Jersey and also from 141 homeowners who had already monitored their homes for radon. People who had not tested tended to believe that they were less at risk than their neighbors, and they interpreted ambiguous predictors of home radon levels in ways that supported their beliefs of below-average risk. Residents who had already tested their homes were relatively accurate about the probability of health effects. In both groups less than half of those who knew that radon can cause lung cancer were willing to admit that it would be serious if they suffered health effects from this source. The optimistic biases of the public may hamper attempts to encourage home radon monitoring and to promote appropriate mitigation measures in homes with elevated radon concentrations.

Weinstein, N.D.; Klotz, M.L.; Sandman, P.M.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Statistical uncertainty analysis of radon transport in nonisothermal, unsaturated soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accurately predict radon fluxes soils to the atmosphere, we must know more than the radium content of the soil. Radon flux from soil is affected not only by soil properties, but also by meteorological factors such as air pressure and temperature changes at the soil surface, as well as the infiltration of rainwater. Natural variations in meteorological factors and soil properties contribute to uncertainty in subsurface model predictions of radon flux, which, when coupled with a building transport model, will also add uncertainty to predictions of radon concentrations in homes. A statistical uncertainty analysis using our Rn3D finite-element numerical model was conducted to assess the relative importance of these meteorological factors and the soil properties affecting radon transport. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Holford, D.J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Development of Super-high Sensitivity Radon Detector for the Super-Kamiokande Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

samples of standard radon water produced by the radon water making system, which takes account produced by the radon water making system. 13 #12; Diluted Rn water[mBq=m 3 ] 700L C.F[cpd/(mBq=m 3 )] 70L-high sensitivity radon detector for water which works as a real-time monitor of the radon concentration in water

Takeuchi, Yasuo

78

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.

Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Particle number fluctuations in nuclear collisions within excluded volume hadron gas model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The multiplicity fluctuations are studied in the van der Waals excluded volume hadron-resonance gas model. The calculations are done in the grand canonical ensemble within the Boltzmann statistics approximation. The scaled variances for positive, negative and all charged hadrons are calculated along the chemical freeze-out line of nucleus-nucleus collisions at different collision energies. The multiplicity fluctuations are found to be suppressed in the van der Waals gas. The numerical calculations are presented for two values of hard-core hadron radius, $r=0.3$ fm and 0.5 fm, as well as for the upper limit of the excluded volume suppression effects.

M. I. Gorenstein; M. Hauer; D. O. Nikolajenko

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Production of Strange, Non-strange particles and Hypernuclei in an Excluded-Volume Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of production of strange and non-strange hadron yields and their ratios obtained in various experiments using our thermodynamically consistent excluded-volume model. We also analyze the production of light nuclei, hypernuclei and their antinuclei in terms of our excluded-volume model over a broad energy range starting from Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) to Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies. Further, we extend our model for studying rapidity spectra of hadrons produced in heavy-ion collisions.

S. K. Tiwari; C. P. Singh

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Long term performance of different radon remedial methods in Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this project was to investigate the long time effectiveness of different radon remedial methods. The ten years project started 1991. From start the investigation comprised of 105 dwellings (91 single-family houses and 14 flats in multi-family buildings). In all of the dwellings remedial measures were carried out in the eighties. Before and immediately after the reduction the local measured the radon concentrations. New measurements of the radon concentrations have been made every third year; in 1991, 1994, 1997 and in 2000. Twelve different radon remedial methods and method combinations were used. The radon sources were building materials as well as sub-soils. In all of the dwellings the radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track films during 3 months (January-March) measurements and in half of them the air change rates by passive tracer gas methods. The results of the 2000 and the 1991 (within brackets) studies showed that the radon concentration was up to 200 Bq/m sup 3 in 54 (54) sin...

Clavensjoe, B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

EPA's Recommended Residential Radon Mitigation Standard of Practice EPA recommends the Standard Practice for Installing Radon Mitigation Systems in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing Low-Rise Residential Buildings * for residential radon mitigation. This voluntary, consensus-based standard was developed and issued by the American Society for Testing and Materials International, and is identified as ASTM E-2121. The Agency first cited ASTM E-2121 in 2003 as a national consensus standard appropriate for reducing radon in homes as far as practicable below the national action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in indoor air. As of May 2006, EPA no longer recommends, and will no longer distribute its own, superseded Radon Mitigation Standards (EPA 402-R-93-

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

A range description for the planar circular Radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transform considered in the paper integrates a function supported in the unit disk on the plane over all circles centered at the boundary of this disk. Such circular Radon transform arises in several contemporary imaging techniques, as well as in other applications. As it is common for transforms of Radon type, its range has infinite co-dimension in standard function spaces. Range descriptions for such transforms are known to be very important for computed tomography, for instance when dealing with incomplete data, error correction, and other issues. A complete range description for the circular Radon transform is obtained. Range conditions include the recently found set of moment type conditions, which happens to be incomplete, as well as the rest of conditions that have less standard form. In order to explain the procedure better, a similar (non-standard) treatment of the range conditions is described first for the usual Radon transform on the plane.

Gaik Ambartsoumian; Peter Kuchment

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Radon transformation on reductive symmetric spaces: support theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a class of Radon transforms for reductive symmetric spaces, including the horospherical transforms, and study some of their properties. In particular we obtain a generalization of Helgason's support theorem for the horospherical transform on a Riemannian symmetric space.

Kuit, J J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Radon in homes and other technologically enhanced radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

The results are described of recent observations at Argonne National Laboratory, contributing to our knowledge of such factors as the origin of high levels of radon in houses, its variability with time or otherwise, its uniformity throughout the house or otherwise, and the behavior and fate of the short-lived daughter-products. In a sample of 110 houses, mostly in the west suburban area of Chicago, 15% had radon concentrations in excess of 6 pCi litre/sup -1/ and 96% greater than 10 pCi litre /sup -1/. If this distribution is representative of all houses in the USA, the population being exposed to such high concentrations of radon is far greater than the number of people in Grand Junction being exposed to quite similar concentrations from technologically enhanced radioactivity. There is a great need for far more extensive data on radon in houses.

Rundo, J.; Toohey, R.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations in selected Rainier Mesa tunnels  

SciTech Connect

A survey of radon and radon daughter concentrations (RDCs) in selected tunnels on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was conducted as a part of the underground testing program at NTS. Measurements were taken in three tunnels, N, T, and G. Results of preliminary measurements indicate that N and T Tunnels have low RDCs, i.e., 0.01 WL (working level) (3% of the EPA standard), with normal ventilation conditions. However, it was demonstrated that RDCs can rise to relatively high levels, i.e., 0.24 WL when ventilation rates are significantly lowered. The radon daughter concentrations measured in G Tunnel were an order of magnitude higher than those in N and T Tunnels. The average RDC in the rock mechanics drift (the ''worst-case'' location in G Tunnel) was 0.13 WL with a range from 0.07 WL to 0.23 WL. Elevated RDCs found in the rock mechanics drift of G Tunnel seemed to be attributable to a lower ventilation rate in conjunction with the more highly fractured nature of the ''welded tuff'' rock formation in which the incline drift was mined. By increasing the ventilation rate, a 60% reduction in RDCs from an average of 0.13 Wl to an average of 0.05 WL was achieved.

Fauver, D.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Progress report, July 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes studies on the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and its dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are to determine the formation rates of {center_dot}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay, to examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2} ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size, to measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and to measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}Po{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations. Tasks of the exposure studies in occupied indoor spaces are to initiate measurements of the activity size distributions in actual homes with occupants present so that the variability of the indoor activity size distributions can be assessed with respect to indoor aerosol sources and general lifestyle variations of the occupants, to initiate a prospective study of the utility of measurement of deposited {sup 210}Pb embedded in glass surfaces as a measure of the long-term, integrated exposure of the population to radon, and to develop the methodology to determine the hygroscopicity of the indoor aerosol so that the changes in deposition efficiency of the radioactive indoor aerosol with hygroscopic growth in the respiratory tract can be assessed.

Hopke, P.K.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

High indoor radon variations and the thermal behavior of eskers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in houses built on the Pispala esker in the city of Tampere were taken. The objective was to find connections between indoor radon concentrations, esker topography, and meteorological factors. The results show that not only the permeable soil but also subterranean air-flows in the esker strongly affect the indoor radon concentrations. The difference in temperature between the soil air inside the esker and the outdoor air compels the subterranean air to stream between the upper and lower esker areas. In winter, the radon concentrations are amplified in the upper esker areas where air flows out from the esker. In summer, concentrations are amplified in certain slope zones. In addition, wind direction affects the soil air and indoor radon concentrations when hitting the slopes at right angles. Winter-summer concentration ratios are typically in the range of 3-20 in areas with amplified winter concentration, and 0.1-0.5 in areas with amplified summer concentrations. A combination of winter and summer measurements provides the best basis for making mitigation decisions. On eskers special attention must be paid to building technology because of radon. 9 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Arvela, H.; Voutilainen, A.; Honkamaa, T.; Rosenberg, A. [Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, Helsinki (Finland)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

Not Available

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improvements needed in the Environmental Protection Agency's testing program for radon measurement companies  

SciTech Connect

Radon, a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless gas, has been shown to cause lung cancer. As a result, EPA and the Public Health Service advise homeowners to test their homes and to take action if elevated radon levels are discovered. However, GAO believes that to make health decisions, homeowners need more assurance that the radon test results they obtain are accurate. This report discusses how greater accuracy in radon measurements would result from mandating company participation in the Radon Measurement Proficiency program and requiring radon measurement firms to meet minimum quality assurance requirements as a condition to participation. In addition, to ensure that state programs provide a minimum degree of control and consistency over radon measurement companies, GAO recommends that EPA issue guidance on the type of state programs and level of control it believes are needed at the state level in order to provide homeowners with adequate assurances that radon measurements are accurate.

Hembra, R.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN); Tsouris, Costas (Oak Ridge, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Riestenberg, David E. (Knoxville, TN); McCallum, Scott D. (Knoxville, TN)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

93

MEASUREMENTS IN EIGHT "RADON-RESISTANT " NEW HOUSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have logged continuous radon, differential air pressures and other characteristics for eight houses built with radon-resistant features by Habitat for Humanity of Dane County. Pressures logged in the bases of the passive stacks were predominantly below basement air pressure, varying with time, while pressures in the sealed sump pits were above basement air pressure. Wind speed, wind direction and outdoor temperature affected the depressurization in the stack bases. With the stacks closed, the pressures in their bases increased to about 2 Pascals above basement air, and indoor radon increased by factors of 1.3 to 8 among the houses. In some houses, when appliance fans withdrawing air from the house envelope were operated, they pulled the basement air pressure below the pressure in the base of the stack, and bursts of indoor radon resulted. Basement radon averaged 1, 1.3, 2.6, 2.8, 3.8, 4.0, 4.0, and 12 pCi/L in winter in the eight houses. The latter house, which had poor sealing of basement floor-wall joints, was mitigated to 0.5 pCiIL with a 14-watt fan.

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radon emissions during mill tailings backfill operations in a uranium mine  

SciTech Connect

Experimental measurements of airflow and radon concentrations in a part of an underground uranium mine in the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, area were used to determine total radon release rates during construction/maintenance, mining, and backfill operations. A mathematical model of the airflow and radon emissions was developed to simulate radon release in this same mine area. Calculated estimates were high by a factor of about 2.6. When calibrated using the experimental data, the simulation model predicted release rates and trends very well. Backfilling of mined-out rooms resulted in a small decrease in total radon release.

Kauffman, D.; Kong, E.J.C.; Lin, J.P.H. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Wavelet transform and Radon transform on the Quaternion Heisenberg group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $\\mathscr Q$ be the quaternion Heisenberg group, and let $\\mathbf P$ be the affine automorphism group of $\\mathscr Q$. We develop the theory of continuous wavelet transform on the quaternion Heisenberg group via the unitary representations of $\\mathbf P$ on $L^2(\\mathscr Q)$. A class of radial wavelets is constructed. The inverse wavelet transform is simplified by using radial wavelets. Then we investigate the Radon transform on $\\mathscr Q$. A Semyanistri-Lizorkin space is introduced, on which the Radon transform is a bijection. We deal with the Radon transform on $\\mathscr Q$ both by the Euclidean Fourier transform and the group Fourier transform. These two treatments are essentially equivalent. We also give an inversion formula by using wavelets, which does not require the smoothness of functions if the wavelet is smooth.

He, JIanxun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Predicting the efficiency of activated charcoal for filtering radon  

SciTech Connect

In order to accurately assess the effectiveness of activated charcoal for the removal of radon from flowing air, a literature survey was performed to identify the models and relevant data that were available. It was found that by modifying the mathematical model of equilibrium stage theory used by Strong and Levins, the output rate of an activated charcoal filter exposed to a step function input in the radon rate at time zero with a given carrier gas flow velocity could be predicted. This paper outlines the modifications made to Strong and Levins's model and presents predictions for the filter output from the modified model.

Jarzemba, M.S.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E.; Christensen, R.N. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Portable Apparatus for the Measurement of Environmental Radon and Thoron  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radometer is a portable instrument for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric radon/thoron in a test area. A constant velocity pump pulls the air from the outside at a constant flow rate. If the air is too moist, some or all of the sample is passed through a desiccant filter prior to encountering an electrostatic filter. The electrostatic filter prevents any charged particles from entering the sampling chamber. Once the sample has entered the chamber, the progeny of the decay of radon/thoron are collected on a detector and measured. The measured data is compiled by a computer and displayed.

Negro, Vincent

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Imaging alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Radon Monitoring and Early Low Background Counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K. J.; Mei, D.-M. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD 57069 (United States); Heise, J. [Sanford Laboratory at Homestake, Lead, SD 57754 (United States); Durben, D. [Black Hills State University, Spearfish, SD 57799 (United States); Salve, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Time-dependent response of a charcoal bed to radon and water vapor in flowing air  

SciTech Connect

Extremely high airborne concentrations of radon gas may be encountered during the remediation of uranium mill tailings storage facilities. Radon is also a constituent of the off-gas of mill-tailing vitrification. An effective way to remove radon from either gas is to pass the gas through a packed bed containing activated charcoal. Measurements of radon concentrations in the environment using charcoal canisters were first described by George. Canisters similar to those used by George in his first experiments have become the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) standard for measuring environmental radon and were described in the EPA protocol for environmental radon measurement. The dynamic behavior of EPA charcoal canisters has been previously described with a mathematical model for the kinetics of radon gas adsorption in air in the presence of water vapor. This model for charcoal canisters has been extended to large charcoal beds with flowing air containing radon and water vapor. The mathematical model for large charcoal beds can be used to evaluate proposed bed designs or to model existing beds. Parameters that affect the radon distribution within a charcoal bed that can be studied using the mathematical model include carrier gas relative humidity and flow velocity, and input radon concentration. In addition, the relative performances of several different charcoals can be studied, provided sufficient information about their adsorption, desorption, and diffusion constants is known.

Henkel, J.A.; Fentiman, A.W.; Blue, T.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

Radon as an In Situ Tracer in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By measuring trace amounts of radon in geothermal steam, utilities can estimate changes in the properties of the fluid produced from a reservoir. These measurements provide a method to monitor the transition from a liquid-dominated reservoir to a boiling reservoir.

1987-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

104

Moisture content and unsaturated conditions in UMTRA project radon barriers  

SciTech Connect

A typical Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal facility consists of uranium tailings and other contaminated materials covered by a three to six foot thick radon barrier and six inches of filter sand, overlain by one foot of erosion-protection riprap. To comply with the proposed US Environmental Protection Agency groundwater protection standards applicable to the UMTRA Project, groundwater concentration limits of hazardous constitutents cannot be exceeded at the point of compliance, which is the downgradient limit of the waste management area. The typical radon barrier has a saturated hydraulic conductivity of approximately 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} centimeters per second (cm/s). Long-term seepage rates from a disposal facility with an unsaturated radon barrier may permit the concentration limits to be met at the point of compliance. Field studies were undertaken to measure the percent saturation and the relation of percent saturation to soil tension, and to predict the hydraulic conductivity as a function of percent saturation in radon barriers at three UMTRA Project disposal facilities that have been completed for up to two years. Presently typical covers have been completed at the Shiprock, Clive, and Burrell sites, and they are planned or under construction at the Ambrosia Lake, Green River, Lakeview, Mexican Hat, Slick Rock, and Tuba City sites. 2 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Evaluation of Passive Monitors for Measuring Indoor Radon and Formaldehyde  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive monitors for indoor air pollutants can furnish a cost-effective alternative to larger, more sophisticated, active monitors. In this study, three passive radon monitors provided sufficient accuracy and precision to support their use in utility measurement programs. However, the marginal performance of a passive formaldehyde monitor indicated the need for a vigorous quality assurance program to quantify its performance.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Distillation purification and radon assay of liquid xenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We succeeded to reduce the Kr contamination in liquid xenon by a factor of 1/1000 with a distillation system in Kamioka mine. Then, the remaining radioactivities (Radon and Kr) in purified liquid xenon were measured with the XMASS prototype detector. In this talk, the distillation system and the remaining internal radioactivity levels are reported.

Takeuchi, Yasuo [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo, Kamioka-cho, Hida-shi, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

2005-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

107

I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+ s a ) + y ) . / t ; % Heat capacity f u n c t i o n CV = clattice gas coexistence heat capacity i n the limit of thepared to the exact heat capacity (line). The heat capacity

Breus, Dimitry E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Simplest Models of Radiative Neutrino Mass: Excluding Simplified Zee Models and Beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complexity of radiative neutrino-mass models can be judged by: (i) whether they require the imposition of ad hoc symmetries, (ii) the number of new multiplets they introduce, and (iii) the number of arbitrary parameters that appear. Adopting the view that the imposition of arbitrary new symmetries is the least appealing approach, the simplest models have two new multiplets and a minimal number of new parameters. With this in mind, we search for the simplest models of radiative neutrino mass. We are lead to two new models, containing a real scalar triplet and a charged scalar doublet (respectively), in addition to the charged singlet scalar considered by Zee [h^+\\sim(1,1,2)]. The new models are essentially simplified versions of the Zee model and appear to be \\emph{the simplest} models of radiative neutrino mass. However, these models are only of pedagogical interest; despite successfully generating nonzero masses, present-day data is sufficient to rule them out. The lessons learned from these models also enable one to exclude a more general class of radiative models. Moving beyond the minimal cases, we find a new model of two-loop masses that employs the charged doublet \\Phi\\sim(1,2,3) and the doubly-charged scalar k^{++}\\sim(1,1,4).

Sandy S. C. Law; Kristian L. McDonald

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida  

SciTech Connect

As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Title Radon Progeny as a experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-117E Year of Publication 2009 Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Michael G. Apte Journal Radiation Biology. Radioecology (Russian) Volume 49 Start Page Chapter Issue 3 Pagination 395-404 Other Numbers LBNL-117E Abstract The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry - nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction

112

Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols: Proposed method and research strategy Title Unattached radon progeny as an experimental tool for dosimetry of nanoaerosols: Proposed method and research strategy Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-117E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ruzer, Lev S., and Michael G. Apte Journal Inhalation Toxicology Volume 22 Pagination 760-766 Abstract The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry - nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction

113

Analytical risk-based model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport in landfills with radium sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical model of gaseous and liquid-phase radon transport through soils is derived for environmental modeling of landfills containing uranium mill tailings or Ra-226 sources. Processes include radon diffusion in both the gas and liquid phases, ... Keywords: Landfill, Multiphase, Performance assessment, Probabilistic modeling, Radium, Radon, Transport

Clifford K. Ho

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of indoor radon ({sup 222}Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to assess the variability of exposure expected among atomic bomb survivors. Two hundred dwellings, mostly belonging to members of the fixed cohort of atomic bomb survivors under study by the Radiation Effects Research Foundations, were selected for this measurement. The geometric mean values of the radon concentrations for 100 dwellings in Hiroshima and 99 dwellings in Nagasaki measured by Track-Etcho Type SF detectors were 56.8 Bq m{sup {minus}3} and 28.5 Bq m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed between lung cancer mortalities in the low-dose range in the two cities. However, apparent values of the mortality rate for low dose range in Hiroshima are consistently greater than those in Nagasaki. The exposure to radon and its progeny and the atomic bomb radiation effect might have some cooperative effects on the lung cancer incidence.

Yonehara, Hidenori; Aoyama, Takashi [Shiga Univ. of Medical Science (Japan); Radford, E.P. [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

A study of radon-222 concentrations in North Carolina groundwater  

SciTech Connect

The groundwater of 400 North Carolina homes was sampled to ascertain the distribution and extent of {sup 222}Rn in North Carolina groundwater. Arithmetic mean (AM) and geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 1,816 pCi L{sup {minus}1} and 656 pCi L{sup {minus}1} were found for the state. These results indicate that two-thirds of 114{degree}C. homes served by groundwater exceed the EPA proposed 300 pCi L{sup {minus}1} maximum contaminant level (MCL). Only 2% of NC homes exceeded 10,000 pCi L-1. The Eastern region had the lowest radon concentrations by far, with a GM of 2-)0 pCi L{sup {minus}1}. The Central region and Western region had GM`s of 794 pCi L{sup {minus}1} and 1,032 pCi L{sup {minus}1} respectively. The groundwater data approached a log normal distribution. No consistent trends were noted in the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and groundwater radon concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.00921 revealed a very weak linear relationship.

Evans, J.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Activated carbon: Utilization excluding industrial waste treatment. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the commercial use and theoretical studies of activated carbon. Topics include performance evaluations in water treatment processes, preparation and regeneration techniques, materials recovery, and pore structure studies. Adsorption characteristics for specific materials are discussed. Studies pertaining specifically to industrial waste treatment are excluded. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Comparison of Ambient Radon Concentrations in Air in the Northern Mojave Desert from Continuous and Integrating Instruments  

SciTech Connect

As part of a program to characterize and baseline environmental parameters, ambient radon-222 (Rn) monitoring was conducted in the rural community of Amargosa Valley, NV, the closest community to Yucca Mountain. Passive integrating and continuous Rn monitoring instruments were deployed adjacent to the Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) station in Amargosa Valley. The CEMP station provided real-time ambient gamma exposure and meteorological data used to correct the integrated Rn measurements, verified the meteorological data collected by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument, and for provided instrumentation for evaluating the relationships between meteorological conditions and Rn concentrations. Hourly Rn concentrations in air measured by the continuous Rn monitoring instrument (AlphaGUARD®) were compared to the average hourly values for the integrating Rn measurements (E-PERM®) by dividing the total Rn measurements by the number of hours the instruments were deployed. The results of the comparison indicated that average hourly ambient Rn concentrations as measured by both methods ranged from 0.2 to 0.4 pico-curies per liter of air. Ambient Rn values for the AlphaGUARD exhibited diurnal variations. When Rn concentrations were compared with measurements of temperature (T), barometric pressure, and relative humidity, the correlation (inversely) was highest with T, albeit weakly.

David S. Shafer; David McGraw; Lynn H. Karr; Greg McCurdy; Tammy L. Kluesner; Karen J. Gray; Jeffrey Tappen

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications  

SciTech Connect

This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

Cohen, B.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Development of a data base on radon in US homes and applications. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This research led to the development of the compilation of data on radon in homes which is included in this document. This research also contributed to the development of two papers analyzing the results. These are a case control study test and tests of the liner no-threshold theory for lung cancer induced by exposure to radon in residential buildings.

Cohen, B.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Experience from Intercomparison Exercises of Radon Gas Detectors in the Years 1996?2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon gas measuring services in Switzerland must be approved by the Federal Office for Public Health (FOPH). The maintenance of approval includes the obligation to participate in annual intercomparison exercises performed at the radon gas reference laboratory of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). In eleven intercomparison exercises since 1996 a total of 1

Gernot Butterweck; Christoph Schuler

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Vertical Distribution of Radon in Clear and Cloudy Daytime Terrestrial Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon (222Rn) is a powerful natural tracer of mixing and exchange processes in the atmospheric boundary layer. The authors present and discuss the main features of a unique dataset of 50 high-resolution vertical radon profiles up to 3500 m above ...

Alastair G. Williams; Wlodek Zahorowski; Scott Chambers; Alan Griffiths; Jörg M. Hacker; Adrian Element; Sylvester Werczynski

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Long range alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. A high voltage is generated near a conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles across the mesh. The current in the mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

Wolf, M.A.; McAdtee, J.L. III; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiadra, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

Study on radon and radium concentrations in drinking water in west region of Iran  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important characterizations of social health is existence the availability of safe drinking water. Since one of the sources of water contamination is nuclear contamination from radon gas, so in this research radon 222 concentration levels in water supplies in the Toyserkan (a region located in the west of Iran) is investigated. For measuring radon gas in water wells and springs Lucas chamber method is used. Review the results of these measurements that taken from 15th place show that, only five sites have radon concentrations above the limit dose. To reduce radon concentration, it is better to keep water in open pools in contact with air before the water is delivered to users.

Forozani, Ghasem

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies  

SciTech Connect

This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

HUMAN DISEASE FROM RADON EXPOSURES: THE IMPACT OF ENERGY CONSERVATION IN RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS  

SciTech Connect

The level of radon and its daughters inside conventional buildings is often higher than the ambient background level. Interest in conserving energy is motivating homeowners and builers to reduce ventilation and hence to increase the concentration of indoor generated air contaminants, including radon. It is unliekly that the current radiation levels in conventional homes and buildings from radon daughters could account for a significant portion of the lung cancer rate in non-smokers. However, it is likely that some increased lung cancer risk would result from increased radon exposures; hence, it is prudent not to allow radon concentrations to rise significantly. There are several ways to implement energy conservation measures without increasing risks.

Budnitz, R.J.; Berk, J.V.; Hollowell, C.D.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V.; Rosenfeld, A.H.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Effectiveness of radon control features in new house construction, south central Florida. Final report, November 1993-December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of a study to evaluate the effectiveness of two slab types (monolithic and slab-in-stem wall) in retarding radon entry in new houses built in accordance with the State of Florida`s proposed radon standard for new construction over high radon potential soils. Fourteen houses were monitored during their construction on sites whose soil gas radon concentrations were screened to be > 1000 pCi/L. Some of the house sites had concentrations 12,000 pCi/L. Slab integrity was monitored over time, and post-construction ventilation and radon entry were measured in all the houses.

Fowler, C.S.; McDonough, S.E.; Williamson, A.D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radon transform on a space over a residue class ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The functions on a space of dimension N over the residue class ring Z{sub n} modulo n that are invariant with respect to the group GL(N,Z{sub n}) form a commutative convolution algebra. We describe the structure of this algebra and find the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the operators of multiplication by elements of this algebra. The results thus obtained are applied to solve the inverse problem for the hyperplane Radon transform on Z{sup N}{sub n}. Bibliography: 2 titles.

Molchanov, Vladimir F [Tambov State University, Tambov (Russian Federation)

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Marsh, James [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Gregoratto, Demetrio [Health Protection Agency of Great Britain; Blanchardon, Eric [IRSN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

The Effect of Steady Winds on Radon-222 Entry from soil into houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind affects the radon-222 entry rate from soil into buildings and the resulting indoor concentrations. To investigate this phenomenon, we employ a previously tested three-dimensional numerical model of soil-gas Bow around houses, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, an established model for determining ventilation rates in the presence of wind, and new wind tunnel results for the ground-surface pressure field caused by wind. These tools and data, applied under steady-state conditions to a prototypical residential building, allow us (1) to determine the complex soil-gas flow patterns that result from the presence of wind-generated ground-surface pressures, (2) to evaluate the effect of these flows on the radon concentration in the soil, and (3) to calculate the effect of wind on the radon entry rate and indoor concentration. For a broad range of soil permeabilities, two wind speeds, and two wind directions, we quantify the"flushing" effect of wind on the radon in the soil surrounding a house, and the consequent sharp decrease in radon entry rates. Experimental measurements of the time-dependent radon concentration in soil gas beneath houses confirm the existence of wind-induced flushing. Comparisons are made to modeling predictions obtained while ignoring the effect of the wind-generated ground-surface pressures. These investigations lead to the conclusion that wind-generated ground-surface pressures play a significant role in determining radon entry rates into residential buildings. [References: 26

Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Long range alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); McAtee, James L. (Los Alamos, NM); Unruh, Wesley P. (Los Alamos, NM); Cucchiara, Alfred L. (Los Alamos, NM); Huchton, Roger L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Long range alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

A TRANSISTORIZED ALPHA COUNTER FOR AN ALPHA GAUGE  

SciTech Connect

A transistorized instrument prototype was designed and constructed to replace a vacuum-tube instrument in an alpha gauge, which measures the thickness density of gases. The instrument amplifies, shapes, discriminates, and counts alpha pulses from a Au-Si surface-barrier detector exposed to an alpha source in a gas-filled chamber. The circuit consists of a charge-sensitive preamplifier, a main amplifier with pulse clipping, a Schmitt trigger, a diode pump, and a count rate meter. Preliminary tests gave results comparable to the vacuum-tube instrument. Accuracy of counting was within 10% for 0.5- to 10-Mev alpha particles emitted at a maximum rate of 10/sup 6 per sec. The instrument was stable at 25 to 55 deg C, is small and portable, and costs less than 0. An infinitely thick, alpha source that will give a high count rate is being constructed for final tests. (auth)

Kopp, M.C.

1962-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

134

Expert systems: A new approach to radon mitigation training and quality assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Training radon mitigators and ensuring that they provide high-quality work on the scale necessary to reduce radon to acceptable levels in the large number of homes and schools requiring some mitigation is a challenging problem. The US Environmental Protection Agency and several states have made commendable efforts to train mitigators and ensure that they provide quality services to the public. Expert systems could be used to extend and improve the effectiveness of these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the radon community to this promising new technology. The paper includes a description of a prototype system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory that illustrates several of the capabilities that expert systems can provide, a brief explanation of how the prototype works, and a discussion of the potential roles and benefits of fully-developed expert systems for radon mitigation. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Brambley, M.R.; Hanlon, R.L.; Parker, G.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Imaging of structure at and near the core mantle boundary using a generalized radon transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, concepts from inverse scattering and modem statistics are combined into a powerful tool for imaging interfaces in Earth's deep interior. Specially, a generalized Radon transform (GRT) approach is developed ...

Wang, Ping, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

Riley, W.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Investigation of radon-222 in subsurface waters as an earthquake predictor  

SciTech Connect

Changes of radon-222 content of well waters in seismically active regions may provide earthquake precursor signals, according to reports of recent Chinese and Russian work. A high-precision $gamma$-ray system for continuous monitoring of radon in wells and springs has been developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, where monitoring began in April 1975, and has been extended to other sites including the San Andreas fault zone. (auth)

Smith, A.R.; Bowman, H.R.; Mosier, D.F.; Asaro, F.; Wollenberg, H.A.; King, C.Y.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

First direct measurement of resonance strengths in {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne  

SciTech Connect

The reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne has been measured by in-beam {gamma} spectroscopy for the first time in the energy range E{sub {alpha}=}750-1650 keV using highly enriched anodized Ta{sub 2}({sup 17}O){sub 5} targets. Resonances were found at E{sub {alpha}=} 1002, 1386, and 1619 keV. Their strengths and primary {gamma}-ray branchings are given. The new results exclude the low reaction rate of Descouvemont and support the rate of Caughlan and Fowler. Implications for the neutron poisoning efficiency of {sup 16}O in the weak s-process are discussed.

Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Kontos, A.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

The angular integral of the radon transform (aniRT) as a feature vector in categorization of visual objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recently introduced angular integral of the Radon transform (aniRT) seems to be a good candidate as a feature vector used in categorization of visual objects in a rotation invariant fashion. We investigate application of aniRT in situations when ... Keywords: categorization of visual objects, chinese characters, incremental learning, radon transform, self-organizing maps

Andrew P. Papli?ski

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked LR 115 detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of both active layers were calculated. Two glass samples were exposed in a chamber to determine the experimental calibration fac- tors for the radon gas and progeny, which were then compared with the theoretical agreed well. The discrepancy between the calibration factors for radon gas was due to a much higher

Yu, K.N.

142

Recommended performance standard of the Florida Radon Research Program. Final report, April 1990-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report is a revised version of a support document for the performance testing portion of the proposed Florida statewide building standard for radon-resistant construction. The support document was developed by the Alternate Performance Standard Development Committee of the Florida Radon Research Program (FRRP), commissioned by the Florida Department of Community Affairs. The report contains the rationale and technical justification for the version of the Performance Testing Section (Section 5) of the standard which was recommended by the Standard Development Committee, as well as recommended text for the section. The recommendations and draft standard language were based largely on an FRRP research project which involved study of short- and long-term average indoor radon concentrations in 80 Florida houses for over a year. At the time of the committee report the project had collected 6 months of data from about half the houses and 3 months of data from the remaining half. After a brief review of the variability of indoor radon, the report describes background, methodology, data analysis strategy, and early results from the short-/long-term radon correlation project. These are followed by a rationale for the recommended standard section.

McDonough, S.E.; Williamson, A.D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radon mitigation studies: South Central Florida demonstration. Final report, November 1987-January 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report gives results of an EPA radon mitigation project involving 14 slab-on-grade houses in Polk County, FL, having indoor radon levels of 320-3810 Bq/cu m (8.7-103 pCi/L), using sub-slab depressurization (SSD) in a variety of applications to evaluate optimal design criteria to be recommended as cost-effective and capable of reducing indoor radon concentrations in houses built over compacted soil fills. For all houses, obvious accessible radon entry points were sealed, and 53-90 L (12-20 gal.) suction pits were dug into the fill material. Two of the houses were mitigated with exterior horizontal suction holes drilled through the stem walls. In four houses, one or more suction pipes were in the garage. The remainder of the interior suction holes were in closets or some other unobtrusive location. Except for the two houses with exterior systems, the other 12 had mitigation fans in the attic. In-line centrifugal fans were used to mitigate each house, although a larger radial blower was installed overnight for experimental purposes in one house, and a vaccumcleaner was used to simulate a larger suction in another house for pressure field measurements only. Post-mitigation worst-case radon concentrations in these houses ranged from 40 to 290 Bq/cu m.

Fowler, C.S.; Williamson, A.D.; Pyle, B.E.; Belzer, F.E.; Coker, R.N.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radon in Soil Gas Above Bedrock Fracture Sets at the Shepley’s Hill Superfund Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site near Devens, MA (Figure 1). The technical support was requested as follow-on work to an initial screening level radiation survey conducted in 2008. The purpose of the original study was to assess the efficacy of the INL-developed Backpack Sodium Iodide System (BaSIS) for detecting elevated areas of natural radioactivity due to the decay of radon-222 gases emanating from the underlying fracture sets. Although the results from the initial study were mixed, the BaSIS radiation surveys did confirm that exposed bedrock outcrops have higher natural radioactivity than the surficial soils, thus a high potential for detecting elevated levels of radon and/or radon daughter products. (INL 2009) The short count times associated with the BaSIS measurements limited the ability of the system to respond to elevated levels of radioactivity from a subsurface source, in this instance radon gas emanating from fracture sets. Thus, it was postulated that a different methodology be employed to directly detect the radon in the soil gases. The CR-39 particle track detectors were investigated through an extensive literature and technology search. The relatively long deployment or “detection” time of several days, as well as the sensitivity of the measurement and robustness of the detectors made the CR-39 technology promising for deployment at the Shepley’s Hill site.

J.R. Giles; T.L. McLing; M.V. Carpenter; C.J. Smith; W. Brandon

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

An indoor radon survey of the X-ray rooms of Mexico City hospitals  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the X-ray rooms of a selection of hospitals in the metropolitan area of Mexico City. The metropolitan area of Mexico City is Mexico's largest metropolitan area by population; the number of patients requiring the use of X-rays is also the highest. An understanding of indoor radon concentrations in X-ray rooms is necessary for the estimation of the radiological risk to which patients, radiologists and medical technicians are exposed. The indoor radon concentrations were monitored for a period of six months using nuclear track detectors (NTD) consisting of a closed-end cup system with CR-39 (Lantrack Registered-Sign ) polycarbonate as detector material. The indoor radon concentrations were found to be between 75 and 170 Bq m{sup -3}, below the USEPA-recommended indoor radon action level for working places of 400 Bq m{sup -3}. It is hoped that the results of this study will contribute to the establishment of recommended action levels by the Mexican regulatory authorities responsible for nuclear safety.

Juarez, Faustino [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000, Mexico. Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito (Mexico); Reyes, Pedro G. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100. Estado de Mexico, 50000 (Mexico); Espinosa, Guillermo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico D.F. Cp.04510 (Mexico)

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Alpha-nucleus potential for alpha-decay and sub-barrier fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The set of parameters for alpha-nucleus potential is derived by using the data for both the alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections around the barrier for reactions alpha+40Ca, alpha+59Co, alpha+208Pb. The alpha-decay half-lives are obtained in the framework of a cluster model using the WKB approximation. The evaluated alpha-decay half-lives and the fusion cross-sections agreed well with the data. Fusion reactions between alpha-particle and heavy nuclei can be used for both the formation of very heavy nuclei and spectroscopic studies of the formed compound nuclei.

V. Yu. Denisov; H. Ikezoe

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

148

A synopsis of collective alpha effects and implications for ITER  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the following: Alpha Interaction with Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes; Alpha Interaction with Ballooning Modes; Alpha Interaction with Fishbone Oscillations; and Implications for ITER.

Sigmar, D.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Determination of alpha_s from tau decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic tau decays offer the possibility of determining the strong coupling alpha_s at relatively low energy. Precisely for this reason, however, good control over the perturbative QCD corrections, the non-perturbative condensate contributions in the framework of the operator product expansion (OPE), as well as the corrections going beyond the OPE, the duality violations (DVs), is required. On the perturbative QCD side, the contour-improved versus fixed-order resummation of the series is still an issue, and will be discussed. Regarding the analysis, self-consistent fits to the data including all theory parameters have to be performed, and this is also explained in some detail. The fit quantities are moment integrals of the tau spectral function data in a certain energy window and care should be taken to have acceptable perturbative behaviour of those moments as well as control over higher-dimensional operator corrections in the OPE.

Jamin, Matthias

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

A long-term study of radon and airborne particulates at phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida  

SciTech Connect

The EPA is presently assessing the significance of radioactive emissions from phosphogypsum stacks to determine if they should be regulated under the Clean Air Act. As part of this assessment, a one-year study was conducted to measure the airborne radionuclide emissions from five phosphogypsum stacks in central Florida. This report provides a detailed description of this study. Measurements were conducted over a 12-month period on four active and one inactive phosphogypsum stacks. The study included the following measurements: 1260 radon-222 flux, 90 ambient radon-222, and 50 gamma-ray exposure rates. Also, radionuclide analyses were performed on 33 airborne particulate samples, 9 airborne particle-size samples, and 50 phosphogypsum samples. The annual average radon flux determined for the dry-loose material on top of active phosphogypsum stacks was 20 pCi/mS-s, and is regarded as representative of stacks in the central Florida region. The annual average flux on the top surface of the inactive stack was 4 to 5 times smaller, due to a surface crust. The data suggest that to obtain a representative annual average radon flux on a phosphogypsum stack the total number of measurements made is more important than the period of time over which the measurements are made. 11 ref., 16 figs., 24 tabs.

Horton, T.R.; Blanchard, R.L.; Windham, S.T.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Evaluating risk communication: Narrative vs. technical presentations of information about radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an experiment to test the hypothesis that people respond better to risk communication that reflects more closely the conditions of their social and cultural lives. The experiment used the case of radon to determine whether technical or narrative forms of risk communication were more effective at drawing people`s attention, imparting information, and modifying behavior. Two series of articles on radon were placed in the local newspapers of two Massachusetts communities. Homeowners attitudes, knowledge, and responses were monitored in baseline and follow-up telephone surveys. A third community was selected for comparison. The newspaper series were developed on the basis of previous research and six focus groups conducted with homeowners. The technical series presented authoritative, factual risk information, in the scientific style of the passive voice with generalized and impersonal language. The narrative series consisted of dramatized accounts of individuals making decisions about radon testing and mitigation, written in a more personal style. The findings from the focus groups confirm the results of previous studies, but the small size of the follow-up samples was a limiting factor in drawing definitive conclusions about the relative effectiveness of the two formats. The experiment demonstrates the difficulty of any risk communication effort on radon and underscores the need for good research design. The study illustrates the need for further research on the role of sociological and cultural factors in the public perception and response to risk. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Golding, D. [Center for Risk Management, Washington, DC (United States); Krimsky, S.; Plough, A. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Refinement of the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ fish-bone potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ fish-bone potential by simultaneously fitting to the experimental phase shifts. We found that with a double Gaussian parametrization of the local potential can describe the $n-\\alpha$ and $p-\\alpha$ phase shifts for all partial waves.

Smith, E; Papp, Z

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Alpha Channeling in a Rotating Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wave-particle alpha-channeling effect is generalized to include rotating plasma. Specifically, radio frequency waves can resonate with alpha particles in a mirror machine with ExB rotation to diffuse the alpha particles along constrained paths in phase space. Of major interest is that the alpha-particle energy, in addition to amplifying the RF waves, can directly enhance the rotation energy which in turn provides additional plasma confinement in centrifugal fusion reactors. An ancillary benefit is the rapid removal of alpha particles, which increases the fusion reactivity.

Fetterman, Abraham J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Seasonal Variation of Indoor Radon Concentration in the Tropics: Comparative studies between Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Kerala, India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation dose received by man from indoor radon and its progeny is the largest at more than 50% of total dose received. The seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in Kerala, India and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were studied. The Southwest coast of the Kerala state in India is known to have very high levels of natural background radiation owing to the rare earths rich monazite sand available in large amount. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia used to be a famous tin mining area where it was done using open cast system. One-year measurements of radon concentration in houses were done for these two regions. It was found that there is considerable seasonal variation in the levels of radon in Kerala but the variation in Kuala Lumpur is only less than 10%.

Mahat, R. H.; Amin, Y. M. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jojo, P. J. [Physics Department, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India); Pereira, C. E. [CARPS, Department of Physics, Fatima Mata National College, Kerala (India)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Atmospheric Radon Measurements in the Arctic; Fronts, Seasonal Observations, and Transport of Continental Air to Polar Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon was determined in the atmosphere over the Arctic Ocean in flights of a United States Naval Research Laboratory aircraft in April and May 1974. Simultaneously collected air samples were analyzed for carbon monoxide, methane, ...

P. E. Wilkniss; R. E. Larson

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

A method for determining an indicator of effective dose calculation due to inhalation of Radon and its progeny from in vivo measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the absolved dose to lung tissue from inhalation of radon and its progeny is not possible and must be calculated using dosimetric models, taking into consideration the several parameters upon which the dose calculation depends. To asses the dose due to inhalation of radon and its progeny, it is necessary to estimate the cumulative exposure. Historically, this has been done using WLM values estimated with measurements of radon concentration in air. The radon concentration in air varies significantly, however, in space with time, and the exposed individual is also constantly moving around. This makes it almost impossible to obtain a precise estimate of an individual's inhalation exposure. This work describes a pilot study to calculate lung dose from the deposition of radon progeny, via estimates of cumulative exposure derived from in vivo measurements of sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Pb, in subjects exposed to above-average radon and its progeny concentrations in their home environments. The measureme...

Estrada, J

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

RADIATION EFFECTS OF ALPHA PARTICLES ON URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Alpha irradiation of uranium hexafluoride results in the formation of fluorine and intermediate, solid uranium fluorides: these products react with each other, apparently by a radiation-induced process. to reform uranium hexifluoride. The number of molecules of uranium hexafluoride decomposed, excluding recombiapproximately 1 in the temperature range 21 to 87 deg C. Irradiation of a mixture of fluorine and uranium hexafluoride in a vessel containing uranium fluorides substantistes the postulated mechanism. At fluorine pressures of 50 to 100 mm Hg, there is an increase, rather than a decrease, in uranium hexafluoride pressure. Rates of both decomposition and recombination processes appear to depend only on the rates of radiation energy absorption. Equations formnulated to describe the combined decomposition and reformation reactions can be used to calculate equilibrium concentrations of uranium hexfluoride and fluorine when the intensity of the radiation source is defined. The effects of three diluent gases, helium, nitrogen and oxygen, were studied in an attempt to find possible electron transfer processes. (auth)

Bernhardt, H.A.; Davis, W. Jr.; Shiflett, C.H.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Available Technologies: Biological Production of Alpha Olefins ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Production of the following from sugar or starch: alpha olefins including 1-hexene, 1-decene, deca-1,5-diene, aromatic ...

159

SHOE V.1.5 ALPHA  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

002913MLTPL00 Sandia Higher Order Elements (SHOE) v 0.5 alpha  http://midas3.kitware.com/midas/folder/10328 

160

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994  

SciTech Connect

In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Update on radon-mitigation research in schools. Rept. for 1988-Aug 91  

SciTech Connect

The paper is an overview of research by EPA's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) on radon mitigation in 47 schools since 1988. The structural and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system characteristics of the research schools are presented, along with the mitigation techniques implemented in the schools. Research discussed includes recent and on-going projects in Colorado, Maine, Maryland, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Virginia. Initial research focussed on the application of active subslab depressurization (ASD) to school buildings, and recent research has emphasized the ability and limitations of using HVAC systems to reduce radon levels in schools. A goal of future projects is to compare the effectiveness of the two techniques in the same building. Slab-on-grade is the most prevalent substructure in AEERL's research schools and, depending on pressure field extension, ASD systems have been recommended for radon control in many of them. In schools where they have been installed, ASD systems have performed well and are currently being evaluated for long-term performance. The distribution of HVAC system types in these schools is about a third central air handling systems, a third unit ventilators, and a third that do not supply conditioned outdoor air (i.e., fan coil units or radiant heat).

Leovic, K.W.; Craig, A.B.; Harris, D.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alpha Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Alpha Technologies Place Bellingham, Washington State Zip 98226 Sector Services, Solar Product Bellingham (WA)-based firm offering, among other products, power conversion products designed specifically for the PV market, plus installation services for solar systems. Coordinates 48.75235°, -122.471219° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.75235,"lon":-122.471219,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiationNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319­323 Passive monitoring for passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor F inside a radon exposure chamber. The method is based

Yu, K.N.

165

Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NAREL (National Air and Standard Environmental Laboratory) standard operating procedures for radon-222 measurement using diffusion barrier charcoal canisters  

SciTech Connect

Radon monitoring procedures for the National Air and Radiation Environment Laboratory (NAREL) are described. Radon is detected by sorption to activated charcoal, followed by detection of gamma ray emissions from the radon decay products lead-214 (295 KeV and 392 KeV) and bismuth-214 (609 KeV). The activated charcoal is held in an 8 ounce metal can, under a polyethylene diffusion barrier and a stainless steel screen, 30--50% open. The polyethylene barrier reduces water absorption by the charcoal, and improves integration over the exposure period. The proper use of the container is described, as is the counting system and calibration of the detecting system. Fabrication of reference standards and background canisters is described. Equations and sample calculations to determine radon concentrations are given. All terms in the equation are defined, and all calibration factors are calculated. The minimal detectable amounts of radon as a function of detector exposure time are calculated. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab. (MHB)

Gray, D.J.; Windham, S.T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alpha Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Alpha Renewable Energy Place Atlanta, Georgia Sector Biomass Product Manufacturer of biomass wood gas stoves and standalone power generators for rural areas. References Alpha Renewable Energy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Alpha Renewable Energy is a company located in Atlanta, Georgia . References ↑ "Alpha Renewable Energy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Alpha_Renewable_Energy&oldid=342033" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

168

Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radon-222 emissions and control practices for licensed uranium mills and their associated tailings piles. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report is organized into five main sections. The conclusions of the effort are summarized in Chapter 2. A general description of current milling and tailings management practices and a summary of the site-specific characteristics of operating and standby uranium mills are contained in Chapter-3. The sources and emission rates of radon-222 at licensed mills and their associated tailings piles are contained in Chapter 4 along with the results of an effort to develop generic procedures to estimate radon-222 emissions for milling operations and tailings disposal. Control practices that are being or could be applied to the milling operation and tailings disposal areas and their estimated cost and effectiveness in reducing radon-222 emissions are presented in Chapter 5. The appendices contain detailed information on mill site data and emission estimates.

Not Available

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Alpha-Particle Condensation in Nuclear Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The onset of quartetting, i.e. alpha-particle condensation, in symmetric nuclear matter is studied with the help of an in-medium modified four nucleon equation. It is found that at very low density quartetting wins over pairing, because of the strong binding of the alpha-particles. The critical temperature can reach values up to around 6 MeV. Also the disappearance of alpha-particles with increasing density, i.e. the Mott transition, is investigated. In finite nuclei the Hoyle state, that is the 0_2^+ of 12C, is identified as an "alpha-particle condensate" state. It is conjectured that such states also exist in heavier n alpha-nuclei, like 16O, 20Ne, etc. For instance the 6-th 0^+ state of 16O at 15.1 MeV is identified from a theoretical analysis as being a strong candidate for an alpha condensate state. Exploratory calculations are performed for the density dependence of the alpha condensate fraction at zero temperature to address the suppression of the four-particle condensate below nuclear-matter density. Possible quartet condensation in other systems is discussed briefly

Y. Funaki; T. Yamada; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Alpha Energy formerly Altair Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington State . References "Alpha Energy (formerly Altair Energy)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleAlphaEnergyformerlyAltairEnergy&oldid342032...

172

Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

1983-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

Investigating Indoor Radon Levels and Influencing Factors in Primary Schools of Zulfi City, Saudi Arabia  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of indoor Concentrations were performed in Zulfi city of Saudi Arabia, using CR-39 track etch detectors. This investigation focused on the influence of different parameters, namely different locations, school categories, school building types, and room type as well as on the existence of differences in radon concentration at floor levels. We divided the Zulfi city into five regions, keeping in mind their geographical locations between Tuwaiq Mountains and Al-Thuwayrat sands. The measured average radon concentrations for regions 1-5 respectively are: 87.0{+-}14.2 Bq/m{sup 3}, 83.4{+-}6.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 61.6{+-}6.4 Bq/m{sup 3}, 63.7{+-}5.4 Bq/m{sup 3} and 87.5{+-}6.Bq/m{sup 3} and the minimum concentrations are 28.0 Bq/m{sup 3}, 5.5 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.1 Bq/m{sup 3}, 1.0 Bq/m{sup 3} and 24 Bq/m{sup 3} respectively. These results are still within normal limits and below the action level of 148 Bqm{sup -3} set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). A test of significance using Minitab program was applied to investigate if radon levels in regions are significantly different from each other. We tried all combinations, and found the following results. The ''within regions''(different location) test yielded, region 2 is not significant versus region ''1''(p = 0.783) and versus region ''5''(P = 0.646), whereas it is significant versus region ''3''(P = 0.0160) and also versus region ''4''(p = 0.018). We investigated government and rented school's building also and none was found significantly different (p = 0.052). Floors of the same building were tested in order to examine the radon concentration as a function of storey level. No significant difference was observed at floor levels (p = 0.009). When girl's schools versus Boys and kindergartens schools were tested they were found significantly different. It is believed that this significant difference is due to geographical nature of the area, since most of the girl's schools were selected from regions 2 and 3, these regions are relatively close to the Tuwaiq mountains whereas other regions are near to the Al-Thuwayrat sands.

Al-Ghamdi, S. S.; Al-Garawi, M. S.; Al-Mosa, Tahani M.; Baig, M. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

Measurements of alpha_s from hadronic event shapes in e+e- annihilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New studies of hadronic event shape observables in e+ e- collisions between 13 and 183 GeV CM energy have enabled the running of alpha_s to be confirmed and the validity of non-perturbative power-law corrections to be investigated. A more precise value of alpha_s(M_Z) with reduced theoretical errors has been reported from fitting 18 oriented event shape distributions measured in one experiment at the Z.

J. C. Thompson

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

175

Methods for the synthesis and polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-p-xylenes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention describes an improved method for the polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.-dihalo-p-xylene's such as the .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-xylene's. The procedure for synthesis is based on the specific order of addition of reagents and the use of an anionic initiator that allows control of the molecular weight of the polymer. The molecular weight control allows processability of the polymer which is important for its utility in applications including in light-emitting-diodes, field effect transistors and photovoltaic devices.

Ferraris, John P. (Coppell, TX); Neef, Charles J. (Garland, TX)

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Cancer mortality among a group of fluorspar miners exposed to radon progeny  

SciTech Connect

A cohort study of the mortality experience (1950-1984) of 1,772 Newfoundland underground fluorspar miners occupationally exposed to high levels of radon daughters (mean dose = 382.8 working levels months) has been conducted. Observed numbers of cancers of the lung, salivary gland, and buccal cavity and pharynx were significantly elevated among these miners. A highly significant relation was noted between radon daughter exposure and risk of dying of lung cancer; the small numbers of salivary gland (n = 2) and buccal cavity and pharynx (n = 6) cancers precluded meaningful analysis of dose response. Attributable and relative risk coefficients for lung cancer were estimated as 6.3 deaths per working level month per million person-years and 0.9% per working level month, respectively. Relative risk coefficients were highest for those first exposed before age 20 years. Cigarette smokers had relative and attributable risk coefficients comparable to those of nonsmokers. Relative risks fell sharply with age, whereas attributable risks were lowest in the youngest and oldest age groups. The results suggest that efforts to raise existing occupational exposure standards may be inappropriate.

Morrison, H.I.; Semenciw, R.M.; Mao, Y.; Wigle, D.T.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Microaneurysms detection with the radon cliff operator in retinal fundus images  

SciTech Connect

Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the leading causes of blindness in the industrialized world. Early detection is the key in providing effective treatment. However, the current number of trained eye care specialists is inadequate to screen the increasing number of diabetic patients. In recent years, automated and semi-automated systems to detect DR with color fundus images have been developed with encouraging, but not fully satisfactory results. In this study we present the initial results of a new technique for the detection and localization of microaneurysms, an early sign of DR. The algorithm is based on three steps: candidates selection, the actual microaneurysms detection and a final probability evaluation. We introduce the new Radon Cliff operator which is our main contribution to the field. Making use of the Radon transform, the operator is able to detect single noisy Gaussian-like circular structures regardless of their size or strength. The advantages over existing microaneurysms detectors are manifold: the size of the lesions can be unknown, it automatically distinguishes lesions from the vasculature and it provides a fair approach to microaneurysm localization even without post-processing the candidates with machine learning techniques, facilitating the training phase. The algorithm is evaluated on a publicly available dataset from the Retinopathy Online Challenge.

Giancardo, Luca [ORNL; Meriaudeau, Fabrice [ORNL; Karnowski, Thomas Paul [ORNL; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William [ORNL; Li, Yaquin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Chaum, Edward [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lyman-$\\alpha$ line is expected to be strong in the presence of active star formation and the absence of dust, making it a good tool for finding chemically primitive galaxies in the early universe. We report on a new survey for high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new $8192^2$ pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ galaxies have an observed surface density corresponding to $11000 \\pm 700$ per square degree per unit redshift at $z=4.5$. Early spectroscopic followup from the Keck telescope suggests that $\\sim 1/3$ of these are actually at $z\\approx 4.5$, and has confirmed five $z > 4$ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters so far. Combining our photometric survey with spectroscopic results, we estimate a net density of $\\sim 4000 $ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters per square degree per unit redshift at $z\\approx 4.5$. The star formation rate density (estimated both from UV continuum and from line emission) is comparable to that of the Lyman break galaxy population within present uncertainties. The most extreme Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters in our sample have rest frame equivalent widths $> 100\\AA$, consistent with the expectations for the first burst of star formation in a primitive, dust-free galaxy.

James E. Rhoads; Sangeeta Malhotra; Arjun Dey; Buell T. Jannuzi; Daniel Stern; Hyron Spinrad

2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves  

SciTech Connect

An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high n? can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Review on the determination of alpha_s from the QCD static energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the determination of the strong coupling alpha_s from the comparison of the perturbative expression for the Quantum Chromodynamics static energy with lattice data. We collect here all the perturbative expressions needed to evaluate the static energy at the currently known accuracy.

Tormo, Xavier Garcia i

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

ALPHA ATTENUATION DUE TO DUST LOADING  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies had been done in order to show the attenuation of alpha particles in filter media. These studies provided an accurate correction for this attenuation, but there had not yet been a study with sufficient results to properly correct for attenuation due to dust loading on the filters. At the Savannah River Site, filter samples are corrected for attenuation due to dust loading at 20%. Depending on the facility the filter comes from and the duration of the sampling period, the proper correction factor may vary. The objective of this study was to determine self-absorption curves for each of three counting instruments. Prior work indicated significant decreases in alpha count rate (as much as 38%) due to dust loading, especially on filters from facilities where sampling takes place over long intervals. The alpha count rate decreased because of a decrease in the energy of the alpha. The study performed resulted in a set of alpha absorption curves for each of three detectors. This study also took into account the affects of the geometry differences in the different counting equipment used.

Dailey, A; Dennis Hadlock, D

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lyman-$\\alpha$ line is expected to be strong in the presence of active star formation and the absence of dust, making it a good tool for finding chemically primitive galaxies in the early universe. We report on a new survey for high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new $8192^2$ pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman-$\\alpha$ galaxies have an observed surface density corresponding to $11000 \\pm 700$ per square degree per unit redshift at $z=4.5$. Early spectroscopic followup from the Keck telescope suggests that $\\sim 1/3$ of these are actually at $z\\approx 4.5$, and has confirmed five $z > 4$ Lyman-$\\alpha$ emitters so far. Combining our photometric survey with spectroscopic results, we estimate a net density of $\\sim...

Rhoads, J E; Dey, A; Jannuzi, B T; Stern, D; Spinrad, H; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Stern, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at ...

Furlanetto, S; Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Furlanetto, Steven; Schaye, Joop; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alpha decay favoured isotopes of some superheavy nuclei: Spontaneous fission versus alpha decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous fission and alpha decay are the main decay modes for superheavy nuclei. The superheavy nuclei which have small alpha decay half-life compared to spontaneous fission half-life will survive fission and can be detected in the laboratory through alpha decay. We have studied the alpha decay half-life and spontaneous half-life of some superheavy elements in the atomic range Z = 100-130. Spontaneous fission half-lives of superheavy nuclei have been calculated using the phenomenological formula and the alpha decay half-lives using Viola-Seaborg-Sobiczewski formula (Sobiczewski et al. 1989), semi empirical relation of Brown (1992) and formula based on generalized liquid drop model proposed by Dasgupta-Schubert and Reyes (2007). The results are reported here.

O. V. Kiren; S. B. Gudennavar; S. G. Bubbly

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

186

AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AlphaWatt Ltd AlphaWatt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AlphaWatt Ltd Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1V 4PY Sector Solar Product Solar project developer, plans to become an independent power provider. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

187

Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

Grisham, Larry R. (Lawrence Township, Mercer County, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Dawson, John M. (Pacific Palisades, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Alternating current long range alpha particle detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at z~0, collisional excitation following photo-heating may well dominate the total emission at higher redshifts. The central regions of these systems are dense enough to shield themselves from the metagalactic ionizing background; unfortunately, in this regime our simulations are no longer reliable. We therefore consider several scenarios for the emission from the central cores, including one in which self-shielded gas does not emit at all. We show that the combination of star formation and cooling IGM gas can explain most of the observed "Lyman-alpha blobs" at z~3, with the important exception of the largest sources. On the other hand, except under the most optimistic assumptions, cooling IGM gas cannot explain the observations on its own.

Steven Furlanetto; Joop Schaye; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Fan-less long range alpha detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fan-less long range alpha detector which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fan-less long range alpha detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Transformer Recharging with Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Transformer recharging with lower hybrid waves in tokamaks can give low average auxiliary power if the resistivity is kept high enough during the radio frequency (rf) recharging stage. At the same time, operation in the hot ion mode via alpha channeling increases the effective fusion reactivity. This paper will address the extent to which these two large cost saving steps are compatible. __________________________________________________

N.J. Fisch

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

193

Temperature Sensitivity of Lyman-Alpha Hygrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of an E.R.C. Lyman-alpha hygrometer to humidity and temperature variations has been experimentally determined in a humidity calibration tunnel. The data are compared to a simple two-gas/two-line model to determine the errors made in ...

P. Mestayer; C. Rebattet

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

195

The measurement of $\\alpha_s$ from event shapes with the DELPHI detector at the highest LEP energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic event shape distributions are determined from data in e+e- collisions between 183 and 207 GeV. From these the strong coupling alpha_s is extracted in O(alpha_s^2), NLLA and matched O(alpha_s^2)+NLLA theory. Hadronisation corrections evaluated with fragmentation model generators as well as an analytical power ansatz are applied. Comparing these measurements to those obtained at and around M_Z allows a combined measurement of alpha_s from all DELPHI data and a test of the energy dependence of the strong coupling.

Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, Borut P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I B; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zinchenko, A I; Zupan, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Gallop, Mark A. (East Palo Alto, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

198

Some numerical reslts on best uniform polynomial approximation of. chi. sup. alpha. on (0,1)  

SciTech Connect

Let {alpha} be a positive number, and let E{sub n}(chi{sup {alpha}}; (0,1)) denote the error of best uniform approximation to {chi}{sup {alpha}}, by polynomials of degree at most n, on the interval (0,1). The Russian mathematician S.N. Bernstein established the existence of a nonnegative constant {Beta}({alpha}) such that {Beta}({alpha}):= {sub n{yields}{infinity}lim(2n){sup 2{alpha}}E{sub n}({chi}{sup {alpha}};(0.1)). In addition, Bernstein showed that {Beta}{alpha} < {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert bar}sin(pi}{alpha}){vert bar}/{pi} ({alpha} > 0) and that {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert bar}sin({pi}{alpha}){vert bar}/{pi} (1{minus}1/2{alpha}{minus}1) < {Beta}({alpha}) ({alpha} > {1/2}), so that the asymptotic behavior of {Beta}({alpha}) is known when {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. Still, the problem of trying to determine {Beta}({alpha}) more precisely, for all {alpha} > 0, is intriguing. To this end, we have rigorously determined the numbers for thirteen values of {alpha}, where these numbers were calculated with a precision of at least 200 significant digits. For each of these thirteen values of {alpha}, Richardson's extrapolation was applied to the products to obtain estimates of {Beta}({alpha}) to approximately 40 decimal places. Included are graphs of the points ({alpha},{Beta}({alpha})) for the thirteen values of {alpha} that we considered.

Carpenter, A.J.; Varga, R.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Alternate Alpha Induced Reactions for NIF Radiochemistry  

SciTech Connect

Radiochemical analysis of NIF capsule residues has been identified as a potential diagnostic of NIF capsule performance. In particular, alpha-induced nuclear reactions that occur on tracer elements added to the NIF capsule have been shown through simulation to be a very sensitive diagnostic for mix. The short range of the alpha particles makes them representative of the hot spot where they are created through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Reactions on elements doped into the innermost part of the capsule ablator would therefore be sensitive to material that had mixed into the hot spot. Radiochemical determinations of activated detector elements may perhaps be the only true measure of mix that occurs in a NIF capsule, particularly in cases when the capsule fails.

Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Bernstein, L A

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

First Attempts at Antihydrogen Trapping in ALPHA  

SciTech Connect

The ALPHA apparatus is designed to produce and trap antihydrogen atoms. The device comprises a multifunction Penning trap and a superconducting, neutral atom trap having a minimum-B configuration. The atom trap features an octupole magnet for transverse confinement and solenoidal mirror coils for longitudinal confinement. The magnetic trap employs a fast shutdown system to maximize the probability of detecting the annihilation of released antihydrogen. In this article we describe the first attempts to observe antihydrogen trapping.

Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der [Department of Physics, Swansea University, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S. [Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-7300 (United States); Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M. [Instituto de Fisica Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-972 (Brazil); Fujiwara, M. C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] (and others)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

Mohagheghi, Amir H. (Albuquerque, NM); Reese, Robert P. (Edgewood, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Radon (Rn-222) and thoron (Rn-220) emanation fractions from three separate formations of oil field pipe scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the course of normal oil well operations, pipes used downhole in the oil and petroleum industry tend to accumulate a mineral deposit on their interior, which restricts the flow of oil. This deposit, termed scale, will eventually occlude the interior diameter of the pipe making removal from service and descaling a cost effective option. The pipes are sent to cleaning yards where they remain until descaling can be performed. This storage period can potentially create a health concern not only because of the external radiation exposure but also because of the radon gas emissions, both of which are due to the radioactive minerals contained in the scale. It was believed that the structure of the scale is formed tightly enough to prevent much of the radon from becoming airborne. The goal of this research was to determine the emanation fractions for the rattled scale samples from three formations. A high purity germanium detector was used to measure the activities of the parents and progeny of radon, and electret ion chambers were used to measure the concentration of radon emanated from the scale. The emanation fractions of between 4.9x10-5 and 1.08x10-3 for radon were a factor of approximately 100 smaller than previous research results. For thoron, the fractions were and 5.72x10-8 and 4.92x10-7 for thoron with no previous research to compare. However, information that pertains to the temperature dependence of emanation was included in this research and was not available for previous, similar research. Therefore, differences in the environment (e.g., temperature, humidity, etc.) in which the previous experiments were conducted, as well as differences in the scale formation types used, could account for the discrepancy. In addition, measuring the emanation fractions of the rattled scale was a method of determining whether surface to volume ratio dependence existed. After acquiring the emanation fractions, insufficient evidence of any surface to volume ratio dependence could be found.

Fruchtnicht, Erich Harold

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Assessment of the radon concentrations in air caused by emissions from multiple sources in a uranium mining and milling region. A case study of the Ambrosia Lake region of New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Ambrosia Lake uranium mining and milling operations were selected to characterize the relative importance of these sources on ambient atmospheric radon concentrations. All uranium mines at Ambrosia Lake are underground. The comparisons of interest were both between the sources and between the sources and background concentrations. The results show that vents are by far the greatest source of the computed radon concentrations in the immediate area of the operations. The computed radon concentrations at receptor points were largely influenced by the closer sources, rather than by more distant stronger sources. The area where computed radon concentrations significantly exceed the background is confined to the general area around the vents and mills. A comparison between computed radon concentrations and monitoring data at selected points demonstrates order of magnitude agreement.

Droppo, J.G.; Glissmeyer, J.A.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Study of the combined effects of smoking and inhalation of uranium ore dust, radon daughters and diesel oil exhaust fumes in hamsters and dogs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to particulates from uranium ore dust and diesel exhaust soot provoked inflammatory and proliferative responses in lungs. Also exposure to radon and radon daughters yielded increased occurrences of bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia and metaplastic changes of alveolar epithelium. The data suggest that this cellular change is also a precursor of premalignant change in hamsters. The authors suggest an animal model other than the hamster based on two observations: (1) the Syrian golden hamster has been shown to be highly refractory to carcinoma induction; and (2) that when exposed to realistic levels of agents in life-span exposure regimens, the hamster does not develop lesions. Dog studies with cigarette smoke exposure showed mitigating effects on radon daughter induced respiratory tract cancer. Two reasons are suggested although no empirical evidence was gathered. A strict comparison of human and animal exposures and interpolative models are not possible at this time. (PCS)

Cross, F.T.; Palmer, R.F.; Filipy, R.E.; Busch, R.H.; Stuart, B.O.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Analysis of Gamma Radiation from a Radon Source: Indications of a Solar Influence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents an analysis of about 29,000 measurements of gamma radiation associated with the decay of radon in a sealed container at the Geological Survey of Israel (GSI) Laboratory in Jerusalem between 28 January 2007 and 10 May 2010. These measurements exhibit strong variations in time of year and time of day, which may be due in part to environmental influences. However, time-series analysis reveals a number of periodicities, including two at approximately 11.2 year$^{-1}$ and 12.5 year$^{-1}$. We have previously found these oscillations in nuclear-decay data acquired at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), and we have suggested that these oscillations are attributable to some form of solar radiation that has its origin in the deep solar interior. A curious property of the GSI data is that the annual oscillation is much stronger in daytime data than in nighttime data, but the opposite is true for all other oscillations. This may be a systematic effect but, if it is not, this property should help narrow the theoretical options for the mechanism responsible for decay-rate variability.

Peter A. Sturrock; Gideon Steinitz; Ephraim Fischbach; Daniel Javorsek, II; Jere H. Jenkins

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor [sup 222]Rn and in [sup 222]Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house [sup 222]Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater [sup 222]Rn concentration than the measured outdoor [sup 222]Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding [sup 222]Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Physical stability of asphalt emulsion admix seal radon barrier for uranium mill tailings  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is investigating the use of an asphalt emulsion admix seal to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. A key requirement of any cover system is its long-term stability; the cover must withstand failure over very long periods of time. An important determinant of overall cover system stability is the integrity of the 6.35-cm (2.5-in.) thick asphalt admix seal. Therefore, the physical stability of this seal was examined. The investigation considered the mechanical interaction between the tailings pile and cover. The potential effect of differential settlement of the tailings pile on the integrity of the seal system was also examined. Results indicate that the minimum span length the seal could withstand without failing is 0.34 m (1.1 ft). This assumes a differential settlement of 4.92 cm (1.94 in.) at the center resulting from the application of a 0.76-m (2.5-ft) cover. At spans greater than 0.60 m (1.97 ft), no tensile strain would develop.

Gates, T.E.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Aqueous chemical growth of alpha-Fe2O3-alpha-Cr203 nanocompositethin films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are reporting here on the inexpensive fabrication and optical properties of an iron(III) oxide chromium(III) oxide nanocomposite thin film of corundum crystal structure. Its novel and unique-designed architecture consists of uniformed, well-defined and oriented nanorods of Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) of 50 nm in diameter and 500nm in length and homogeneously distributed nonaggregated monodisperse spherical nanoparticles of Eskolaite (alpha-Cr2O3) of 250 nm in diameter. This alpha-Fe2O3 alpha-Cr2O3 nanocomposite thin film is obtained by growing, directly onto transparent polycrystalline conducting substrate, an oriented layer of hematite nanorods and growing subsequently, the eskolaite layer. The synthesis is carried out by a template-free, low-temperature, multilayer thin film coating process using aqueous solution of metal salts as precursors. Almost 100 percent of the light is absorbed by the composite film between 300 and 525 nm and 40 percent at 800 nm which yields great expectations as photoanode materials for photovoltaic cells and photocatalytic devices.

Vayssieres, Lionel; Guo, Jinghua; Nordgren, Joseph

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU ALPHA LLWT TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Training Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project

210

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

MFTF-. cap alpha. + T progress report  

SciTech Connect

Early in FY 1983, several upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were proposed to the fusion community. The one most favorably received was designated MFTF-..cap alpha..+T. The engineering design of this device, guided by LLNL, has been a principal activity of the Fusion Engineering Design Center during FY 1983. This interim progress report represents a snapshot of the device design, which was begun in FY 1983 and will continue for several years. The report is organized as a complete design description. Because it is an interim report, some parts are incomplete; they will be supplied as the design study proceeds. As described in this report, MFTF-..cap alpha..+T uses existing facilities, many MFTF-B components, and a number of innovations to improve on the physics parameters of MFTF-B. It burns deuterium-tritium and has a central-cell Q of 2, a wall loading GAMMA/sub n/ of 2 MW/m/sup 2/ (with a central-cell insert module), and an availability of 10%. The machine is fully shielded, allows hands-on maintenance of components outside the vacuum vessel 24 h after shutdown, and has provisions for repair of all operating components.

Nelson, W.D. (ed.)

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

GHRS Observations of the Lyman alpha Forest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review the results obtained using the GHRS on low redshift Lyman alpha absorbers. Until the advent of HST and the GHRS, the existence of such absorbers was doubted. The confirmation of their existence, in one of the first GHRS GTO team results to be published, must rank as one of the HSTs most interesting results. The GHRS resolution allows us to probe equivalent widths well below those detectable with the FOS, and has led to a number of interesting new questions. One example is the apparent disagreement between the GHRS result that there are many Lyman alpha absorbers which are not associated with luminous galaxies, and FOS studies which suggest that all such absorbers have a nearby galaxy causing them. This almost certainly shows that the equivalent width (or column density) range reachable by the GHRS includes gas from a wide range of causes, and not only the halos of luminous galaxies. With these data, we are seeing the debris left over from Galaxy formation, material flung out from galaxy interactions and starbursts, and also diffuse halo material at the outer edges of normal galaxies.

Simon L. Morris

1996-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

Alpha inelastic scattering and cluster structures in {sup 24}Mg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alpha inelastic scattering from {sup 24}Mg was measured to obtain the isoscalar natural-parity excitation strengths and to search for the {alpha}-condensed states. The multipole decomposition analysis for the measured cross sections was performed. The strength distributions for the {Delta}L = 0-3 were successfully obtained and the possible candidates for the {alpha}-condensed states around the {sup 16}O core were found.

Kawabata, T.; Ishiguro, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Tomida, N.; Yokota, N. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University (Japan); Adachi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Tamii, A.; Yasuda, Y.; Zenihiro, J. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University (Japan); Itoh, M.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshida, H. P. [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University (Japan); Maeda, Y.; Miyasako, H.; Saito, T. [Faculty of Engineering, University of Miyazaki (Japan); Matsubara, H.; Sasamoto, Y.; Tokieda, H. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 January 27, 2006 These guidelines and accompanying criteria fulfill the requirement under Section 543(c)(3) of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). Section 543(c)(3) states that the Secretary of Energy shall issue guidelines that establish criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year, any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings, within the statutory framework provided by the law. The purpose of these guidelines is to clarify and explicate, as necessary, the statutory

215

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 January 27, 2006 These guidelines and accompanying criteria fulfill the requirement under Section 543(c)(3) of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA) as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPACT). Section 543(c)(3) states that the Secretary of Energy shall issue guidelines that establish criteria for exclusions from the energy performance requirement for a fiscal year, any Federal building or collection of Federal buildings, within the statutory framework provided by the law. The purpose of these guidelines is to clarify and explicate, as necessary, the statutory

216

Atomistic Modeling of Screw Dislocation Mobility in Alpha-Fe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Register as a New User ... Presentation Title, Atomistic Modeling of Screw Dislocation Mobility in Alpha-Fe. Author(s), Neeraj S. Thirumalai, Peter Gordon, Ju Li, ...

217

Crystallographic variant selection in {alpha}-{beta} brass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transformation texture of {alpha}/{beta} brass with a diffusional Widmanstaetten {alpha} growth morphology has been investigated. Electron micrographs and electron backscattered diffraction was used to determine that the orientation relationship between the {beta} phase and the {alpha} associated with nucleation at {beta} grain boundaries was 44.3 deg . Crystallographic variant selection was observed across those prior {beta}/{beta} grain boundaries, but this has little effect on the transformation texture due to the crystal symmetry. The effect of the crystallographic variant selection on texture is further weakened by nucleation of diffusional transformed {alpha} in the grain interior.

Stanford, N. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Bate, P.S. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: pete.bate@man.ac.uk

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Progress on Production of Alpha-emitting Radioisotopes for Cancer...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Progress on Production of Alpha-emitting Radioisotopes for Cancer Therapy Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding...

219

Superconducting calorimetric alpha particle sensors for nuclear nonproliferation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of trace nuclear materials is usually accomplished by alpha spectrometry. Current detectors cannot distinguish critical elements and isotopes. We have developed a detector called a microcalorimeter

Robert D. Horansky; Joel N. Ullom; James A. Beall; Gene C. Hilton; Kent D. Irwin; Donald E. Dry; Elizabeth P. Hastings; Stephen P. Lamont; Clifford R. Rudy; Michael W. Rabin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Modeling Dislocation Slip Transmission across Alpha-Beta Interface ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After matching the two GSFs at the alpha-beta interface with Burgers orientation relationship, we perform microscopic phase field simulations. These simulations  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Analysis of alpha Centauri AB including seismic constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed models of alpha Cen A and B based on new seismological data for alpha Cen B by Carrier & Bourban (2003) have been computed using the Geneva evolution code including atomic diffusion. Taking into account the numerous observational constraints now available for the alpha Cen system, we find a stellar model which is in good agreement with the astrometric, photometric, spectroscopic and asteroseismic data. The global parameters of the alpha Cen system are now firmly constrained to an age of t=6.52+-0.30 Gyr, an initial helium mass fraction Y_i=0.275+-0.010 and an initial metallicity (Z/X)_i=0.0434+-0.0020. Thanks to these numerous observational constraints, we confirm that the mixing-length parameter alpha of the B component is larger than the one of the A component, as already suggested by many authors (Noels et al. 1991, Fernandes & Neuforge 1995 and Guenther & Demarque 2000): alpha_B is about 8% larger than alpha_A (alpha_A=1.83+-0.10 and alpha_B=1.97+-0.10). Moreover, we show that asteroseismic measurements enable to determine the radii of both stars with a very high precision (errors smaller than 0.3%). The radii deduced from seismological data are compatible with the new interferometric results of Kervella et al. (2003) even if they are slightly larger than the interferometric radii (differences smaller than 1%).

P. Eggenberger; C. Charbonnel; S. Talon; G. Meynet; A. Maeder; F. Carrier; G. Bourban

2004-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Some numerical reslts on best uniform polynomial approximation of. chi. sup. alpha. on (0,1)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let {alpha} be a positive number, and let E{sub n}(chi{sup {alpha}}; (0,1)) denote the error of best uniform approximation to {chi}{sup {alpha}}, by polynomials of degree at most n, on the interval (0,1). The Russian mathematician S.N. Bernstein established the existence of a nonnegative constant {Beta}({alpha}) such that {Beta}({alpha}):= {sub n{yields}{infinity}lim(2n){sup 2{alpha}}E{sub n}({chi}{sup {alpha}};(0.1)). In addition, Bernstein showed that {Beta}{alpha} 0) and that {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert bar}sin({pi}{alpha}){vert bar}/{pi} (1{minus}1/2{alpha}{minus}1) {1/2}), so that the asymptotic behavior of {Beta}({alpha}) is known when {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. Still, the problem of trying to determine {Beta}({alpha}) more precisely, for all {alpha} > 0, is intriguing. To this end, we have rigorously determined the numbers for thirteen values of {alpha}, where these numbers were calculated with a precision of at least 200 significant digits. For each of these thirteen values of {alpha}, Richardson's extrapolation was applied to the products to obtain estimates of {Beta}({alpha}) to approximately 40 decimal places. Included are graphs of the points ({alpha},{Beta}({alpha})) for the thirteen values of {alpha} that we considered.

Carpenter, A.J.; Varga, R.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Summary of alpha-neutron sources in GADRAS.  

SciTech Connect

A common source of neutrons for calibration and testing is alpha-neutron material, named for the alpha-neutron nuclear reaction that occurs within. This material contains a long-lived alpha-emitter and a lighter target element. When the alpha particle from the emitter is absorbed by the target, neutrons and gamma rays are released. Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) includes built-in alpha-neutron source definitions for AcC, AmB, AmBe, AmF, AmLi, CmC, and PuC. In addition, GADRAS users may create their own alpha-neutron sources by placing valid alpha-emitters and target elements in materials within their one-dimensional models (1DModel). GADRAS has the ability to use pre-built alpha-neutron sources for plotting or as trace-sources in 1D models. In addition, if any material (existing or user-defined) specified in a 1D model contains both an alpha emitter in conjunction with a target nuclide, or there is an interface between such materials, then the appropriate neutron-emission rate from the alpha-neutron reaction will be computed. The gamma-emissions from these sources are also computed, but are limited to a subset of nine target nuclides. If a user has experimental data to contribute to the alpha-neutron gamma emission database, it may be added directly or submitted to the GADRAS developers for inclusion. The gadras.exe.config file will be replaced when GADRAS updates are installed, so sending the information to the GADRAS developers is the preferred method for updating the database. This is also preferable because it enables other users to benefit from your efforts.

Mitchell, Dean James; Thoreson, Gregory G.; Harding, Lee T.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

A Performance Evaluation of an Alpha EV7 Processing Node  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we detail the performance of a new Alpha-Server node containing 16 Alpha EV7 CPUs. The EV7 processor is based on the EV68 processor core that is used in terascale systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing ... Keywords: Performance, analysis, application performance, communication performance, high performance computing, memory performance

Darren J. Kerbyson; Adolfy Hoisie; Scott Pakin; Fabrizio Petrini; Harvey J. Wasserman

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TAE SATURATION OF ALPHA PARTICLE DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN TFTR \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. B. White, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 H. L by the fusion produced alpha particles. In this paper we apply a recently developed nonlinear theory of kinetic induced by alpha particles includ­ ing FOW and FLR effects [8]. Additional calculation had been added

226

CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Quality Assurance Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications

227

CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Radiation Protection Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Radiological Controls - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT

228

Effects of alpha populations on tokamak ballooning stability  

SciTech Connect

Fusion product alpha populations can significantly influence tokamak stability due to coupling between the trapped alpha precessional drift and the kinetic ballooning mode frequency. This effect is of particular importance in parameter regimes where the alpha pressure gradient begins to constitute a sizable fraction of the thermal plasma pressure gradient. Careful, quantitative evaluations of these effects are necessary in burning plasma devices such as the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor and the Joint European Torus, and we have continued systematic development of such a kinetic stability model. In this model we have considered a range of different forms for the alpha distribution function and the tokamak equilibrium. Both Maxwellian and slowing-down models have been used for the alpha energy dependence while deeply trapped and, more recently, isotropic pitch angle dependence have been examined.

Spong, D.A.; Sigmar, D.J.; Tsang, K.T.; Ramos, J.J.; Hastings, D.E.; Cooper, W.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

The molecular biology and biochemistry of rice endosperm. alpha. -globulin  

SciTech Connect

The author's first objective was to isolate a cDNA clone that encodes the rice endosperm {alpha}-globulin. Purified antibodies against a rice storage protein, {alpha}-globulin, were used to screen a {lambda}gt11 cDNA expression library constructed from immature rice seed endosperm. The cDNA insert of clone 4A1 (identified by antibody screening) was used as a probe to identify long cDNA inserts in the library. The deduced amino acid sequence of clone A3-12 cDNA insert (identified by cDNA screening) contained the amino acid sequences of three cyanogen bromide peptides fragment of {alpha}-globulin. The calculated molecular weight and amino acid composition of the deduced amino acid sequence were similar to the {alpha}-globulin protein. Northern blot analysis indicated that mRNA of one size, approximately 1.0 kb, is expressed. Southern genomic blot analysis revealed one band with EcoRI or Hind III digestion. Cell-free translation and immunoprecipitation showed that the initial translation product is approximately 2,000 daltons larger than the mature protein. The amino acid sequence of {alpha}-globulin revealed limited regions of similarities with wheat storage proteins. The author concludes that the cDNA insert in clone A3-12 contained the entire coding region of {alpha}-globulin protein and that {alpha}-globulin is encoded by a single gene. My second objective was to inhibit the degradation of {alpha}-globulin in the salt extract of rice flour. The salt extract of rice flour contained an acid protease whose optimal pH was 3 for {sup 3}H-casein hydrolysis. A polypeptide with molecular weight of 20,000 was immunologically reactive with {alpha}-globulin antibodies and is produced by limited proteolysis in the extract. Pepstatin inhibited the proteolysis of 3H-casein and slowed the proteolysis of {alpha}-globulin.

Shorrosh, B.S.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Method of and apparatus for measuring the mean concentration of thoron and/or radon in a gas mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of and an apparatus for detecting and accurately measuring the mean concentrations of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in a gas mixture, such as the ambient atmosphere in a mine, is provided. The apparatus includes an alpha target member which defines at least one operative target surface and which is preferably fabricated from a single piece of an alpha particle sensitive material. At least one portion of the operative target surface is covered with an alpha particle filter. The uncovered and filter covered operative surface is exposed to the gas mixture containing the .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn. In the radioactive decay series of these isotopes the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of .sup.222 Rn is about 1.1 MeV less than the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of a .sup.220 Tn. The alpha particle filter has a predetermined mass per unit area of the covered portion of the operative target surface that prevents penetration of alpha particles which originate from .sup.222 Rn decay, but which allows passage therethrough of the maximum kinetic energy alpha particles from .sup.220 Tn decay. Thus, a count of the alpha particle tracks in the uncovered portion of the target member is proportional to the mean concentration of sum of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture, while the count of alpha tracks in the target member under the filter is proportional to the concentration of only the .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture.

Lucas, Henry (P.O. Box 1454, Sedona, AZ 86336)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Morphometry for alpha particle hits of critical targets in the lungs. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to provide detailed data on the number, location and type of critical target cells in the airspaces and to use these data in order to make risk assessments of the health effects of radon and radon progeny in the lungs. This will be done by quantitative morphometric study of the distribution of the various cell types and mucous lining layers in the lungs. The results provide anatomically correct models for dosimetry in the rate and human airways which significantly improve the ability to do risk assessment for radon exposures by providing quantitative data for specific cell types and provide a basis for mechanism based comparison between data available in animal exposures and human epidemiology.

Mercer, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Some numerical reslts on best uniform polynomial approximation of {chi}{sup {alpha}} on [0,1  

SciTech Connect

Let {alpha} be a positive number, and let E{sub n}(chi{sup {alpha}}; [0,1]) denote the error of best uniform approximation to {chi}{sup {alpha}}, by polynomials of degree at most n, on the interval [0,1]. The Russian mathematician S.N. Bernstein established the existence of a nonnegative constant {Beta}({alpha}) such that {Beta}({alpha}):= {sub n{yields}{infinity}lim(2n){sup 2{alpha}}E{sub n}({chi}{sup {alpha}};[0.1]). In addition, Bernstein showed that {Beta}{alpha} < {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert_bar}sin(pi}{alpha}){vert_bar}/{pi} ({alpha} > 0) and that {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert_bar}sin({pi}{alpha}){vert_bar}/{pi} (1{minus}1/2{alpha}{minus}1) < {Beta}({alpha}) ({alpha} > {1/2}), so that the asymptotic behavior of {Beta}({alpha}) is known when {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. Still, the problem of trying to determine {Beta}({alpha}) more precisely, for all {alpha} > 0, is intriguing. To this end, we have rigorously determined the numbers for thirteen values of {alpha}, where these numbers were calculated with a precision of at least 200 significant digits. For each of these thirteen values of {alpha}, Richardson`s extrapolation was applied to the products to obtain estimates of {Beta}({alpha}) to approximately 40 decimal places. Included are graphs of the points ({alpha},{Beta}({alpha})) for the thirteen values of {alpha} that we considered.

Carpenter, A.J.; Varga, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Agent Tcl: Alpha Release 1.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agent Tcl is a transportable agent system. The agents are written in an extended version of the Tool Command Lanuage (Tcl). Each agent can suspend its execution at an arbitrary point, transport to another machine and resume execution on the new machine. This migration is accomplished with the agent jump command. agent jump captures the current state of the Tcl script and transfers this state to the destination machine. The state is restored on the new machine and the Tcl script continues its execution from the command immediately after the agent jump. In addition to migration, agents can send messages to each other and can establish direct connections. A direct connection is more efficient than message passing for bulk data transfer. Finally, agents can use the Tk toolkit to create graphical user interfaces on their current machine. Agent Tcl is implemented as two components. The first component is an extended Tcl interpreter. The second component is a server which runs on each machine. The server accepts incoming agents, messages and connection requests and keeps track of the agents that are running on its machine. An alpha release of Agent Tcl is available for public use. This documentation describes how to obtain and compile the source code, how to run the server and how to write transportable agents.

Robert Gray Department; Robert S. Gray

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

1. LEARNING FROM THE PIPER ALPHA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

people and cost billions of dollars in property damage. It was caused by a massive fire, which was not the result of an unpredictable “act of God ” but of an accumulation of errors and questionable decisions. Most of them were rooted in the organization, its structure, procedures, and culture. This paper analyzes the accident scenario using the risk analysis framework, determines which human decision and actions influenced the occurrence of the basic events, and then identifies the organizational roots of these decisions and actions. These organizational factors are generalizable to other industries and engineering systems. They include flaws in the design guidelines and design practices (e.g., tight physical couplings or insufficient redundancies), misguided priorities in the management of the tradeoff between productivity and safety, mistakes in the management of the personnel on board, and errors of judgment in the process by which financial pressures are applied on the production sector (i.e., the oil companies ’ definition of profit centers) resulting in deficiencies in inspection and maintenance operations. This analytical approach allows identification of risk management measures that go beyond the purely technical (e.g., add redundancies to a safety system) and also include improvements of management practices. KEY WORDS: Piper Alpha accident; offshore platforms; human error; organizational errors; postmortem analysis; probabilistic risk analysis.

M. Elisabeth Patc-cornell

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Alpha migration through air filters: A numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This theoretical study investigates the migration of alpha-emitting particles through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. As part of the study, a review of previous research relating to the alpha-migration phenomena was conducted. As a result of the literature review, a numerical model was developed to simulate the migration of alpha-emitting radionuclide aerosols through HEPA filters. This model predicts the filter performance with regard to particle penetration. It can be used to better estimate the penetration of alpha radioactive species through filter systems for environmental concerns, to aid in the use of current filter systems, and to design new filter systems. It is obvious from the review of the literature that evidence exists of migration of alpha radionuclide species through high-efficiency filter media. The theories suggest that nanometer-size particles can eventually penetrate fibrous filters because of gradual movement through the filter matrix. It is conjectured that this movement may be induced by energies caused by the alpha recoil from the decay process by thermal energies. It is further hypothesized that such nanometer-size particles, containing radionuclide species can be formed from larger particles already captured within the filter. The penetration of such small particles through high-efficiency filter media is so low that experimental corroboration of these mechanisms by penetration measurements is difficult at best. A number of items were identified that affect the migration of alpha-emitting particles through a filter. These include the size distribution of aerosol particles entering the filter, the size distribution of fragment particles produced by alpha recoil, the penetration of the challenge aerosols and fragment particles, the velocity through the filter, the radionuclide specific activity, the alpha recoil energy, and the surface-binding energies between the particle and the filter matrix.

Biermann, A.H.; da Roza, R.A.; Chang, Yun.

1991-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

236

H{alpha} ABSORPTION IN TRANSITING EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES  

SciTech Connect

Absorption of stellar H{alpha} by the upper atmosphere of the planet HD 189733b has recently been detected by Jensen et al. Motivated by this observation, we have developed a model for atomic hydrogen in the n = 2 state and compared the resulting H{alpha} line profile to the observations. The model atmosphere is in hydrostatic balance, as well as thermal and photoionization equilibrium. Collisional and radiative transitions are included in the determination of the n = 2 state level population. We find that H{alpha} absorption is dominated by an optical depth {tau} {approx} 1 shell, composed of hydrogen in the metastable 2s state that is located below the hydrogen ionization layer. The number density of the 2s state within the shell is found to vary slowly with radius, while that of the 1s state falls rapidly. Thus while the Ly{alpha} absorption, for a certain wavelength, occurs inside a relatively well defined impact parameter, the contribution to H{alpha} absorption is roughly uniform over the entire atomic hydrogen layer. The model can approximately reproduce the observed Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} integrated transit depths for HD 189733b by using an ionization rate enhanced over that expected for the star by an order of magnitude. For HD 209458b, we are unable to explain the asymmetric H{alpha} line profile observed by Jensen et al., as the model produces a symmetric line profile with transit depth comparable to that of HD 189733b. In an appendix, we study the effect of the stellar Ly{alpha} absorption on the net cooling rate.

Christie, Duncan; Arras, Phil; Li Zhiyun, E-mail: dac5zm@virginia.edu, E-mail: pla7y@virginia.edu, E-mail: zl4h@virginia.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

Fujiwara, M C; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Bray, C C; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Lai, W; Lambo, R; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif El Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; Van der Werf, D P; Wasilenko, L; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

Orr, Christopher Henry (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Methods of Using Alpha Channeling Together with Transformer Recharging |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods of Using Alpha Channeling Together with Transformer Recharging Methods of Using Alpha Channeling Together with Transformer Recharging A tokamak current can be sustained using rf waves for transformer recharging at low density and high-Z with high efficiency if the resistivity is kept high enough during the radio frequency recharging stage. At the same time, operation in the hot ion mode via alpha channeling increases the effective fusion reactivity. The two separate inventions can be made to work synergistically. Specifically, by operating the tokamak in a low-density recharge phase, the lower hybrid wave penetrates the plasma more effectively. High reactivity is obtained by operation in the hot ion mode through the alpha channeling technique. Then, by using a high temperature relaxation stage, not only is the plasma current sustained

242

City of Alpha, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alpha, Minnesota (Utility Company) Alpha, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Alpha Place Minnesota Utility Id 266 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0758/kWh Commercial: $0.0957/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Alpha,_Minnesota_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409261" Categories:

243

Alpha-beta coordination method for collective search - Energy ...  

An agent in the alpha role is motivated to improve its status by exploring new regions of the search space. ... Solar Photovoltaic; Solar ... by the U.S. Department ...

244

The alpha-particle induced bystander effect for sister chromatid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agents than typical FA cells. We studied the effects of low-dose alpha-particle irradiation-induced bystander effects in KO40 and control CHO cell lines. Cultures of G0...

245

Energetics of [alpha]-helix formation in peptides and proteins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the energetics of !-helix formation in peptides and proteins. The [alpha]-helix is the most prevalent type of secondary structure found in proteins, and has arguably dominated our thinking about ...

Schubert, Christian Reinhold

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Baroclinic Instabilities of the Two-Layer Quasigeostrophic Alpha Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The class of alpha models for turbulence may be derived by applying Lagrangian averaging to the exact fluid equations and then making a closure approximation based on Taylor’s hypothesis of frozen-in fluctuations. This derivation provides a ...

Darryl D. Holm; Beth A. Wingate

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Labeled ALPHA4BETA2 ligands and methods therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Contemplated compositions and methods are employed to bind in vitro and in vivo to an .alpha.4.beta.2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a highly selective manner. Where such compounds are labeled, compositions and methods employing such compounds can be used for PET and SPECT analysis. Alternatively, and/or additionally contemplated compounds can be used as antagonists, partial agonists or agonists in the treatment of diseases or conditions associated with .alpha.4.beta..beta.2 dysfunction.

Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Pichika, Ramaiah; Potkin, Steven; Leslie, Frances; Chattopadhyay, Sankha

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Treatment of carcinoma of the pancreas with radon seed implantation and intra-arterial infusion of 5-FUDR  

SciTech Connect

This review has the shortcomings of any retrospective uncontrolled study and one should not conclude that the procedures described offer better palliation with less morbidity and mortality than present attempts at cure and palliation of this disease. At present, surgical resection offers the best chance of cure and palliation. However, the dismal results of surgical therapy make imperative the establishment of additional protocols with new therapeutic approaches, which include and combine the use of high dose external and interstitial radiation, systemic and regional chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and surgery. Radon seed implantation is able to provide high dose cancericidal radiation with relatively few side effects. Concomitant chemotherapy, both regional and systemic, can therefore be given with less fear of additive toxicity from therapeutic levels for control of disseminated microscopic foci of disease. (auth)

Barone, R.M.

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

First Results from the Large Area Lyman Alpha Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new survey for z=4.5 Lyman alpha sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new 8192x8192 pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman alpha galaxies (i.e., observed equivalent width above 80 Angstroms and line+continuum flux between 2.6e-17 and 5.2e-17 erg/cm^2/sec in an 80 Angstrom filter) have an observed surface density corresponding to 11000 +- 700 per square degree per unit redshift at z=4.5. Spatial variation in this surface density is apparent on comparison between counts in 6561 and 6730 Angstrom filters. Early spectroscopic followup results from the Keck telescope included three sources meeting our criteria for good Lyman alpha candidates. Of these, one is confirmed as a z=4.52 source, while another remains consistent with either z=4.55 or z=0.81. We infer that 30 to 50% of our good candidates are bona fide Lyman alpha emitters, implying a net density of about 4000 Lyman alpha galaxies per square degree per unit redshift.

James E. Rhoads; Sangeeta Malhotra; Arjun Dey; Daniel Stern; Hyron Spinrad; Buell Jannuzi

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

H/sub. cap alpha. / studies on TFTR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission is a useful indicator of hydrogen ionization since the energy required to excite hydrogen to the n = 3 level is approximately the same as to ionize the hydrogen atom. Other aspects of recycling, such as plasma scrape-off parameters, wall particle fluxes, and wall retention rates can be inferred from spatial distributions of H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. There are two H/sub ..cap alpha../ diagnostics on TFTF observing the inner limiter: a relatively calibrated wide-angle TV camera, and the absolutely calibrated HAIFA diagnostic, both viewing the inner limiter. H/sub ..cap alpha../ observations by these instruments have been analyzed using the DEGAS neutral transport code. The core recycling rate, and ion and neutral particle limiter fluxes, have been deduced from the calculations. The results are very sensitive to the ion flux distribution, and therefore also provide information on the plasma scrape-off conditions. A survey was made of over 500 TFTR discharges. H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission appears to increase in proportion to /bar n//sub e//sup 2/. The ratio of core ionization to average H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission was calculated to be roughly constant over a large range of discharges. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Heifetz, D.B.; Ehrhardt, A.B.; Ramsey, A.T.; Dylla, H.F.; Budny, R.; McNeill, D.; Medley, S.; Ulrickson, M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Evaluation Ratings Definitions (Excluding Utilization of Small...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(WOSB), HUBZone small business, veteran-owned small business (VOSB) and service disabled veteran owned small business (SDVOSB). Complied with FAR 52.219-8, Utilization of...

252

working lunch menus prices excludes VAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cheese and biscuits with dried apricot and a fresh grape garnish » stuffed organic peppers with cream

253

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used to Access Groundwater Monitoring Wells South of the Tuba City, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Title I Ste 05282013 B1.3 LM-01-13 Current and Future...

254

RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRENGTH EXPERIMENTS OF THE PRESSURE-INDUCED alpha->epsilon->alpha' PHASE TRANSITION IN IRON  

SciTech Connect

We present here the first dynamic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) strength measurement of a material undergoing solid-solid phase transition. Iron is quasi-isentropically driven across the pressure-induced bcc ({alpha}-Fe) {yields} hcp ({var_epsilon}-Fe) phase transition and the dynamic strength of the {alpha}, {var_epsilon} and reverted {alpha}{prime} phases have been determined via proton radiography of the resulting Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between the iron target and high-explosive products. Simultaneous velocimetry measurements of the iron free surface yield the phase transition dynamics and, in conjunction with detailed hydrodynamic simulations, allow for determination of the strength of the distinct phases of iron. Forward analysis of the experiment via hydrodynamic simulations reveals significant strength enhancement of the dynamically-generated {var_epsilon}-Fe and reverted {alpha}{prime}-Fe, comparable in magnitude to the strength of austenitic stainless steels.

Belof, J L; Cavallo, R M; Olson, R T; King, R S; Gray, G T; Holtkamp, D B; Chen, S R; Rudd, R E; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Remington, B A; Park, H; Prisbrey, S T; Vitello, P A; Bazan, G; Mikaelian, K O; Comley, A J; Maddox, B R; May, M J

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

alpha_s and the tau hadronic width: fixed-order, contour-improved and higher-order perturbation theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determination of $\\alpha_s$ from hadronic $\\tau$ decays is revisited, with a special emphasis on the question of higher-order perturbative corrections and different possibilities of resumming the perturbative series with the renormalisation group: fixed-order (FOPT) vs. contour-improved perturbation theory (CIPT). The difference between these approaches has evolved into a systematic effect that does not go away as higher orders in the perturbative expansion are added. We attempt to clarify under which circumstances one or the other approach provides a better approximation to the true result. To this end, we propose to describe the Adler function series by a model that includes the exactly known coefficients and theoretical constraints on the large-order behaviour originating from the operator product expansion and the renormalisation group. Within this framework we find that while CIPT is unable to account for the fully resummed series, FOPT smoothly approaches the Borel sum, before the expected divergent behaviour sets in at even higher orders. Employing FOPT up to the fifth order to determine $\\alpha_s$ in the $\\MSb$ scheme, we obtain $\\alpha_s(M_\\tau)=0.320 {}^{+0.012}_{-0.007}$, corresponding to $\\alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1185 {}^{+0.0014}_{-0.0009}$. Improving this result by including yet higher orders from our model yields $\\alpha_s(M_\\tau)=0.316 \\pm 0.006$, which after evolution leads to $\\alpha_s(M_Z) = 0.1180 \\pm 0.0008$. Our results are lower than previous values obtained from $\\tau$ decays.

Martin Beneke; Matthias Jamin

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

256

{open_quotes}Radon{close_quotes} - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities.

Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Understanding Partition Coefficient, Kd, Values Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available Kd Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium (3H), and Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air and Radiation Air and Radiation EPA 402-R-99-004B Environmental Protection August 1999 Agency UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium UNDERSTANDING VARIATION IN PARTITION COEFFICIENT, K d , VALUES Volume II: Review of Geochemistry and Available K d Values for Cadmium, Cesium, Chromium, Lead, Plutonium, Radon, Strontium, Thorium, Tritium ( 3 H), and Uranium August 1999 A Cooperative Effort By: Office of Radiation and Indoor Air Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585

258

Alpha-beta coordination method for collective search  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a decentralized coordination strategy called alpha-beta coordination. The alpha-beta coordination strategy is a family of collective search methods that allow teams of communicating agents to implicitly coordinate their search activities through a division of labor based on self-selected roles and self-determined status. An agent can play one of two complementary roles. An agent in the alpha role is motivated to improve its status by exploring new regions of the search space. An agent in the beta role is also motivated to improve its status, but is conservative and tends to remain aggregated with other agents until alpha agents have clearly identified and communicated better regions of the search space. An agent can select its role dynamically based on its current status value relative to the status values of neighboring team members. Status can be determined by a function of the agent's sensor readings, and can generally be a measurement of source intensity at the agent's current location. An agent's decision cycle can comprise three sequential decision rules: (1) selection of a current role based on the evaluation of the current status data, (2) selection of a specific subset of the current data, and (3) determination of the next heading using the selected data. Variations of the decision rules produce different versions of alpha and beta behaviors that lead to different collective behavior properties.

Goldsmith, Steven Y. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Transcriptional regulation of human retinoic acid receptor-alpha (RAR-{alpha}) by Wilms` tumour gene product  

SciTech Connect

The Wilms` tumor gene encodes a 47-49 kDa transcription factor expressed in kidney, gonads and mesothelium during embryogenesis. Inherited mutations of WT1 lead to aberrant urogenital development and Wilms` tumor, but the role of WT1 in development is not fully understood. Since the human RAR-{alpha} gene contains a potential WT1 binding site at its 5{prime} end, we studied the effect of WT1 co-transfection on expression of an RAR-{alpha} promoter/CAT reporter construct in COS cells. COS cells were plated at 5X10{sup 5} cells/dish in DMEM with 10% FBS and transfected by the Ca/PO4 method with an expression plasmid containing the full-length WT1 (-/-) cDNA under the control of the CMV promoter, plasmid containing the RAR-{alpha} promoter (-519 to +36)/CAT reporter and TK/growth hormone plasmid to control for efficiency of transfection. CAT/GH activity at 48 hours was inhibited by co-transfection with increasing amounts of WT1 (-/-); maximum inhibition = 5% of control. WT1 co-transfection did not affect expression of TKGH, nor of a CMV-CAT vector. Expression of WT1 protein in tranfected COS cells was demonstrated by Western blotting. Minimal inhibiton of RAR-{alpha}/CAT activity was seen when cells were co-transfected with vectors containing WT1 deletion mutants, alternate WT1 splicing variants, or WT1 (-/-) cDNA bearing a mutation identified in a patient with Drash syndrome. Gel shift assays indicated binding of WT1 to RAR-{alpha} cDNA but not to an RAR-{alpha} deletion mutant lacking the GCGGGGGGCG site. These observations suggest that WT1 may function to regulate RAR-{alpha} expression during normal development.

Goodyer, P.R.; Torban, E.; Dehbi, M. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a survey in Balmer Alpha of the entire Northern sky above declination -30 deg. This survey provides the first calibrated, velocity-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Galaxy. With one-degree spatial resolution, 12 km s^{-1} velocity resolution, and sensitivity to features as faint as 0.1 R (EM ~ 0.2 cm^{-6} pc), this survey provides the deepest maps of the ionized content of the Galaxy to date. In addition to probing the detailed kinematic structure of the Warm Ionized Medium and the vertical structure of the ionized content in spiral arms, initial results include the discovery of several faint, extended (d > 1\\deg) H II regions and the first map of the ionized component of an intermediate velocity cloud.

L. M. Haffner

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure.

Steadman, Peter (Santa Fe, NM); MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

262

Some numerical reslts on best uniform polynomial approximation of {chi}{sup {alpha}} on [0,1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Let {alpha} be a positive number, and let E{sub n}(chi{sup {alpha}}; [0,1]) denote the error of best uniform approximation to {chi}{sup {alpha}}, by polynomials of degree at most n, on the interval [0,1]. The Russian mathematician S.N. Bernstein established the existence of a nonnegative constant {Beta}({alpha}) such that {Beta}({alpha}):= {sub n{yields}{infinity}lim(2n){sup 2{alpha}}E{sub n}({chi}{sup {alpha}};[0.1]). In addition, Bernstein showed that {Beta}{alpha} 0) and that {Gamma}(2{alpha}){vert_bar}sin({pi}{alpha}){vert_bar}/{pi} (1{minus}1/2{alpha}{minus}1) {1/2}), so that the asymptotic behavior of {Beta}({alpha}) is known when {alpha}{yields}{infinity}. Still, the problem of trying to determine {Beta}({alpha}) more precisely, for all {alpha} > 0, is intriguing. To this end, we have rigorously determined the numbers for thirteen values of {alpha}, where these numbers were calculated with a precision of at least 200 significant digits. For each of these thirteen values of {alpha}, Richardson`s extrapolation was applied to the products to obtain estimates of {Beta}({alpha}) to approximately 40 decimal places. Included are graphs of the points ({alpha},{Beta}({alpha})) for the thirteen values of {alpha} that we considered.

Carpenter, A.J.; Varga, R.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. [Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.; Quapp, W.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study  

SciTech Connect

The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT E) requirements for each of the three concepts.

Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B. (Morrison Knudson Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States). Environmental Services Div.); Quapp, W.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Humidity response of the Eberline model PAC-7 alpha instrument  

SciTech Connect

Response of the Eberline Model PAC-7 alpha instrument under varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature conditions was studied in an environmental chamber. Electric discharges resulting in spurious counts or in instrument paralysis occurred at 35 to 50% RH. Improvement in the RH level tolerated by the PAC-7 alpha instrument was obtained by conformal coating of the high-voltage region of the printed circuit (PC) board. Following this treatment, electric discharges occurred only at relatively high humidity levels and then as a result of high-voltage breakdown within the AC-24C probe rather than within the PC board.

McAtee, J.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

First-principles elastic properties of (alpha)-Pu  

SciTech Connect

Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the ambient pressure and low temperature elastic properties of the ground-state {alpha} phase of plutonium metal. The electronic structure and correlation effects are modeled within a fully relativistic anti-ferromagnetic treatment with a generalized gradient approximation for the electron exchange and correlation functionals. The 13 independent elastic constants, for the monoclinic {alpha}-Pu system, are calculated for the observed geometry. A comparison of the results with measured data from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for a cast sample is made.

Soderlind, P; Klepeis, J E

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

267

THE EMANATION OF RADON 220 FROM SINTERED UO$sub 2$ POWDERS AND PLATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emanation of thoron (Rn/sup 220/) from sintered UO/sub 2/ powders and plates was measured as a function of temperature. The uranium oxide samples were indexed with radiothorium by coprecipitation and coevaporation techniques. The emanation measurements were performed in a flow system, using an alpha scintillation detector and a helium-hydrogen carrier gas mixture. Both the radiothorium concentration (5 to 100 mu C/g UO/sub 2/) and the uranium oxide density (71 to 99 percent TD) were varied. The surface areas and densities of the UO/sub 2/ plates were measured by krypton gas adsorption and liquid immersion techniques, respectively. Assuming a diffusion mechanism, diffusion coefficients for thoron in sintered UO/sub 2/ were calculated as a function of temperature. The data were represented by an equation of the form, D = D/sub O/ exp (-Q/RT). An apparent increase in both activation energy (Q) and D/sub O/ with density was observed for the 1100 to 1450 deg C temperature range. For some samples the thoron emanating power could be measured at temperatures as low as 400 deg C. Log D versus 1/T plots from 400 to 1450 deg C gave intersecttng straight lines with different activation energies. One intersection occurred near the Tammann temperature. The emanation of Rn/sup 220/ from UO/sub 2/ apparently involves several types of diffusion processes. (auth)

Clayton, J.C.; Aronson, S.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples clean.'' This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD's), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gross alpha/beta determination by liquid scintillation counting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is used to assay liquid samples for both gross alpha and gross beta (including tritium) activity in order to declare these samples ``clean.`` This method provides several advantages over traditional gross assay techniques including easy sample preparation, no sample self-absorption, short counting times, acceptable lower limits of detection (LLD`s), and convenient sample disposal.

Leyba, J.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

PROBING PRIMORDIAL MAGNETIC FIELDS USING Ly{alpha} CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

From previous studies of the effect of primordial magnetic fields on early structure formation, we know that the presence of primordial magnetic fields during early structure formation could induce more perturbations at small scales (at present 1-10 h {sup -1} Mpc) as compared to the usual {Lambda}CDM theory. Matter power spectra over these scales are effectively probed by cosmological observables such as shear correlation and Ly{alpha} clouds. In this paper we discuss the implications of primordial magnetic fields on the distribution of Ly{alpha} clouds. We simulate the line-of-sight density fluctuation including the contribution coming from the primordial magnetic fields. We compute the evolution of Ly{alpha} opacity for this case and compare our theoretical estimates of Ly{alpha} opacity with the existing data to constrain the parameters of the primordial magnetic fields. We also discuss the case when the two density fields are correlated. Our analysis yields an upper bound of roughly 0.3-0.6 nG on the magnetic field strength for a range of nearly scale-invariant models, corresponding to a magnetic field power spectrum index n {approx_equal} -3.

Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Sethi, Shiv K. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)] [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Alpha-tricalcium phosphate-calcium sulfate hybrid bone cement ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alpha-tricalcium phosphate-calcium sulfate hybrid bone ... electron scanning microscopy on the characterization of polymer coating ... Improving the Resistance to Contact and Flexural Damage of Ceramics Using Elastic Gradients ... using phosphoric acid activation by ultrasound and microwave radiation ...

272

Superscalar Instruction Execution in the 21164 Alpha Microprocessor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 21164 is a new quad-issue, superscalar Alpha microprocessor that executes 1.2 billion instructions per second. Available this January, the 3OO-MHz,0.5-pm CMOS chip delivers an estimated 345/505 SPECint92/SPECfp92 performance. The design's high clock rate, low operational latency, and high-throughput/nonblocking memory systems contribute to this performance.

John H. Edmondson; Paul Rubinfeld; Ronald Preston; Vidya Rajagopalan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

First Results from the Large Area Lyman $\\alpha$ Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a new survey for z=4.5 Lyman alpha sources, the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. Our survey achieves an unprecedented combination of volume and sensitivity by using narrow-band filters on the new 8192x8192 pixel CCD Mosaic Camera at the 4 meter Mayall telescope of Kitt Peak National Observatory. Well-detected sources with flux and equivalent width matching known high redshift Lyman alpha galaxies (i.e., observed equivalent width above 80 Angstroms and line+continuum flux between 2.6e-17 and 5.2e-17 erg/cm^2/sec in an 80 Angstrom filter) have an observed surface density corresponding to 11000 +- 700 per square degree per unit redshift at z=4.5. Spatial variation in this surface density is apparent on comparison between counts in 6561 and 6730 Angstrom filters. Early spectroscopic followup results from the Keck telescope included three sources meeting our criteria for good Lyman alpha candidates. Of these, one is confirmed as a z=4.52 source, while another remains consistent with either z=4.55...

Rhoads, J E; Dey, A; Stern, D; Spinrad, H; Jannuzi, B; Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Dey, Arjun; Stern, Daniel; Spinrad, Hyron; Jannuzi, Buell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

TAE SATURATION OF ALPHA PARTICLE DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN TFTR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TAE SATURATION OF ALPHA PARTICLE DRIVEN INSTABILITY IN TFTR N. N. Gorelenkovy, Y. Chen, R. B. White. In this paper we apply a recently developed nonlinear theory of kinetic instabilities [5] to calculate calculation had been added to allow an accurate numerical integration of Eq.(14) over the phase space

275

Economic analyses of alpha channeling in tokamak power plants.  

SciTech Connect

The hot-ion-mode of operation [1] has long been thought to offer optimized performance for long-pulse or steady-state magnetic fusion power plants. This concept was revived in recent years when theoretical considerations suggested that nonthermal fusion alpha particles could be made to channel their power density preferentially to the fuel ions [2,3]. This so-called anomalous alpha particle slowing down can create plasmas with fuel ion temperate T{sub i} somewhat larger than the electron temperature T{sub e}, which puts more of the beta-limited plasma pressure into the useful fuel species (rather than non-reacting electrons). As we show here, this perceived benefit may be negligible or nonexistent for tokamaks with steady state current drive. It has likewise been argued [2,3] that alpha channeling could be arranged such that little or no external power would be needed to generate the steady state toroidal current. Under optimistic assumptions we show that such alpha-channeling current drive would moderately improve the economic performance of a first stability tokamak like ARIES-I [4], however a reversed-shear (advanced equilibrium) tokamak would likely not benefit since traditional radio-wave (rf) electron-heating current drive power would already be quite small.

Ehst, D.A.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Method for the simultaneous preparation of radon-211, xenon-125, xenon-123, astatine-211, iodine-125 and iodine-123  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a practical method for commercially producing radiopharmaceutical activities and, more particularly, relates to a method for the preparation of about equal amount of Radon-211 (/sup 211/Rn) and Xenon-125 (/sup 125/Xe) including a one-step chemical procedure following an irradiation procedure in which a selected target of Thorium (/sup 232/Th) or Uranium (/sup 238/U) is irradiated. The disclosed method is also effective for the preparation in a one-step chemical procedure of substantially equal amounts of high purity /sup 123/I and /sup 211/At. In one preferred arrangement of the invention almost equal quantities of /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe are prepared using a onestep chemical procedure in which a suitably irradiated fertile target material, such as thorium-232 or uranium-238, is treated to extract those radionuclides from it. In the same one-step chemical procedure about equal quantities of /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I are prepared and stored for subsequent use. In a modified arrangement of the method of the invention, it is practiced to separate and store about equal amounts of only /sup 211/Rn and /sup 125/Xe, while preventing the extraction or storage of the radionuclides /sup 211/At and /sup 123/I.

Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Measurement and apportionment of radon source terms for modeling indoor environments. Final progress report, March 1990--August 1992  

SciTech Connect

During the present 2 1/2 year contract period, we have made significant Progress in modeling the source apportionment of indoor {sup 222}Rn and in {sup 222}Rn decay product dosimetry. Two additional areas were worked on which we believe are useful for the DOE Radon research Program. One involved an analysis of the research house data, grouping the hourly house {sup 222}Rn measurements into 2 day, 7 day and 90 day intervals to simulate the response of passive monitors. Another area requiring some attention resulted in a publication of 3 years of our indoor/outdoor measurements in a high-rise apartment. Little interest has been evinced in apartment measurements yet 20% of the US population lives in multiple-family dwellings, not in contact with the ground. These data together with a summary of all other published data on apartments showed that apartments have only about 50% greater {sup 222}Rn concentration than the measured outdoor {sup 222}Rn. Apartment dwellers generally represent a low risk group regarding {sup 222}Rn exposure. The following sections describe the main projects in some detail.

Harley, N.H.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Physical Interactions between Mcm10, DNA, and DNA Polymerase [alpha  

SciTech Connect

Mcm10 is an essential eukaryotic protein required for the initiation and elongation phases of chromosomal replication. Specifically, Mcm10 is required for the association of several replication proteins, including DNA polymerase {alpha} (pol {alpha}), with chromatin. We showed previously that the internal (ID) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of Mcm10 physically interact with both single-stranded (ss) DNA and the catalytic p180 subunit of pol {alpha}. However, the mechanism by which Mcm10 interacts with pol {alpha} on and off DNA is unclear. As a first step toward understanding the structural details for these critical intermolecular interactions, x-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy were used to map the binary interfaces between Mcm10-ID, ssDNA, and p180. The crystal structure of an Mcm10-ID {center_dot} ssDNA complex confirmed and extended our previous evidence that ssDNA binds within the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding-fold cleft of Mcm10-ID. We show using NMR chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence spectroscopy that p180 also binds to the OB-fold and that ssDNA and p180 compete for binding to this motif. In addition, we map a minimal Mcm10 binding site on p180 to a small region within the p180 N-terminal domain (residues 286-310). These findings, together with data for DNA and p180 binding to an Mcm10 construct that contains both the ID and CTD, provide the first mechanistic insight into how Mcm10 might use a handoff mechanism to load and stabilize pol {alpha} within the replication fork.

Warren, Eric M.; Huang, Hao; Fanning, Ellen; Chazin, Walter J.; Eichman, Brandt F.; (Vanderbilt)

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users...

280

Estimation of the alpha decay half-lives D. N. Poenaru and M. Ivascu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semiempirical relationship is derived on the grounds of the fission theory of alpha decay. It takes }, based on the fission theory of alpha decay [16] have been derived and was briefly presented in refe

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gross Alpha and Gross Beta Measurements in Coal Combustion Product Leachate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to provide information to help interpret gross alpha and gross beta concentrations in coal combustion product (CCP) leachate. This objective was accomplished by chemically characterizing 15 field leachate samples that were collected at three CCP management facilities. The leachate samples were analyzed for gross alpha and gross beta concentrations and for the potential individual alpha and beta emitters in solution. Gross alpha concentrations at the three sites ranged fro...

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

282

Alpha-Particle Condensate in Nuclear Matter at Normal Density and Statistics of Composite Bosons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is proved that alpha-particle states are well described by the Elliott SU(3) model. This result is used to analyze the alpha-particle condensation effect. It is shown that these states possess the basic attributes of the alpha-condensate and, also, the normal nuclear density on frequent occasions. The statistics of alpha-particles (and of arbitrary composite bosons) turns out to be something other than the Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac statistics, and parastatistics.

I. A. Gnilozub; S. D. Kurgalin; Yu. M. Tchuvil'sky

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

283

Program Considerations for Addressing Alpha Emitting Radionuclides at Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for assessing the magnitude and potential dose impact of alpha emitting nuclides at nuclear power plants with elevated levels of alpha contamination. Since alpha emitting nuclides are not always easy to detect and can have serious health consequences, quantifying their presence and assessing their impact can be important. This report provides several options for modifying a radiation protection program to address elevated levels of alpha contamination.

2001-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Investigation of radon, thoron, and their progeny near the earth`s surface. Final report, 1 January 1994--31 December 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG03-94ER6178, covering a performance period of 1 January 1994 through 31 December 1997. The DOE award amount for this period was $547,495. The objective of the project as stated in its proposal was {open_quotes}to improve our understanding of the physical processes controlling the concentration of radon, thoron, and their progeny in the atmospheric environment.{close_quotes} The original project was directed at developing underlying science that would help with evaluation of the health hazard from indoor radon in the United States and implementation of corrective measures that might be employed to reduce the health hazard. As priorities within the Office of Health and Environment (OHER) changed, and the radon research program was phased out, emphasis of the project was shifted somewhat to be also relevant to other interests of the OHER, namely global pollution and climate change and pollution resulting from energy production. This final report is brief, since by reference it can direct the reader to the comprehensive research publications that have been generated by the project. In section 2, we summarize the main accomplishments of the project and reference the primary publications. There were seven students who received support from the project and their names are listed in section 3. One of these students (Fred Yarger, Ph.D. candidate) continues to work on research initiated through this project. No post-docs received support from the project, although one of the co-principal investigators (Dr. Piotr Wasiolek) received the majority of his salary from the project. The project also provided part-time support for a laboratory manager (Dr. Maryla Wasiolek). Section 4 lists chronologically the reports and publications resulting from the project (references 1 through 12), and the Appendix provides abstracts of major publications and reports.

Schery, S.D.; Wasiolek, P.T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Regional and National Estimates of the PotentialEnergy Use, Energy Cost, and CO{sub 2} Emissions Associated with Radon Mitigation by Sub-slab Depressurization  

SciTech Connect

Active sub-slab depressurization (SSD) systems are an effective means of reducing indoor radon concentrations in residential buildings. However, energy is required to operate the system fan and to heat or cool the resulting increased building ventilation. We present regional and national estimates of the energy requirements, operating expenses, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with using SSD systems at saturation (i.e., in all U.S. homes with radon concentrations above the EPA remediation guideline and either basement or slab-on-grade construction). The primary source of uncertainty in these estimates is the impact of the SSD system on house ventilation rate. Overall, individual SSD system operating expenses are highest in the Northeast and Midwest at about $99 y{sup -1}, and lowest in the South and West at about $66 y{sup -1}. The fan consumes, on average, about 40% of the end-use energy used to operate the SSD system and accounts for about 60% of the annual expense. At saturation, regional impacts are largest in the Midwest because this area has a large number of mitigable houses and a relatively high heating load. We estimate that operating SSD systems in U.S. houses where it is both appropriate and possible (about 2.6 million houses), will annually consume 1.7 x 10{sup 4} (6.4 x 10{sup 3} to 3.9 x 10{sup 4}) TJ of end-use energy, cost $230 (130 to 400) million (at current energy prices), and generate 2.0 x 10{sup 9} (1.2 x 10{sup 9} to 3.5 x 10{sup 9}) kg of CO{sub 2}. Passive or energy efficient radon mitigation systems currently being developed offer opportunities to substantially reduce these impacts.

Riley, W.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

alpha-amylase and Glucose Oxidase as Promising Improvers for Wheat Bread  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of alpha-amylase and glucose oxidase as bread improvers on the textural and thermal properties of bread were evaluated by the rapid viscosity analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that alpha-amylase and glucose oxidase ... Keywords: alpha-amylase, Glucose oxidase, viscosity, Bread quality

Jie Zeng; Haiyan Gao; Guanglei Li; Xinhong Liang

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The n+n+{alpha} system in a continuum Faddeev formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The continuum Faddeev equations for the neutron-neutron-alpha (n+n+{alpha}) system are formulated for a general interaction as well as for finite rank forces. In addition, the capture process n+n+{alpha}{yields}{sup 6}He+{gamma} is derived.

Khaldi, K. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Boumerdes, 35000 Boumerdes (Algeria); Elster, Ch. [Institute of Nuclear and Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Gloeckle, W. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Constraining PCP Violating Varying Alpha Theory through Laboratory Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report we have studied the implication of a parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating interaction in varying alpha theory. Due to this interaction, the state of photon polarization can change when it passes through a strong background magnetic field. We have calculated the optical rotation and ellipticity of the plane of polarization of an electromagnetic wave and tested our results against different laboratory experiments. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter {beta} and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. By analyzing the laboratory experimental data, we found the most stringent constraints on our model parameters to be 1 {le} {omega} {le} 10{sup 13} GeV{sup 2} and -0.5 {le} {beta} {le} 0.5. We also found that with the existing experimental input parameters it is very difficult to detect the ellipticity in the near future.

Maity, Debaprasad; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

289

Small-Molecule Inhibition of TNF-alpha  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small-Molecule Inhibition of TNF-alpha Tumour necrosis factor is a polypeptide cytokine involved in inflammation and the acute phase response. TNF-alpha is present in larger quantities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. Direct inhibition of TNF-a by the commercial biological agents etanercept (Enbrel), infliximab (Remicade), adalimumab (Humira), has produced significant advances in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and validated the extra-cellular inhibition of this proinflammatory cytokine as an effective therapy. However, despite considerable incentives, viable leads for analogous small-molecule inhibitors of TNF-a have not been reported (1). Such drugs with attendant advantages in manufacturing, patient accessibility, administration, and compliance would represent a major advance in the treatment of TNF-a mediated diseases.

290

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be p...

Zhan, H; Eisenstein, D J; Katz, N; Zhan, Hu; Dave, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel; Katz, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Filament and Flare Detection in H{\\alpha} image sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar storms can have a major impact on the infrastructure of the earth. Some of the causing events are observable from ground in the H{\\alpha} spectral line. In this paper we propose a new method for the simultaneous detection of flares and filaments in H{\\alpha} image sequences. Therefore we perform several preprocessing steps to enhance and normalize the images. Based on the intensity values we segment the image by a variational approach. In a final postprecessing step we derive essential properties to classify the events and further demonstrate the performance by comparing our obtained results to the data annotated by an expert. The information produced by our method can be used for near real-time alerts and the statistical analysis of existing data by solar physicists.

Riegler, Gernot; Pötzi, Werner; Veronig, Astrid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

AIR ALPHA PROPORTIONAL COUNTER INSENSITIVE TO ATMOSPHERIC HUMIDITY  

SciTech Connect

A conventional alpha proportional counter which uses air as the counter gas is sensitive to high relative humidity and generates spurious pulses that cannot be distinguished from actual alpha pulses. It was found possible to operate such a counter satisfactorily at high relative humidity by passing a small current ( approximates 15 ma) through the center wire. In this manner the center wire is heated and the relative humidity of the surrounding sheath of air is reduced sufficiently so that operation of the counter at high relative humidity is comparable to operation with dry air, Two different mechanisms are proposed for the formation of spurious pulses in such a counter at high relative humidity. (auth)

Ferrari, A.M.R.; Borkowski, C.J.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Automated multispectra alpha spectrometer and data reduction system  

SciTech Connect

A complete hardware and software package for the accumulation and rapid analysis of multiple alpha pulse height spectra has been developed. The system utilizes a 4096-channel analyzer capable of accepting up to sixteen inputs from solid-state surface barrier detectors via mixer-router modules. The analyzer is interfaced to a desk-top programmable calculator and thermal line printer. A chained software package including spectrum printout, peak analysis, plutonium- 238 and plutonium-239 data reduction, and automatic energy calibration routines was written. With the chained program a complete printout, peak analysis, and plutonium data reduction of a 512-channel alpha spectrum are obtained in about three minutes with an accuracy within five percent of hand analyses. (auth)

Hochel, R.C.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Alpha Solarco`s Photovoltaic Concentrator Development program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the work done under Sandia`s Photovoltaic Concentrator Development contract, funded jointly by Alpha Solarco and the US Department of Energy. It discusses improvements made to the cell assembly and module design of Alpha Solarco`s point-focus, high-concentration photovoltaic module. The goals of this effort were to increase the module efficiency, reduce the manufacturing cost of the cell assembly, and increase product reliability. Redesign of the secondary optical element achieved a 4 percent increase in efficiency due to better cell fill factors and offtrack performance. New, lower cost materials were identified for the secondary optical element, the optical couple between the secondary optical element and the cell, and the cell assembly electrical insulator. Manufacturing process improvements and test equipment are also discussed.

Anderson, A.; Bailor, B.; Carroll, D. [Alpha Solarco, Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States)] [and others

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Michrochannel plate for position sensitive alpha particle detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper will describe the use of a microchannel plate (MCP) as the associated particle detector on a sealed tube neutron generator. The generator produces neutrons and associated alpha particles for use as a probe to locate and identify hidden explosives in associated particle imaging (API). The MCP measures the position in two dimensions and precise timing of the incident alpha particle, information which is then used to calculate the emission time and direction of the corresponding neutron. The MCP replaces the position-sensitive photomultipler tube (PSPMT) which, until recently, had been the only detector available for measuring position and timing for alpha particles in neutron generator applications. Where the PSPMT uses charge division for generating position information, a process that requires a first order correction to each pulse, the MCP uses delay-line timing, which requires no correction. The result is a device with an order of magnitude improvement in both position resolution and timing compared to the PSPMT. Hardware and software development and the measurements made to characterize the MCP for API applications are described.

Paul Hurley and James Tinsley

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has surveyed the distribution and kinematics of ionized gas in the Galaxy above declination -30 degrees. The WHAM Northern Sky Survey (WHAM-NSS) has an angular resolution of one degree and provides the first absolutely-calibrated, kinematically-resolved map of the H-Alpha emission from the Warm Ionized Medium (WIM) within ~ +/-100 km/s of the Local Standard of Rest. Leveraging WHAM's 12 km/s spectral resolution, we have modeled and removed atmospheric emission and zodiacal absorption features from each of the 37,565 spectra. The resulting H-Alpha profiles reveal ionized gas detected in nearly every direction on the sky with a sensitivity of 0.15 R (3 sigma). Complex distributions of ionized gas are revealed in the nearby spiral arms up to 1-2 kpc away from the Galactic plane. Toward the inner Galaxy, the WHAM-NSS provides information about the WIM out to the tangent point down to a few degrees from the plane. Ionized gas is also detected toward many intermediate velocity clouds at high latitudes. Several new H II regions are revealed around early B-stars and evolved stellar cores (sdB/O). This work presents the details of the instrument, the survey, and the data reduction techniques. The WHAM-NSS is also presented and analyzed for its gross properties. Finally, some general conclusions are presented about the nature of the WIM as revealed by the WHAM-NSS.

L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds; S. L. Tufte; G. J. Madsen; K. P. Jaehnig; J. W. Percival

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nielsen-Olesen vortex in varying-alpha theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider soliton solutions to Bekenstein's theory, for which the fine structure constant $\\alpha=e^2/(4\\pi\\hbar c)$ is allowed to vary due to the presence of a dielectric field pervading the vacuum. More specifically we investigate the effects of a varying $\\alpha$ upon a complex scalar field with a U(1) electromagnetic gauge symmetry subject to spontaneous symmetry breaking. We find vortex solutions to this theory, similar to the Nielsen-Olesen vortex. Near the vortex core the electric charge is typically much larger than far away from the string, lending these strings a superconducting flavour. In general the dielectric field coats the usual local string with a global string envelope. We discuss the cosmological implications of networks of such strings, with particular emphasis on their ability to generate inhomogeneous recombination scenarios. We also consider the possibility of the dielectric being a charged free field. Even though the vacuum of such a field is trivial, we find that the dielectric arranges itself in the shape of a local string, with a quantized magnetic flux at the core -- presumably borrowing these topological features from the underlying Nielsen-Olesen vortex.

J. Magueijo; H. Sandvik; T. W. B. Kibble

2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portable survey instrumentation has always been an integral part of most operational health physics programs. The ability to detect and prevent the spread of contamination is one of the most significant roles of portable survey meters, and manufacturers are continually attempting to improve the sensitivity and usefulness of such equipment. A major concern of instrument makers deals with the sensitivity of probes to alpha emitting radionuclides, which, due to extremely short ranges, are very difficult to detect with survey meters. In response to these concerns several probes have been designed with an increased sensitivity to alpha radiation, combining larger sensitive surface areas with very thin windows to increase detector efficiency. Two such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served as an industry standard for many years and continues to be used frequently. The evaluation consisted of several tests concerning response to radiation under various laboratory conditions and also under actual conditions, to determine overall probe performance.

Sackett, Gregory Duane

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Lyman-alpha wing absorption in cool white dwarf stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kowalski & Saumon (2006) identified the missing absorption mechanism in the observed spectra of cool white dwarf stars as the Ly-alpha red wing formed by the collisions between atomic and molecular hydrogen and successfully explained entire spectra of many cool DA-type white dwarfs. Owing to the important astrophysical implications of this issue, we present here an independent assessment of the process. For this purpose, we compute free-free quasi-molecular absorption in Lyman-alpha due to collisions with H and H2 within the one-perturber, quasi-static approximation. Line cross-sections are obtained using theoretical molecular potentials to describe the interaction between the radiating atom and the perturber. The variation of the electric-dipole transition moment with the interparticle distance is also considered. Six and two allowed electric dipole transitions due to H-H and H-H2 collisions, respectively, are taken into account. The new theoretical Lyman-alpha line profiles are then incorporated in our ...

Rohrmann, R D; Kepler, S O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to probe $\\alpha$-emitting radioactivity in bulk material.

Y. Iwata; Y. Inoue; M. Minowa

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Measurement of the Alpha Asymmetry Parameter for the Omega- to Lambda K- Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the alpha parameter of the Omega- to Lambda K- decay using data collected with the HyperCP spectrometer during the 1997 fixed-target run at Fermilab. Analyzing a sample of 0.96 million Omega- to Lambda K^-, Lambda to p pi- decays, we obtain alpha_Omega*alpha_Lambda = [1.33+/-0.33(stat)+/-0.52(syst)] x 10^{-2}. With the accepted value of alpha_Lambda, alpha_Omega is found to be [2.07+/-0.51(stat)+/-0.81(syst)] x 10^{-2}.

HyperCP Collaboration; Y. C. Chen; R. A. Burnstein; A. Chakravorty; A. Chan; W. S. Choong; K. Clark; E. C. Dukes; C. Durandet; J. Felix; G. Gidal; P. Gu; H. R. Gustafson; C. Ho; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; C. James; C. M. Jenkins; D. M. Kaplan; L. M. Lederman; N. Leros; M. J. Longo; F. Lopez; L. C. Lu; W. Luebke; K. B. Luk; K. S. Nelson; H. K. Park; J. P. Perroud; D. Rajaram; H. A. Rubin; P. K. Teng; J. Volk; C. G. White; S. L. White; P. Zyla

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

302

K{alpha} satellite transitions in elements with 12{<=}Z{<=}30 produced by electron incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of x-ray satellite lines in the K{alpha} region of Mg, Si, Sc, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zn induced by electron incidence was studied by means of wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. The satellite lines studied were K{alpha}{sup '}, K{alpha}{sub 3}, K{alpha}{sub 4}, K{alpha}{sub 5}, K{alpha}{sub 6}, and two transitions denoted here as K{alpha}{sub 22} and K{alpha}{sub 12}. Energy shifts with respect to the main K{alpha}{sub 1} diagram line and transition probabilities relative to the whole K{alpha} group were determined for a number of lines through a careful spectral processing. The dependence of these parameters, as well as of the K{beta}:K{alpha} intensity ratio, on the atomic number was compared with previous experimental and theoretical determinations when available. A discussion about the different mechanisms responsible for vacancy creation involved in the production of double-ionization satellites was performed in the light of the results obtained. Finally, the behavior of the satellite intensities as a function of the incidence energy was discussed for silicon.

Limandri, Silvina P.; Carreras, Alejo C.; Trincavelli, Jorge C. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Matematica, Astronomia y Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Cordoba (Argentina); Bonetto, Rita D. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas Dr. Jorge Ronco (CINDECA), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, La Plata (Argentina)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Calculated /alpha/-induced thick target neutron yields and spectra, with comparison to measured data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One component of the neutron source associated with the decay of actinide nuclides in many environments is due to the interaction of decay /alpha/ particles in (/alpha/,n) reactions on low Z nuclides. Measurements of (/alpha/,n) thick target neutron yields and associated neutron spectra have been made for only a few combinations of /alpha/ energy and target nuclide or mixtures of actinide and target nuclides. Calculations of thick target neutron yields and spectra with the SOURCES code require /alpha/-energy-dependent cross sections for (/alpha/,n) reactions, as well as branching fractions leading to the energetically possible levels of the product nuclides. A library of these data has been accumulated for target nuclides of Z /le/ 15 using that available from measurements and from recent GNASH code calculations. SOURCES, assuming neutrons to be emitted isotopically in the center-of-mass system, uses libraries of /alpha/ stopping cross sections, (/alpha/,n) reaction cross reactions, product nuclide level branching fractions, and actinide decay /alpha/ spectra to calculate thick target (/alpha/,n) yields and neutron spectra for homogeneous combinations of nuclides. The code also calculates the thick target yield and angle intergrated neutron spectrum produced by /alpha/-particle beams on targets of homogeneous mixtures of nuclides. Illustrative calculated results are given and comparisons are made with measured thick target yields and spectra. 50 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Wilson, W.B.; Bozoian, M.; Perry, R.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Questions and Answers - What are alpha rays? How are they produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why do we use radioactivityto destroy cancers? Why do we use radioactivity<br>to destroy cancers? Previous Question (Why do we use radioactivity to destroy cancers?) Questions and Answers Main Index Next Question (What is an alpha particle?) What is an alpha particle? What are alpha rays? How are they produced? Alpha "rays" are actually high speed particles. Early researchers tended to refer to any form of energetic radiation as rays, and the term is still used. An alpha particle is made up of two protons and two neutrons, all held together by the same strong nuclear force that binds the nucleus of any atom. In fact, an alpha particle really is a nucleus - it's the same as the nucleus of a common atom of helium - but it doesn't have any electrons around it, and it's traveling very fast. Alpha particles are a type of

305

Implementation of the LANS-alpha turbulence model in a primitive equation ocean model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the first numerical implementation and tests of the Lagrangian-averaged Navier-Stokes-alpha (LANS-alpha) turbulence model in a primitive equation ocean model. The ocean model in which we work is the Los Alamos Parallel Ocean Program (POP); we refer to POP and our implementation of LANS-alpha as POP-alpha. Two versions of POP-alpha are presented: the full POP-alpha algorithm is derived from the LANS-alpha primitive equations, but requires a nested iteration that makes it too slow for practical simulations; a reduced POP-alpha algorithm is proposed, which lacks the nested iteration and is two to three times faster than the full algorithm. The reduced algorithm does not follow from a formal derivation of the LANS-alpha model equations. Despite this, simulations of the reduced algorithm are nearly identical to the full algorithm, as judged by globally averaged temperature and kinetic energy, and snapshots of temperature and velocity fields. Both POP-alpha algorithms can run stably with longer timesteps than standard POP. Comparison of implementations of full and reduced POP-alpha algorithms are made within an idealized test problem that captures some aspects of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, a problem in which baroclinic instability is prominent. Both POP-alpha algorithms produce statistics that resemble higher-resolution simulations of standard POP. A linear stability analysis shows that both the full and reduced POP-alpha algorithms benefit from the way the LANS-alpha equations take into account the effects of the small scales on the large. Both algorithms (1) are stable; (2) make the Rossby Radius effectively larger; and (3) slow down Rossby and gravity waves.

Matthew W. Hecht; Darryl D. Holm; Mark R. Petersen; Beth A. Wingate

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Euler:=proc(f,y_true,a,b,N,alpha) local w,h,i, ptlist; w:=alpha; h:=evalf ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2.6. > Euler:=proc(f,y_true,a,b,N,alpha) local w,h,i, ptlist; w:=alpha; h:=evalf((b-a )/N); ptlist:=[a,w]; print(a,w,y_true(a)); for i from 0 to N-1 do w:=evalf(w+h*f(a+i*h ...

307

MFTF-. cap alpha. +T end plug magnet design  

SciTech Connect

The conceptual design of the end-plug magnets for MFTF-..cap alpha..+T is described. MFTF-..cap alpha..+ T is a near-term upgrade of MFTF-B, which features new end plugs to improve performance. The Fusion Engineering Design Center has performed the engineering design of MFTF-..cap alpha..+T under the overall direction of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each end plug consists of two Yin-Yang pairs, each with approx.2.5:1 mirror ratio and approx.5-T peak field on axis; two transition coils; and a recircularizing solenoid. This paper describes the end-plug magnet system functional requirements and presents a conceptual design that meets them. The peak field at the windings of the end-plug coils is approx.6-T. These coils are designed using the NbTi MFTF-B conductor and cooled by a 4.2K liquid helium bath. All the end-plug magnets are designed to operate in the cryostable mode with adequate quench protection for safety. Shielding requirements are stated and a summary of heat loads is provided. Field and force calculations are discussed. The field on axis is shown to meet the functional requirements. Force resultants are reported in terms of winding running loads and resultant coil forces are also given. The magnet structural support is described. A trade study to determine the optimum end-cell coil internal nuclear shield thickness and the resulting coil size based on minimizing the end-cell life cycle cost is summarized.

Srivastava, V.C.; O'Toole, J.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hobbs, D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiolytic gas production in the alpha particle degradation of plastics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Net gas generation due to alpha particle irradiation of polyethylene and polyvinyl chloride was investigated. Experiments were performed in an air environment at 30, 60, and 100{degree}C. The predominant radiolytic degradation products of polyethylene were hydrogen and carbon dioxide with a wide variety of trace organic species noted. Irradiation of polyvinyl chloride resulted in the formation of HCl in addition to the products observed for polyethylene. For both plastic materials, a strong enhancement of net yields was noted at 100{degree}C.

Reed, D.T.; Hoh, J.; Emery, J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Hobbs, D. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NONEQUILIBRIUM FLUCTUATIONS IN SHOCK COMPRESSION OF POLYCRYSTALLINE ALPHA-IRON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a numerical study of heterogeneous and nonequilibrium fluctuations in shock compression of {alpha}-iron at the grain level. A quasi-molecular code called DM2 is used to model the interactions of a plane shock wave with grain boundaries and crystal anisotropy over the pressure range of 5-45 GPa. Highly transient eddies that were reported earlier are again observed. We show new features through an elementary statistical analysis. They are (1) a characteristic decay constant for the non-equilibrium fluctuation on the order of 20ns, (2) a resonance phenomenon at an intermediate shock pressure, and (3) a more uniform shock structure for very high pressures.

Y. HORIE; K. YANO

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A BATTERY OPERATED ALPHA AND BETA RADIATION RECORDER  

SciTech Connect

Design is described of a portable battery operated unit with a rate meter which can be used either with an alpha scintillation head and photomultiplier tube or with a G. M. tube. A microammeter is calibrated to read count rate. Provision is also made to read the output on an Esterline Angus recorder. Double coated transparent scotch tape is used to hold the scintillating material (silver activated zinc sulphide) on the window of the photomultiplier tube. A light trap incorporated in the unit makes it possible to place samples in the lighttight counting chamber without admitting room light to the photomultiplier tube. (auth)

Strebe, F.C.

1957-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let 5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 23, 2013 - 12:26am Addthis PROBLEM: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: EMC AlphaStor 4.0 prior to build 800 (All platforms) ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in EMC AlphaStor. REFERENCE LINKS: ESA-2013-008: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028020 Secunia Advisory SA51930 CVE-2013-0928 CVE-2013-0929 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can send a specially crafted DCP run command to inject commands and cause the Device Manager (rrobotd.exe) to execute arbitrary code on the target system [CVE-2013-0928].

313

CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRU ALPHA LLWT TRU ALPHA LLWT Project CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project November 2003 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Safety Basis - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT

314

V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let 5: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code V-075: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code January 23, 2013 - 12:26am Addthis PROBLEM: EMC AlphaStor Command Injection and Format String Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: EMC AlphaStor 4.0 prior to build 800 (All platforms) ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in EMC AlphaStor. REFERENCE LINKS: ESA-2013-008: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1028020 Secunia Advisory SA51930 CVE-2013-0928 CVE-2013-0929 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: A remote user can send a specially crafted DCP run command to inject commands and cause the Device Manager (rrobotd.exe) to execute arbitrary code on the target system [CVE-2013-0928].

315

Structure of alpha-glycerophosphate Oxidase from Streptococcus sp.: a Template for the Mitochondrial alpha-glycerophosphate Dehydrogenase  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FAD-dependent {alpha}-glycerophosphate oxidase (GlpO) from Enterococcus casseliflavus and Streptococcus sp. was originally studied as a soluble flavoprotein oxidase; surprisingly, the GlpO sequence is 30-43% identical to those of the {alpha}-glycerophosphate dehydrogenases (GlpDs) from mitochondrial and bacterial sources. The structure of a deletion mutant of Streptococcus sp. GlpO (GlpO{Delta}, lacking a 50-residue insert that includes a flexible surface region) has been determined using multiwavelength anomalous dispersion data and refined at 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Using the GlpO{Delta} structure as a search model, we have also determined the intact GlpO structure, as refined at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. The first two domains of the GlpO fold are most closely related to those of the flavoprotein glycine oxidase, where they function in FAD binding and substrate binding, respectively; the GlpO C-terminal domain consists of two helix bundles and is not closely related to any known structure. The flexible surface region in intact GlpO corresponds to a segment of missing electron density that links the substrate-binding domain to a {beta}{beta}{alpha} element of the FAD-binding domain. In accordance with earlier biochemical studies (stabilizations of the covalent FAD-N5-sulfite adduct and p-quinonoid form of 8-mercapto-FAD), Ile430-N, Thr431-N, and Thr431-OG are hydrogen bonded to FAD-O2{alpha} in GlpO{Delta}, stabilizing the negative charge in these two modified flavins and facilitating transfer of a hydride to FAD-N5 (from Glp) as well. Active-site overlays with the glycine oxidase-N-acetylglycine and d-amino acid oxidase-d-alanine complexes demonstrate that Arg346 of GlpO{Delta} is structurally equivalent to Arg302 and Arg285, respectively; in both cases, these residues interact directly with the amino acid substrate or inhibitor carboxylate. The structural and functional divergence between GlpO and the bacterial and mitochondrial GlpDs is also discussed.

T Colussi; D Parsonage; W Boles; T Matsuoka; T Mallett; P Karplus; A Claiborne

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be precisely determined from a small number of lines of sight.

Hu Zhan; Romeel Dave; Daniel Eisenstein; Neal Katz

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Simulation of Alpha Particles in Rotating Plasma Interacting with a Stationary Ripple  

SciTech Connect

Superthermal ExB rotation can provide magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and enhanced confinement to axisymmetric mirrors. However, the rotation speed has been limited by phenomena at end electrodes. A new prediction is that rotation might instead be produced using a magnetic ripple and alpha particle kinetic energy, in an extension of the alpha channeling concept. The interaction of alpha particles with the ripple results in visually interesting and practically useful orbits.

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

High-statistics measurement of the beta-delayed alpha spectrum of 20Na  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A measurement of the 20Na beta-delayed alpha spectrum with a high-granularity set-up has allowed the decay scheme to be revised on several points. Three new transitions of low intensity are found at low alpha-particle energy. An R-matrix fit of the complete spectrum gives an improved description of the decay and indicates feeding to the broad 2^+ alpha-cluster state close to 9 MeV.

K. L. Laursen; O. S. Kirsebom; H. O. U. Fynbo; A. Jokinen; M. Madurga; K. Riisager.; A. Saastamoinen; O. Tengblad; J. Äysto

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

319

Density-induced suppression of the alpha-particle condensate in nuclear matter and the structure of alpha cluster states in nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At low densities, with decreasing temperatures, in symmetric nuclear matter alpha-particles are formed, which eventually give raise to a quantum condensate with four-nucleon alpha-like correlations (quartetting). Starting with a model of alpha-matter, where undistorted alpha particles interact via an effective interaction such as the Ali-Bodmer potential, the suppression of the condensate fraction at zero temperature with increasing density is considered. Using a Jastrow-Feenberg approach, it is found that the condensate fraction vanishes near saturation density. Additionally, the modification of the internal state of the alpha particle due to medium effects will further reduce the condensate. In finite systems, an enhancement of the S state wave function of the c.o.m. orbital of alpha particle motion is considered as the correspondence to the condensate. Wave functions have been constructed for self-conjugate 4n nuclei which describe the condensate state, but are fully antisymmetrized on the nucleonic level. These condensate-like cluster wave functions have been successfully applied to describe properties of low-density states near the n alpha threshold. Comparison with OCM calculations in 12C and 16O shows strong enhancement of the occupation of the S-state c.o.m. orbital of the alpha-particles. This enhancement is decreasing if the baryon density increases, similar to the density-induced suppression of the condensate fraction in alpha matter. The ground states of 12C and 16O show no enhancement at all, thus a quartetting condensate cannot be formed at saturation densities.

Y. Funaki; H. Horiuchi; G. Röpke; P. Schuck; A. Tohsaki; T. Yamada

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutron Moderation in the Oklo Natural Reactor and the Time Variation of alpha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the analysis of the Oklo (gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine structure constant alpha, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a non-zero change in alpha, over the last two billion years since the reactor was operating, of \\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha\\geq 2.2\\times 10^{-7} (6\\sigma confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron resonances are discussed.

Lamoreaux, S K

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

TNF Alpha concentration in tumored and non-tumored Sinclair swine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The infiltration of pigment-laden macrophages (PLM) in Sinclair swine cutaneous melanoma during the time frame in which histopathological evidence of tumor regression is observed suggests that they may play a role in this event. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF[alpha]c) is a major cytotoxic secretagogue of activated macrophages. This study analyzed the circulating and intratumoral levels of TNF[alpha] in melanoma-positive and melanoma-free Sinclair swine over the first 100 days of age. TNF[alpha] concentrations were measured by porcine-specific TNF[alpha] ELISA. The mean serum TNF[alpha] concentration of all tumored pig samples combined (23.2 pg/n-d) was significantly higher than non-tumored pigs (15.97 pg/ml). However, comparisons of age groups between tumored and non-tumored pigs showed no significant differences. Comparisons of different ages within a tumor status group showed significant changes in serum TNF[alpha] concentrations. Intratumoral concentrations of TNF[alpha](X showed a significant decrease from 260.9 pg/ml to 40.4 pg/n-A over the first 100 days of age. These studies indicate that differences in TNF[alpha] serum and intratumoral concentrations occur in Sinclair swine and these may be correlated with age and tumor status.

Ash, Joan Olivia Rogers

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Review of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Readiness Assessment (Implementation Verification Review Sections) May 2011 November 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency...

323

Processing and the Evolution of Alpha/Beta Microtexture in Titanium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Processing and the Evolution of Alpha/Beta Microtexture in ... Analysis of Hot Rolling with Simplified Weighted Velocity Field and MY Criterion.

324

An Analysis of Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics from the Lyman-alpha Forest /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information regarding fundamental physics that is waiting toof Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics from the Lyman-alphaof Astrophysics and Fundamental Physics from the Lyman-alpha

Day, Aaron Joseph

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

An alpha/beta/gamma health physics instrument with pulse-shape discrimination  

SciTech Connect

A recent breakthrough in alpha scintillation detector design supports the feasibility of extending this new technology to the development of a monolithic alpha/beta/gamma ({alpha}/{beta}/{gamma}) scintillation detector. The new scintillator is physically robust and chemically resistant to environmental conditions encountered in radiation monitoring, and yet inexpensive to manufacture. The use of pulse-shape discrimination electronics allows pulses from each scintillator to be separated for particle identification. An {alpha}/{beta}/{gamma} detector has a wide variety of possible applications including laundry monitoring, wastewater monitoring, air sampling, and health physics instrumentation. 2 refs., 1 fig.

McElhaney, S.A.; Chiles, M.M.; Ramsey, J.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Alpha-helical Protein Networks Are Self-protective and Flaw-tolerant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alpha-helical Protein Networks Are Self-protective and Flaw- ... Bulk Metallic Glass Composites: A New High-Performance Structural Material.

327

Systematics of {alpha}-decay half-lives around shell closures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic calculation of {alpha}-decay half-lives of even-even heavy and superheavy nuclei in the framework of the preformed {alpha} model. The microscopic {alpha}-daughter nuclear interaction potential is calculated by double-folding the density distributions of both {alpha} and daughter nuclei with a realistic effective Michigan three-Yukawa nucleon-nucleon interaction, and the microscopic Coulomb potential is calculated by folding the charge density distributions of the two interacting nuclei. The half-lives are found to be sensitive to the density dependence of the nucleon-nucleon interaction and the implementation of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition inherent in the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approach. The {alpha}-decay half-lives obtained agree reasonably well with the available experimental data. Moreover, the study has been extended to the newly observed superheavy nuclei. The interplay of closed-shell effects in {alpha}-decay calculations is investigated. The {alpha}-decay calculations give the closed-shell effects of known spherical magicities, Z=82 and N=126, and further predict enhanced stabilities at N=152,162, and 184 for Z=100,108, and 114, owing to the stability of parent nuclei against {alpha} decays. It is worth noting that the aim of this work is not only to reproduce the experimental data better, but also to extend our understanding of {alpha}-decay half-lives around shell closures.

Ismail, M.; Ellithi, A. Y.; Botros, M. M.; Adel, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University (Egypt)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Neutron Moderation in the Oklo Natural Reactor and the Time Variation of alpha  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the analysis of the Oklo (gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine structure constant alpha, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a non-zero change in alpha, over the last two billion years since the reactor was operating, of \\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha\\geq 4.5\\times 10^{-8} (6\\sigma confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron resonances are discussed.

S. K. Lamoreaux

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Migration of positively charged defects in (alpha)-quartz  

SciTech Connect

We apply a newly developed quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) scheme to simulate the migration of charged oxygen defects in {alpha}-quartz. We simulate the transition mechanism and compute the potential energy and free energy surface for the puckering of the symmetric charged oxygen vacancy and the formation of the E{prime}{sub 1} center. By overcoming low energy barriers this puckering mechanism can be reiterated allowing the drift of the positive charge localized on an over-coordinated oxygen atom. This process enhances the stability of the E{prime}{sub 1} center and can be regarded as an important channel of structural reorganization of oxygen deficient silica in the presence of strong polarizing electric fields.

Laino, T; Donadio, D; Kuo, I W

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Plasma heating from alpha particle micro-instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential use of thermonuclear (i.e., fusion product) driven kinetic instabilities to heat the background plasma has long been recognized. Considerable research on velocity space micro-instabilities exists. Most work to date has focused upon the basic physics criteria for and characteristics of particular micro-instabilities. Kinetic instabilities resulting in spatial transport of fusion products have also received some attention, but the effects on reactor concepts and performance remain uncertain. We have developed an engineering model which scopes the effect of a velocity space relaxation of fast alphas on a quasi-linear time scale. This model includes the additional heating to background plasma ions under the assumptions of: ion damping of the plasma wave; heating to background plasma results predominantly from fusion products; and periodic hiccups of the instability.

Miley, G.H.; Sutton, W.R.; Choi, C.K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Gold Coated Lanthanide Phosphate Nanoparticles for Targeted Alpha Generator Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Targeted radiotherapies maximize cytotoxicty to cancer cells. In vivo generators such as 225Ac, which emits four particles in its decay chain, can significantly amplify the radiation dose delivered to the target site. However, renal dose from unbound 213Bi escaping during the decay process limits the dose of 225Ac that can be administered. Traditional chelating moieties are unable to sequester the radioactive daughters because of the high recoil energy from alpha particle emission. To counter this, we demonstrate that an engineered multilayered nanoparticle-antibody conjugate can both deliver radiation and contain the decay daughters of the in vivo -generator 225Ac while targeting biologically relevant receptors. These multi-shell nanoparticles combine the radiation resistance of crystalline lanthanide phosphate to encapsulate and contain 225Ac and its radioactive decay daughters, the magnetic properties of gadolinium phosphate for easy separation, and established surface chemistry of gold for attachment of nanoparticles to targeting antibodies.

McLaughlin, Mark F [ORNL; Woodward, Jonathan [ORNL; Boll, Rose Ann [ORNL; Wall, Jonathan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Kennel, Steve J [ORNL; Mirzadeh, Saed [ORNL; Robertson, David J. [University of Missouri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Effect of alpha-radiolysis on TRUEX-NPH solvent  

SciTech Connect

An unexpectedly high degradation of the TRUEX (TRansUranic EXtraction) solvent occurred during the treatment of waste solutions from the New Brunswick Laboratory. The waste solutions treated contained approximately 1 g/L of Pu-239 and 20 mg/L of Am-241. Earlier studies of {alpha}-radiolysis using carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) rather than normal paraffinic hydrocarbons (NPH) as a diluent indicated greater resistance to radiation damage than observed. For this study, the TRUEX-NPH solvent was loaded with Am-241 in nitric acid, irradiated with doses up to 3.5 Mrad, and monitored for decline in extraction capability as a function of absorbed dose. Results of this study are being used to improve the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM), a thermodynamic model that permits flowsheet design for solvent extraction processing.

Buchholz, B.A.; Nunez, L.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Networked alpha and gamma spectral acquisition and analysis system  

SciTech Connect

This manual assumes a knowledge of (terminology used and a working familiarity with) the windowing system and mouse of the Sun computer workstation. See the appropriate Sun manuals for additional information. ALDO, the alpha detector control program, is used to control, monitor, and edit log information associated with the collection of alpha spectra. Actual data collection and control functions are performed by Mizar Real-Time computers for which ALDO acts as a friendly user command interface and status display. It is normally started as part of your login procedure, but may also be started from the ``NETSPEC Utilities`` submenu of the root menu. The root menu is obtained by pushing the right mouse button when the cursor is over the root window (background picture). To become a user of ALDO and the other programs in the NETSPEC system, contact the person who performs systems administration tasks for the Sun computers. Most user interaction with ALDO is by means of mouse manipulation of screen items such as buttons, checkboxes, and sliders. The action of pushing the left mouse button when the cursor is over an item is called selecting that item. The left mouse button is therefore called the select button. The right mouse button is the menu button because a limited number of options may be displayed when that button is pressed when the cursor is over an item with a triangle (inverted delta). In this document, names of selectable items are printed in bold when they are first mentioned or when emphasis is helpful. In general, items which do not apply to the current context are either disabled or made invisible in order to prevent selection.

Wilcox, C.M.; Gross, J.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The History Heuristic and Alpha-Beta Search Enhancements in Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many enhancements to the alpha-beta algorithm have been proposed to help reduce the size of minimax trees. A recent enhancement, the history heuristic, which improves the order in which branches are considered at interior nodes is described. A comprehensive ... Keywords: alpha-beta search enhancements, game trees, history heuristic, interior nodes, minimax techniques, minimax trees, search problems, transposition tables, trees (mathematics)

J. Schaeffer

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Isoform-specific regulation of adipocyte differentiation by Akt/protein kinase B{alpha}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway tightly regulates adipose cell differentiation. Here we show that loss of Akt1/PKB{alpha} in primary mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells results in a defect of adipocyte differentiation. Adipocyte differentiation in vitro and ex vivo was restored in cells lacking both Akt1/PKB{alpha} and Akt2/PKB{beta} by ectopic expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha} but not Akt2/PKB{beta}. Akt1/PKB{alpha} was found to be the major regulator of phosphorylation and nuclear export of FoxO1, whose presence in the nucleus strongly attenuates adipocyte differentiation. Differentiation-induced cell division was significantly abrogated in Akt1/PKB{alpha}-deficient cells, but was restored after forced expression of Akt1/PKB{alpha}. Moreover, expression of p27{sup Kip1}, an inhibitor of the cell cycle, was down regulated in an Akt1/PKB{alpha}-specific manner during adipocyte differentiation. Based on these data, we suggest that the Akt1/PKB{alpha} isoform plays a major role in adipocyte differentiation by regulating FoxO1 and p27{sup Kip1}.

Yun, Sung-Ji; Kim, Eun-Kyoung [Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration and Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Ami-dong 1-ga 10, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Tucker, David F. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kim, Chi Dae [Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration and Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Ami-dong 1-ga 10, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Birnbaum, Morris J. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bae, Sun Sik [Medical Research Center for Ischemic Tissue Regeneration and Medical Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Pusan National University, Ami-dong 1-ga 10, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sunsik@pusan.ac.kr

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Measurements of the Release of Alpha Quartz: A New Standard for Impedance-Matching Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the release of alpha quartz into SiO2 aerogel are found to agree well with previous near-direct measurements for that aerogel Hugoniot. The results establish alpha quartz as an impedance-matching standard that, because of its transparency, enables higher-accuracy measurements and knowledge of the pressure profile in the pusher.

Boehly, T.R.; Miller, J.E.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Eggert, J.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Hicks, D.G.; Collins, G.W.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic cells in zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic of an adaptive response by the ionizing radiation against sub- sequent exposures to Cd. Keywords Multiple embryos subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (low-dose alpha particles

Yu, K.N.

338

A p38alpha-Selective Chemosensor for use in Unfractionated Cell Lysates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent efforts have identified the p38alpha Ser/Thr kinase as a potential target for the treatment of inflammatory diseases as well as non-small cell lung carcinoma. Despite the significance of p38alpha, no direct activity ...

Stains, Cliff I.

339

On the Security of the Y-00 (AlphaEta) Direct Encryption Protocol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the current status of the AlphaEta direct encryption protocol. After describing AlphaEta, we summarize the main security claims made on it. We then describe recent attacks developed against it in the literature, and suggest security enhancements and future research directions based on our results.

Ranjith Nair; Horace P. Yuen

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

340

Calculating alpha Eigenvalues in a Continuous-Energy Infinite Medium with Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

The {alpha} eigenvalue has implications for time-dependent problems where the system is sub- or supercritical. We present methods and results from calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum for a continuous-energy infinite medium with a simplified Monte Carlo transport code. We formulate the {alpha}-eigenvalue problem, detail the Monte Carlo code physics, and provide verification and results. We have a method for calculating the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum in a continuous-energy infinite-medium. The continuous-time Markov process described by the transition rate matrix provides a way of obtaining the {alpha}-eigenvalue spectrum and kinetic modes. These are useful for the approximation of the time dependence of the system.

Betzler, Benjamin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

05: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak 05: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EIS-0305: Treating Transuranic (TRU)/Alpha Low-Level at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee SUMMARY This EIS evaluates DOE's proposal to construct, operate, and decontaminate/decommission a Transuranic (TRU) Waste Treatment Facility in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The four waste types that would be treated at the proposed facility would be remote-handled TRU mixed waste sludge, liquid low-level waste associated with the sludge, contact-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids, and remote-handled TRU/alpha low-level waste solids. The mixed waste sludge and some of the solid waste contain metals regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and may be

342

Abundances at High Redshifts: the Chemical Enrichment History of Damped Lyman-alpha Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damped Lyman-alpha absorption systems found in the spectra of high redshift quasars are believed to trace the interstellar gas in high redshift galaxies. In this paper, we study the elemental abundances of C, N, O, Al, Si, S, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Zn in a sample of 14 damped Lyman-alpha systems using high quality echelle spectra of quasars obtained with the 10m Keck telescope. These abundances are combined with similar measurements in the literature in order to investigate the chemical evolution of damped Lyman-alpha galaxies in the redshift range 0.7nature of the star formation process in damped Lyman-alpha galaxies, and the nature of damped Lyman-alpha galaxies themselves.

Limin Lu; Wallace L. W. Sargent; Thomas A. Barlow

1996-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Use of /sup 3/He/sup + +/ ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the present invention to provide a better understanding of alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined, energetic plasma. Another object of the present invention is to provide an improved means and method for studying and measuring the energy distribution of heated alpha particles in a confined plasma. Yet another object of the present invention is to permit detailed analysis of energetic alpha particle behavior in a magnetically confined plasma for use in near term fusion reactor experiments. A still further object of the present invention is to simulate energetic alpha particle behavior in a deuterium-tritium plasma confined in a fusion reactor without producing the neutron activation associated with the thus produced alpha particles.

Post, D.E. Jr.; Hwang, D.Q.; Hovey, J.

1983-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

344

Total alpha-globin gene cluster deletion has high frequency in Filipinos  

SciTech Connect

Most {alpha}-thalassemias [Thal] are due to large deletions. In Southeast Asians, the (--{sup SEA}) double {alpha}-globin gene deletion is common, 3 (--{sup Tot}) total {alpha}-globin cluster deletions are known: Filipino (--{sup Fil}), Thai (--{sup Thai}), and Chinese (--{sup Chin}). In a Hawaii Thal project, provisional diagnosis of {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygotes was based on microcytosis, normal isoelectric focusing, and no iron deficiency. One in 10 unselected Filipinos was an {alpha}-Thal-1 heterozygote, 2/3 of these had a (--{sup Tot}) deletion: a {var_sigma}-cDNA probe consistently showed fainter intensity of the constant 5.5 kb {var_sigma}{sub 2} BamHI band, with no heterzygosity for {var_sigma}-globin region polymorphisms; {alpha}-cDNA or {var_sigma}-cDNA probes showed no BamHI or BglII bands diagnostic of the (--{sup SEA}) deletion; bands for the (-{alpha}) {alpha}-Thal-2 single {alpha}-globin deletions were only seen in Hb H cases. A reliable monoclonal anti-{var_sigma}-peptide antibody test for the (--{sup SEA}) deletion was always negative in (--{sup Tot}) samples. Southern digests with the Lo probe, a gift from D. Higgs of Oxford Univ., confirmed that 49 of 50 (--{sup Tot}) chromosomes in Filipinos were (--{sup Fil}). Of 20 {alpha}-Thal-1 hydrops born to Filipinos, 11 were (--{sup Fil}/--{sup SEA}) compound heterozygotes; 9 were (--{sup SEA}/--{sup SEA}) homozygotes, but none was a (--{sup Fil}/--{sup Fil}).

Hunt, J.A.; Haruyama, A.Z.; Chu, B.M. [Kapiolani Medical Center, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from inhalation of uranium mine atmospheres. HEALTH PHYS.07/--/69. A S R C : Uranium mine and laboratory experimentsTest chambers in a dormant uranium mine were monitored to

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

RADON: A BIBLIOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of external and internal radiation exposure to the U.S.r> estimate the internal radiation exposure to vistors andboth internal and external exposures to the radiation from

Lepman, S.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

The role of HIF-1 alpha in the localization of embryonic stem cells with respect to hypoxia within teratomas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In embryonic stem (ES) cell tumors, the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF- 1[alpha], has been shown to be a tumor suppressor, and HIF-1[alpha]-expressing cells have been shown to localize preferentially in vivo ...

Cochran, David M., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Direct measurement of the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p) reaction of importance to supernovae, using reclaimed $^{44}$Ti  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct measurement of the $^{44}$Ti($\\alpha$,p) reaction of importance to supernovae, using reclaimed $^{44}$Ti

CERN. Geneva; Lindroos, Mats; CERN. Geneva. ISOLDE and Neutron Time-of-Flight Experiments Committee; INTC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Use of passive alpha detectors to screen for uranium contamination in a field at Fernald, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the results from a field test of newly developed techniques for inexpensive, in situ screening of soil for alpha contamination. Passive alpha detectors that are commercially available for the detection indoor airborne alpha activity (i.e., {sup 222}Rn) have been modified so they can be applied to the detection of alpha contamination on surfaces or in soils. Results reported here are from an intercomparison involving several different techniques with all measurements being made at the same sites in a field near the formerly used uranium processing facility at Fernald, Ohio, during the summer of 1994. The results for two types of passive alpha detector show that the quality of calibration is improved if soils samples are milled to increase homogeneity within the soil matrices. The correlation between laboratory based radiochemical analyses and quick, field-based screening measurements is acceptable and can be improved if the passive devices are left for longer exposure times in the field. The total cost per measurement for either type of passive alpha detector is probably less than $25 and should provide a cost-effective means for site managers to develop the information needed to find areas with remaining alpha contamination so resources can be allocated efficiently.

Dudney, C.S.; Meyer, K.E.; Gammage, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wheeler, R.V.; Salasky, M. [Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL (United States); Kotrappa, P. [Rad Electric Inc., Frederick, MD (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

{sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne for the weak s process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of the reaction rates of the competing channels {sup 17}O({alpha}{gamma}){sup 21}Ne and {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne determines the efficiency of {sup 16}O as a neutron poison in the s process in low metallicity rotating stars. It has a large impact on the element production, either producing elements to the mass range of A=90 in case of a significant poisoning effect or extending the mass range up to the region of A=150 if the {gamma} channel is of negligible strength. We present an improved study of the reaction {sup 17}O({alpha},n){sup 20}Ne, including an independent measurement of the {sup 17}O({alpha},n{sub 1}){sup 20}Ne channel. A simultaneous R-Matrix fit to both the n{sub 0} and the n{sub 1} channels has been performed. New reaction rates, including recent data on the {sup 17}O({alpha},{gamma}){sup 21}Ne reaction, have been calculated and used as input for stellar network calculations and their impact on the s process in rotating massive stars is discussed.

Best, A.; Goerres, J.; Beard, M.; Couder, M.; Boer, R. de; Falahat, S.; Gueray, R. T.; Kontos, A.; Kratz, K.-L.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Li, Q.; O'Brien, S.; Oezkan, N.; Pignatari, M.; Sonnabend, K.; Talwar, R.; Tan, W.; Uberseder, E.; Wiescher, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States) and Department for Biogeochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, Kacaeli University, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department for Biogeochemistry, Max-Planck-Institute for Chemistry, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, Kacaeli University, Umuttepe 41380, Kocaeli (Turkey); Department of Physics, University of Basel, Basel 4056 (Switzerland); Institute for Applied Physics, Goethe-University Frankfurt, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

Stellar Evolution Constraints on the Triple-Alpha Reaction Rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-alpha reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8 rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low- and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M >~ 10 Msun) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on AGB phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8 10 at T = 1 - 1.2 x 10^8 K where the cross section is proportional to T^{nu}. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than ~ 10^{-29} cm^6 s^{-1} mole^{-2} at ~ 10^{7.8} K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation. In an effort to compromise with the revised rates, we calculate and analyze models with enhanced CNO cycle reaction rates to increase the maximum luminosity of the first giant branch. However, it is impossible to reach the typical RGB tip luminosity even if all the reaction rates related to CNO cycles are enhanced by more than ten orders of magnitude.

Takuma Suda; Raphael Hirschi; Masayuki Y. Fujimoto

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

Regulatory sequences within DQ. cap alpha. and DQ. beta  

SciTech Connect

The Class II Histocompatibility Antigen DQ is characterized by tissue specific expression, relatively late appearance in development and modulation of expression in response to gamma interferon, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and prostaglandins of the E series. They have utilized the sensitive reporter function of chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) in transient expression assays to screen for the presence of regulatory regions within the DQ..cap alpha.. and DQ..beta.. genes. Two regions have been identified which stimulate CAT transcription in transfected cells. One region includes the first intron of DQ..beta.. and the other region brackets the first exon of DQ/sup 2/. These regions are both tissue specific in their stimulation of CAT transcription i.e., both regions stimulate transcription more effectively in a DQ expressing B cell line (BJAB) than in a DQ negative T cell line (Jurkat). Additionally, the CAT plasmids containing the first intron of DQ..beta.. appear to be gamma interferon responsive. Transfection of these plasmids into BJAB followed by treatment of the cells with gamma interferon for 24 hours results in a doubling of the CAT transcription. This increase is analogous to the endogenous DQ response to gamma interferon. These two regions undoubtedly contribute to the complex regulation of DQ expression.

Sullivan, K.; Peterlin, B.M.

1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

Correlation between the Mean Matter Density and the Width of the Saturated Lyman Alpha Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a scaling of the mean matter density with the width of the saturated Lyman alpha absorptions. This property is established using the ``pseudo-hydro'' technique (Croft et al. 1998). It provides a constraint for the inversion of the Lyman alpha forest, which encounters difficulty in the saturated region. With a Gaussian density profile and the scaling relation, a simple inversion of the simulated Lyman alpha forests shows that the one-dimensional mass power spectrum is well recovered on scales above 2 Mpc/h, or roughly k small scales, but improvement is possible with a more sophisticated algorithm.

Zhan, H

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Correlation between the Mean Matter Density and the Width of the Saturated Lyman Alpha Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a scaling of the mean matter density with the width of the saturated Lyman alpha absorptions. This property is established using the ``pseudo-hydro'' technique (Croft et al. 1998). It provides a constraint for the inversion of the Lyman alpha forest, which encounters difficulty in the saturated region. With a Gaussian density profile and the scaling relation, a simple inversion of the simulated Lyman alpha forests shows that the one-dimensional mass power spectrum is well recovered on scales above 2 Mpc/h, or roughly k small scales, but improvement is possible with a more sophisticated algorithm.

Hu Zhan

2003-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

355

Experimental study of alpha-induced reactions on 64Zn for the astrophysical gamma-process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the synthesis of the heavy, proton rich isotopes in the astrophysical gamma-process the precise knowledge of alpha-induced cross sections is of high importance. We have initiated a comprehensive study of the 64Zn+alpha system involving the cross section measurement of different reaction channels as well as the elastic scattering at low, astrophysically relevant energies. In this paper the experimental technique and some preliminary results of the 64Zn(alpha,p)67Ga cross section measurement are presented.

Gy. Gyürky; J. Farkas; Z. Halász; Zs. Fülöp; E. Somorjai; T. Szücs; P. Mohr; A. Wallner

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

Variable Iron K-alpha Lines in Seyfert 1 Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find that variability of the iron K-alpha line is common in Seyfert 1 galaxies. Using data from the ASCA archive for objects that have been observed more than once during the mission, we study the time-averaged spectra from individual observations, thereby probing variability on timescales that range from days to years. Since the statistics of the data do not warrant searches for line variability in terms of a complex physical model, we use a a simple Gaussian to model the gross shape of the line, and then use the centroid energy, intensity and equivalent width as robust indicators of changes in the line profile. We find that ~70% of Seyfert 1s (ten out of fifteen) show variability in at least one of these parameters: the centroid energy, intensity, and equivalent width vary in six, four, and eight sources respectively. Due to the low S/N, limited sampling and time averaging, we consider these results to represent lower limits to the rate of incidence of variability. In most cases changes in the line do not appear to track changes in the continuum. In particular, we find no evidence for variability of the line intensity in NGC 4151, suggesting an origin in a region larger than the putative accretion disk, where most of the iron line has been thought to originate. Mkn 279 is investigated on short timescales. The time-averaged effective line energy is 6.5 keV in the galaxy rest frame. As the continuum flux increases by 20% in a few hours, the Fe K line responds with the effective line energy increasing by 0.22 keV (~10,500 km s^-1). Problems with the ASCA and Rosat calibration that affect simultaneous spectral fits are discussed in an appendix.

K. A. Weaver; J. Gelbord; T. Yaqoob

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Hardy-Littlewood theorem for trigonometric series with {alpha}-monotone coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hardy-Littlewood theorem is established for trigonometric series with {alpha}-monotone coefficients. Inequalities of Hardy-Littlewood kind are proved. Examples of series demonstrating that the results obtained are sharp are constructed. Bibliography: 15 titles.

Dyachenko, Mikhail I [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nursultanov, Erlan D [Kazakhstan Branch of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preliminary Assessment of the Functional Fitness of Alpha Emitter At-211 for Radiotherapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The functional fitness of the alpha-emitter At-211 for radiotherapy of the thyroid gland cancer is evaluated. Radiation doses are calculated using the MIRD method and previously obtained pharmacokinetic data for At-211 in isotonic solution.

Eremenko, D. O.; Fotina, O. V.; Platonov, S. Yu.; Subbotina, E. A.; Yuminov, O. A. [Skobetsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Pankratova, T. V.; Sirotkina, E. B. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Physical Department, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Tultaev, A. V. [Institute of Biophysics, State Research Center of Russia, Zhivopisnaya, 46, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

359

Induction of a bystander mutagenic effect of alpha particles in mammalian cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process play a critical role in mediating the by- stander phenomenon. Epidemiological studies of uranium mine workers and exper- imental animal studies suggest a positive correlation between exposure to alpha

360

Early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung:  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an inhalation exposure experiment that concerns early and continuing effects of combined alpha and beta irradiation of the lung of rats. Both morbidity at 18 months and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined for rats exposed to the beta-emitter /sup 147/Pm, the alpha-emitter /sup 238/Pu, or both combined. The results were used to validate hazard-function models that were developed (1)for pulmonary functional morbidity at 18 months and (2) for lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis within 18 months. Both models were found to adequately predict the experimental observations after combined chronic alpha and beta irradiation of the lung. A relative biological effectiveness of approximately 7 was obtained for /sup 238/Pu alpha radiation compared to /sup 147/Pm beta radiation for both pulmonary functional morbidity and lethality from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. 12 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Snipes, M.B.; Newton, G.J.; Eidson, A.F.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Plasma ion heating and energy loss from alpha-particle micro-instabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An engineering model is described which scopes the effect of a velocity space relaxation of fast alphas on a quasi-linear time scale. An approximation for the ion heating is given. (MOW)

Sutton, W.R.; Choi, C.K.; Miley, G.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Testing and Final Construction of the Superconducting Magnet for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics experiment based on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of the detector is a large superconducting magnet, cooled to a temperature of 1.8 K by ...

Harrison, Stephen

363

Hybrid potential model of the {alpha}-cluster structure of {sup 212}Po  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cluster-core potentials derived microscopically or phenomenologically each have some desirable features. We combine these features in an analysis of the properties of {sup 212}Po treated as an {alpha}-{sup 208}Pb system.

Ibrahim, T. T.; Perez, S. M.; Wyngaardt, S. M. [Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, P.O. Box 1529, Stellenbosch 7599, South Africa, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129, South Africa, Department of Physics, University of Ilorin, PMB 1515 Ilorin (Nigeria); Department of Physics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700, South Africa, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Physics, University of Stellenbosch, P.O. Box 1529, Stellenbosch 7599 (South Africa)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Effects of Volume Averaging on Spectra Measured with a Lyman-Alpha Hygrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because the Lyman-alpha hygrometer averages turbulent fluctuations in humidity over a right circular cylinder, the spectral response of the instrument degrades at higher wavenumbers. This paper contains a derivation of the three-dimensional ...

Edgar L. Andreas

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Solid-state continuous Lyman-alpha source for laser-cooling of antihydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Cooling antihydrogen atoms is important for future experiments both to test the fundamental CPT symmetry by high-resolution laser spectroscopy and also to measure the gravitational acceleration of antimatter. Laser-cooling of antihydrogen can be done on the strong 1 S-2 P transition at the wavelength of Lyman-alpha (121.6 nm). Ongoing work to set up a solid-state continuous-wave laser source at Lyman-alpha is described.

Walz, Jochen; Beyer, Thomas; Kolbe, Daniel; Markert, Frank; Muellers, Andreas; Scheid, Martin [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

On the covariant gauge {alpha} of the linearized gravity in de Sitter spacetime  

SciTech Connect

In previous work, we studied the linearized gravity with covariant gauge {beta}= 2/3 and {alpha}= 5/3. It was found that the sum of the source and initial contributions reproduces the correct field configuration over the whole de Sitter spacetime. In this paper, we extend this work to generalizing the linearized gravitational field in an arbitrary value of the gauge parameter {alpha} but the gauge parameter {beta} remains the same.

Cheong, Lee Yen [Department of Fundamental and Applied Science Universiti Teknologi Petronas, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

EPRI Alpha Monitoring and Control Guidelines for Operating Nuclear Power Stations, Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) first published the EPRI Alpha Monitoring Guidelines for Operating Nuclear Stations (EPRI report 1013509), to provide standardized guidance for monitoring alpha contamination. Minor revisions were made to the guidelines, which were re-issued in 2009 (1019500). Most US and some international utilities have implemented the guidelines, and several areas of improvement were identified to enhance information to support the monitoring and ...

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE NARROWBAND SEARCH FOR EXTENDED Ly{alpha} EMISSION AROUND TWO z > 6 QUASARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We search for extended Ly{alpha} emission around two z > 6 quasars, SDSS J1030+0524 (z = 6.309) and SDSS J1148+5251 (z = 6.419) using Wide Field Camera 3 narrowband filters on board the Hubble Space Telescope. For each quasar, we collected two deep, narrowband images, one sampling the Ly{alpha} line+continuum at the quasar redshifts and one of the continuum emission redward of the line. After carefully modeling the point-spread function, we find no evidence for extended Ly{alpha} emission. These observations set 2{sigma} limits of L(Ly{alpha}, extended) rates typically inferred from (rest-frame) far-infrared measurements of z {approx} 6 quasars, these limits are well below the intrinsic bright Ly{alpha} emission expected from the recombination of gas photoionized by the quasars or by the star formation in the host galaxies, and point toward significant Ly{alpha} suppression or dust attenuation. However, small extinction values have been observed along the line of sight to the nuclei, thus reddening has to be coupled with other mechanisms for Ly{alpha} suppression (e.g., resonance scattering). No Ly{alpha} emitting companions are found, down to a 5{sigma} sensitivity of {approx}1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2} (surface brightness) and {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} (assuming point sources).

Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian; Yang Yujin; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Venemans, Bram P. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Carilli, Chris L. [NRAO, Pete V. Domenici Array Science Center, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fan Xiahoui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kurk, Jaron [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riechers, Dominik [Astronomy Department, Caltech, 1200 East California boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Strauss, Michael A., E-mail: decarli@mpia.de [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

EXCRETION OF ALPHA-FOETOPROTEIN IN THE URINE OF PREGNANT RATS AND HEPATOMA-BEARING ANIMALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary.-Urine of normal rats, pregnant animals and animals bearing chemically induced hepatoma was tested with antisera to foetoproteins by the double immunodiffusion technique. Antigens were not detected in the urine of normal rats. Alpha-foetoprotein was demonstrated in the urine of pregnant rats and hepatomabearing animals. THREE specific embryonic proteins have been described in the rat. One antigen, the lipoprotein esterase, is present in the serum of the adult animal in minute amounts. The other two constituents, alpha-foetoprotein and alpha-M-foetoprotein, formerly termed LA antigen and alpha-2-glycoprotein, normally occur in the serum of the foetus, neonate and pregnant rat (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, 1967). Alpha-M-foetoprotein also appears in the serum of rats with acute toxic liver injury and following a variety of experimental procedures (van Gool and Ladiges, 1969; Heim and Lane, 1964). On the other hand, both foetoproteins are detected in the serum of rats with chemically induced hepatoma (Stanislawski-Birencwajg, Uriel and Grabar,. 1967). Since the alpha-foetoprotein (AFP) is present in the amniotic fluid, to which foetal urine contributes substantially (Pitkin, Reynolds and Burchell, 1968; Vernier and Smith, 1968), it is surprising that urinary excretion in the adult has received little attention (Masseyeff, 1972). In the rat, urinary excretion of non-plasma proteins, i.e. tissue antigens emanating from the accessory sex glands, kidneys, liver and testes, has been reported from

E. Okon; E. Rosenmann; T. Dishont; J. H. Boss

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A "Muon Mass Tree" with alpha-quantized Lepton, Quark and Hadron Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A "muon mass tree" is displayed that contains the excitation systematics for accurately reproducing the masses of the six Standard Model quarks (u,d,s,c,b,t); the heavy leptons; the proton; the phi, J/Psi and Upsilon vector meson thrshold states; the Bc meson; and the mass-averaged W and Z gauge bosons, using a unified mass formalism based on the electron ground state. Multiples of an alpha-quantized 105.04 MeV fermion mass quantum reproduce the states below 12 GeV, and multiples of a doubly-alpha-quantized 14,394 Mev fermion mass quantum reproduce the W-Z and t states above 12 GeV, where alpha ~ 1/137 is the fine structure constant. Masses are additive, and the overall mass accuracy for these states is in the 1% range. A similar "pion mass tree" based on an alpha-quantized 70.03 MeV boson mass quantum accurately reproduces the pseudoscalar meson masses. The mass alpha-quantization follows from a corresponding experimental alpha-spacing of the long-lived particle lifetimes, which occur in well-defined lifetime groups that are each determined by a dominant Standard Model quark substate.

Malcolm H. Mac Gregor

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

How well do time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images represent hot electron spatial distributions?  

SciTech Connect

A computational study is described, which addresses how well spatially resolved time-integrated K{sub {alpha}} images recorded in intense laser-plasma experiments correlate with the distribution of ''hot'' (>1 MeV) electrons as they propagate through the target. The hot electron angular distribution leaving the laser-plasma region is critically important for many applications such as Fast Ignition or laser based x-ray sources; and K{sub {alpha}} images are commonly used as a diagnostic. It is found that K{sub {alpha}} images can easily mislead due to refluxing and other effects. Using the particle-in-cell code LSP, it is shown that a K{sub {alpha}} image is not solely determined by the initial population of forward directed hot electrons, but rather also depends upon ''delayed'' hot electrons, and in fact continues to evolve long after the end of the laser interaction. Of particular note, there is a population of hot electrons created during the laser-plasma interaction that acquire a velocity direction opposite that of the laser and subsequently reflux off the front surface of the target, deflect when they encounter magnetic fields in the laser-plasma region, and then traverse the target in a wide spatial distribution. These delayed fast electrons create significant features in the K{sub {alpha}} time-integrated images. Electrons refluxing from the sides and the back of the target are also found to play a significant role in forming the final K{alpha} image. The relative contribution of these processes is found to vary depending on depth within target. These effects make efforts to find simple correlations between K{alpha} images and, for example, Fast Ignition relevant parameters prone to error. Suggestions for future target design are provided.

Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Kemp, G. E.; Schumacher, D. W.; Freeman, R. R.; Van Woerkom, L. D. [Physics Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Local structure and vibrational properties of alpha'-Pu martensitein Ga-stabilized delta-Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to investigate the local atomic environment and vibrational properties of plutonium and gallium atoms in the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases of a mixed phase Pu-Ga alloy. EXAFS results measured at low temperature compare the structure of the mixed phase sample with a single-phase {delta}-Pu sample. EXAFS spectral components attributed to both {alpha}{prime}-Pu and {delta}-Pu were observed in the mixed phase sample. Ga K-edge EXAFS spectra indicate local atomic environments similar to the Pu LIII-edge EXAFS results, which suggests that Ga is substitutional for Pu atoms in both the monoclinic {alpha}{prime}-Pu and the fcc {delta}-Pu structures. In {delta}-Pu, we measure a Ga-Pu bond length contraction of 0.11 Angstroms with respect to the Pu-Pu bond length. The corresponding bond-length contraction around Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu is only 0.03 Angstroms. Results from temperature-dependent Pu LIII-edge EXAFS measurements are fit to a correlated Debye model, and a large difference in the Pu-Pu bond Debye temperature is observed for the {alpha}{prime} and {delta} phases: {theta}{sub cD}({alpha}{prime})=159{+-}13 K versus {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=120{+-}3 K. The corresponding analysis for the Ga K EXAFS determines a Ga-Pu bond Debye temperature of {theta}{sub cD}({delta})=188{+-}12 K in the {delta}-Pu phase. These results are related to the observed solubility of Ga in {delta}-Pu, the ''stabilization'' of {delta}-Pu by Ga at room temperature, and the insolubility of Ga in {alpha}{prime}-Pu.

Nelson, E.J.; Blobaum, K.J.M.; Wall, M.A.; Allen, P.G.; Schwartz,A.J.; Booth, C.H.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Predictions of Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predictions of alpha heating in L-mode and H-mode DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The baseline toroidal field of 5.3 T, plasma current ramped to 15 MA and a flat electron density profile ramped to Greenwald fraction 0.85 are assumed. Various combinations of external heating by negative ion neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance, and electron cyclotron resonance are assumed to start half-way up the density ramp. The time evolution of plasma temperatures and, for some cases, toroidal rotation are predicted assuming GLF23 and boundary parameters. Significant toroidal rotation and flow-shearing rates are predicted by GLF23 even in the L-mode phase with low boundary temperatures, and the alpha heating power is predicted to be significant if the power threshold for the transition to H-mode is higher than the planned total heating power. The alpha heating is predicted to be 8-76 MW in L-mode at full density. External heating mixes with higher beam injection power have higher alpha heating power. Alternatively if the toroidal rotation is predicted assuming that the ratio of the momentum to thermal ion energy conductivity is 0.5, the flow-shearing rate is predicted to have insignificant effects on the GLF23- predicted temperatures, and alpha heating is predicted to be 8-20 MW. In H-mode plasmas the alpha heating is predicted to depend sensitively on the assumed pedestal temperatures. Cases with fusion gain greater than 10 are predicted to have alpha heating greater than 80 MW.

R.V. Budny

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sustainable Design Standards in India: The Excluded Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the recent emphasis on “Green Building” in different countries around the world, LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification has emerged as one of the major recognized standards for measuring building sustainability. In 2005, the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC) adopted the original US rating system without substantive modifications in response to the significant contextual differences between the United States and India. In 2007, the IGBC published the LEED INDIA NC Version 1.0 with changes to better respond to the Indian context. This version did not address climatic variations, which demand focused attention on particular sections, such as natural ventilation and daylighting. This paper highlights the essential significance of these critical issues in latest LEED Indian Guidelines in the current LEED standards with respect to comparison between performance of green buildings with and without the LEED certification.

Gupta, K.; Haider, J.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Arsenite enhances tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiological studies demonstrated a high association of vascular diseases with arsenite exposure. We hypothesize that arsenite potentiates the effect of proinflammatory cytokines on vascular endothelial cells, and hence contributes to atherosclerosis. In this study, we investigated the effect of arsenite and its induction of glutathione (GSH) on vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) protein expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in response to tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}), a typical proinflammatory cytokine. Our study demonstrated that arsenite pretreatment potentiated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with up-regulations of both activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). To elucidate the role of GSH in regulation of AP-1, NF-{kappa}B, and VCAM-1 expression, we employed L-buthionine (S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), a specific {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase ({gamma}-GCS) inhibitor, to block intracellular GSH synthesis. Our investigation revealed that, by depleting GSH, arsenite attenuated the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression as well as a potentiation of AP-1 and an attenuation of NF-{kappa}B activations by TNF-{alpha}. Moreover, we found that depletion of GSH would also attenuate the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression with a down-regulation of the TNF-{alpha}-induced NF-{kappa}B activation and without significant effect on AP-1. On the other hand, the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression could be completely abolished by inhibition of AP-1 or NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B was necessary for VCAM-1 expression. In summary, we demonstrate that arsenite enhances the TNF-{alpha}-induced VCAM-1 expression in HUVECs via regulation of AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B activities in a GSH-sensitive manner. Our present study suggested a potential mechanism for arsenite in the induction of vascular inflammation and vascular diseases via modulating the actions of proinflammatory cytokines.

Tsou, T.-C. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: tctsou@nhri.org.tw; Yeh, Szu Ching [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Tsai, E.-M. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kaohsiung Medical University Chung-Ho Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, F.-Y. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China); Chao, H.-R. [Department of Environmental and Safety Health Engineering, Chung Hwa College of Medical Technology, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Louis W. [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

The nuclear import of RNA helicase A is mediated by importin-{alpha}3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RNA helicase A (RHA), an ATPase/helicase, regulates the gene expression at various steps including transcriptional activation and RNA processing. RHA is known to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. We identified the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of RHA and analyzed the nuclear import mechanisms. The NLS of RHA (RHA-NLS) consisting of 19 amino acid residues is highly conserved through species and does not have the consensus classical NLS. In vitro nuclear import assays revealed that the nuclear import of RHA was Ran-dependent and mediated with the classical importin-{alpha}/{beta}-dependent pathway. The binding assay indicated that the basic residues in RHA-NLS were used for interaction with importin-{alpha}. Furthermore, the nuclear import of RHA-NLS was supported by importin-{alpha}1 and preferentially importin-{alpha}3. Our results indicate that the nuclear import of RHA is mediated by the importin-{alpha}3/importin-{beta}-dependent pathway and suggest that the specificity for importin may regulate the functions of cargo proteins.

Aratani, Satoko [Department of Genome Science, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8512 (Japan); Oishi, Takayuki [Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Fujita, Hidetoshi [Department of Genome Science, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8512 (Japan); Nakazawa, Minako [Department of Genome Science, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8512 (Japan); Fujii, Ryouji [Department of Genome Science, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8512 (Japan); Imamoto, Naoko [Cellular Dynamics Laboratory, Discovery Research Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Yoneda, Yoshihiro [Department of Frontier Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Biosciences, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Fukamizu, Akiyoshi [Center for Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Nakajima, Toshihiro [Department of Genome Science, Institute of Medical Science, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-8512 (Japan)]. E-mail: nakashit@marianna-u.ac.jp

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

378

Analysis of the human [alpha]-globin gene cluster in transgenic mice  

SciTech Connect

A 350-bp segment of DNA associated with an erythroid-specific DNase I-hypersensitive site (HS -40), upstream of the [alpha]-globin gene cluster, has been identified as the major tissue-specific regulator of the [alpha]-globin genes. However, this element does not direct copy number-dependent or developmentally stable expression of the human genes in transgenic mice. To determine whether additional upstream hypersensitive sites could provide more complete regulation of [alpha] gene expression, the authors have studied 17 lines of transgenic mice bearing various DNA fragments containing HSs -33, -10, -8, and -4, in addition to HS -40. Position-independent, high-level expression of the human [zeta]- and [alpha]-globin genes was consistently observed in embryonic erythroid cells. However, the additional HSs did not confer copy-number dependence, alter the level of expression, or prevent the variable down-regulation of expression in adults. These results suggest that the region upstream of the human [alpha]-globin genes is not equivalent to that upstream of the [beta] locus and that although the two clusters are coordinately expressed, there may be differences in their regulation.

Sharpe, J.A.; Vyas, P.; Higgs, D.R.; Wood, W.G. (Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)); Wells, D.J. (Royal Veterinary College, Royal College Street, London (United Kingdom)); Whitelaw, E. (Univ. of Sydney, Sydney (Australia))

1993-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Lyman-alpha Heating of Inhomogeneous High-redshift Intergalactic Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the epoch of reionization consists mostly of neutral hydrogen gas. Ly-alpha photons produced by early stars resonantly scatter off hydrogen atoms, causing energy exchange between the radiation field and the gas. This interaction results in moderate heating of the gas due to the recoil of the atoms upon scattering, which is of great interest for future studies of the pre-reionization IGM in the HI 21 cm line. We investigate the effect of this Ly-alpha heating in the IGM with linear density, temperature and velocity perturbations. Perturbations smaller than the diffusion length of photons could be damped due to heat conduction by Ly-alpha photons. The scale at which damping occurs and the strength of this effect depend on various properties of the gas, the flux of Ly-alpha photons and the way in which photon frequencies are redistributed upon scattering. To find the relevant length scale and the extent to which Ly-alpha heating affects perturbations, we calculate the gas ...

Oklopcic, Antonija

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effect of internal alpha radiation on borosilicate glass containing Savannah River Plant waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of internal alpha radiation on borosilicate glass, a perspective matrix for long-term storage of Savannah River Plant (SRP) radioactive waste, were evaluated in samples containing 45 wt % simulated waste (Fe(OH)/sub 3/--MnO/sub 2/) and either 0.5 wt % /sup 244/Cm or 1 wt % /sup 238/Pu. A glass containing /sup 238/Pu without waste was also studied for comparison. The glasses were examined for changes in physical stability, leachability, and dilatation. Alpha dose rates in the test glasses ranged from 4.5 x 10/sup 14/ to 1.3 x 10/sup 15/ alpha dis/(g-day). After 420 days, microcracks had formed; however, no macrostructural damage to the glasses was observed. Leachabilities for /sup 244/Cm and /sup 238/Pu were <7 x 10/sup -8/ g/(cm/sup 2/-day) and were not affected by the radiation. Continuous leaching by water for 5 days removed <10/sup -5/% of the isotopes. Alpha radiolysis caused expansion of the simulated-waste glasses in proportion to dose. Application of these results to glass containing radioactive Savannah River Plant waste indicated that internal alpha radiolysis will not cause detrimental effects during long-term storage (>10/sup 6/ years) of the waste glass.

Bibler, N.E.; Kelley, J.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Krein space related perturbation theory for MHD alpha-2-dynamos and resonant unfolding of diabolical points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectrum of the spherically symmetric alpha-2 dynamo is studied in the case of idealized boundary conditions. Starting from the exact analytical solutions of models with constant alpha-profiles a perturbation theory and a Galerkin technique are developed in a Krein-space approach. With the help of these tools a very pronounced alpha-resonance pattern is found in the deformations of the spectral mesh as well as in the unfolding of the diabolical points located at the nodes of this mesh. Non-oscillatory as well as oscillatory dynamo regimes are obtained. A Fourier component based estimation technique is developed for obtaining the critical alpha-profiles at which the eigenvalues enter the right spectral half-plane with non-vanishing imaginary components (at which overcritical oscillatory dynamo regimes form). Finally, Frechet derivative (gradient) based methods are developed, suitable for further numerical investigations of Krein-space related setups like MHD alpha-2-dynamos or models of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics.

Oleg Kirillov; Uwe Guenther

2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

Low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ({alpha}e) time coincidence method is applied to study the low-energy electron spectrum of a copper target bombarded by {alpha}-particles of {sup 238}Pu. Ionization of atoms bombarded by charged particles is considered as the shaking of electrons into the continuous spectrum due to a sudden perturbation by a flying particle. A comparison of experimental and calculated distributions showed good agreement, which confirms the accuracy of the ionization description as a result of the shaking effect.

Kupryashkin, V. T., E-mail: kupryashkinvt@yahoo.com; Sidorenko, L. P.; Feoktistov, A. I.; Rovenskykh, E. P. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Ukraine)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

The phonon density of states of {alpha}- {delta}-plutonium by inelastic x-ray scattering.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the phonon density of states (DOS) were performed on polycrystalline samples of pure {alpha}-Pu and {delta}-Pu{sub 0.98}Ga{sub 0.02} at room temperature. The heat capacity of {alpha}-Pu is well reproduced by contributions calculated from the measured phonon DOS plus conventional thermal-expansion and electronic contributions, showing that {alpha}-Pu is a 'well-behaved' metal in this regard. A comparison of the phonon DOS of the two phases at room temperature showed that the vibrational entropy difference between them is only a quarter of the total entropy difference expected from known thermodynamic measurements. The missing entropy is too large to be accounted for by conventional electronic entropy and evidence from the literature rules out a contribution from spin fluctuations. Possible alternative sources for the missing entropy are discussed.

Manley, M. E.; Said, A.; Fluss, M. J.; Wall, M.; Lashley, J. C.; Alatas, A.; Moore, K. T.; LLNL; LANL

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Synthesis of fine-grained .alpha.-silicon nitride by a combustion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion synthesis process for the preparation of .alpha.-silicon nitride and composites thereof is disclosed. Preparation of the .alpha.-silicon nitride comprises the steps of dry mixing silicon powder with an alkali metal azide, such as sodium azide, cold-pressing the mixture into any desired shape, or loading the mixture into a fused, quartz crucible, loading the crucible into a combustion chamber, pressurizing the chamber with nitrogen and igniting the mixture using an igniter pellet. The method for the preparation of the composites comprises dry mixing silicon powder (Si) or SiO.sub.2, with a metal or metal oxide, adding a small amount of an alkali metal azide such as sodium azide, introducing the mixture into a suitable combustion chamber, pressurizing the combustion chamber with nitrogen, igniting the mixture within the combustion chamber, and isolating the .alpha.-silicon nitride formed as a reaction product.

Holt, J. Birch (San Jose, CA); Kingman, Donald D. (Danville, CA); Bianchini, Gregory M. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

ISOTHERMAL (DELTA)/(ALPHA-PRIME) TRANSFORMATION AND TTT DIAGRAM IN A PLUTONIUM GALLIUM ALLOY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used as an alternative approach to determining the tine-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram for the martensitic delta to alpha-prime transformation in a Pu-2.0 at% Ga alloy. Previous work suggests that the TTT diagram for a similar alloy exhibits an unusual double-C curve for isothermal holds of less than 100 minutes. Here, we extend this diagram to 18 hours, and confirm the double-C curve behavior. When the sample is cooled prior to the isothermal holds, the delta to alpha-prime transformation is observed as several overlapping exothermic peaks. These peaks are very reproducible, and they are believed to be the result of different kinds of delta to alpha-prime martensitic transformation. This may be due to the presence of different nucleation sites and/or different morphologies.

Oudot, B P; Blobaum, K M; Wall, M A; Schwartz, A J

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper Northern Sky Survey of Galactic Ionized Hydrogen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) has completed a one-degree resolution, velocity-resolved northern sky survey of H-alpha emission from our Galaxy. The unprecedented sensitivity of the instrument and accurate spectral subtraction of atmospheric features allow us to detect Galactic features as faint as 0.1 Rayleighs (EM ~ 0.25 cm^{-6} pc). This survey allows a direct comparison of the ionized and neutral components of the ISM on a global scale for the first time. All-sky maps of H-alpha emission in select velocity bands highlight the rich kinematic structure of the Galaxy's ionized gas. The full set of data from the WHAM survey is now available at http://www.astro.wisc.edu/wham/. (abridged)

G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner; R. J. Reynolds

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

387

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

R. J. Reynolds; V. Chaudhary; G. J. Madsen; L. M. Haffner

2004-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

388

Unresolved H-Alpha Enhancements at High Galactic Latitude in the WHAM Sky Survey Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have identified 85 regions of enhanced H-Alpha emission at |b| > 10 degrees subtending approximately 1 degree or less on the Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) sky survey. These high latitude ``WHAM point sources'' have H-Alpha fluxes of 10^{-11} to 10^{-9} erg cm^-2 s^-1, radial velocities within about 70 km/s of the LSR, and line widths that range from less than 20 km/s to about 80 km/s (FWHM). Twenty nine of these enhancements are not identified with either cataloged nebulae or hot stars and appear to have kinematic properties that differ from those observed for planetary nebulae. Another 14 enhancements are near hot evolved low mass stars that had no previously reported detections of associated nebulosity. The remainder of the enhancements are cataloged planetary nebulae and small, high latitude H II regions surrounding massive O and early B stars.

Reynolds, R J; Madsen, G J; Haffner, L M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Varying couplings in the early universe: Correlated variations of {alpha} and G  

SciTech Connect

The cosmic microwave background anisotropies provide a unique opportunity to constrain simultaneous variations of the fine-structure constant {alpha} and Newton's gravitational constant G. Those correlated variations are possible in a wide class of theoretical models. In this brief paper we show that the current data, assuming that particle masses are constant, give no clear indication for such variations, but already prefer that any relative variations in {alpha} should be of the same sign of those of G for variations of {approx}1%. We also show that a cosmic complementarity is present with big bang nucleosynthesis and that a combination of current CMB and big bang nucleosynthesis data strongly constraints simultaneous variations in {alpha} and G. We finally discuss the future bounds achievable by the Planck satellite mission.

Martins, C. J. A. P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); CTC, DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Menegoni, Eloisa [ICRA, International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, University of Rome, 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Galli, Silvia [Physics Department and INFN, University of Rome, 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris Diderot, 75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); Mangano, Gianpiero [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, and Physics Department, University of Naples 'Federico II', Via Cintia, 80126 Naples (Italy); Melchiorri, Alessandro [Physics Department and INFN, University of Rome, 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Hwang, David Q. (Lawrencevill, NJ); Hovey, Jane (Plainsboro, NJ)

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

391

DEPENDENCE OF s-PROCESS NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN MASSIVE STARS ON TRIPLE-ALPHA AND {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O REACTION RATE UNCERTAINTIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the sensitivity of s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars to {+-}2{sigma} variations in the rates of the triple-{alpha} and {sup 12}C({alpha}, {gamma}){sup 16}O reactions. We simulated the evolution of massive stars from H burning through Fe-core collapse, followed by a supernova explosion. We found that the production factors of s-process nuclides between {sup 58}Fe and {sup 96}Zr change strongly with changes in the He burning reaction rates; using the Lodders solar abundances rather than those of Anders and Grevesse reduces s-process nucleosynthesis; later burning phases beyond core He burning and shell C burning have a significant effect on post-explosive production factors. We also discuss the implications of the uncertainties in the helium burning rates for evidence of a new primary neutron capture process (LEPP) in massive stars.

Tur, Clarisse; Austin, Sam M. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, 1 Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI 48824-1321 (United States); Heger, Alexander [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0149 (United States)], E-mail: tur@nscl.msu.edu, E-mail: austin@nscl.msu.edu, E-mail: alex@physics.umn.edu

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

392

Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

Chaudhuri, Shubhra, E-mail: schaudhuri@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); McCullough, Sandra S., E-mail: mcculloughsandras@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Hennings, Leah, E-mail: henningsleah@uams.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Letzig, Lynda [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Simpson, Pippa M., E-mail: psimpson@mcw.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Hinson, Jack A., E-mail: hinsonjacka@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); James, Laura P., E-mail: lameslaurap@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

On resonant excitations of high-n magnetohydrodynamic modes by energetic/alpha particles in tokamaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical theories for the excitations in tokamaks of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes with large toroidal mode numbers (n>>1) are presented. Specifically, only instability mechanisms due to resonances with energetic ions/alpha particles are considered. It is noted that, while trapped energetic particles contribute to the ideal region, circulating energetic particles contribute mainly to the singular layer dynamics. A unified dispersion relation manifesting both fishbone-like modes and beam transit-resonance modes is then driven. Finally, we also analyze the stability property of toroidicity-induced shear Alfven waves excited via transit resonances with alpha particles in ignited tokamaks. 11 refs.

Chen, Liu

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

ASSIMILATING DATA INTO AN {alpha}{Omega} DYNAMO MODEL OF THE SUN: A VARIATIONAL APPROACH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a variational data assimilation technique for the Sun using a toy {alpha}{Omega} dynamo model. The purpose of this work is to apply modern data assimilation techniques to solar data using a physically based model. This work represents the first step toward a complete variational model of solar magnetism. We derive the adjoint {alpha}{Omega} dynamo code and use a minimization procedure to invert the spatial dependence of key physical ingredients of the model. We find that the variational technique is very powerful and leads to encouraging results that will be applied to a more realistic model of the solar dynamo.

Jouve, Laurene [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, CNRS, IRAP, 31400 Toulouse (France); Brun, Allan Sacha [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, 91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Talagrand, Olivier [Laboratoire de meteorologie dynamique, UMR 8539, Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Proliferation of Estrogen Receptor alpha Positive Mammary Epithelial Cells is Restrained by TGFbeta1 in Adult Mice  

SciTech Connect

Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}1) is a potent inhibitor of mammary epithelial proliferation. In human breast, estrogen receptor {alpha} (ER{alpha}) cells rarely co-localize with markers of proliferation, but their increased frequency correlates with breast cancer risk. To determine whether TGF{beta}1 is necessary for the quiescence of ER{alpha}-positive population, we examined mouse mammary epithelial gland at estrus. Approximately 35% of cells showed TGF{beta}1 activation, which co-localized with nuclear receptor-phosphorylated Smad 2/3, indicating that TGF{beta} signaling is autocrine. Furthermore, nuclear Smad co-localized with nuclear ER{alpha}. To test whether TGF{beta} was functional, we examined genetically engineered mice with different levels of TGF{beta}1. ER{alpha} co-localization with markers of proliferation (i.e. Ki-67 or BrdU) at estrus was significantly increased in the mammary glands of Tgf{beta}1 C57/bl/129SV heterozygote mice. This relationship was maintained following pregnancy, but was absent at puberty. Conversely, mammary epithelial expression of constitutively active TGF{beta}1 via the MMTV promoter suppressed proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells. Thus, TGF{beta}1 activation functionally restrains ER{alpha} positive cells from proliferating in adult mammary gland. Accordingly, we propose that TGF{beta}1 dysregulation may promote proliferation of ER{alpha} positive cells associated with breast cancer risk in humans.

Ewan, Kenneth B.R.; Oketch-Rabah, Hellen A.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Shyamala, G.; Moses, Harold L.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

396

Balmer alpha emission and hydrogen atom energy in ion-source discharges  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line emission profiles from three types of neutral beam injector ion source plasmas (filling pressure approx. 10 mTorr, electron density approx. 1 to 2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/, electron temperature approx. 2 to 4 eV) is studied with the aid of a simple model for the neutral particle balance and H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission. A large fraction of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ is produced by dissociative excitation of H/sub 2/ and dissociative recombination of H/sub 2//sup +/, while the remainder is produced by excitation of H atoms, most of which have energies that are close to the characteristic H/sub 2/ dissociation energies. The H/sub ..cap alpha../ linewidth is thus insensitive to the discharge operating conditions and equals approx. 0.27 A when only slow (approx. 0.3 eV) dissociatively excited atoms are present or approx. 0.35 A when fast (> 1 eV) atoms, apparently also produced in dissociation reactions, are present as well.

McNeill, D.H.; Kim, J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Cosmological constraints from the CMB and Ly-alpha forest revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WMAP team has recently highlighted the usefulness of combining the Ly-alpha forest constraints with those from the cosmic microwave background (CMB). This combination is particularly powerful as a probe of the primordial shape of the power spectrum. Converting between the Ly-alpha forest observations and the linear mass power spectrum requires a careful treatment of nuisance parameters and modeling with cosmological simulations. We point out several issues which lead to an expansion of the errors, the two most important being the range of cosmological parameters explored in simulations and the treatment of the mean transmitted flux constraints. We employ a likelihood calculator for the current Ly-alpha data set based on an extensive 6-dimensional grid of simulations. We show that the current uncertainties in the mean transmission and the flux power spectrum define a degeneracy line in the amplitude-slope plane. The CMB degeneracy due to the primordial power spectrum shape follows a similar relation in this plane. This weakens the statistical significance of the primordial power spectrum shape constraints based on combined CMB+Ly-alpha forest analysis. Using the current data the simplest n=1 scale invariant model with dn/dln k=0 and no tensors has a Delta chi^2=4 compared to the best fitting model in which these 3 parameters are free. Current data therefore do not require relaxing these parameters to improve the fit.

Uros Seljak; Patrick McDonald; Alexey Makarov

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Agent Tcl: Alpha Release 1.1 Robert S. Gray \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agent Tcl: Alpha Release 1.1 Robert S. Gray \\Lambda Department of Computer Science Dartmouth College Hanover, NH 03755 E­mail: robert.s.gray@dartmouth.edu December 1, 1995 Abstract Agent Tcl is a transportable agent system. The agents are written in an extended version of the Tool Command Lanuage (Tcl

399

H{alpha} AND FREE-FREE EMISSION FROM THE WARM IONIZED MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect

Recent observations have found the ratio of H{alpha} to free-free radio continuum to be surprisingly high in the diffuse ionized interstellar medium (the so-called warm ionized medium), corresponding to an electron temperature of only {approx}3000 K. Such low temperatures were unexpected in gas that was presumed to be photoionized. We consider a three-component model for the observed diffuse emission, consisting of a mix of (1) photoionized gas, (2) gas that is recombining and cooling, and (3) cool H I gas. This model can successfully reproduce the observed intensities of free-free continuum, H{alpha}, and collisionally excited lines such as [N II]6583. To reproduce the low observed value of free-free to H{alpha}, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon abundance in the photoionized regions must be lowered by a factor {approx}3, and {approx}20% of the diffuse H{alpha} must be reflected from dust grains, as suggested by Wood and Reynolds.

Dong Ruobing; Draine, B. T. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

CANDIDATES OF H{alpha} EMITTING REGIONS IN THE MAGELLANIC STREAM IV CLOUD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From H{alpha} narrowband observations, we identified three H{alpha} emitting regions in the direction of Magellanic Stream IV (MS IV). They consist of three parallel filaments of 2 arcmin width and 6-30 arcmin length at 12 arcmin intervals. Their mean surface brightness (SB) is {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}. Because of their low SB, the regions were not detected in previous H{alpha} surveys. In the H I map, the position of the filaments overlap MS, suggesting that they are parts of the MS, but there also exists a local H I structure. If the filaments are associated with the MS, the sizes are 30 pc Multiplication-Sign 100-500 pc. The filaments lie at the leading edge of a downstream cloud, which supports shock heating and its propagation (shock cascade) model for the ionizing source. If they are local objects, on the other hand, Fossil Stroemgren Trails of more than two stars is a possible interpretation, and the sizes would be 0.1 pc Multiplication-Sign 0.3-1.5 pc at 180 pc distance. The positional information of the H{alpha} filaments presented in this Letter enables future spectroscopic observations to clarify their nature.

Yagi, Masafumi; Komiyama, Yutaka [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi, E-mail: YAGI.Masafumi@nao.ac.jp [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alpha excluding radon" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Enhanced E1 transitions and {alpha}-clustering in {sup 212}Po  

SciTech Connect

An {alpha}+{sup 208}Pb(0{sup +},3{sup -}) cluster model explains the recently observed enhanced E1 transitions from the new negative-parity levels to the yrast states in {sup 212}Po. Heavy and light nuclei present good examples of surface clustering and well-localized clustering.

Suzuki, Y. [Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ohkubo, S. [Department of Applied Science and Environment, Kochi Women's University, Kochi 780-8515 (Japan)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Gaseous ISM Observations with the Wisconsin $H-\\alpha$ Mapper (WHAM)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) is a new facility dedicated to the study of faint optical emission lines from diffuse interstellar gas. During its first 18 months of operation, WHAM carried out a survey of the interstellar H-alpha emission associated with the warm, ionized component of the interstellar medium. The observations consisted of 37,000 spectra obtained with a one degree diameter beam on a 0.98 X 0.85 degree grid (lxb), covering the sky above declination -30 degrees. This survey provides for the first time a detailed picture of the distribution and kinematics of the diffuse ionized hydrogen through the H-alpha line comparable to surveys of the neutral hydrogen obtained through the 21 cm line. Preliminary reduction of the data from selected portions of the sky reveal that the interstellar H II has a complex distribution, with long filaments and loop-like structures extending to high Galactic latitudes and superposed on a more diffuse background. Apart from the H-alpha sky survey, WHAM has also de...

Reynolds, R J; Tufte, S L

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Preponderance of Elastic Properties of Alpha Plutonium Measured Via Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of {alpha} plutonium were fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Plutonium Facility. Cylindrical samples were machined from cast pucks. Precision immersion density and resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) measurements were completed on 27 new samples, yielding elastic moduli measurements. Mechanical tests were performed in compression yielding stress-strain curves as a function of rate, temperature and phase.

Saleh, Tarik A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrow, Adam M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freibert, Franz J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Experimental investigations of electron capture from atomic hydrogen and deuterium by alpha particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have undertaken a program at the University of Missouri-Rolla to experimentally determine cross sections for ion-atom collisions of interest in fusion reactor development. During the last grant period, we have made measurements of total and singly-differential cross sections for the alpha double-capture reaction. He{sup ++} + He(ls{sup 2}) {yields} He({Sigma}n,{ell}) + He{sup ++}. Collisions of this type have been discussed as a basis for diagnostics in which alphas are neutralized in a single collisions either by a HeI beam or by the ablative cloud from mechanically introduced impurity pellets. We are now finishing measurements of cross sections for the alpha single capture reaction He{sup ++} + He(1s{sup 2}) {yields} He{sup +}(n) + He{sup +}(1s), and propose to study He{sup ++} + H(1s) {yields} He{sup +}(n) + H{sup +} during next year. Accurate knowledge of these cross sections is fundamental for modeling of neutral-hydrogen beam penetration in fusion plasmas as well as for spectroscopic diagnostics of alpha densities and velocity distributions, especially for the case of capture into the n = 4 state of the projectile He{sup +}. Our measurements are made using a unique collision spectrometer discussed in this paper.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Pairing and alpha-like quartet condensation in N=Z nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the treatment of isovector pairing by an alpha-like quartet condensate which conserves exactly the particle number, the spin and the isospin. The results show that the quartet condensate describes accurately the isovector pairing correlations in the ground state of systems with an equal number of protons and neutrons

N. Sandulescu; J. Dukelsky; D. Negrea

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

406

Calculation of the pulsed Feynman-alpha formulae and their experimental verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.elsevier.com/locate/anucene annals of NUCLEAR ENERGY #12;1. Introduction The theory of the Feynman-alpha method with pulsed sources,*, Y. Kitamura b , J. Wright a , T. Misawa c a Department of Reactor Physics, Chalmers University-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan c Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan

Pázsit, Imre

407

The Backward Theory of Feynman-and Rossi-Alpha Methods with Multiple Emission Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Backward Theory of Feynman- and Rossi-Alpha Methods with Multiple Emission Sources I. Pázsit* Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Reactor Physics SE-41296 Göteborg, Sweden and Y. Yamane Nagoya University, Department of Nuclear Engineering Furoh-cho, Chikusa-ku, 46401 Nagoya, Japan Received

Pázsit, Imre

408

Theory and Analysis of the Feynman-Alpha Method for Deterministically and Randomly Pulsed Neutron Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contract FIKW-CT-2000-00063. REFERENCES 1. R. UHRIG, Random Noise Techniques in Nuclear Reactor Systems. Conf. New Frontiers of Nuclear Technology: Reactor Phys- ics (PHYSOR 2002), Seoul, Korea, October 7 Determination in Accelerator Driven Nuclear Reactors by Statistics from Neutron Detectors ~Feynman-Alpha Method

Pázsit, Imre

409

On the Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta lines in solar coronal streamers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the formation of the H I Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta lines in an equatorial coronal streamer. Particular attention is paid to frequency redistribution for the scattering of the incident radiation. The properties of the spectral lines are studied. The coronal model is given by a global 2.5-D three fluid solar wind model with alpha particles. The emergent intensities and line profiles are calculated from the solution of the statistical equilibrium and radiative transfer equations for an hydrogen atom with 11 energy levels under non local thermodynamic equilibrium. The formation of the lines results from radiative excitation, collisional excitation, and takes into account the coupling with all other transitions between the hydrogen energy levels. We present new estimates of the radiative and collisional contributions of the Lyman line intensities within the streamer. It is also shown that within the streamer, the full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the Lyman-beta line is a better indicator of the plasma temperature than that of Lyman-alpha. These results show that care should be taken when inferring the proton temperature from the Lyman-alpha line profile as observed in coronal streamers, e.g. by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer or the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation experiments on board the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory.

Nicolas Labrosse; Xing Li; Bo Li

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Proton and Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission  

SciTech Connect

Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schroedinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster and proton radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A. [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Nuclear Physics, Odessa National Polytechnic University, Odessa (Ukraine); Mavrodiev, S. Cht. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Quantization in Classical Mechanics and Diffusion Mechanism of Alpha Decay, Cluster Radioactivity, Spontaneous Fission  

SciTech Connect

Based on the Chetaev generalized theorem the Schredinger equation as the stability condition of trajectories in classical dynamics in the presence of dissipative forces is derived. In the framework of this approach the alternative model for unified description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity and is developed. We show the possibility of the classical (without tunneling) description of radioactive decay of heavy nuclei, when the so called noise-induced transition or, in other words, the stochastic channel of radioactive decay conditioned by the Kramers diffusion mechanism is generated under certain conditions.Using the ENSDF nuclear data, we have found the parametrized solutions of the Kramers equation of the Langevin type by the Alexandrov dynamic auto-regularization method (REGN-Dubna program). These solutions describe with high-accuracy the dependences of half-life (the decay probability) of heavy radioactive nuclei on total kinetic energy of daughter decay products.Verification of the inverse problem solution in the framework of the universal Kramers description of alpha decay, spontaneous fission, cluster radioactivity, which based on the newest experimental data for alpha-decay of even-even superheavy nuclei (Z = 114, 116, 118), shows good coincidence of the experimental and theoretical dependences of half-life on alpha-decay energy.

Rusov, V. D.; Vlasenko, D. S.; Deliyergiyev, M. A. [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Nuclear Physics, Odessa National Polytechnic University, Odessa (Ukraine); Mavrodiev, S. Cht. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

Neumayer, P. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Basko, M. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich Supercomputing Center, Forschungzentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Inst. EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kazakov, E. [RRC Kurchatov Inst., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuehl, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Labaune, C. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rosmej, O. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, An. [ExtreMe Matter Inst. EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Modeling of non-stationary autoregressive alpha-stable processes by particle filters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the literature, impulsive signals are mostly modeled by symmetric alpha-stable processes. To represent their temporal dependencies, usually autoregressive models with time-invariant coefficients are utilized. We propose a general sequential Bayesian ... Keywords: Bayesian estimation techniques, Particle filtering, Skewed ?-stable distributions, Time varying autoregressive processes

Deniz Gença?a; Ay??n Ertüzün; Ercan E. Kuruo?lu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The luminescence characteristics of CsI(Na) crystal under {alpha} and X/{gamma} excitation  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the effective decay time characteristic of CsI(Na) crystal under {sup 239}Pu alpha particle and {sup 137}Cs gamma-ray excitation using a single photon counting decay time measurement system. The measurement system employs a silicon optical fiber to couple and transit single photon. The slow decay time component of CsI(Na) crystal is 460-550 ns. We observe a 15 ns fast decay component under alpha particle excitation. In addition, we find that the primary stage of the falling edge in the decay time curve is non-exponential and drops rapidly when CsI(Na) crystal is excited by {sup 239}Pu alpha particles. Since the high density of self-trapped-excitons (STEs) is produced in alpha particle excitation process, we propose that the fast falling edge is corresponding to the quenching process of STEs which transit with non-radiation in the case of high excitation density. To prove this proposal, we excited the CsI(Na) crystal with sub-nanosecond intensive pulsed X-ray radiation. Our X-ray impinging results show that the fast falling edge also exists under low energy (average 100 keV) bremsstrahlung X-ray excitation.

Liu Jinliang [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); Liu Fang [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Ouyang Xiaoping [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Liu Bin [School of Nuclear Science and Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Chen Liang; Ruan Jinlu; Zhang Zhongbing; Liu Jun [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710024 (China)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Theory of periodically pulsed Feynman-and Rossi-alpha methods Imre Pzsit and Andreas Enqvist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. I. PÁZSIT, L. PÁL, "Neutron Fluctuations ­ A Treatise on the Physics of Branching Processes@nephy.chalmers.se INTRODUCTION Methods based on the fluctuations in the number of detected neutrons in a subcritical system driven with an extraneous neutron source, such as the variance-to-mean (Feynman-alpha) or the correlation

Pázsit, Imre

416

COMPLETING THE CENSUS OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT THE REIONIZATION EPOCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carried out extended spectroscopic confirmations of Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z = 6.5 and 5.7 in the Subaru Deep Field. Now, the total number of spectroscopically confirmed LAEs is 45 and 54 at z = 6.5 and 5.7, respectively, and at least 81% (70%) of our photometric candidates at z = 6.5 (5.7) have been spectroscopically identified as real LAEs. We made careful measurements of the Ly{alpha} luminosity, both photometrically and spectroscopically, to accurately determine the Ly{alpha} and rest-UV luminosity functions (LFs). The substantially improved evaluation of the Ly{alpha} LF at z = 6.5 shows an apparent deficit from z = 5.7 at least at the bright end, and a possible decline even at the faint end, though small uncertainties remain. The rest-UV LFs at z = 6.5 and 5.7 are in good agreement, at least at the bright end, in clear contrast to the differences seen in the Ly{alpha} LF. These results imply an increase in the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium from z = 5.7 to 6.5. The rest-frame equivalent width (EW{sub 0}) distribution at z = 6.5 seems to be systematically smaller than z = 5.7, and it shows an extended tail toward larger EW{sub 0}. The bright end of the rest-UV LF can be reproduced from the observed Ly{alpha} LF and a reasonable EW{sub 0}-UV luminosity relation. Integrating this rest-UV LF provides the first measurement of the contribution of LAEs to the photon budget required for reionization. The derived UV LF suggests that the fractional contribution of LAEs to the photon budget among Lyman break galaxies significantly increases toward faint magnitudes. Low-luminosity LAEs could dominate the ionizing photon budget, though this inference depends strongly on the uncertain faint-end slope of the Ly{alpha} LF.

Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iye, Masanori [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Okamura, Sadanori [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Matsuda, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Egami, Eiichi; Jiang, Linhua [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Nagao, Tohru; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Shioya, Yasuhiro [Research Center for Space and Cosmic Evolution, Ehime University, Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami; Ota, Kazuaki [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-Ha, Kashiwa City, Chiba 77-8582 (Japan); Malkan, Matthew A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Hattori, Takashi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Ly, Chun [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Furusawa, Hisanori [Astronomy Data Center, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shibuya, Takatoshi; Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Toshikawa, Jun, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Plutonium-238 alpha-decay damage study of the ceramic waste form.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An accelerated alpha-decay damage study of a glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form has recently been completed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the physical and chemical durability of the waste form after significant exposure to alpha decay. This accelerated alpha-decay study was performed by doping the ceramic waste form with {sup 238}Pu which has a much greater specific activity than {sup 239}Pu that is normally present in the waste form. The alpha-decay dose at the end of the four year study was approximately 1 x 10{sup 18} alpha-decays/gram of material. An equivalent time period for a similar dose of {sup 239}Pu would require approximately 1100 years. After four years of exposure to {sup 238}Pu alpha decay, the investigation observed little change to the physical or chemical durability of the ceramic waste form (CWF). Specifically, the {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF maintained it's physical integrity, namely that the density remained constant and no cracking or phase de-bonding was observed. The materials chemical durability and phase stability also did not change significantly over the duration of the study. The only significant measured change was an increase of the unit-cell lattice parameters of the plutonium oxide and sodalite phases of the material and an increase in the release of salt components and plutonium of the waste form during leaching tests, but, as mentioned, these did not lead to any overall loss of waste form durability. The principal findings from this study are: (1) {sup 238}Pu-loaded CWF is similar in microstructure and phase composition to referenced waste form. (2) Pu was observed primarily as oxide comprised of aggregates of nano crystals with aggregates ranging in size from submicron to twenty microns in diameter. (3) Pu phases were primarily found in the intergranular glassy regions. (4) PuO phase shows expected unit cell volume expansion due to alpha decay damage of approximately 0.7%, and the sodalite phase unit cell volume has expanded slightly by 0.3% again, presumably due to alpha-decay damage. (5) No bulk sample swelling was observed. (6) No amorphization of sodalite or actinide bearing phases was observed after four years of alpha-decay damage. (7) No microcracks or phase de-bonding were observed in waste form samples aged for four years. (8) In some areas of the {sup 238}Pu doped ceramic waste form material bubbles and voids were found. Bubbles and voids with similar size and density were also found in ceramic waste form samples without actinide. These bubbles and voids are interpreted as pre-existing defects. However, some contribution to these bubbles and voids from helium gas can not be ruled out. (9) Chemical durability of {sup 238}Pu CWF has not changed significantly after four years of alpha-decay exposure except for an increase in the release of salt components and Pu. Still, the plutonium release from CWF is very low at less than 0.005 g/m{sup 2}.

Frank, S. M.; Barber, T. L.; Cummings, D. G.; DiSanto, T.; Esh, D.W.; Giglio, J. J.; Goff, K. M.; Johnson, S. G.; Kennedy, J. R.; Jue, J-F; Noy,M.; O'Holleran, T. P.; Sinkler, W.

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Mapping Neutral Hydrogen During Reionization with the Ly-alpha Emission from Quasar Ionization Fronts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new method to directly map the neutral-hydrogen distribution during the reionization epoch and to constrain the emission properties of the highest-redshift quasars (QSOs). As a tracer of HI, we propose to use the Ly-alpha radiation produced by quasar ionization fronts (I-fronts) that expand in the partially ionized intergalactic medium (IGM) before reionization is complete. These Ly-alpha photons are mainly generated by collisional excitations of hydrogen atoms in the boundary of the rapidly expanding HII region. The observable signal is produced by the part of the I-front that lies behind the QSO with respect to the observer. Combining two radiative transfer models (one for the QSO ionizing radiation and one for the Ly-alpha photons), we estimate the expected Ly-alpha spectral shape and surface brightness (SB) for a large number of configurations where we varied both the properties of the ionizing QSO and of the surrounding medium. We find that the expected signal is observable as a single (broad) emission line with a characteristic width of 100-200 km/s. The expected SB produced at redshift z~6.5 within a fully neutral region (at mean density) by a typical QSO I-front lies in the range $10^{-21}-10^{-20}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$ arcsec$^{-2}$ and decreases proportionally to $(1+z)^2$ for a given QSO age. QSOs with harder spectra may produce a significantly brighter emission at early phases. The signal may cover up to a few hundred square arcmin on the sky and should be already detectable with current facilities by means of moderate/high resolution spectroscopy. The detection of this Ly-alpha emission can shed new light on the reionization history, the age and the emission properties of the highest-redshift QSOs. (abridged)

Sebastiano Cantalupo; Cristiano Porciani; Simon J. Lilly

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of overburden, biomass and atmospheric inversions on energy and angular distributions of gamma rays from U, K, Th, and airborne radon sources. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a set of radiation transport calculations that were run with the AHISN S/sub n/ discrete ordinates code and a point kernel code to determine the energy, polar angle and height in air distributions of the total and direct gamma-ray flux densities from: (1) uranium sources of 3.2, 200 and 800 ppM in a sandstone orebody covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (2) thorium sources of 12, 25 and 80 ppM in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (3) potassium source (2.5 wt %) in a sandstone ore body covered with biomass densities of 0, 10.2, 20.4, 51.0 and 102.0 kg/m/sup 2/; (4) constant airborne source with height for no inversion and for inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (5) exponentially decreasing airborne source for no inversion and inversion layer heights of 65.22, 260.32 and 458.43 m; (6) 3.2 ppM uranium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; (7) 12 ppM thorium source in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm; (8) 2.5 wt % of potassium in overburden layers of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm thick; and (9) 3.2 ppM, 200 ppM, and 800 ppM uranium source in sandstone orebody covered with overburden thicknesses of 10.266, 17.110, 26.399 and 32.509 cm. Gamma-ray emission from the decay of natural uranium, thorium, radon, and potassium are given in a 45-energy group structure applicable to the energy windows used to map the potential uranium ore reserves.

Rubin, R.M.; Leggett, D.; Wells, M.B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Determining alpha-smooth muscle actin expression in embryonic and mesenchymal stem cells of assorted mammals seeded in collagen scaffolds in vitro  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Healing by contraction is responsible for scarring in adults. Embryos heal by regeneration but the mechanism is unknown. Alpha-smooth muscle actin ([alpha]-SMA) is the protein responsible for contraction, thus determining ...

Jennings, Edward B., III (Edward Bernard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the alpha-Helix to beta-Sheet Transition in Coiled Protein Filaments: Evidence for a Critical Filament Length Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The alpha-helix to beta-sheet transition (?-? transition) is a universal deformation mechanism in alpha-helix rich protein materials such as wool, hair, hoof, and cellular proteins. Through a combination of molecular and ...

Buehler, Markus J.

422

WHAM Observations of H$\\alpha$ Emission from High Velocity Clouds in the M, A, and C Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first observations of the recently completed Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) facility include a study of emission lines from high velocity clouds in the M, A, and C complexes, with most of the observations on the M I cloud. We present results including clear detections of H-alpha emission from all three complexes with intensities ranging from 0.06 R to 0.20 R. In every observed direction where there is significant high velocity H I gas seen in the 21 cm line we have found associated ionized hydrogen emitting the H-alpha line. The velocities of the H-alpha and 21 cm emission are well correlated in every case except one, but the intensities are not correlated. There is some evidence that the ionized gas producing the H-alpha emission envelopes the 21 cm emitting neutral gas but the H-alpha "halo", if present, is not large. If the H-alpha emission arises from the photoionization of the H I clouds, then the implied Lyman continuum flux F_{LC} at the location of the clouds ranges from 1.3 to 4.2 x 10^5 photons...

Tufte, S L; Haffner, L M

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Color transformations and bolometric corrections for Galactic halo stars: alpha-enhanced vs scaled-solar results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have performed the first extensive analysis of the impact of an [alpha/Fe]>0 metal distribution on broadband colors in the parameter space (surface gravity, effective temperature, metal content) covered by Galactic globular cluster stars.A comparison of updated and homogeneous ATLAS9 UBVRIJHKL synthetic photometry, for both alpha-enhanced and scaled-solar metal distributions, has shown that it is impossible to reproduce alpha-enhanced (B-V) and (U-B) color transformations with simple rescalings of the scaled-solar ones. At [Fe/H]$\\sim -$2.0 alpha-enhanced transformations are well reproduced by scaled-solar ones with the same [Fe/H], but this good agreement breaks down at [Fe/H] larger than about -1.6.As a general rule, (B-V) and (U-B) alpha-enhanced colors are bluer than scaled-solar ones at either the same [Fe/H] or [M/H], and the differences increase with increasing metallicity and decreasing T_eff. A preliminary analysis of the contribution of the various alpha elements to the stellar colors shows that the magnesium abundance (and to lesser extent oxygen and silicon) is the main responsible for these differences. On the contrary, the bolometric correction to the V band and more infrared colors predicted by alpha-enhanced transformations are well reproduced by scaled-solar results, due to their weak dependence on the metal content.Key parameters like the Turn Off and Zero Age Horizontal Branch V magnitudes, as well as the red Giant Branch tip I magnitude obtained from theoretical isochrones are in general unaffected when using the appropriate alpha-enhanced transformations in place of scaled-solar ones. We have also studied the effect of boundary conditions obtained from appropriate alpha-enhanced model atmospheres on the evolutionary tracks in the HR diagram.

Santi Cassisi; Maurizio Salaris; Fiorella Castelli; Adriano Pietrinferni

2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

424

Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay  

SciTech Connect

Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geochronology of recent sediments from the Cariaco Trench (Venezuela) by Alpha Spectrometry of {sup 210}Pb ({sup 210}Po)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

210Pb concentration in marine sediments of the Cariaco Trench (North-East of Venezuela) was measured through the analysis of 210Po alpha emissions, which can be assumed to be in secular equilibrium with 210Pb. The analysed sediment core has a length of 1.9 m. The results allowed to apply the CF:CS dating model (Constant Flux and Constant Supply). The sedimentation rate was estimated to be 0.25 cm/y. As far as we know this is the first {alpha}- dating carried out in the country, performed with an alpha spectrometer recently funded by the IAEA.

Arriojas, A.; Barros, H.; Palacios, D.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Hurtado, S.; Villa, M. [Centro de Investigacion, Tecnologia e Innovacion de la Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Perez, K.; Alfonso, J. [Centro de Quimica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

426

Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANL-2012-07-20 ANL-2012-07-20 Site: Argonne National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Dates of Activity : 07/17/2012 - 07/20/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to shadow the Argonne Site Office (ASO) Facility Representative (FR) performing a review of the technical safety requirements (TSRs) for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), a hazard category 2 nuclear facility. The ASO review evaluated the flow down of the TSRs into the facility documentation of surveillance procedures, datasheets, and the performance of the surveillance.

427

Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility, July 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL-2012-07-20 ANL-2012-07-20 Site: Argonne National Laboratory Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) Activity Report for Operational Awareness Oversight of the Argonne National Laboratory Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility Dates of Activity : 07/17/2012 - 07/20/2012 Report Preparer: Joseph P. Drago Activity Description/Purpose: The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to shadow the Argonne Site Office (ASO) Facility Representative (FR) performing a review of the technical safety requirements (TSRs) for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF), a hazard category 2 nuclear facility. The ASO review evaluated the flow down of the TSRs into the facility documentation of surveillance procedures, datasheets, and the performance of the surveillance.

429

Cosmological constraints from the CMB and Ly-alpha forest revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The WMAP team has recently highlighted the usefulness of combining the Ly-alpha forest constraints with those from the cosmic microwave background. This combination is particularly powerful as a probe of the primordial shape of the power spectrum. Converting between the Ly-alpha forest observations and the linear mass power spectrum requires a careful treatment of nuisance parameters and modeling with cosmological simulations. We point out several errors and inconsistencies in the previous treatments that propagate into the estimations and associated errors of cosmological parameters, including those reported by the WMAP team. The two most important are the insufficient range of cosmological parameters explored in simulations used to date and an incorrect treatment of the mean transmitted flux constraints. We employ a likelihood calculator for the current data set based on an extensive 6-dimensional grid of simulations. We show that the current uncertainties in the mean transmission and the flux power spectru...

Seljak, U; Makarov, A; Seljak, Uros; Donald, Patrick Mc; Makarov, Alexey

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

PROMETHEE: An Alpha Low Level Waste Assay System Using Passive and Active Neutron Measurement Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a passive-active neutron assay system for alpha low level waste characterization at the French Atomic Energy Commission is discussed. Less than 50 Bq[{alpha}] (about 50 {mu}g Pu) per gram of crude waste must be measured in 118-l 'European' drums in order to reach the requirements for incinerating wastes. Detection limits of about 0.12 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu in total active neutron counting, and 0.08 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu coincident active neutron counting, may currently be detected (empty cavity, measurement time of 15 min, neutron generator emission of 1.6 x 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} [4{pi}]). The most limiting parameters in terms of performances are the matrix of the drum - its composition (H, Cl...), its density, and its heterogeneity degree - and the localization and self-shielding properties of the contaminant.

Passard, Christian [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Mariani, Alain [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Jallu, Fanny [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Romeyer-Dherbey, Jacques [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Recroix, Herve [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Rodriguez, Michel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Loridon, Joel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Denis, Caroline [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Toubon, Herve [COGEMA (France)

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Undetected Sources Allow Transmission of the Lyman-alpha Line From Galaxies Prior to Reionization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of Lyman-alpha emission from galaxies at redshifts beyond z~6.5 should not be naively interpreted as implying that the intergalactic medium (IGM) had been reionized at higher redsifts. We show that a cluster of faint undetected sources around each observed galaxy generates an HII region sufficiently large to allow transmission of the galaxy's Lyman-alpha line prior to reionization. We also show that quasars may contribute a significant fraction of the ionizing photons to HII regions around galaxies with a velocity dispersion larger than ~100km/s. These contributing quasars are not usually seen due to the small fraction of time they spend in a luminous phase.

Stuart Wyithe; Abraham Loeb

2004-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Effects of a new 3-alpha reaction on the s-process in massive stars  

SciTech Connect

Effect of a new 3-alpha reaction rate on the s-process during the evolution of a massive star of 25 solar mass is investigated for the first time, because the s-process in massive stars have been believed to be established with only minor change. We find that the s-process with use of the new rate during the core helium burning is very inefficient compared to the case with the previous 3-alpha rate. However, the difference of the overproduction is found to be largely compensated by the subsequent carbon burning. Since the s-process in massive stars has been attributed so far to the neutron irradiation during core helium burning, our finding reveals for the first time the importance of the carbon burning for the s-process during the evolution of massive stars.

Kikuch, Yukihiro; Ono, Masaomi; Matsuo, Yasuhide; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro [Department of physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Department of physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kumamoto National College of Technology, Kumamoto 861-1102 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

433

WHAM Observations of H-alpha from High-Velocity Clouds Are They Galactic or Extragalactic?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been suggested that high velocity clouds may be distributed throughout the Local Group and are therefore not in general associated with the Milky Way galaxy. With the aim of testing this hypothesis, we have made observations in the H-alpha line of high velocity clouds selected as the most likely candidates for being at larger than average distances. We have found H-alpha</