National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for alpha excluding radon

  1. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  2. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  3. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  4. I. Excluded Volume Effects in Ising Cluster Distributions and Nuclear Multifragmentation II. Multiple-Chance Effects in Alpha-Particle Evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breus, Dimitry E.

    2005-05-16

    In Part 1, geometric clusters of the Ising model are studied as possible model clusters for nuclear multifragmentation. These clusters may not be considered as non-interacting (ideal gas) due to excluded volume effect which predominantly is the artifact of the cluster's finite size. Interaction significantly complicates the use of clusters in the analysis of thermodynamic systems. Stillinger's theory is used as a basis for the analysis, which within the RFL (Reiss, Frisch, Lebowitz) fluid-of-spheres approximation produces a prediction for cluster concentrations well obeyed by geometric clusters of the Ising model. If thermodynamic condition of phase coexistence is met, these concentrations can be incorporated into a differential equation procedure of moderate complexity to elucidate the liquid-vapor phase diagram of the system with cluster interaction included. The drawback of increased complexity is outweighted by the reward of greater accuracy of the phase diagram, as it is demonstrated by the Ising model. A novel nuclear-cluster analysis procedure is developed by modifying Fisher's model to contain cluster interaction and employing the differential equation procedure to obtain thermodynamic variables. With this procedure applied to geometric clusters, the guidelines are developed to look for excluded volume effect in nuclear multifragmentation. In part 2, an explanation is offered for the recently observed oscillations in the energy spectra of {alpha}-particles emitted from hot compound nuclei. Contrary to what was previously expected, the oscillations are assumed to be caused by the multiple-chance nature of {alpha}-evaporation. In a semi-empirical fashion this assumption is successfully confirmed by a technique of two-spectra decomposition which treats experimental {alpha}-spectra has having contributions from at least two independent emitters. Building upon the success of the multiple-chance explanation of the oscillations, Moretto's single-chance evaporation

  5. The relation of seismic activity and radon concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulali, Feride E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Akkurt, ?skender E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Vogiannis, Efstratios

    2014-10-06

    Radon, which is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation, reaches to surface as gas or dissolved form in the ground water. Emanation of radon can has a profile is disposed to increasing or decreasing depending on the effects of meteorological events or crust movements. In this work, the radon concentration in soil gas, which is transported from soil to AlphaGUARD, is continuously measured in Mytilene (Greece). A graph of radon concentration is prepared for comparison with simultaneous earthquake data. As a consequence of comparison, we determined that the radon concentration indicates anomalies before the earthquakes.

  6. Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schery, Stephen D., Wasiolek, Piotr; Rodgers, John

    1999-06-01

    Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

  7. Fernald radon stack monitor user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, C.R.

    1997-01-01

    The stack monitor uses long-range alpha detection (LRAD) technology for the measurement of radon levels in the stack emissions. The basic principle behind LRAD is the collection of ions created in air through the energy loss mechanisms of decay alphas. This is accomplished by establishing an electric field in the region where alpha decays will occur, and directing the ions via the field onto a biased plate. Accumulation of charge on the plate results in a current in the biasing circuit which can be read with a sensitive electrometer. In electrostatic LRAD designs, the linearity of the measured current with gross alpha activity is well-established. In order to determine radon-222 levels in the presence of other radon isotopes, it is necessary to perform some type of isotopic analysis on the stack samples. In the present case, other radon isotopes of possible concern are radon-219, which occurs in the decay chain of uranium-235, and radon-220, found in the decay chain of thorium-232. Radon-219, with a half-life of four seconds, presents no difficulty for the situation in which emanations from the vitrification process undergo as little as one minute of delay before release into the stack. For example, an initial concentration of 200,000 pCi/l of radon-219 decays to 5 pCi/l in one minute. Radon-220, however, has a half-life of about 55 seconds. If initially present in a substantial ratio to radon-222, a radon gross-alpha measurement on stack emissions would have a significant error if used as a measure for radon-222, even with many minutes of processing delay before the sample was taken.

  8. Use of MCNPX for Alpha Spectrometry Simulations of a Continuous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectrum in a Passive Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector, as modeled by MCNPX 1, ... PROGENY; RADIOISOTOPES; RADON; SILICON Alpha Spectrometry, Continuous Air ...

  9. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  10. Event counting alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  11. ARM - Campaign Instrument - radon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsradon Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Radon (RADON) Instrument Categories...

  12. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, L.

    1974-01-01

    A method of removing radon and radon daughter elements from an atmosphere containing these elements by passing the atmosphere through a bed of fluorinating compound whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. These fluorides adhere to the fluorinating compound and are thus removed from the atmosphere which may then be recirculated. A method for recovering radon and separating radon from its daughter elements is also described. (Official Gazette)

  13. Radon measurements at the FEMP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczak, L.M.; Daniels, R.D.; Dennis, C.; Glassey, H.G.; Lohner, W.G.; Ray, E.C.; Selasky, J.A.; Spitz, H.B.; Roush, K.

    1993-08-01

    Environmental radon monitoring activities at the DOE Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) have been conducted extensively since the early 1980`s. Monitoring has been conducted at ambient concentration levels (< 1 pCi/L Rn-222), inside buildings, and at significantly elevated levels (hundreds of thousands pCi/L Rn-222) within the K-65 silo that store concentrated radium bearing wastes. The purpose of this paper/presentation is to present and discuss some of the difficulties encountered/solutions (e.g. reliability, detection limits, affects of environmental factors, data transfer, etc.) that have been discovered while taking measurements using both alpha track-etch passive integrating detectors and alpha scintillation real-time detectors. A short summary and conclusion section is provided following each topic presented.

  14. ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _._-l"." .-_ "...",.,~~-- ORNL-5489 Radon and Radon Daughter Measurements at and near the Former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey F. F. Haywood P. T. Perdue D. J . Chris tian R. W . Leggett H. W . Dickson T. E. Myric k ,--___ . . . ^.. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical information Service US. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161 NTIS price codes-Printed Copy: A04 Microfiche A01 This

  15. Atmosphere purification of radon and radon daughter elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stein, L.

    1973-12-11

    A method for purifying an atmosphere of radon and radon daughter elements which may be contained therein by contacting the atmosphere with a fluorinating solution, whereby the radon and radon daughters are oxidized to their respective fluorides is discussed. The fluorides dissolve in the fluorinating solutlon and are removed from the atmosphere, which may then be recirculated. (Official Gazette)

  16. Studies on the reduction of radon plate-out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruemmer, M.; Nakib, M.; Calkins, R.; Cooley, J. Sekula, S.

    2015-08-17

    The decay of common radioactive gases, such as radon, produces stable isotopes by a sequence of daughter particles with varied half-lives. These daughter particles are a significant source of gamma, neutron, and alpha (α) particle backgrounds that can mimic desired signals in dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. In the LUMINA Laboratory at Southern Methodist University (SMU), studies of radon plate-out onto copper samples are conducted using one of XIA’s first five UltraLo 1800 alpha counters. We present results from investigations into various mitigation approaches. A custom-built copper holder (in either plastic or metal) has been designed and produced to maximize the copper’s exposure to {sup 220}Rn. The {sup 220}Rn source is a collection of camping lantern mantles. We present the current status of control and experimental methods for addressing radon exposure levels.

  17. Residential radon and lung cancer incidence in a Danish cohort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braeuner, Elvira V.; Andersen, Claus E.; Sorensen, Mette; Jovanovic Andersen, Zorana; Center for Epidemiology Screening, Department of Public Health, University of Copenhagen ; Gravesen, Peter; Ulbak, Kaare; Hertel, Ole; Pedersen, Camilla; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2012-10-15

    High-level occupational radon exposure is an established risk factor for lung cancer. We assessed the long-term association between residential radon and lung cancer risk using a prospective Danish cohort using 57,053 persons recruited during 1993-1997. We followed each cohort member for cancer occurrence until 27 June 2006, identifying 589 lung cancer cases. We traced residential addresses from 1 January 1971 until 27 June 2006 and calculated radon at each of these addresses using information from central databases regarding geology and house construction. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer risk associated with residential radon exposure with and without adjustment for sex, smoking variables, education, socio-economic status, occupation, body mass index, air pollution and consumption of fruit and alcohol. Potential effect modification by sex, traffic-related air pollution and environmental tobacco smoke was assessed. Median estimated radon was 35.8 Bq/m{sup 3}. The adjusted IRR for lung cancer was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.69-1.56) in association with a 100 Bq/m{sup 3} higher radon concentration and 1.67 (95% CI: 0.69-4.04) among non-smokers. We found no evidence of effect modification. We find a positive association between radon and lung cancer risk consistent with previous studies but the role of chance cannot be excluded as these associations were not statistically significant. Our results provide valuable information at the low-level radon dose range.

  18. Radon in multi-story residential buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mardis, H.M.; MacWaters, J.; Oswald, J.

    1991-12-01

    In September 1989, HUD signed an Interagency Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requesting EPA to measure radon levels and distribution patterns in several multi-story residential buildings. This study was conducted in two phases. The Phase 1 included walk-through investigations of each of the four test buildings. These preliminary investigations were focused on identifying site-specific characteristics that might influence radon entry and distribution. The results of these investigations were used to design and implement short-term screening measurements (diffusion barrier charcoal canisters) of each building's radon potential. Phase 2 consisted of long-term radon measurements with alpha track detectors (approximately 6 months) and investigations of the characteristics of each building. These measurements were made to address the possibility that long-term radon levels might be higher on upper floors than indicated by the short-term basement and ground-level screening tests. The report describes the investigations that were conducted, the data that were gathered for each building, and general observations and discussions about patterns of radon distribution in these specific buildings.

  19. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding ... This document contains the Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from ...

  20. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Gregory K.; Martz, Dowell E.

    1989-01-01

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinguishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts.

  1. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

    1988-06-27

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

  2. Construction and measurements of a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnee, R. W.; Bunker, R.; Ghulam, G.; Jardin, D.; Kos, M.; Tenney, A. S. [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY 13244 (United States)

    2013-08-08

    Long-lived alpha and beta emitters in the {sup 222}Rn decay chain on (and near) detector surfaces may be the limiting background in many experiments attempting to detect dark matter or neutrinoless double beta decay, and in screening detectors. In order to reduce backgrounds from radon-daughter plate-out onto the wires of the Beta Cage during its assembly, an ultra-low-radon cleanroom is being commissioned at Syracuse University using a vacuum-swing-adsorption radon-mitigation system. The radon filter shows ?20 reduction at its output, from 7.470.56 to 0.370.12 Bq/m{sup 3}, and the cleanroom radon activity meets project requirements, with a lowest achieved value consistent with that of the filter, and levels consistently < 2 Bq/m{sup 3}.

  3. "ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ENDING STOCKS OF CRUDE OIL (excluding SPR)" "Sourcekey","WCESTP11","WCESTP11","WCESTP21","... 1) Ending Stocks excluding SPR of Crude Oil (Thousand Barrels)","Weekly East Coast ...

  4. Evaluation Ratings Definitions (Excluding Utilization of Small...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Excluding Utilization of Small Business) Rating Definition Note Exceptional ... Definitions (Utilization of Small Business) Rating Definition Note Exceptional ...

  5. Microsoft Word - S02459_2006Annual GW Rpt.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    d Total gross alpha excluding radon which is lost during analysis. e Gross alpha minus uranium activity. Result rounded as appropriate. f Uranium activity greater than gross alpha. ...

  6. Complementary system for long term measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazur, J.; Kozak, K.

    2014-02-15

    A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up made it possible to perform 4–6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions.

  7. Radon Dose Determination for Cave Guides in Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thinova, Lenka; Rovenska, Katerina

    2008-08-07

    According to recommended approach there are six (from total of twelve) open-to-public caves in Czech Republic, reaching near to an effective lung-dose of 6mSv/year. A conservative approach for estimating the potential effective lung-dose in caves (or underground) is based on two season's measurements, using solid state alpha track detector (Kodak in plastic diffusion chamber). The obtained dataset is converted into an annual effective dose, in agreement with the ICRP65 recommendation, using the 'cave factor' 1.5. The value of 'cave factor' which depends on the spectrum of aerosol particles, or on the proportional representation of the unattached/attached ratio (6.5 : 93.5 for residential places, 13.6 : 86.4 for caves due to lower concentration of free aerosols) and on the equilibrium factor. Thus conversion factor is 1.5 times higher in comparison with ICRP 65. Is this correct? Because a more precisely determined dose value would have a significant impact on radon remedies, or on restricting the time workers stay underground, a series of measurement was initiated in 2003 with the aim to specify input data, computation and errors in effective dose assessment in each one of the evaluated caves separately. The enhancement of personal dosimetry for underground work places includes a study of the given questions, from the following points of view in each cave: continual radon measurement; regular measurements of radon and its daughters to estimate the equilibrium factor and the presence of free {sup 218}Po; regular indoor air flow measurements to study the location of the radon supply and its transfer among individual areas of the cave; natural radioactive element content evaluation in subsoil and in water inside/outside, a study of the radon sources in the cave; determination of the free fraction from continual unattached and attached fraction measurement (grid and filter); thoron measurement. Air flow measurements provide very interesting information about the origin

  8. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  9. Radon-related backgrounds in the LUX dark matter search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Akerib, D. S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Arajo, H. M. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Bailey, A. J. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Balajthy, J. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bernard, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Byram, D. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Cahn, S. B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Carmona-Benitez, M. C. [Univ. of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Chan, C. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Chapman, J. J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Chiller, A. A. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Chiller, C. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Coffey, T. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Currie, A. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); de Viveiros, L. [Univ. of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Dobi, A. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Dobson, J. [Univ. of Edingburg, Edinburg (United Kingdom); Druszkiewicz, E. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Edwards, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Faham, C. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fiorucci, S. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Flores, C. [Univ. of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Gaitskell, R. J. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Gehman, V. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ghag, C. [Univ. College London, London (United Kingdom); Gibson, K. R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Gilchriese, M. G.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Hall, C. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Hertel, S. A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Horn, M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Huang, D. Q. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Ihm, M. [Univ. of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jacobsen, R. G. [Univ. of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kazkaz, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Knoche, R. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Larsen, N. A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lee, C. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Lindote, A. [Univ. of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Lopes, M. I. [Univ. of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Malling, D. C. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Mannino, R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); McKinsey, D. N. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Mei, D. -M. [Univ. of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD (United States); Mock, J. [Univ. of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Moongweluwan, M. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Morad, J. [Univ. of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Murphy, A. St.J. [Univ. of Edingburg, Edinburg (United Kingdom); Nehrkorn, C. [Univ. of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Nelson, H. [Univ. of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Neves, F. [Univ. of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal); Ott, R. A. [Univ. of California, Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Pangilinan, M. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Parker, P. D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Pease, E. K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Pech, K. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Phelps, P. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Reichhart, L. [Univ. College London, London (United Kingdom); Shutt, T. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Silva, C. [Univ. of Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-01-01

    The LUX detector is currently in operation at the Davis Campus at the 4850 level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD to directly search for WIMP dark matter. Knowing the type and rate of backgrounds is critical in a rare, low energy event search, and LUX was designed, constructed, and deployed to mitigate backgrounds, both internal and external. An important internal background are decays of radon and its daughters. These consist of alpha decays, which are easily tagged and are a tracer of certain backgrounds, and beta decays, some of which are not as readily tagged and present a background for the WIMP search. We report on studies of alpha decay and discuss implications for the WIMP search.

  10. Radon-related backgrounds in the LUX dark matter search

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bradley, A.; Akerib, D. S.; Araújo, H. M.; Bai, X.; Bailey, A. J.; Balajthy, J.; Bernard, E.; Bernstein, A.; Byram, D.; Cahn, S. B.; et al

    2015-01-01

    The LUX detector is currently in operation at the Davis Campus at the 4850’ level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD to directly search for WIMP dark matter. Knowing the type and rate of backgrounds is critical in a rare, low energy event search, and LUX was designed, constructed, and deployed to mitigate backgrounds, both internal and external. An important internal background are decays of radon and its daughters. These consist of alpha decays, which are easily tagged and are a tracer of certain backgrounds, and beta decays, some of which are not as readily taggedmore » and present a background for the WIMP search. We report on studies of alpha decay and discuss implications for the WIMP search.« less

  11. Alpha Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments

  12. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. ... MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; RADON; SILICON air monitoring, radon, algorithm, PIPS, ...

  13. Problems Found Using a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted planar silicon (PIPS) detector. ... MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; RADON; SILICON air monitoring, radon, algorithm, PIPS, ...

  14. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  15. Use of MCNPX for Alpha Spectrometry Simulations of a Continuous Air Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hayes, Craig Marianno

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the alpha energy spectrum in a Passive Implanted Planar Silicon (PIPS) detector, as modeled by MCNPX [1], can be used to design a radon stripping algorithm for a continuous air monitor (CAM). This stripping algorithm would be employed to discriminate naturally occurring radioisotopes from the anthropogenic for nuclear safety -related applications. It is hoped that using an algorithm based on MCNPX simulations, the CAM will not be prone to false alarms when radon levels are dynamic as identified in other CAM systems [2,3]. This work is focused on the design of the next generation air particulate detector (NGAPD) for the United States Navy. The primary isotope of interest is Co-60. This radionuclide emits a beta with an average energy of 96 keV. Therefore, once deposited on the CAM filter, it will produce a beta continuum seen by the PIPS detector. In addition, as radon progeny is deposited on the air filter, these will give rise to characteristic alpha peaks and a beta continuum. This is primarily an issue in port-or land-based applications. Ultimately, measurement of a radon alpha spectrum is desired to predict the amount of beta activity which would be measured from the radon progeny decay chains. All excess beta activity could then be attributed to anthropogenic sources once the radon progeny contributions have been stripped out.

  16. Radon and radon daughter measurements at and near the former Middlesex Sampling Plant, Middlesex, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, F.F.; Perdue, P.T.; Christian, D.J.; Leggett, R.W.; Dickson, H.W.; Myrick, T.E.

    1980-03-01

    The results of the radon and radon daughter measurements made to date (1978) at the Middlesex Sampling Plant in Middlesex, New Jersey, are presented in this report. These measurements were one portion of a more comprehensive radiological survey conducted at this site and the surrounding area from 1976 to 1978. The surveyed property served as a uranium ore sampling plant during the 1940's and early 1950's and as a result contains elevated levels of surface an subsurface contamination. On-site indoor radon daughter and radon concentrations exceeded both the US Surgeon General Guidelines and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's maximum permissible concentration limits for radon (10 CFR Part 20) in all structures surveyed. Off-site structures showed concentrations of radon and radon daughters at or only slightly above background levels, except for one site where the radon levels were found to be above the 10 CFR Part 20 guidelines. Outdoor radon ad radon daughter concentrations, measured both on and off the site, were well below the guidelines, and the data give no indication of significant radon transport from the site.

  17. Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

    1982-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

  18. Radiological risk assessment of environmental radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid, Norafatin; Majid, Amran Ab; Yahaya, Redzuwan; Yasir, Muhammad Samudi

    2013-11-27

    Measurements of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) in the environmental are important to assess indoor air quality and to study the potential risk to human health. Generally known that exposure to radon is considered the second leading cause of lung cancer after smoking. The environmental radon concentration depends on the {sup 226}Ra concentration, indoor atmosphere, cracking on rocks and building materials. This study was carried out to determine the indoor radon concentration from selected samples of tin tailings (amang) and building materials in an airtight sealed homemade radon chamber. The radiological risk assessment for radon gas was also calculated based on the annual exposure dose, effective dose equivalent, radon exhalation rates and fatal cancer risk. The continuous radon monitor Sun Nuclear model 1029 was used to measure the radon concentration emanates from selected samples for 96 hours. Five types of tin tailings collected from Kampar, Perak and four samples of building materials commonly used in Malaysia dwellings or building constructions were analysed for radon concentration. The indoor radon concentration determined in ilmenite, monazite, struverite, xenotime and zircon samples varies from 219.6 76.8 Bq m{sup ?3} to 571.1 251.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 101.0 41.0 Bq m{sup ?3} to 245.3 100.2 Bq m{sup ?3}, 53.1 7.5 Bq m{sup ?3} to 181.8 9.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, 256.1 59.3 Bq m{sup ?3} to 652.2 222.2 Bq m{sup ?3} and 164.5 75.9 Bq m{sup ?3} to 653.3 240.0 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. Whereas, in the building materials, the radon concentration from cement brick, red-clay brick, gravel aggregate and cement showed 396.3 194.3 Bq m{sup ?3}, 192.1 75.4 Bq m{sup ?3}, 176.1 85.9 Bq m{sup ?3} and 28.4 5.7 Bq m{sup ?3}, respectively. The radon concentration in tin tailings and building materials were found to be much higher in xenotime and cement brick samples than others. All samples in tin tailings were exceeded the action level for radon gas of 148 Bq m

  19. National radon database documentation. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: Year 4. Final report 1986-1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The National Radon Database has been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to distribute information collected in two recently completed radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys, Years 1 to 6; and The National Residential Radon Survey. The goals of the state radon surveys were twofold. Some measure of the distribution of radon levels among residences was desired for major geographic areas within each state and for each state as a whole. In addition, it was desired that each state survey would be able to identify areas of potentially high residential radon concentrations (hot spots) in the state, enabling the state to focus its attention on areas where indoor radon concentrations might pose a greater health threat. The document discusses year 4, 1989-90. The areas surveyed are: California; Hawaii; Idaho; Louisiana; Nebraska; Billings, MT IHS Area; Nevada; North Carolina; Oklahoma; South Carolina; and Navajo Nation.

  20. Occupant radon exposure in houses with basements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franklin, E.M.; Fuoss, S.

    1995-12-31

    This study compares basement and main-level radon exposure based on bi-level week-long radon measurements, occupancy and activity data collected in normal use during heating and non-heating seasons in a geographically-stratified random sample of about 600 Minnesota homes, in response to critiques of radon measurement protocol. Basement radon (RN1) (M=4.5, SD=4.5) and main level (Rn2)(M=2.9, SD=3.4) correlation was 0.8 (p=.00), including seasonal variation. In a 101-house subsample where Rn1 >=4.0 pCi/L and Rn2 <=3.9 pCi/L, maximum household exposure in basements was 1162 pCiHrs (M=120, Sd=207), main-level 2486 pCiHrs (M-434, SD=421). In same households, persons with most basement-time maxed 100 hrs (M=13,SD=23), persons with most main-level time maxed 160 hrs (M=79, SD=39). Basement activities show two patterns, (1) member used it for personal domain, e.g. sleeping, and (2) household used it for general activities, e.g. TV or children`s play. Basement occupancy justifies measurement of radon in the lowest livable housing level.

  1. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Radon free storage container and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langner, Jr., G. Harold; Rangel, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    A radon free containment environment for either short or long term storage of radon gas detectors can be provided as active, passive, or combined active and passive embodiments. A passive embodiment includes a resealable vessel containing a basket capable of holding and storing detectors and an activated charcoal adsorbing liner between the basket and the containment vessel wall. An active embodiment includes the resealable vessel of the passive embodiment, and also includes an external activated charcoal filter that circulates the gas inside the vessel through the activated charcoal filter. An embodiment combining the active and passive embodiments is also provided.

  3. Study of the radon released from open drill holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacer, J C

    1981-06-01

    The radon emanating from three open drill holes was measured at a site of known uranium mineralization in the Red Desert of south central Wyoming. The radon flux from the soil and drill holes was measured by the accumulator method with activated charcoal cartridges. The surface soil was found to release radon at an average rate of 0.41 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec; the radon emanating from the holes was more variable than that from the soil. The three holes studied released an average of 47 atoms/cm/sup 2//sec of radon. This average is equivalent to the radon released to the atmosphere by 14.5 ft/sup 2/ of soil. The data indicate that the radon emanated from an open drill hole is not as significant as other possible activities at a drill site (i.e. digging a trench or drilling a hole) or from household activities involving the usage of water.

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NEPA » National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorically Excluded Actions Categorical Exclusions (CX) - Categorical exclusions are categories of actions that DOE has determined, by regulation, do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment and for which neither an environmental assessment nor an environmental impact statement is typically required. Title

  5. Low-cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Building America research team Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofits conducted a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation and living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois, area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity measurements. Blower door and zone pressure diagnostics were conducted at each house. The treatments consisted of using air-sealing foams at the underside of the floor that separated the living space from the foundation and providing duct sealing on the ductwork that is situated in the foundation area. The hypothesis was that air sealing the floor system that separated the foundation from the living space should better isolate the living space from the foundation; this isolation should lead to less radon entering the living space from the foundation. If the hypothesis had been proven, retrofit energy-efficiency programs may have chosen to adopt these isolation methods for enhanced radon protection to the living space.

  6. Study of the atmospheric chemistry of radon progeny in laboratory and real indoor atmospheres. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-09-01

    This report completes Clarkson University`s study of the chemical and physical behavior of the {sup 218}Po atom immediately following its formation by the alpha decay of radon. Because small changes in size for activity in the sub-10 nm size range result in large changes in the delivered dose per unit exposure, this behavior must be understood if the exposure to radon progeny and it dose to the cells in the respiratory tract are to be fully assessed. In order to pursue this general goal, two areas of radon progeny behavior are being pursued; laboratory studies under controlled conditions to better understand the fundamental physical and chemical processes that affect the progeny`s atmospheric behavior and studies in actual indoor environments to develop a better assessment of the exposure of the occupants of that space to the size and concentration of the indoor radioactive aerosol. Thus, two sets of specific goals have been established for this project. The specific tasks of the controlled laboratory studies are (1) Determine the formation rates of {circ}OH radicals formed by the radiolysis of air following radon decay; (2) Examine the formation of particles by the radiolytic oxidation of substances like SO{sub 2}, ethylene, and H{sub 2}S to lower vapor pressure compounds and determine the role of gas phase additives such as H{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3} in determining the particle size; (3) Measure the rate of ion-induced nucleation using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber, and (4) Measure the neutralization rate of {sup 218}PoO{sub x}{sup +} in O{sub 2} at low radon concentrations.

  7. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xin; Do, Changwoo; Liu, Yun; Hong, Kunlun; Smith, Greg; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffnessmore » of its constituent branch.« less

  8. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xin [ORNL; Do, Changwoo [ORNL; Liu, Yun [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Smith, Greg [ORNL; Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    In this work we present a new model for the form factor of a star polymer consisting of self-avoiding branches. This new model incorporates excluded volume effects and is derived from the two point correlation function for a star polymer.. We compare this model to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements from polystyrene (PS) stars immersed in a good solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). It is shown that this model provides a good description of the scattering signature originating from the excluded volume effect and it explicitly elucidates the connection between the global conformation of a star polymer and the local stiffness of its constituent branch.

  9. Radon exhalation rates from some soil samples of Kharar, Punjab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Vimal; Singh, Tejinder Pal; Chauhan, R. P.; Mudahar, G. S.

    2015-08-28

    Radon and its progeny are major contributors in the radiation dose received by general population of the world. Because radon is a noble gas, a large portion of it is free to migrate away from radium. The primary sources of radon in the houses are soils and rocks source emanations, emanation from building materials, and entry of radon into a structure from outdoor air. Keeping this in mind the study of radon exhalation rate from some soil samples of the Kharar, Punjab has been carried out using Can Technique. The equilibrium radon concentration in various soil samples of Kharar area of district Mohali varied from 12.7 Bqm{sup −3} to 82.9 Bqm{sup −3} with an average of 37.5 ± 27.0 Bqm{sup −3}. The radon mass exhalation rates from the soil samples varied from 0.45 to 2.9 mBq/kg/h with an average of 1.4 ± 0.9 mBq/kg/h and radon surface exhalation rates varied from 10.4 to 67.2 mBq/m{sup 2}/h with an average of 30.6 ± 21.8 mBq/m{sup 2}/h. The radon mass and surface exhalation rates of the soil samples of Kharar, Punjab were lower than that of the world wide average.

  10. A radon progeny deposition model (Journal Article) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    by the long half life (22 y) of sup 210Pb on sensitive locations of a detector. ... RADIATION; CLEAN ROOMS; DEPOSITION; HALF-LIFE; PROGENY; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADON; ...

  11. Radon diffusion through multilayer earthen covers: models and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, D.W.; Oster, C.A.; Nelson, R.W.; Gee, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    A capability to model and analyze the fundamental interactions that influence the diffusion of radon gas through uranium mill tailings and cover systems has been investigated. The purpose of this study is to develop the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion and to develop an understanding of the fundamental interactions that influence radon diffusion. This study develops the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion in one, two and three dimensions. The theory has been incorporated into three computer models that are used to analyze several tailings and cover configurations. This report contains a discussion of the theoretical basis for modeling radon diffusion, a discussion of the computer models used to analyze uranium mill tailings and multilayered cover systems, and presents the results that have been obtained.

  12. Invited Article: In situ comparison of passive radon-thoron discriminative monitors at subsurface workplaces in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvsi, Norbert; Social Organization for Radioecological Cleanliness, Veszprm ; Vigh, Tams; Manganese Mining Process Ltd., rkt ; Nmeth, Csaba; University of Pannonia, Veszprm ; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Omori, Yasutaka; Janik, Miroslaw; Yonehara, Hidenori

    2014-02-15

    radon data acquired by CF monitors at subsurface workplaces to gain comparable data for SF monitors. In the case of thoron, the data were unreliable and no significant tendency was seen during the comparison therefore comparison of previously obtained thoron data acquired by either CF or SF is doubtful. There was probable influence by relative humidity on the detection response; however, the effects of the high wind speed and elevated aerosol concentration could not be excluded. The results of this study call attention to the importance of calibration under extreme environmental conditions and the need for using reliable radon-thoron monitors for subsurface workplaces.

  13. Nationwide occurrence of radon and other natural radioactivity in public water supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horton, T. R.

    1985-10-01

    The nationwide study, which began in November of 1980, was designed to systematically sample water supplies in all 48 contiguous states. The results of the study will be used, in cooperation with EPA's Office of Drinking Water, to estimate population exposures nationwide and to support possible future standards for radon, uranium, and other natural radioactivity in public water supplies. Samples from more than 2500 public water supplies representing 35 states were collected. Although we sampled only about five percent of the total number of groundwater supplies in the 48 contiguous states of the US, those samples represent nearly 45 percent of the water consumed by US groundwater users in the 48 contiguous states. Sample results are summarized by arithmetic mean, geometric mean, and population weighted arithmetic mean for each state and the entire US. Results include radon, gross alpha, gross beta, Ra-226, Ra-228, total Ra, U-234, U-238, total U, and U-234/U-238 ratios. Individual public water supply results are found in the appendices. 24 refs., 91 figs., 51 tabs.

  14. Destilaria Alpha | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alpha Jump to: navigation, search Name: Destilaria Alpha Place: Claudio, Minas Gerais, Brazil Product: Brazil based ethanol producer. References: Destilaria Alpha1 This article...

  15. ARM - Field Campaign - Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2008) govCampaignsRadon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX 2008) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX) 2006.11.01, Fischer, SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX 2008) 2008.04.01 - 2009.03.31 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Abstract At present, uncertainty in vertical mixing

  16. Radon Measurements of Atmospheric Mixing (RAMIX) 2006-2014 Final...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The radioisotope radon-222 (222Rn) is a valuable tracer for measuring atmospheric mixing because it is emitted from the land surface and has a short enough half-life (3.8 days) to ...

  17. Scattering from Colloid-Polymer Conjugates with Excluded Volume Effect

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Xin; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E.; Smith, Gregory Scott; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2015-01-13

    This work presents scattering functions of conjugates consisting of a colloid particle and a self-avoiding polymer chain as a model for protein-polymer conjugates and nanoparticle-polymer conjugates in solution. The model is directly derived from the two-point correlation function with the inclusion of excluded volume effects. The dependence of the calculated scattering function on the geometric shape of the colloid and polymer stiffness is investigated. The model is able to describe the experimental scattering signature of the solutions of suspending hard particle-polymer conjugates and provide additional conformational information. This model explicitly elucidates the link between the global conformation of a conjugatemore » and the microstructure of its constituent components.« less

  18. Scattering from Colloid-Polymer Conjugates with Excluded Volume Effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xin [ORNL; Sanchez-Diaz, Luis E [ORNL; Smith, Gregory Scott [ORNL; Chen, Wei-Ren [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This work presents scattering functions of conjugates consisting of a colloid particle and a self-avoiding polymer chain as a model for protein-polymer conjugates and nanoparticle-polymer conjugates in solution. The model is directly derived from the two-point correlation function with the inclusion of excluded volume effects. The dependence of the calculated scattering function on the geometric shape of the colloid and polymer stiffness is investigated. The model is able to describe the experimental scattering signature of the solutions of suspending hard particle-polymer conjugates and provide additional conformational information. This model explicitly elucidates the link between the global conformation of a conjugate and the microstructure of its constituent components.

  19. Radon in energy-efficient earth-sheltered structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.

    1983-05-01

    Exposure o the radioactive-decay products of radon 222 that are present in indoor air constitutes the most-significant radiation dose received by the general population in most countries. Indoor concentrations vary from one building to another, ranging from insignificant to very high levels that cause radiation doses higher than those experienced by uranium miners. This wide range of concentrations is attributable to variability in the rate at which radon enters buildings, and differences in the ventilation rate. Earth-sheltered dwellings, because they are more completely surrounded by earth material than other structures, have an as yet unquantified potential for having radon entry rates that are higher than typical for other houses in the region. Moreover, measures that save energy by reducing ventilation rates (for example by reducing infiltration) can also raise indoor radon concentrations. For these reasons a significant effort is needed to determine the potential for ventilation-reducing measures and earth sheltering to increase radon concentrations, especially in regions where they are already high. Where necessary, proper attention to specific design features that affect radon entry rates or residence time indoors should be adequate to avoid undue risk to the public.

  20. Development of an Innovative, High-Efficiency Radon Fan | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy an Innovative, High-Efficiency Radon Fan Development of an Innovative, High-Efficiency Radon Fan Mechanical Solutions Inc. will use the latest modeling techniques, in combination with decades of experience and market leader Fantech, to produce a high-efficiency radon fan design. Source: Mechanical Solutions Inc. Mechanical Solutions Inc. will use the latest modeling techniques, in combination with decades of experience and market leader Fantech, to produce a high-efficiency radon fan

  1. HEALTH PHYSICS SOCIETY - ENVIRONMENTAL/RADON SECTION ANNOUNCEMENT OF SPONSORED SCHOLARSHIP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEALTH PHYSICS SOCIETY - ENVIRONMENTAL/RADON SECTION ANNOUNCEMENT OF SPONSORED SCHOLARSHIP Tim Jannik, Environmental/Radon Section President The HPS Environmental/Radon Section is dedicated to promoting students within our discipline. To this end, the Environmental/Radon section is proud to announce the F. Ward Whicker Scholarship. This scholarship will provide $2,000 per year ($1,000 for the first semester and $1,000 for the second semester-dependent on successful completion of the first

  2. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  3. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  4. Multi-parametric approach towards the assessment of radon and thoron progeny exposures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rosaline E-mail: rosaline.mishra@gmail.com; Sapra, B. K.; Mayya, Y. S.

    2014-02-15

    Conventionally, the dosimetry is carried out using radon and thoron gas concentration measurements and doses have been assigned using assumed equilibrium factors for the progeny species, which is inadequate pertaining to the variations in equilibrium factors and possibly due to significant thoron. In fact, since the true exposures depend upon the intricate mechanisms of progeny deposition in the lung, therefore an integrated approach for the assessment of progeny is essential. In this context, the recently developed deposition based progeny concentration measurement techniques (DTPS: Direct Thoron progeny sensors and DRPS: Direct Radon progeny sensors) appear to be best suited for radiological risk assessments both among occupational workers and general study populations. DTPS and DRPS consist of aluminized mylar mounted LR115 type passive detectors, which essentially detects the alpha particles emitted from the deposited progeny atoms on the detector surface. It gives direct measure of progeny activity concentrations in air. DTPS has a lower limit of detection limit of 0.1?Bq/m{sup 3} whereas that for DRPS is 1 Bq/m{sup 3}, hence are perfectly suitable for indoor environments. These DTPS and DRPS can be capped with 200-mesh type wire-screen to measure the coarse fraction of the progeny concentration and the corresponding coarse fraction deposition velocities as well as the time integrated fine fraction. DTPS and DRPS can also be lodged in an integrated sampler wherein the wire-mesh and filter-paper are arranged in an array in flow-mode, to measure the fine and coarse fraction concentration separately and simultaneously. The details are further discussed in the paper.

  5. Modeling surface backgrounds from radon progeny plate-out

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perumpilly, G.; Guiseppe, V. E.; Snyder, N. [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)] [University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States)

    2013-08-08

    The next generation low-background detectors operating deep underground aim for unprecedented low levels of radioactive backgrounds. The surface deposition and subsequent implantation of radon progeny in detector materials will be a source of energetic background events. We investigate Monte Carlo and model-based simulations to understand the surface implantation profile of radon progeny. Depending on the material and region of interest of a rare event search, these partial energy depositions can be problematic. Motivated by the use of Ge crystals for the detection of neutrinoless double-beta decay, we wish to understand the detector response of surface backgrounds from radon progeny. We look at the simulation of surface decays using a validated implantation distribution based on nuclear recoils and a realistic surface texture. Results of the simulations and measured ? spectra are presented.

  6. Portable apparatus for the measurement of environmental radon and thoron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Negro, Vincent C.

    2001-01-01

    The radometer is a portable instrument for the measurement of the concentration of atmospheric radon/thoron in a test area. A constant velocity pump pulls the air from the outside at a constant flow rate. If the air is too moist, some or all of the sample is passed through a desiccant filter prior to encountering an electrostatic filter. The electrostatic filter prevents any charged particles from entering the sampling chamber. Once the sample has entered the chamber, the progeny of the decay of radon/thoron are collected on a detector and measured. The measured data is compiled by a computer and displayed.

  7. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Ajay Sharma, Sumit

    2015-08-28

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  8. Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2010-09-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  9. Radon Reduction Experience at a Former Uranium Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eger, K. J.; Rutherford, L.; Rickett, K.; Fellman, R.; Hungate, S.

    2004-02-29

    Approximately 6,200 cubic meters of waste containing about 2.0E8 MBq of radium-226 are stored in two large silos at the Fernald Site in southwest Ohio. The material is scheduled for retrieval, packaging, off site shipment and disposal by burial. Air in the silos above the stored material contained radon-222 at a concentration of 7.4 E5 Bq/L. Short-lived daughters formed by decay in these headspaces generated dose rates at contact with the top of the silos up to 1.05 mSv/hr and there complicate the process of retrieval. A Radon Control System (RCS) employing carbon adsorption beds has been designed under contract with the Fluor Fernald to remove most of the radon in the headspaces and maintain lower concentrations during periods when work on or above the domes is needed. Removing the radon also removes the short-lived daughters and reduces the dose rate near the domes to 20 to 30 {mu}Sv/hr. Failing to remove the radon would be costly, in the exposure of personnel needed to work extended periods at these moderate dose rates, or in dollars for the application of remote retrieval techniques. In addition, the RCS minimizes the potential for environmental releases. This paper describes the RCS, its mode of operation, and early experiences. The results of the test described herein and the experience gained from operation of the RCS during its first phase of continuous operation, will be used to determine the best air flow, and air flow distribution, the most desirable number and sequence number and sequence of adsorption beds to be used and the optimum application of air recycle within the RCS.

  10. Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

    1983-03-01

    This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

  11. Link Alpha U

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    u A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Unconscious Bias University/Hill Operations Center (Biosciences

  12. Link Alpha Y

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    y A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Year End Close

  13. Link Alpha Z

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    z A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Zimride Zip + 4 (Zip codes for Berkeley Lab)

  14. Link Alpha K

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    k A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Key Plans: Building Floor Plans Key Request: Facilities Lock Shop

  15. Link Alpha V

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    v A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Vacation Policy Vanpool Commuting Program for Employees...

  16. Radon induced surface contaminations in low background experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattavina, L. [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)] [INFN - Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, I-67010 Assergi (AQ) (Italy)

    2013-08-08

    In neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches, one of the main issues is to increase the experimental sensitivity through careful material selection and production, minimizing the background contributions. In order to achieve the required, extremely low, counting rates, very stringent requirements must be fulfilled in terms of bulk material radiopurity. As the experimental sensitivity increases, the bulk impurities in the detector components decrease, and surface contaminations start to play an increasingly significant role In fully active detectors, like cryogenic particle detectors, surface contaminations are a critical issue (as shown by the CUORICINO experiment). {sup 222}Rn is by far the most intense source of airborne radioactivity, and if a radio-pure material is exposed to environment where the Radon concentration is not minimized, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po contaminations can occur. The mechanisms and the dynamics of Radon-induced surface contaminations are reviewed, and specific solutions to prevent and to reject the induced background are presented.

  17. Effects of excluded volume and correlated molecular orientations on Frster resonance energy transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Mino

    2014-04-14

    Frster theory for the survival probability of excited chromophores is generalized to include the effects of excluded volume and orientation correlation in the molecular distribution. An analytical expression for survival probability was derived and written in terms of a few simple elementary functions. Because of the excluded volume, the survival probability exhibits exponential decay at early times and stretched exponential decay at later times. Experimental schemes to determine the size of the molecular excluded volume are suggested. With the present generalization of theory, we analyzed vibrational resonance energy transfer kinetics in neat water. Excluded volume effects prove to be important and slow down the kinetics at early times. The majority of intermolecular resonance energy transfer was found to occur with exponential kinetics, as opposed to the stretched exponential behavior predicted by Frster theory. Quantum yields of intra-molecular vibrational relaxation, intra-, and intermolecular energy transfer were calculated to be 0.413, 0.167, and 0.420, respectively.

  18. Link Alpha Q

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    q A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Qualified Electrical Worker (QEW) Qualified Electrical Worker (QEW) Support Quality Assurance Quickbase (Electrical Safety Database)

  19. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  20. Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed.

  1. Surface alpha clustering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rotter, I.

    1983-05-01

    The problem of alpha decay is discussed on the basis of a theory which describes discrete and continuous states in a unified manner. A formula for numerical calculations is given in which configurational mixing as well as channel coupling is taken into account. The R-matrix approximation is shown to be justified if the width is spread over a small number of decay channels. Generally, renormalization of the wave function is necessary if a factorization of the width is assumed. The importance of channel coupling for the case of a small reduced width is discussed.

  2. Link Alpha R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    r A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Radiation Protection Group (EH&S) Radiation Safety Committee Charter Radiation Safety Committee Members Receiving Recovery Act (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) Recruitment Recycling (Waste Minimization) Reflective X-Ray Optics Renewable Energy Report Coordination Report Submission and Search Reporting Portal (Cognos) (FY15+) Reporting Portal (Cognos) Help &

  3. Link Alpha S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    s A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Safety Advisory Committee Safety and Hazardous Waste (Facilities Division) Safety Awards Safety Concerns Safety Culture Improvement Safety Data Sheets (SDS) Safety Walkthrough Management Salary Ranges Salvage (Waste Minimization) Scientific Cluster Support Scientific Networking Division Scientific Programs Seaborg: Glenn Seaborg's Life & Contributions Search lab-wide web

  4. Link Alpha T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    t A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Tax Services Technical Area Designation Technology Transfer Department (Innovation and Partnerships Office) Technology Transfer Ombudsman Telecommuting Telemetry Database Telephone Service Center Termination Termination Notification System (TNS) Today at Berkeley Lab Tours of Berkeley Lab for the Public Traffic Safety Training (Berkeley Lab Training) Transit Passes

  5. Link Alpha W

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    w A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z WageWorks Commuter Benefits for Lab Employees Walkthrough (Safety Management) Warehouse: see Off-site Storage Waste (Recycling and Composting) Waste Guide Waste Management Waste Minimization (Hazardous Waste) Weather Conditions at LBNL Web Job Order (WJO) Whistleblower Online Reporting Whistleblower Policy Windchill (Windchill Account Required, contact cad@lbl.gov) Windows

  6. Link Alpha A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z ABPDU (Advanced Biofuels Process Demonstration Unit) Accelerator Technology and Applied Physics Division (ATAP) Accident Report (Motor Vehicle) Accident Statistics Accident Statistics Archive Accommodations: Motels, Hotels and Housing for Visitors and Guests Accounts (new computer accounts) Accounts Payable (Disbursements)(processes payments and maintains records) Activity

  7. Link Alpha B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Back-Up Dependent (Child & Elder) Care Program Backups for Computers Backups for PC and Mac (self-service using Carbonite) Badge Office BASE (Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects) BELLA (Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator) Benefits Berkeley Center for Structural Biology(BCSB) Berkeley Lab 75th Anniversary Site Berkeley Lab Energy and Environmental Research Blog Berkeley Lab

  8. Link Alpha C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    c A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Cafeteria: Laboratory Cafeteria menu Calendar Calendar of Events Calendaring FAQ Cancer & Carcinogens: Carcinogenic Potency Database Project Carbon Cycle 2.0 Careers Carpooling Catalog: Berkeley Lab Scientific and Technical Reports Catalog (1989 to present) Catastrophic Leave Sharing Catering CATS (Corrective Action Tracking System) CCSE: Center for Computational Sciences

  9. Link Alpha E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    e A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Early Career Research Program Earth And Environmental Sciences Area eBuy (Firefox Recommended Browser) Ecology Department (EESA) Economic Impact Study ECR Ion Sources Educational Programs at the Lab EH&S Safety Training Electric Vehicle Charging Electrical Equipment Safety Program (EESP) Electrical Safety Manual Electrical Safety Program (PUB-3000 Chapter 8) Electrical

  10. Link Alpha F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    f A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Facilities Division Facilities Lockshop Facilities Project Status Facilities Safety and Hazardous Waste Facilities Work Request Center Family Member Eligibility Verification Project FAQ on Computing Topics Financial Compliance Financial Management System (FMS 8.8 - FY14 and Prior) Financial Management System (FMS 9.2 - FY15+) Financial Management System (FMS) Help &

  11. Link Alpha G

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    g A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Gate Pass and Visitor Request Form (accessible only from onsite hosts) visitorpass.lbl.gov Gcal (Google Calendar) Gender Transition Guidelines, Workplace General Accounting Genome: DOE Joint Genome Institute Genomics: Visualization Tool for Alignments (VISTA) Geochemistry Department (EESA) Geophysics Department (EESA) GERT - General Employee Radiological Training (English)

  12. Link Alpha H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    h A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Hands-on Universe (HOU) Program Harassment Prevention and Harassment Complaint Process HARP Hazard Management System (HMS) Hazardous Waste Requisition Health Services at the Lab (or call x6266) Heat Island Research Group Helios - harnessing the sun for a secure, sustainable, and prosperous future Help Desk (or call x4357) High Performance Computing Research Department Hire

  13. Link Alpha I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    i A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Image Library Project Images - Release for Non-commercial Use Imaging and Distributed Computing Group (Home of the Whole Frog Project) Immigration Services Implicit Bias Improper Governmental Activities Reporting Incident Notification/Contact x6999 Indoor Air Quality Scientific Findings Resource Bank Indoor Air Quality, Inside Information Industrial Energy Analysis Industry

  14. Link Alpha J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    j A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z JBEI: Joint BioEnergy Institute JCAP: Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis JDEM: The Joint Dark Energy Mission JGI: Joint Genome Institute Job Descriptions Job Hazards Analysis (JHA Help Center) Job Hazards Analysis (JHA Login page) Job Opening Request Jobs

  15. Link Alpha L

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    l A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z LabAlert - LabAlert Emergency Alerting Service Laboratory Counsel Laboratory Directed Research & Development Program (LDRD) Laboratory Property Review (LPR) Laboratory Support Services Lactation / Nursing Moms Lactation Accommodation Program Laser Ablation: Advanced Laser Technologies Lab Laser Management System (Laser Inventory) Laser Safety Web Page Lasers, Optical

  16. Link Alpha M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    m A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Macintosh User Group (LBNL-MUG) Mail Services (Facilities Dep't.) Malware/Virus Protection and Prevention Mammary: Human Mammary Epithelial Cell (HMEC) Map: Berkeley Lab Global Talent Map Map: Lab Shuttle Bus Map Maps: Berkeley Lab Interactive Site Map Maps: Berkeley Lab Printable Site Map Massage Material Safety Data Sheets (Safety Data Sheets, SDS) Material Transfer

  17. Link Alpha N

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    n A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z National Health Survey NERSC: National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center Network Research Group New Employee Briefing New Employee Orientation & Training New Hire Request News Center News Releases: Subscribe to Lab News Email list Nobel Laureates Nondisclosure Agreements Notaries Public Nuclear Science Division (NSD) Nuclear Science: Relativistic Nuclear

  18. Link Alpha O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Occurrence Reporting Off-site Storage Office of Contractor Assurance (OCA) Office of Institutional Assurance and Integrity (OIAI) Office of Planning and Strategic Development Office of Sponsored Projects and Industry Partnerships (OSPIP) - see OSPIP / IPO / OCFO Transition Office of the Chief Financial Officer (OCFO) Ombudsman - Technology Transfer / Innovation and

  19. Use of a Radon Stripping Algorithm for Retrospective Assessment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    using a commercial alpha and beta spectroscopy system employing a passive implanted ... FLOW; ALGORITHMS; BETA SOURCES; BETA SPECTROSCOPY; EVALUATION; MODIFICATIONS; PROGENY; ...

  20. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  1. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  2. RADON PROGENY AS AN EXPERIMENTAL TOOL FOR DOSIMETRY OF NANOAEROSOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruzer, Lev; Ruzer, Lev S.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-02-25

    The study of aerosol exposure and dosimetry measurements and related quantitation of health effects are important to the understanding of the consequences of air pollution, and are discussed widely in the scientific literature. During the last 10 years the need to correlate aerosol exposure and biological effects has become especially important due to rapid development of a new, revolutionary industry ?-- nanotechnology. Nanoproduct commerce is predicted to top $1 trillion by 2015. Quantitative assessment of aerosol particle behavior in air and in lung deposition, and dosimetry in different parts of the lung, particularly for nanoaerosols, remains poor despite several decades of study. Direct measurements on humans are still needed in order to validate the hollow cast, animal studies, and lung deposition modeling. We discuss here the use of nanoscale radon decay products as an experimental tool in the study of local deposition and lung dosimetry for nanoaerosols. The issue of the safe use of radon progeny in such measurements is discussed based on a comparison of measured exposure in 3 settings: general population, miners, and in a human experiment conducted at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland. One of the properties of radon progeny is that they consist partly of 1 nm radioactive particles called unattached activity; having extremely small size and high diffusion coefficients, these particles can be potentially useful as radioactive tracers in the study of nanometer-sized aerosols. We present a theoretical and experimental study of the correlation between the unattached activity and aerosol particle surface area, together with a description of its calibration and method for measurement of the unattached fraction.

  3. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  4. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Wolf, Michael A.; McAtee, James L.; Unruh, Wesley P.; Cucchiara, Alfred L.; Huchton, Roger L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  5. Evaluation of three passive-integrating charcoal detectors for measuring radon concentrations. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, D.L.

    1990-03-01

    Three types of passive-integrating detectors that determine Radon-222 (Radon) concentrations in air samples were studied. Each detector type examined uses activated charcoal to adsorb radon from air samples that enter through a diffusion barrier. This results in a time-integrated sample. The three detector types analyzed were liquid-scintillation vials and canisters with and without moisture-absorbing desiccant. The LS vials contain a mixture of charcoal and desiccant. All three types of detectors were calibrated in a chamber of known radon concentration. Since the LS vials had not previously been studied at AFIT, the optimum procedure for exposing, processing, and counting the vials was established. An automated liquid-scintillation counter (LSC) was used for determining the radon levels of the LS vials. The variability in the radon concentrations computed by the LSC for repeated counting of a single vial was examined and was found to be between 1 and 4%. Reproducibility of radon adsorption by a group of vials exposed simultaneously was examined. Reproducibility values for a group of ten vials counted for 4 cycles had a standard error of 1.4%. A blind test was performed where the detectors were exposed to a known concentration, prepared, counted, and then the concentrations measured were compared to actual values. The measured values were within 0.2% to about 8% of the actual concentrations. Exposure times of 24 to 48 hours were recommended for the vials and 3 to 7 days for the canisters.

  6. The Effect of Steady Winds on Radon-222 Entry from soil into houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Bonnefous, Y.C.; Nazaroff, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    Wind affects the radon-222 entry rate from soil into buildings and the resulting indoor concentrations. To investigate this phenomenon, we employ a previously tested three-dimensional numerical model of soil-gas Bow around houses, a commercial computational fluid dynamics code, an established model for determining ventilation rates in the presence of wind, and new wind tunnel results for the ground-surface pressure field caused by wind. These tools and data, applied under steady-state conditions to a prototypical residential building, allow us (1) to determine the complex soil-gas flow patterns that result from the presence of wind-generated ground-surface pressures, (2) to evaluate the effect of these flows on the radon concentration in the soil, and (3) to calculate the effect of wind on the radon entry rate and indoor concentration. For a broad range of soil permeabilities, two wind speeds, and two wind directions, we quantify the"flushing" effect of wind on the radon in the soil surrounding a house, and the consequent sharp decrease in radon entry rates. Experimental measurements of the time-dependent radon concentration in soil gas beneath houses confirm the existence of wind-induced flushing. Comparisons are made to modeling predictions obtained while ignoring the effect of the wind-generated ground-surface pressures. These investigations lead to the conclusion that wind-generated ground-surface pressures play a significant role in determining radon entry rates into residential buildings. [References: 26

  7. A generic biokinetic model for noble gases with application to radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Marsh, James; Gregoratto, Demetrio; Blanchardon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The International Commission for Radiological Protection (ICRP) currently uses a dose conversion coefficient to calculate effective dose per unit exposure to radon and its progeny. The coefficient is derived by dividing the detriment associated with unit exposure to radon, as estimated from epidemiological studies, by the detriment per unit effective dose, as estimated mainly from atomic bomb survivor data and animal studies. In a recent statement the ICRP indicated that future guidance on exposure to radon and its progeny will be developed in the same way as guidance for any other radionuclide. That is, intake of radon and progeny will be limited on the basis of effective dose coefficients derived from biokinetic and dosimetric models. This paper proposes a biokinetic model for systemic (absorbed) radon for use in the calculation of dose coefficients for inhaled or ingested radon. The model is based largely on physical laws governing transfer of a non-reactive and soluble gas between materials. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with results of controlled studies of the fate of internally deposited radon in human subjects.

  8. Link Alpha D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    d A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Data Center Energy Management Data Management Research and Development Group Data Science and Technology Department Daughters and Sons to Work Day at the Lab Daylighting the New York Times Headquarters Building DC Power for Data Centers of the Future Demand Response Research Center Dental Plans: Phone & Contact Info for UC Dental Plans Directions on How to Get to the Lab

  9. Potential Radon-222 Emissions from the Thorium Nitrate Stockpile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, J.W.

    2003-09-04

    The Defense National Stockpile Center (DNSC), a field level activity of the Defense Logistics Agency, has stewardship of a stockpile of thorium nitrate that has been in storage for decades. The thorium nitrate stockpile was produced from 1959 to 1964 for the Atomic Energy Commission and previously has been under the control of several federal agencies. The stockpile consists of approximately 7 million pounds of thorium nitrate crystals (hydrate form) stored at two depot locations in the United States (75% by weight at Curtis Bay, Maryland, and 25% by weight at Hammond, Indiana). The material is stored in several configurations in over 21,000 drums. The U.S. Congress has declared the entire DNSC thorium nitrate stockpile to be in excess of the needs of the Department of Defense. Part of DNSC's mission is to safely manage the continued storage, future sales, and/or disposition of the thorium nitrate stockpile. Historically, DNSC has sold surplus thorium nitrate to domestic and foreign companies, but there is no demand currently for this material. Analyses conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2001 demonstrated that disposition of the thorium nitrate inventory as a containerized waste, without processing, is the least complex and lowest-cost option for disposition. A characterization study was conducted in 2002 by ORNL, and it was determined that the thorium nitrate stockpile may be disposed of as low-level waste. The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was used as a case study for the disposal alternative, and special radiological analyses and waste acceptance requirements were documented. Among the special radiological considerations is the emission of {sup 220}Rn and {sup 222}Rn from buried material. NTS has a performance objective on the emissions of radon: 20 pCi m{sup -2} sec{sup -1} at the surface of the disposal facility. The radon emissions from the buried thorium nitrate stockpile have been modeled. This paper presents background information and summarizes

  10. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. Radon and helium in soil gases in the Phlegraean Fields, central Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardi, S. ); Reimer, G.M. )

    1990-05-01

    The distribution and migration of radon and helium soil-gas concentrations in the Phlegraean Fields, Italy, are controlled by the tectonic features of the area. Radon is supplied from surficial sources and helium has both surficial and deep origins. There is no direct correlation between the two noble gases on a point-to-point basis but the areal distribution of both gases is similar, suggesting that the distribution is controlled primarily by fractures and movement of geothermal fluids.

  12. Development of a system to perform, record, and analyze measurements of radon concentrations on a large scale. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, W.D.

    1990-10-01

    A system to process large numbers of radon samples of buildings on Wright-Patterson AFB was developed. The method for measuring the radon concentrations indoors have been developed previously by AFIT students; however, an integrated system was required to not only collect data but save and access data as well. A survey form based on the EPA's national radon survey form was designed and used to gather information on each building, including possible radon sources and methods of distribution. A large database was set up to facilitate storage of the information collected. Several programs were written to handle input, manipulation, and output of the data. A general user's manual was written to explain how the entire system and each program may be used. Some base buildings were tested and evaluated for indoor radon concentrations, in order to demonstrate the operation of the system. Most buildings tested had radon concentrations below the EPA's action level.

  13. Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W J

    1996-05-01

    Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

  14. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404). Environmental guidance program reference book: Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  15. Industrial Technology of Decontamination of Liquid Radioactive Waste in SUE MosSIA 'Radon' - 12371

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, Dmitry V.; Neveykin, Petr P.; Karlin, Yuri V.; Savkin, Alexander E. [SUE MosSIA 'Radon', 7th Rostovsky lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    SUE MosSIA 'RADON' - this enterprise was created more than 50 years ago, which deals with the recycling of radioactive waste and conditioning of spent sources of radiation in stationary and mobile systems in the own factory and operating organizations. Here is represented the experience SUE MosSIA 'Radon' in the field of the management with liquid radioactive waste. It's shown, that the activity of SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is developing in three directions - improvement of technical facilities for treatment of radioactive waters into SUE MosSIA 'RADON' development of mobile equipment for the decontamination of radioactive waters in other organizations, development of new technologies for decontamination of liquid radioactive wastes as part of various domestic Russian and international projects including those related to the operation of nuclear power and nuclear submarines. SUE MosSIA 'RADON' has processed more than 270 thousand m{sup 3} of radioactive water, at that more than 7000 m{sup 3} in other organizations for more than 50 years. It is shown that a number of directions, particularly, the development of mobile modular units for decontamination of liquid radioactive waste, SUE MosSIA 'RADON' is a leader in the world. (authors)

  16. The ORNL Indoor Air Quality Study: Re-cap, Context, and Assessment on Radon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonn, Bruce Edward; Rose, Erin M.; Ternes, Mark P.

    2015-10-01

    As part of the retrospective evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy s low-income Weatherization Assistance Program that was led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), an assessment of the impacts of weatherization on indoor air quality (IAQ) was conducted. This assessment included nearly 500 treatment and control homes across the country. Homes were monitored for carbon monoxide, radon, formaldehyde, temperature and humidity pre- and post-weatherization. This report focuses on the topic of radon and addresses issues not thoroughly discussed in the original IAQ report. The size, scope and rigor of the radon component of the IAQ study are compared to previous studies that assessed the impacts of weatherization on indoor radon levels. It is found that the ORNL study is by far the most extensive study conducted to date, though the ORNL results are consistent with the findings of the other studies. However, the study does have limitations related to its reliance on short-term measurements of radon and inability to attribute changes in radon levels in homes post-weatherization to specific weatherization measures individually or in combination.

  17. Effect of radon transport in groundwater upon gamma-ray borehole logs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.H.; Rachiele, R.; Smith, A.

    1980-09-01

    Granitic rock at an experimental waste storage site at Stripa, Sweden, is unusually high in natural radioelements (40 ppM uranium) with higher concentrations occurring locally in thin chloritic zones and fractures. Groundwater seeping through fractures into open boreholes is consequently highly anomalous in its radon content, with activity as high as one microcurie per liter. When total count gamma-ray logs are run in boreholes where groundwater inflow is appreciable, the result is quite unusual: the radon daughter activity in the water adds considerably to the contribution from the rock, and in fact often dominates the log response. The total gamma activity increases where radon-charged groundwater enters a borehole, and remains at a high level as the water flows along the hole in response to the hydraulic gradient. As a consequence, the gamma log serves as a flow profile, locating zones of water entry (or loss) by an increase (or decrease) in the total gamma activity. A simple model has been developed for flow through a thin crack emanating radon at a rate E showing that the radon concentration of water entering a hole is E/..lambda..h, where ..lambda.. is the radon decay rate and h the crack aperture, assuming that the flow rate and crack source area are such that an element of water resides within the source area for several radon half-lives or more. Concentration measurements can provide a measurement of the inflow rate. Data from the 127-mm holes in the time-scale drift behave in this fashion.

  18. Effects of finite sampling and additive noise on image reconstruction from Radon transform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, E.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    The Radon transform arises naturally in the problem of reconstructing an image or cross section from line integral measurements through a specified object. Each line integral or ray is a sample of the Radon transform of the object and the set of all samples at a particular angle is called a projection or view. Consequently, the set of all possible samples at all possible projections in a particular plane constitutes the two-dimensional Radon transform. Of course, it is impossible to acquire an infinite number of data points for the purpose of image reconstruction. However, with a sufficient set of Radon transform samples, an images can be determined through various Radon transform inversion techniques. From this statement, however, arises the question of just what constitutes a sufficient set of Radon transform samples. Acquiring an insufficient number of samples results in various artifacts in the reconstructed image. On the other hand, taking too many samples utilizes the data inefficiently. Thus, the problem of interest is to determine the optimum number of projections and the optimum number of samples per projection required to adequately represent the Radon transform such that the image can be accurately reconstructed. The problem of image reconstruction is further complicated if noise is introduced in the projection domain. Noise may be caused by round-off error in the sampled projection data or by various other factors inherent in data acquisition processes. However, several filtering techniques can be implemented to suppress the effects of noise. Therefore, a second problem of interest is to study the effectiveness of different filtering techniques in noise suppression.

  19. Method for excluding salt and other soluble materials from produced water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, Tommy J [Knoxville, TN; Tsouris, Costas [Oak Ridge, TN; Palumbo, Anthony V [Oak Ridge, TN; Riestenberg, David E [Knoxville, TN; McCallum, Scott D [Knoxville, TN

    2009-08-04

    A method for reducing the salinity, as well as the hydrocarbon concentration of produced water to levels sufficient to meet surface water discharge standards. Pressure vessel and coflow injection technology developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is used to mix produced water and a gas hydrate forming fluid to form a solid or semi-solid gas hydrate mixture. Salts and solids are excluded from the water that becomes a part of the hydrate cage. A three-step process of dissociation of the hydrate results in purified water suitable for irrigation.

  20. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  1. Study on the influence of CR-39 detector size on radon progeny detection in indoor environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, L. A.; Hadler, J. C.; Lixandrão F, A. L.; Guedes, S.; Takizawa, R. H.

    2014-11-11

    It is well known that radon daughters up to {sup 214}Po are the real contaminants to be considered in case of indoor radon contamination. Assemblies consisting of 6 circular bare sheets of CR-39, a nuclear track detector, with radius varying from 0.15 to 1.2 cm were exposed far from any material surface for periods of approximately 6 months in 13 different indoor rooms (7 workplaces and 6 dwellings), where ventilation was moderate or poor. It was observed that track density was as greater as smaller was the detector radius. Track density data were fitted using an equation deduced based on the assumption that the behavior of radon and its progeny in the air was described by Fick's Law, i.e., when the main mechanism of transport of radon progeny in the air is diffusion. As many people spend great part of their time in closed or poorly ventilated environments, the confirmation they present equilibrium between radon and its progeny is an interesting start for dosimetric calculations concerning this contamination.

  2. Potential increases in natural radon emissions due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.M.

    1992-02-01

    Heating of the rock mass by the spent fuel in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will cause extra amounts of natural radon to diffuse into the fracture system and to migrate faster to the accessible environment. Indeed, free-convection currents due to heating will act to shorten the radon travel times and will cause larger releases than would be possible under undistributed conditions. To estimate the amount of additional radon released due to heating of the Yucca Mountain rock mass, we obtain an expression for the release enhancement factor, E. This factor is defined as the ratio between the total flux of radon at the surface of the mountain before and after closure of the repository assuming the only cause of disturbance to be the heating of the rock mass. With appropriate approximations and using a heat load representative of that expected at Yucca Mountain, the present calculations indicate that the average enhancement factor over the first 10,000 years will be 4.5 as a minimum. These calculations are based on the assumption that barometric pumping does not significantly influence radon release. The latter assumption will need to be substantiated.

  3. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  4. Asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings: an overview of the technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.; Gates, T.E.; Nelson, D.A.; Dunning, R.L.

    1984-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) office, has developed an asphalt emulsion cover system to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. The system has been field tested at Grand Junction, Colorado. Results from laboratory and field tests indicate that this system is effective in reducing radon release to near-background levels (<2.5 pCi m/sup -2/s/sup -1/) and has the properties required for long-term effectiveness and stability. Engineering specifications have been developed, and analysis indicates that asphalt emulsion covers are cost-competitive with other cover systems. This report summarizes the technology for asphalt emulsion radon barrier systems. 59 references, 45 figures, 36 tables.

  5. Radon in HUD assisted multifamily housing: Policy recommendations to the Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The report complies with Section 1091 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1988 which requires that the HUD Secretary report to the Congress on a recommended policy for addressing radon contamination in specified housing. The housing specified in the Act is virtually all rental housing predominantly for low-income and moderate-income households. Almost all of it is multifamily housing: row houses, walk-up apartment buildings, or high-rise buildings. There is inadequate information on the extent to which excessive concentrations of radon occur above the first floor of multistory buildings and on the variation in radon concentrations in attached houses in the same row. HUD's recommended policy is in the four topic areas specified in the Act: research, education, testing, and mitigation.

  6. Unexpected Complication with the New C3 Excluder: Cause and Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katsargyris, Athanasios; Oikonomou, Kyriakos; Bracale, Umberto M.; Verhoeven, Eric L. G.

    2013-04-15

    The new C3 Gore Excluder delivery system enables both up/downward and rotational repositioning of the device before complete deployment. This contributes to more precise proximal landing and permits facilitation of the contralateral gate cannulation. During separate deployment, the position of the ipsilateral limb can also be readjusted. We have used the modified C3 delivery system in more than 50 patients, and in most cases, we were able to utilize the repositioning options of the device to achieve optimal fixation and sealing. However, we present a case where our attempt to readjust the position of the ipsilateral limb led to upward migration of the main body with coverage of the left renal artery origin. The latter was secured with a bare stent implantation.

  7. Radiation detector device for rejecting and excluding incomplete charge collection events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; De Geronimo, Gianluigi; Vernon, Emerson; Yang, Ge; Camarda, Giuseppe; Cui, Yonggang; Hossain, Anwar; Kim, Ki Hyun; James, Ralph B.

    2016-05-10

    A radiation detector device is provided that is capable of distinguishing between full charge collection (FCC) events and incomplete charge collection (ICC) events based upon a correlation value comparison algorithm that compares correlation values calculated for individually sensed radiation detection events with a calibrated FCC event correlation function. The calibrated FCC event correlation function serves as a reference curve utilized by a correlation value comparison algorithm to determine whether a sensed radiation detection event fits the profile of the FCC event correlation function within the noise tolerances of the radiation detector device. If the radiation detection event is determined to be an ICC event, then the spectrum for the ICC event is rejected and excluded from inclusion in the radiation detector device spectral analyses. The radiation detector device also can calculate a performance factor to determine the efficacy of distinguishing between FCC and ICC events.

  8. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (5 1/4 inch, 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  9. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon survey: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  10. Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FROM z {approx} 0.03 STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: THE DOMINANT ROLE OF OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wofford, Aida; Leitherer, Claus [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Salzer, John, E-mail: wofford@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, Indiana University, Swain West 408, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2013-03-10

    The usefulness of H I Ly{alpha} photons for characterizing star formation in the distant universe is limited by our understanding of the astrophysical processes that regulate their escape from galaxies. These processes can only be observed in detail out to a few Multiplication-Sign 100 Mpc. Past nearby (z < 0.3) spectroscopic studies are based on small samples and/or kinematically unresolved data. Taking advantage of the high sensitivity of Hubble Space Telescope's Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), we observed the Ly{alpha} lines of 20 H{alpha}-selected galaxies located at =0.03. The galaxies cover a broad range of luminosity, oxygen abundance, and reddening. In this paper, we characterize the observed Ly{alpha} lines and establish correlations with fundamental galaxy properties. We find seven emitters. These host young ({<=}10 Myr) stellar populations have rest-frame equivalent widths in the range 1-12 A, and have Ly{alpha} escape fractions within the COS aperture in the range 1%-12%. One emitter has a double-peaked Ly{alpha} with peaks 370 km s{sup -1} apart and a stronger blue peak. Excluding this object, the emitters have Ly{alpha} and O I {lambda}1302 offsets from H{alpha} in agreement with expanding-shell models and Lyman break galaxies observations. The absorbers have offsets that are almost consistent with a static medium. We find no one-to-one correspondence between Ly{alpha} emission and age, metallicity, or reddening. Thus, we confirm that Ly{alpha} is enhanced by outflows and is regulated by the dust and H I column density surrounding the hot stars.

  11. AlphaWatt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AlphaWatt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: AlphaWatt Ltd Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: EC1V 4PY Sector: Solar Product: Solar project developer, plans to become an...

  12. Alpha buildings | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    buildings Alpha buildings Looking east to west at ground level, Y-12 building footers and utility lines continue to be constructed. The Alpha buildings are seen in the background

  13. AlphaSpectrum ASPECT analysis code for background correction & peak integration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-04-13

    The ASPECT code provides a means for rapid analysis of energy-resolved spectra obtained by multi-channel pulse-height analysis (MCA) during (or after) counting of alpha-emissions from a filter air sample (or other suitably prepared sample) utilizing a solid-state detector, or other detector having sufficient energy resolution indiviual radioisotope peaks indentified in a spectrum are fitted using a peak shape algorithm by non-linear least-square fitting procedures that minimize Chi-square differences between the data and a fitted peakmore » function. The code accomplishes the identification of all significant peaks present in the spectrum with automatic recalibration to the 7.68 Po-214 alpha peak from the Radon-222 decay chain, the subtraction of all radon progeny interference overlaps with lower energy peaks in the energy range of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and U-234/Th-232, and the integration of the counts in any peak identified for these transuranic radionuclides. The output is therefore in the form of isotope specific net transuranic CPM, DPM or concentration, available in near real-time during air sampling. In this "copyright" version, the assumption is made that the alpha spectra to be analyzed have been stored by unique name in sequential form: "FileName(i)", where "FileName" can be any name and i is the index number of the file saved (e.g., i = 1,2, ..., n). this format is one automatically generated by the alpha Environmental Continuous Air Monitor (ECAM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and manufactured by Canberra Industries, a Laboratory Industrial Partner for this technology. It is assumed in this version of the code that the alpha spectrum data are stored in a 256 channel spectrum, although a larger num ber of channels could be easily accommodated by small code changes. The ECAM data output format is RADNET compliant (an inidustry standard developed at Los Alamos), and include, in addition to a 256-channel alpha spectrum, data on the

  14. AlphaSpectrum ASPECT analysis code for background correction & peak integration

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-04-13

    The ASPECT code provides a means for rapid analysis of energy-resolved spectra obtained by multi-channel pulse-height analysis (MCA) during (or after) counting of alpha-emissions from a filter air sample (or other suitably prepared sample) utilizing a solid-state detector, or other detector having sufficient energy resolution indiviual radioisotope peaks indentified in a spectrum are fitted using a peak shape algorithm by non-linear least-square fitting procedures that minimize Chi-square differences between the data and a fitted peakmorefunction. The code accomplishes the identification of all significant peaks present in the spectrum with automatic recalibration to the 7.68 Po-214 alpha peak from the Radon-222 decay chain, the subtraction of all radon progeny interference overlaps with lower energy peaks in the energy range of Pu-238, Am-241, Pu-239, and U-234/Th-232, and the integration of the counts in any peak identified for these transuranic radionuclides. The output is therefore in the form of isotope specific net transuranic CPM, DPM or concentration, available in near real-time during air sampling. In this "copyright" version, the assumption is made that the alpha spectra to be analyzed have been stored by unique name in sequential form: "FileName(i)", where "FileName" can be any name and i is the index number of the file saved (e.g., i = 1,2, ..., n). this format is one automatically generated by the alpha Environmental Continuous Air Monitor (ECAM), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, and manufactured by Canberra Industries, a Laboratory Industrial Partner for this technology. It is assumed in this version of the code that the alpha spectrum data are stored in a 256 channel spectrum, although a larger num ber of channels could be easily accommodated by small code changes. The ECAM data output format is RADNET compliant (an inidustry standard developed at Los Alamos), and include, in addition to a 256-channel alpha spectrum, data on the count

  15. Cost of radon-barrier systems for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Hartley, J.N.

    1982-08-01

    This report deals specifically with the cost of three types of radon barrier systems, earthen covers, asphalt emulsion covers, and multilayer covers, which could meet standards proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency to stabilize uranium mill tailings located primarily in the western US. In addition, the report includes a sensitivity analysis of various factors which significantly effect the overall cost of the three systems. These analyses were based on a generic disposal site. Four different 3m thick earthen covers were tested and cost an average of $27/m/sup 2/. The least expensive earthen cover cost was about $21/m/sup 2/. The asphalt cover system (6 to 7 cm of asphalt topped with 0.6m of overburden) cost about $28/m/sup 2/. The four multilayer covers averaged $57/m/sup 2/, but materials handling problems encountered during the test inflated this cost above what was anticipated and significant cost reductions should be possible. The least expensive multilayer cover cost $43/m/sup 2/. Based on the results of the Grand Junction field test we estimated the cost of covering the tailings from three high priority sites, Durango, Shiprock, and Salt Lake City (Vitro). The cost of a 3m earthen cover ranged from $18 to 33/m/sup 2/ for the seven disposal sites (two or three at each location) studied. The cost of asphalt cover systems were $23 to 28/m/sup 2/ and the multilayer cover costs were between $31 to 36/m/sup 2/. The earthen cover costs are less than the Grand Junction field test cost primarily because cover material is available at or near most of the disposal sites selected. Earthen material was imported from 6 to 10 miles for the field test. Assuming more efficienct utilization of materials significantly reduced the cost of the multilayer covers.

  16. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Phifer, M.

    2010-07-30

    An air and radon pathways analysis was conducted for the F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. Additionally, the dose to the MEI was estimated at a seepage outcrop located 1600 m from the facility. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent radionuclide was estimated for the simulation period of 10,100 years.

  17. Four Years of Practical Arrangements between IAEA and Moscow SIA 'Radon': Preliminary Results - 13061

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batyukhnova, O.G.; Karlina, O.K.; Neveikin, P.P.

    2013-07-01

    The International Education Training Centre (IETC) at Moscow State Unitary Enterprise Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon'), in co-operation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), has developed expertise and provided training to waste management personnel for the last 15 years. Since 1997, the educational system of the enterprise with the support of the IAEA has acquired an international character: more than 470 experts from 35 countries- IAEA Member States completed the professional development. Training is conducted at various thematic courses or fellowships for individual programs and seminars on IAEA technical projects. In June 2008 a direct agreement (Practical Arrangements) was signed between SIA 'Radon' and the IAEA on cooperation in the field of development of new technologies, expert's advice to IAEA Member States, and, in particular, the training of personnel in the field of radioactive waste management (RWM), which opens up new perspectives for fruitful cooperation of industry professionals. The paper summarizes the current experience of the SIA 'Radon' in the organization and implementation of the IAEA sponsored training and others events and outlines some of strategic educational elements, which IETC will continue to pursue in the coming years. (authors)

  18. Filter for on-line air monitor unaffected by radon progeny and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D.; Edwards, Howard D.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The apparatus includes a sampling box having an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air. The sampling box includes a filter made of a plate of sintered stainless steel. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough. A method of testing air having contaminants and radon progeny therein. The method includes providing a testing apparatus that has a sampling box with an inlet for receiving the air and an outlet for discharging the air, and has a sintered stainless steel filter disposed within said sampling box; drawing air from a source into the sampling box using a vacuum pump; passing the air through the filter; monitoring the contaminants trapped by the filter; and providing an alarm when a selected level of contaminants is reached. The filter traps the contaminants, yet allows at least a portion of the radon progeny to pass therethrough.

  19. Alpha

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effect of Alfve ´ n waves and current drive in reversed-field pinches C. Litwin a) and S. C. Prager Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 9 September 1997; accepted 5 December 1997͒ Circularly polarized Alfve ´ n waves give rise to an ␣-dynamo effect that can be exploited to drive parallel current. In a ''laminar'' magnetic the effect is weak and does not give rise to significant currents for realistic parameters ͑e.g.,

  20. National Weatherization Assistance Program Impact Evaluation: Impact of Exhaust-Only Ventilation on Radon and Indoor Humidity - A Field Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigg, Scott

    2014-09-01

    The study described here sought to assess the impact of exhaust-only ventilation on indoor radon and humidity in single-family homes that had been treated by the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP).

  1. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1996-05-07

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

  2. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D.; Bounds, John A.; Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W.

    1996-01-01

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

  3. X-RAY CONSTRAINTS ON THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhenya; Wang Junxian; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; Gronwall, Caryl; Ciardullo, Robin; Guaita, Lucia; Nilsson, Kim K.

    2012-02-10

    We have co-added the X-ray flux of all known Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) in the 4 Ms Chandra Deep Field South (CDF-S) region, achieving the tightest upper limits yet on the X-ray to Ly{alpha} ratio. We use the X-ray data to place sensitive upper limits on the average unobscured star formation rate (SFR{sub X}) in these galaxies. A very small fraction of Ly{alpha} galaxies in the field are individually detected in the X-rays, implying a low fraction of active galactic nucleus activity. After excluding the few X-ray-detected LAEs, we stack the undetected LAEs located in the 4 Ms CDF-S data and 250 ks Extended CDF-S (ECDF-S) data, and compute a 1{sigma} upper limit on SFR{sub X} < 1.6, 14, 28, 28, 140, 440, 880 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} for LAEs located at z {approx} 0.3 and z = 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 4.5, 5.7, and 6.5, respectively. The upper limit of SFR{sub X} in LAEs can be then compared to SFR{sub Ly{alpha}} derived from Ly{alpha} line and thus can constrain on the Ly{alpha} escape fraction (f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}}). The f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} from X-ray at z {approx} 0.3 is substantially larger than that from UV or H{alpha}. Three X-ray-detected LAE galaxies at z {approx} 0.3 show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} {approx} 3%-22%, and the average Ly{alpha} escape fraction from stacking the X-ray-undetected LAEs show f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 28% at 3{sigma} significance level at the same redshift. We derive a lower limit on f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 14% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit) for LAEs at redshift z {approx} 2.1 and z {approx} 3.1-3.2. At z > 4, the current LAE samples are not of sufficient size to constrain SFR{sub X} well. By averaging all the LAEs at z > 2, the X-ray non-detection constrains f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} > 17% (84% confidence level, 1{sigma} lower limit), and rejects f{sup Esc}{sub Ly{alpha}} < 5.7% at the 99.87% confidence level from 2.1 < z < 6.5.

  4. Laboratory studies on the removal of radon-born lead from KamLAND׳s organic liquid scintillator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keefer, G.; Grant, C.; Piepke, A.; Ebihara, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kibe, Y.; Koseki, Y.; Ogawa, M.; Shirai, J.; et al

    2014-09-28

    We studied the removal of radioactivity from liquid scintillator in preparation of a low background phase of KamLAND. We describe the methods and techniques developed to measure and efficiently extract radon decay products from liquid scintillator. Lastly, we report the radio-isotope reduction factors obtained when applying various extraction methods. During this study, distillation was identified as the most efficient method for removing radon daughters from liquid scintillator.

  5. Water treatment facilities (excluding wastewater facilities). (Latest citations from the Selected Water Resources Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, costs, and operation of water treatment facilities. Facilities covered include those that provide drinking water, domestic water, and water for industrial use. Types of water treatment covered include reverse osmosis, chlorination, filtration, and ozonization. Waste water treatment facilities are excluded from this bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. Measurement of Radon, Thoron, Isotopic Uranium and Thorium to Determine Occupational and Environmental Exposure and Risk at Fernald Feed Material Production Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naomi H. Harley, Ph.D.

    2004-07-01

    To develop a new and novel area and personal radon/thoron detector for both radon isotopes to better measure the exposure to low airborne concentrations of these gases at Fernald. These measurements are to be used to determine atmospheric dispersion and exposure to radon and thoron prior to and during retrieval and removal of the 4000 Ci of radium in the two silos at Fernald.

  7. Alpha Renewable Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alpha Renewable Energy Place: Atlanta, Georgia Sector: Biomass Product: Manufacturer of biomass wood gas stoves and standalone...

  8. SHOE V.1.5 ALPHA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002913MLTPL00 Sandia Higher Order Elements (SHOE) v 0.5 alpha http://midas3.kitware.com/midas/folder/10328

  9. Radon emanation from giant landslides of Koefels (Tyrol, Austria) and Langtang Himal (Nepal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtscheller, F.; Pirchl, T.; Sieder, G.

    1995-07-01

    The identification of extremely high indoor radon concentrations in the village Umhausen (Tyrol, Austria) initiated a scientific program to get information about the source and distribution of this noble gas. The high concentrations can not be related to U anomalies or large-scale fault zones. The nearby giant landslide of Koefels, with its highly fractured and crushed orthogneisses, are the only possible source of radon, despite the fact that the U and Ra content of the rocks is by no means exceptional. The reasons for the high emanation rates from the landslide are discussed and compared to results gained from a similar examination of the giant landslide of Langtang Himal (Nepal). The exceptional geologic situation in both cases, as well as the spatial distribution of different concentration levels, indicate that both landslides must be considered as the production sites of radon. Independent of the U and Ra contents of the rocks, the most important factors producing high emanation rates are the production of a high active surface area in circulation pathways for Rn-enriched soil air by brittle deformation due to the impact of the landslidemass. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

  11. Radon exhalation rate from coal ashes and building materials in Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, A.; Capra, D.; Queirazza, G.

    1992-12-31

    The Italian National Electricity Board, in cooperation with Centro Informazioni Stubi Esperienze (CISE) has a program to assess the hazards connected with using fly ash in civil applications as partial substitutes for cement and other building materials. We investigated the natural radioactivity levels of more than 200 building materials. The survey involved materials available in Italy, categorized by geographical location and type of production. We also examined approximately 100 samples of fly ash from United States and South African coal, obtained from Italian power plants. Exhalation rates from about 40 powdered materials were determined by continuously measuring radon concentration growth in closed containers. Measurements were also performed on whole bricks, slabs, and titles. Details about the high-sensitivity measuring devices are presented. The influence of fly ash on exhalation rates was investigated by accurately measuring radon emanation from slabs with various ash/cement ratios and with slabs of inert materials having various radium concentrations. We will discuss results of forecasting indoor radon concentrations under different ventilation conditions. Two identical test rooms are being built, one with conventional and one with fly-ash building materials, to compare theoretical calculations with experimental data. Specifications for instruments to control and to measure the most important parameters are also discussed.

  12. Low Radioactive Techniques in SuperNEMO: Status of the Radon R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perrot, F. [Universite de Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, Chemin du Solarium, Le Haut-Vigneau, BP120, F-33175 Gradignan (France)

    2011-04-27

    Radon is a well-known source of background with respect to the search for neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}), due to the high Q{sub {beta}} value of one of its daughter nucleus {sup 214}Bi. Radon has been observed and reduced down to 6.5 mBq/m{sup 3} in the NEMO-3 experiment which is looking for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} process in {sup 100}Mo and in six other isotopes. The SuperNEMO project, a next-generation double beta decay experiment which will also use a tracko-calorimeter technique, has been in an R and D phase since 2006. The goal is to reach a sensitivity of T{sub 1/2}(0{nu})>10{sup 26} y corresponding to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.05-0.1 eV with 100 kg of {sup 82}Se. Such a sensitivity requires in particular to improve the radon radiopurity down to 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} in the tracking chamber.

  13. Analysis of electret ion chamber radon detector response to {sup 222}Rn and interference from background gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usman, S.; Spitz, H.; Lee, S.

    1999-01-01

    Environmental radon ({sup 222}Rn) monitors that incorporate electret detectors are confounded by background gamma radiation, which may cause the electret to discharge by as much as 7.5 volts per mR. Although background gamma corrections were formerly made by multiplying the known background gamma exposure rate with a constant conversion factor, this research demonstrates that doing so introduces an error ranging up to about 20%, especially in high gamma background areas. A new, more accurate method of background gamma correction has been developed that uses an average, voltage-dependent discharge factor, D{sub {gamma}} (V Kg C{sup {minus}1}). This factor and its coefficients were experimentally determined by separately exposing groups of electret radon detectors to photons from {sup 60}Co and {sup 137}Cs. Statistical analysis shows that D{sub {gamma}} is independent of the orientation of the electret during irradiation but that some dependency on dose rate or energy of the irradiating photons may be expected. The discharge of the electret due only to gamma irradiation, V{sub {gamma}}, is determined by multiplying the total integrated gamma exposure by D{sub {gamma}}. The discharge of the electret during a radon measurement can then be corrected for background gamma radiation by subtracting V{sub {gamma}} from the total discharge of the electret resulting in a net discharge due solely to radon. A new equation has also been developed in this study for the radon discharge factor, D{sub Rn} (V m{sup 3}Bq{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}), that is entirely consistent with the gamma discharge radon detectors to known concentrations of radon.

  14. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  15. In-vivo measurements of Pb-210 to determine cumulative exposure to radon daughters: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurer, G.R.; Cohen, N. . Inst. of Environmental Medicine); Stark, A.; Ju, C. . Bureau of Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology)

    1990-10-01

    The feasibility of measuring Pb-210 in vivo in the skulls of those individuals who have resided in homes with above average levels of radon/radon daughters, has now been successfully demonstrated. These values, when incorporated into metabolic models of Pb-210 in the body including other related physical parameters, can be used for the calculation of a realistic estimate of a resident's cumulative exposure to radon and its' decay products. Data are presented for 26 subjects exposed to higher than average concentrations of radon i.e. ranging from 10 to 120 pCi/l, for various periods of time. Their skeletal Pb-210 burdens are compared to measurement results of a population of individuals presumed to have been exposed to values which are more representative of average levels i.e. <1pCi/1. Results of a study to determine the biological retention of Pb-210 in the human skeleton for use in the metabolic model relating skull burdens of this nuclide to cumulative radon/daughter exposure, are also described. At the present time, our measurements, made over a period of 10 years, of an individual with a significant Pb-210 burden, indicate a biological half-time of approximately 57 years and an effective half-life of 16 years. 4 refs., 11 figs.

  16. [alpha]E-catenin is an autoinhibited molecule that coactivates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    alphaE-catenin is an autoinhibited molecule that coactivates vinculin Citation Details In-Document Search Title: alphaE-catenin is an autoinhibited molecule that coactivates ...

  17. Microscopic Study Of Alpha + N Bremsstrahlung From Effective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Of Alpha + N Bremsstrahlung From Effective And Realistic Inter-Nucleon Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic Study Of Alpha + N Bremsstrahlung ...

  18. Microscopic Study Of Alpha + N Bremsstrahlung From Effective...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic Study Of Alpha + N Bremsstrahlung From Effective And Realistic Inter-Nucleon Interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic Study Of Alpha + N ...

  19. S. 2844: A Bill to provide for radon testing. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, September 29, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Bill S. 2844 provides for radon testing and is cited as the Department of Housing and Urban Development Policy Act. The bill provides the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) with a mandate to establish a departmental radon policy and program. The department will be required to use its programs to assist the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) address radon contamination. The bill also requires HUD, in coordination with the EPA, to develop a radon assessment and mitigation program which utilizes EPA recommended guidelines and standards to ensure that occupants of housing covered under this act are not exposed to elevated levels of radon. The entire contents of the bill are presented in eight sections entitled: Short Title, findings, Purpose, Definitions, Program, Information, Cooperation with Environmental Protection Agency, and Authorization. The bill was referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  1. Tri Alpha Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    information indicates the company's goal is the commercialisation of plasma based nuclear fusion. References: Tri Alpha Energy1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  2. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Kretzschmar, H.J.

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  3. Transport of Radioactive Material by Alpha Recoil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2005-05-19

    The movement of high-specific-activity radioactive particles (i.e., alpha recoil) has been observed and studied since the early 1900s. These studies have been motivated by concerns about containment of radioactivity and the protection of human health. Additionally, studies have investigated the potential advantage of alpha recoil to effect separations of various isotopes. This report provides a review of the observations and results of a number of the studies.

  4. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (?) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two ?s. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two ? particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  5. Preparation and properties of (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2. 2. 2)oct-3-yl- (R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4-( sup 125 I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2. 2. 2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha- (4-( sup 125 I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate as potential radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, V.I.; Rzeszotarski, W.J.; Gibson, R.E.; Fan, L.H.; Reba, R.C. )

    1989-10-01

    rac-4-Nitrobenzilic acid was synthesized and resolved with quinidine and quinine to give the corresponding (R)- and (S)-salts. The resolved diastereomeric salts were converted to (R)- and (S)-4-nitrobenzilic acids and subsequent esterification gave their corresponding ethyl esters. Transesterification with (R)-(-)-3-quinuclidinol afforded (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha- (4-nitrophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy- alpha-(4-nitrophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate. After hydrogenation, the (R,R)- and (R,S)-amines were converted to the respective triazene derivatives. The triazene derivatives reacted with sodium ({sup 125}I)iodide to give (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)- alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4-({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate and (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy- alpha-(4-(125I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate. The evaluation of their affinities to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (MAcChR) shows that (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(S)-(-)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4- ({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate exhibits an affinity for the MAcChR from corpus striatum that is approximately threefold lower than that of (R)-(-)-1-azabicyclo(2.2.2)oct-3-yl-(R)-(+)-alpha-hydroxy-alpha-(4- ({sup 125}I)iodophenyl)-alpha-phenyl acetate.

  6. Structures of G [alpha [superscript i1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Willard, Francis S.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Fredericks, Zoey; Bodor, Erik T.; Jones, Miller B.; Blaesius, Rainer; Watts, Val J.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John; Ramer, J. Kevin; Siderovski, David P.

    2010-07-19

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are molecular switches that regulate numerous signaling pathways involved in cellular physiology. This characteristic is achieved by the adoption of two principal states: an inactive, GDP bound state and an active, GTP bound state. Under basal conditions, G proteins exist in the inactive, GDP bound state; thus, nucleotide exchange is crucial to the onset of signaling. Despite our understanding of G protein signaling pathways, the mechanism of nucleotide exchange remains elusive. We employed phage display technology to identify nucleotide state-dependent G{alpha} binding peptides. Herein, we report a GDP-selective G{alpha} binding peptide, KB-752, that enhances spontaneous nucleotide exchange of G{alpha}{sub i} subunits. Structural determination of the G{alpha}{sub i1}/peptide complex reveals unique changes in the G{alpha} switch regions predicted to enhance nucleotide exchange by creating a GDP dissociation route. Our results cast light onto a potential mechanism by which G{alpha} subunits adopt a conformation suitable for nucleotide exchange.

  7. Ground radon survey of a geothermal area in Hawaii | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on the lower east riftof Kilauea volcano, were measured by alpha particle sensitive cellulose nitrate films. The survey successfully defined an area of thermal significance...

  8. Determination of radon concentration in water using RAD7 with RAD H{sub 2}O accessories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malik, M. F. I.; Rabaiee, N. A.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2015-04-24

    In the last decade, the radon issue has become one of the major problems of radiation protection. Radon exposure occurs when using water for showering, washing dishes, cooking and drinking water. RAD7 and Rad H20 accessories were used in order to measure radon concentration in water sample. In this study, four types of water were concerns which are reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Reverse osmosis (drinking water) and mineral water were bought from the nearest supermarket while tap water and well water were taken from selected areas of Pulau Pinang and Kedah. Total 20 samples were taken with 5 samples for each type of water. The measured radon concentration ranged from 2.9±2.9 to 79.5±17 pCi/L, 2.9±2.9 to 67.8±16 pCi/L, 15.97±7 to 144.25±24 pCi/L and 374.89±37 to 6409.03±130 pCi/L in reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Well water has the highest radon compared to others. It was due to their geological element such as granite. Results for all types of water are presented and compared with maximum contamination limit (MCL) recommended by United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) which is 300pCi/L. Reverse osmosis water, mineral water and tap water were fall below MCL. However, well water was exceeded maximum level that was recommended. Thus, these findings were suggested that an action should be taken to reduce radon concentration level in well water as well as reduce a health risk towards the public.

  9. Methods for the synthesis and polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-p-xylenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferraris, John P.; Neef, Charles J.

    2002-07-30

    The present invention describes an improved method for the polymerization of .alpha.,.alpha.-dihalo-p-xylene's such as the .alpha.,.alpha.'-dihalo-2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-xylene's. The procedure for synthesis is based on the specific order of addition of reagents and the use of an anionic initiator that allows control of the molecular weight of the polymer. The molecular weight control allows processability of the polymer which is important for its utility in applications including in light-emitting-diodes, field effect transistors and photovoltaic devices.

  10. AIR AND RADON PATHWAY MODELING FOR THE F-AREA TANK FARM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K; Mark Phifer, M

    2007-09-17

    The F-Area Tank Farm (FTF) is located within F-Area in the General Separations Area (GSA) of the Savannah River Site (SRS) as seen in Figure 1. The GSA contains the F and H Area Separations Facilities, the S-Area Defense Waste Processing Facility, the Z-Area Saltstone Facility, and the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities. The FTF is a nearly rectangular shaped area and comprises approximately 20 acres, which is bounded by SRS coordinates N 76,604.5 to N 77,560.0 and E 52,435.0 to E 53,369.0. SRS is in the process of preparing a Performance Assessment (PA) to support FTF closure. As part of the PA process, an analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential magnitude of gaseous release of radionuclides from the FTF over the 100-year institutional control period and 10,000-year post-closure compliance period. Specifically, an air and radon pathways analysis has been conducted to estimate the flux of volatile radionuclides and radon at the ground surface due to residual waste remaining in the tanks following closure. This analysis was used as the basis to estimate the dose to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for the air pathway per Curie (Ci) of each radionuclide remaining in the combined FTF waste tanks. For the air pathway analysis, several gaseous radionuclides were considered. These included carbon-14 (C-14), chlorine-36 (Cl-36), iodine-129 (I-129), selenium-79 (Se-79), antimony-125 (Sb-125), tin-126 (Sn-126), tritium (H-3), and technetium-99 (Tc-99). The dose to the MEI was estimated at the SRS Boundary during the 100 year institutional control period. For the 10,000 year post closure compliance period, the dose to the MEI was estimated at the 100 m compliance point. For the radon pathway analysis, five parent radionuclides and their progeny were analyzed. These parent radionuclides included uranium-238 (U-238), plutonium-238 (Pu-238), uranium-234 (U-234), thorium-230 (Th-230), and radium-226 (Ra-226). The peak flux of radon-222 due to each parent

  11. Evaluation of radon progeny from Mount St. Helens eruptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepel, E.A.; Olsen, K.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Eichner, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    A network of twelve monitoring sites around Mount St. Helens was established to evaluate possible short-lived radioactivity in the fallen ash. Seven sites were located near major population centers of Washington and Oregon, and five sites were located within 80 km of the volcano. Each site monitored the radioactivity present by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeters which recorded the total exposure to radioactivity over the exposure period. Eruptions occurring on July 22, August 7, and October 16 to 18, 1980 were monitored. No statistically significant quantities of measurable radon daughters were observed.

  12. Alpha Channeling in Rotating Plasma with Stationary Waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-15

    An extension of the alpha channeling effect to supersonically rotating mirrors shows that the rotation itself can be driven using alpha particle energy. Alpha channeling uses radiofrequency waves to remove alpha particles collisionlessly at low energy. We show that stationary magnetic fields with high n? can be used for this purpose, and simulations show that a large fraction of the alpha energy can be converted to rotation energy.

  13. Control of contamination of radon-daughters in the DEAP-3600 acrylic vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jillings, Chris; Collaboration: DEAP Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    DEAP-3600 is a 3600kg single-phase liquid-argon dark matter detector under construction at SNOLAB with a sensitivity of 10{sup ?46}cm{sup 2} for a 100 GeV WIMP. The argon is held an an acrylic vessel coated with wavelength-shifting 1,1,4,4-tetraphenyl-1,3-butadiene (TPB). Acrylic was chosen because it is optically transparent at the shifted wavelength of 420 nm; an effective neutron shield; and physically strong. With perfect cleaning of the acrylic surface before data taking the irreducible background is that from bulk {sup 210}Pb activity that is near the surface. To achieve a background rate of 0.01 events in the 1000-kg fiducial volume per year of exposure, the allowed limit of Pb-210 in the bulk acrylic is 31 mBq/tonne (= 1.2 10{sup ?20}g/g). We discuss how pure acrylic was procured and manufactured into a complete vessel paying particular attention to exposure to radon during all processes. In particular field work at the acrylic panel manufacturer, RPT Asia, and acrylic monomer supplier, Thai MMA Co. Ltd, in Thailand is described. The increased diffusion of radon during annealing the acrylic at 90C as well as techniques to mitigate against this are described.

  14. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Camarero, Julio A.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  15. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  16. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  17. Performance of an Alpha-IPEM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; McDaniel, Floyd Del; Rossi, Paolo; Auzelyte, Vaida; Mellon, Michael

    2005-07-01

    The ion photon emission microscope, or IPEM, is the first device that allows scientists to microscopically study the effects of single ions in air on semiconductors, microchips and even biological cells without having to focus the beam. Reported here is a prototype, the size of a conventional optical microscope, developed at Sandia. The alpha-IPEM, that employs alpha particles from a radioactive source, represents the first example of IBA imaging without an accelerator. The IPEM resolution is currently limited to 10 {micro}m, but we also report a gridded-phosphor approach that could improve this resolution to that of the optical microscope, or {approx} 1 {micro}m. Finally, we propose that a simple adaptation of the alpha-IPEM could be the only way to maintain the high utility of radiation effects microscopy into the future.

  18. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  19. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  20. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  1. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A fan-less long range alpha detector which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces.

  2. Fertility and Pregnancy Outcome After Abdominal Irradiation That Included or Excluded the Pelvis in Childhood Tumor Survivors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudour, Helene; Chastagner, Pascal; Claude, Line; Desandes, Emmanuel; Klein, Marc; Carrie, Christian; Bernier, Valerie

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate fertility after abdominal and/or pelvic irradiation in long-term female survivors. Methods and Materials: Puberty and pregnancy outcome were analyzed in female survivors of childhood cancer (aged <18 years) treated with abdominal and/or pelvic radiotherapy (RT) at one of two French centers (Nancy and Lyon) between 1975 and 2004. Data were obtained from medical records and questionnaires sent to the women. Results: A total of 84 patients who had received abdominal and/or pelvic RT during childhood and were alive and aged more than 18 years at the time of the study made up the study population. Of the 57 female survivors treated with abdominal RT that excluded the pelvis, 52 (91%) progressed normally through puberty and 23 (40%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Of the 27 patients treated with pelvic RT, only 10 (37%) progressed normally through puberty and 5 (19%) had at least one recorded pregnancy. Twenty-two women (seventeen of whom were treated with pelvic RT) had certain subfertility. A total of 50 births occurred in 28 women, with one baby dying at birth; one miscarriage also occurred. There was a high prevalence of prematurity and low birth weight but not of congenital malformations. Conclusions: Fertility can be preserved in patients who undergo abdominal RT that excludes the pelvis, taking into account the other treatments (e.g., chemotherapy with alkylating agents) are taken into account. When RT includes the pelvis, fertility is frequently impaired and women can have difficulty conceiving. Nevertheless, pregnancies can occur in some of these women. The most important factor that endangers a successful pregnancy after RT is the total dose received by the ovaries and uterus. This radiation dose has to be systematically recorded to improve our ability to follow up patients.

  3. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  4. Transformer Recharging with Alpha Channeling in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.J. Fisch

    2009-12-21

    Transformer recharging with lower hybrid waves in tokamaks can give low average auxiliary power if the resistivity is kept high enough during the radio frequency (rf) recharging stage. At the same time, operation in the hot ion mode via alpha channeling increases the effective fusion reactivity. This paper will address the extent to which these two large cost saving steps are compatible. __________________________________________________

  5. Method of making nanocrystalline alpha alumina

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W.; Hahn, Horst; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making selected phases of nanocrystalline ceramic materials. Various methods of controlling the production of nanocrystalline alpha alumina and titanium oxygen phases are described. Control of the gas atmosphere and use of particular oxidation treatments give rise to the ability to control the particular phases provided in the aluminum/oxygen and titanium/oxygen system.

  6. MINOR PLANET 2002 EX{sub 12} (=169P/NEAT) AND THE ALPHA CAPRICORNID SHOWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenniskens, P.; Vaubaillon, J.

    2010-05-15

    Minor planet 2002 EX{sub 12} (=comet 169P/NEAT) is identified as the parent body of the alpha Capricornid shower, based on a good agreement in the calculated and observed direction and speed of the approaching meteoroids for ejecta 4500-5000 years ago. The meteoroids that come to within 0.05 AU of Earth's orbit show the correct radiant position, radiant drift, approach speed, radiant dispersion, duration of activity, and distribution of dust at the other node, but meteoroids ejected 5000 years ago by previously proposed parent bodies do not. A more recent formation epoch is excluded because not enough dust would have evolved into Earth's path. The total mass of the stream is about 9 x 10{sup 13} kg, similar to that of the remaining comet. Release of so much matter in a short period of time implies a major disruption of the comet at that time. The bulk of this matter still passes inside Earth's orbit, but will cross Earth's orbit 300 years from now. As a result, the alpha Capricornids are expected to become a major annual shower in 2220-2420 A.D., stronger than any current annual shower.

  7. Photochemically enhanced binding of small molecules to the tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 inhibits the binding of TNF-[alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Percy H.; Scherle, Peggy A.; Muckelbauer, Jodi K.; Voss, Matthew E.; Liu, Rui-qin; Thompson III, Lorin A.; Xu, Meizhong; Lo, Yvonne C.; Li, Zhong; Strzemienski, Paul; Yang, Gengjie; Falahatpishen, Nikoo; Farrow, Neil A.; Tebben, Andrew J.; Underwood, Denis; Trzaskos, James M.; Friedman, Steven M.; Newton, Robert C.; Decicco, Carl P.

    2010-03-05

    The binding of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-{alpha}) to the type-1 TNF receptor (TNFRc1) plays an important role in inflammation. Despite the clinical success of biologics (antibodies, soluble receptors) for treating TNF-based autoimmune conditions, no potent small molecule antagonists have been developed. Our screening of chemical libraries revealed that N-alkyl 5-arylidene-2-thioxo-1,3-thiazolidin-4-ones were antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. After chemical optimization, we discovered IW927, which potently disrupted the binding of TNF-{alpha} to TNFRc1 (IC{sub 50} = 50 nM) and also blocked TNF-stimulated phosphorylation of I{kappa}-B in Ramos cells (IC{sub 50} = 600 nM). This compound did not bind detectably to the related cytokine receptors TNFRc2 or CD40, and did not display any cytotoxicity at concentrations as high as 100 {micro}M. Detailed evaluation of this and related molecules revealed that compounds in this class are 'photochemically enhanced' inhibitors, in that they bind reversibly to the TNFRc1 with weak affinity (ca. 40-100 mM) and then covalently modify the receptor via a photochemical reaction. We obtained a crystal structure of IV703 (a close analog of IW927) bound to the TNFRc1. This structure clearly revealed that one of the aromatic rings of the inhibitor was covalently linked to the receptor through the main-chain nitrogen of Ala-62, a residue that has already been implicated in the binding of TNF-{alpha} to the TNFRc1. When combined with the fact that our inhibitors are reversible binders in light-excluded conditions, the results of the crystallography provide the basis for the rational design of nonphotoreactive inhibitors of the TNF-{alpha}-TNFRc1 interaction.

  8. Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEU/Pb Core (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Rossi alpha ...

  9. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  10. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  11. Alpha Calutron tank | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calutron tank Alpha Calutron tank The C-shaped alpha calutron tank, together with its emitters and collectors on the lower-edge door, was removed in a special drydock from the magnet for the recovery of uranium-235

  12. Minimum detectable activity and false alarm rate relationships for alpha continuous air monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, M.D.; Newton, G.J.

    1994-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy rule for Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR Part 835, December 1993) and the DOE Radiological Control Manual (the RCM) (DOE/EH-0256T, Rev. 1, April 1994) require the use of continuous air monitors (CAMs) in normally occupied areas where an individual is likely to be exposed to a concentration of airborne radioactivity exceeding the derived air concentration (DAC) or where there is a need to alert potentially exposed individuals to unexpected increases in airborne radioactivity levels. The DAC is the airborne concentration that equals the annual limit on intake divided by the volume of air breathed by an average worker for a working year of 2000 h (assuming a breathing volume of 2400 m{sup 3}). It is equivalent to the airborne concentration to which a worker could be exposed for an entire working year (2000 h) without exceeding the allowable annual limit on intake. The rule and the RCM further require that real-time air monitors have an alarm capability and sufficient sensitivity to alert potentially exposed individuals that immediate action is necessary in order to minimize or terminate inhalation exposures. The RCM also recommends that real-time air monitors should be capable of measuring 1 DAC when averaged over 8 h (8 DAC-h) under laboratory conditions. In response to these recommendations, we are developing procedures for determining the basic sensitivity of alpha CAMs under laboratory conditions and for documenting practical alarm set points for routine use of CAMs under a range of radon and thoron concentrations.

  13. Excluding the light dark matter window of a 331 model using LHC and direct dark matter detection data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cogollo, D.; Gonzalez-Morales, Alma X.; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Teles, P. Rebello E-mail: alxogonz@ucsc.edu E-mail: patricia.rebello.teles@cern.ch

    2014-11-01

    We sift the impact of the recent Higgs precise measurements, and recent dark matter direct detection results, on the dark sector of an electroweak extension of the Standard Model that has a complex scalar as dark matter. We find that in this model the Higgs decays with a large branching ratio into dark matter particles, and charged scalars when these are kinematically available, for any coupling strength differently from the so called Higgs portal. Moreover, we compute the abundance and spin-independent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section, which are driven by the Higgs and Z{sup '} boson processes. We decisively exclude the 1–500 GeV dark matter window and find the most stringent lower bound in the literature on the scale of symmetry breaking of the model namely 10 TeV, after applying the LUX-2013 limit. Interestingly, the projected XENON1T constraint will be able to rule out the entire 1 GeV–1000 GeV dark matter mass range. Lastly, for completeness, we compute the charged scalar production cross section at the LHC and comment on the possibility of detection at current and future LHC runnings.

  14. Excluded volume and ion-ion correlation effects on the ionic atmosphere around B-DNA: Theory, simulations, and experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovanesyan, Zaven; Marucho, Marcelo; Medasani, Bharat; Fenley, Marcia O.; Guerrero-García, Guillermo Iván; Olvera de la Cruz, Mónica

    2014-12-14

    The ionic atmosphere around a nucleic acid regulates its stability in aqueous salt solutions. One major source of complexity in biological activities involving nucleic acids arises from the strong influence of the surrounding ions and water molecules on their structural and thermodynamic properties. Here, we implement a classical density functional theory for cylindrical polyelectrolytes embedded in aqueous electrolytes containing explicit (neutral hard sphere) water molecules at experimental solvent concentrations. Our approach allows us to include ion correlations as well as solvent and ion excluded volume effects for studying the structural and thermodynamic properties of highly charged cylindrical polyelectrolytes. Several models of size and charge asymmetric mixtures of aqueous electrolytes at physiological concentrations are studied. Our results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations. Our numerical calculations display significant differences in the ion density profiles for the different aqueous electrolyte models studied. However, similar results regarding the excess number of ions adsorbed to the B-DNA molecule are predicted by our theoretical approach for different aqueous electrolyte models. These findings suggest that ion counting experimental data should not be used alone to validate the performance of aqueous DNA-electrolyte models.

  15. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  16. Alpha Particle Physics Experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R.V.; Darrow, D.S.; Medley, S.S.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.J.; et al.

    1998-12-14

    Alpha particle physics experiments were done on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) during its deuterium-tritium (DT) run from 1993-1997. These experiments utilized several new alpha particle diagnostics and hundreds of DT discharges to characterize the alpha particle confinement and wave-particle interactions. In general, the results from the alpha particle diagnostics agreed with the classical single-particle confinement model in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) quiescent discharges. Also, the observed alpha particle interactions with sawteeth, toroidal Alfvn eigenmodes (TAE), and ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) waves were roughly consistent with theoretical modeling. This paper reviews what was learned and identifies what remains to be understood.

  17. Detection of alpha radiation in a beta radiation field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohagheghi, Amir H.; Reese, Robert P.

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting alpha particles in the presence of high activities of beta particles utilizing an alpha spectrometer. The apparatus of the present invention utilizes a magnetic field applied around the sample in an alpha spectrometer to deflect the beta particles from the sample prior to reaching the detector, thus permitting detection of low concentrations of alpha particles. In the method of the invention, the strength of magnetic field required to adequately deflect the beta particles and permit alpha particle detection is given by an algorithm that controls the field strength as a function of sample beta energy and the distance of the sample to the detector.

  18. Complex-Energy Shell-Model Description of Alpha Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Id Betan, R.; Nazarewicz, Witold

    2011-01-01

    In his pioneering work of alpha decay, Gamow assumed that the alpha particle formed inside the nucleus tunnels through the barrier of the alpha-daughter potential. The corresponding metastable state can be viewed as a complex-energy solution of the time-independent Schroedinger equation with the outgoing boundary condition. The formation of the alpha cluster, missing in the original Gamow formulation, can be described within the R-matrix theory in terms of the formation amplitude. In this work, the alpha decay process is described by computing the formation amplitude and barrier penetrability in a large complex-energy configuration space spanned by the complex-energy eigenstates of the finite Woods-Saxon (WS) potential. The proper normalization of the decay channel is essential as it strongly modifies the alpha-decay spectroscopic factor. The test calculations are carried out for the ^{212}Po alpha decay.

  19. Significance of radon exposures in developing cleanup criteria for radium-contaminated soil at the Weldon Spring Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blunt, D.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Hillman, D.J.

    1993-10-01

    The Weldon Spring site, located in St. Charles County, Missouri, is included on the National Priorities List (NPL) of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting cleanup activities at the site. This paper discusses the significance of radon exposures that may result from radium-contaminated soil and the approach currently being taken at the Weldon Spring site to address this issue.

  20. THE ATTENUATED RADON TRANSFORM: APPLICATION TO SINGLE-PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN THE PRESENCE OF A VARIABLE ATTENUATING MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gullberg, Grant T.

    1980-03-01

    The properties of the attenuated Radon transform and its application to single-photon emission computed tomography (ECT) are analyzed in detail. In nuclear medicine and biological research, the objective of ECT is to describe quantitatively the position and strengths of internal sources of injected radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides where the attenuation between the sources and detector is unknown. The problem is mathematically and practically quite different from well-known methods in transmission computed tomography (TCT) where only the attenuation is unknown. A mathematical structure using function theory and the theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces is developed to better understand the spectral properties of the attenuated Radon transform. The continuous attenuated Radon transform is reduced to a matrix operator for discrete angular and lateral sampling, and the reconstruction problem reduces to a system of linear equations. For variable attenuation coefficients frequently found in imaging internal organs, the numerical methods developed in this paper involve iterative techniques of performing the generalized inverse. Its application to nuclear medicine is demonstrated by reconstructions of transverse sections of the brain, heart, and liver.

  1. Collaborative Proposal: DUSEL R&D at the Kimballton Underground Facility (ICP-MS Confirmation, Material Assay, and Radon Reduction)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning O. Back

    2010-11-30

    Experiments measuring rare events, such as neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay, and those searching for, or measuring very weakly interacting particles, such as low energy solar neutrino experiments or direct dark matter searches, require ever lower backgrounds; particularly those from radioactive contamination of detector materials. The underground physics community strives to identify and develop materials with radioactive contamination at permissible levels, and to remove radioactive contaminants from materials, but each such material represents a separate dedicated research and development effort. This project attempted to help these research communities by expanding the capabilities in the United States, for indentifying low levels of radioactive contamination in detector materials through gamma ray spectroscopy. Additionally the project tried to make a cross comparison between well established gamma ray spectroscopy techniques for identifying radioactive contaminations and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy, which is a relatively new method for searching for uranium and thorium in materials. The project also studied the removal of radioactive radon gas for laboratory air, which showed that an inexpensive technologically simple radon scrubber can potentially be used for homes or businesses with high radon levels even after the employment of other mitigation techniques.

  2. {alpha} decay and shape coexistence in the {alpha}-rotor model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, J.D.; Bingham, C.R.; Nazarewicz, W.; Wauters, J.; Berggren, T.; Berggren, T.; Bingham, C.R.; Nazarewicz, W.; Nazarewicz, W.

    1997-09-01

    The particle-plus-rotor model was employed to study the fine structure seen in the {alpha} decay of even-even neutron-deficient nuclei in the Hg-Po region. The configuration mixing resulting from the shape coexistence between well-deformed prolate bands and spherical (or quasirotational oblate) structures in the daughter nuclei was considered. Experimental {alpha}-decay branching ratios are reproduced within one order of magnitude, except for the case of {sup 180}Hg, where the daughter nucleus {sup 176}Pt is expected to be triaxial in its ground state. The effect of configuration mixing on the relative intensities is discussed in detail, together with the sensitivity of results to the choice of the {alpha}-nucleus optical model parameters. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the snythesis methods of the prior art.

  4. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  5. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jr., Jefferson W.

    1983-01-01

    A method for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(OSOCl)CN, R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(Cl)CN and [R.sub.1 R.sub.2 C(CN)O].sub.2 SO wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 12 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art.

  6. Performance checks with the Alpha Sentry CAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    Before a CAM is put into service, it must be calibrated. The flow meter and detector must be calibrated with an external flow meter to provide accurate flow data, and the detector must be calibrated to produce accurate DPM data. Both flow and DPM data enter into the calculation of the Derived Air Concentration exposure (DAC-hr) by the CAM software. The focus of this report is on methods for checking that the DAC-hr alarm functionality has been properly calibrated and available in installed CAM instruments. The process begins with detector calibration. In order to calibrate the detector, the Alpha Sentry CAM is placed in an off-line calibration mode and detector efficiency calibration is selected. The user is prompted to enter the calibration source DPM and place the source in the CAM head. Upon latching the filter door with the source in place, a count is automatically initiated and completed. From the count data and the user entered DPM data, an efficiency is determined in the Alpha Sentry Manager (ASM) and stored in non-volatile memory in the CAM head electronics. This source is typically a plated {sup 239}Pu or {sup 241}Am source diffused into a stainless steel planchet.

  7. MFTF-. cap alpha. + T progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.D.

    1985-04-01

    Early in FY 1983, several upgrades of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) were proposed to the fusion community. The one most favorably received was designated MFTF-..cap alpha..+T. The engineering design of this device, guided by LLNL, has been a principal activity of the Fusion Engineering Design Center during FY 1983. This interim progress report represents a snapshot of the device design, which was begun in FY 1983 and will continue for several years. The report is organized as a complete design description. Because it is an interim report, some parts are incomplete; they will be supplied as the design study proceeds. As described in this report, MFTF-..cap alpha..+T uses existing facilities, many MFTF-B components, and a number of innovations to improve on the physics parameters of MFTF-B. It burns deuterium-tritium and has a central-cell Q of 2, a wall loading GAMMA/sub n/ of 2 MW/m/sup 2/ (with a central-cell insert module), and an availability of 10%. The machine is fully shielded, allows hands-on maintenance of components outside the vacuum vessel 24 h after shutdown, and has provisions for repair of all operating components.

  8. Run Spear Down Low-alpha Shutdown

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spear Down Low-alpha Shutdown Maintenance / AP University Holidays Sep Oct S 1 Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug 4/6/2012 SPEAR OPERATING SCHEDULE 2011-2012 2011 2012 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb 1 2 M 3 1 1 1 S 2 4 1 3 1 AP 2 2 2 W 5 2 4 2 AP AP 3 3 AP 1 3 T 3 5 3 4 1 4 2 4 1 6 4 F 2 7 5 2 1 5 3 1 5 2 T 1 6 4 S 3 8 5 3 7 5 4 1 6 3 2 6 4 2 6 8 5 S 4 9 6 8 6 low 2 7 4 3 7 5 3 7 5 9 MA MA 9 7 M 5 10 3 8 5 4 alpha 8 6 4 T 6 11 8 6 10 8 7 4 9 MA 6 5 9 MA AP 7 13 11 9 W 7 12 9 5 10 AP 7 6 AP 10 8 6 AP 10 AP 7 AP 13

  9. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  10. An investigation of radon release and mobility in the subsurface environment. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.

    1997-06-01

    Processes affecting transport of volatile species in the shallow soil column have recently been recognized as having a substantial impact on a broad array of real world problems. Investigations of volatile transport have ranged from studies of probable health impacts of radon infiltration into homes to pesticide and volatile organic contaminant mobility in the soil column. The objectives of many of these studies has been the development of numerical models of vapor phase (and solute) transport in shallow soils. An early model, LEACHM, developed by Hutson and Wagenent was recently modified enabling it to describe both solute and vapor phase transport of volatile chemicals in the soil. Subsequent tests of the latter model, named LEACHV, showed that use outside of a very restricted range of soil conditions resulted in large mass balance errors and unreasonable values for soil gas concentrations and vapor flux. The present research was undertaken in an effort to identify and correct the subroutines responsible for the problems and to allow the model to describe vapor phase transport in a much broader range of soil conditions.

  11. CXD 4605, Disposition Excess Equipment from Alpha 1 (4605)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disposition Excess Equipment from Alpha 1 (4605) Y-12 Site Office Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee The proposed action is to characterize and disposition equipment that was...

  12. Probable new type of reaction mechanism: Double. cap alpha. direct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; BERYLLIUM 8; CLUSTER MODEL; BISMUTH 209 TARGET; CARBON 12 REACTIONS; MULTI-NUCLEON TRANSFER REACTIONS; ALPHA ...

  13. Constraining parity and charge-parity violating varying-alpha...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Constraining parity and charge-parity violating varying-alpha theory through laboratory experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Constraining parity and charge-parity ...

  14. Synthesis of alpha-amino acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, J.W. Jr.

    1983-01-25

    A method is described for synthesizing alpha amino acids proceeding through novel intermediates of the formulas: R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(OSOCl)CN, R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(Cl)CN and [R[sub 1]R[sub 2]C(CN)O][sub 2]SO wherein R[sub 1] and R[sub 2] are each selected from hydrogen monovalent substituted and unsubstituted hydrocarbon radicals of 1 to 10 carbon atoms. The use of these intermediates allows the synthesis steps to be exothermic and results in an overall synthesis method which is faster than the synthesis methods of the prior art. No Drawings

  15. Method for using a yeast alpha-amylase promoter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gao, Johnway; Skeen, Rodney S.; Hooker, Brian S.; Anderson, Daniel B.

    2003-04-22

    The present invention provides the promoter clone discovery of an alpha-amylase gene of a starch utilizing yeast strain Schwanniomyces castellii. The isolated alpha-amylase promoter is an inducible promoter, which can regulate strong gene expression in starch culture medium.

  16. Metathesis process for preparing an alpha, omega-functionalized olefin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burdett, Kenneth A.; Mokhtarzadeh, Morteza; Timmers, Francis J.

    2010-10-12

    A cross-metathesis process for preparing an .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, and an .alpha.-olefin having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene. The process involves contacting in a first reaction zone an .alpha.-functionalized internal olefin, such as methyl oleate, and an .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms, such as 1-decene, with a first metathesis catalyst to prepare an effluent stream containing the .alpha.,.omega.-functionalized olefin, such as methyl 9-decenoate, an unfunctionalized internal olefin, such as 9-octadecene, unconverted reactant olefins, and optionally, an .alpha.,.omega.-difunctionalized internal olefinic dimer, such as dimethyl 9-octadecen-1,18-dioate; separating said effluent streams; then contacting in a second reaction zone the unfunctionalized internal olefin with ethylene in the presence of a second metathesis catalyst to obtain a second product effluent containing the .alpha.-olefinic monomer having three or more carbon atoms; and cycling a portion of the .alpha.-olefinic monomer stream(s) to the first zone.

  17. A simple procedure to prepare spherical {alpha}-alumina powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Hongyu [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China); Ning Guiling [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)], E-mail: ninggl@dlut.edu.cn; Gan Zhihong; Lin Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemicals, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116012 (China)

    2009-04-02

    Spherical {alpha}-alumina powders were prepared by the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum isopropoxide in a hydrolysis system consisting of octanol and acetonitrile. Diverse solvents to dissolve reactant formed diverse hydrolysis systems and affected particle shape of {alpha}-alumina powders. The precursors crystallized to {gamma}-alumina at 1000 deg. C and converted to {alpha}-alumina at 1150 deg. C without intermediate phases. The particle morphology of precursor was retained after it crystallized to {alpha}-alumina. The heating rate influenced the particle shape and the state of agglomeration during calcination process. The thermal properties of the precursors were characterized by thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis. X-ray diffraction technique was used to confirm the conversion of crystalline phase of alumina powders from amorphous to {alpha}-phase. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the morphologies and size of the precursors and products.

  18. Method of and apparatus for measuring the mean concentration of thoron and/or radon in a gas mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lucas, Henry

    1990-01-01

    A method of and an apparatus for detecting and accurately measuring the mean concentrations of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in a gas mixture, such as the ambient atmosphere in a mine, is provided. The apparatus includes an alpha target member which defines at least one operative target surface and which is preferably fabricated from a single piece of an alpha particle sensitive material. At least one portion of the operative target surface is covered with an alpha particle filter. The uncovered and filter covered operative surface is exposed to the gas mixture containing the .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn. In the radioactive decay series of these isotopes the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of .sup.222 Rn is about 1.1 MeV less than the maximum kinetic energy emitted by the alpha decay of a .sup.220 Tn. The alpha particle filter has a predetermined mass per unit area of the covered portion of the operative target surface that prevents penetration of alpha particles which originate from .sup.222 Rn decay, but which allows passage therethrough of the maximum kinetic energy alpha particles from .sup.220 Tn decay. Thus, a count of the alpha particle tracks in the uncovered portion of the target member is proportional to the mean concentration of sum of .sup.222 Rn and .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture, while the count of alpha tracks in the target member under the filter is proportional to the concentration of only the .sup.220 Tn in the gas mixture.

  19. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant

  20. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  1. Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEU/Pb Core (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rossi alpha Measurements and Calculations for HEUPb Core You are accessing ...

  2. Selective flow path alpha particle detector and method of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for monitoring alpha contamination are provided in which ions generated in the air surrounding the item, by the passage of alpha particles, are moved to a distant detector location. The parts of the item from which ions are withdrawn can be controlled by restricting the air flow over different portions of the apparatus. In this way, detection of internal and external surfaces separately, for instance, can be provided. The apparatus and method are particularly suited for use in undertaking alpha contamination measurements during the commissioning operations.

  3. ARM - Evaluation Product - LASSO Alpha 1 Data Bundles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsLASSO Alpha 1 Data Bundles ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : LASSO Alpha 1 Data Bundles [ ARM research - evaluation data product ] The Alpha 1 release contains initial data bundles from the large-eddy simulation (LES) ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) workflow pilot

  4. Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.

    1993-01-01

    Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

  5. Single and double grid long-range alpha detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.

    1993-03-16

    Alpha particle detectors capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a voltage is generated in a single electrically conductive grid while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across the conductive grid. The current in the conductive grid can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. Another embodiment builds on this concept and provides an additional grid so that air ions of both polarities can be detected. The detector can be used in many applications, such as for pipe or duct, tank, or soil sample monitoring.

  6. Alpha heating and burning plasmas in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Spears, B. K.; Nora, R.; Bose, A.; Howard, J.; Woo, K. M.; Edwards, M. J.; Sanz, J.

    2015-06-01

    Estimating the level of alpha heating and determining the onset of the burning plasma regime is essential to finding the path towards thermonuclear ignition. In a burning plasma, the alpha heating exceeds the external input energy to the plasma. Using a simple model of the implosion, it is shown that a general relation can be derived, connecting the burning plasma regime to the yield enhancement due to alpha heating and to experimentally measurable parameters such as the Lawson ignition parameter. A general alpha-heating curve is found, independent of the target and suitable to assess the performance of all laser fusion experiments whether direct or indirect drive. The onset of the burning plasma regime inside the hot spot of current implosions on the National Ignition Facility requires a fusion yield of about 50 kJ.

  7. {alpha}-cluster states in N{ne}Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, V. Z.; Rogachev, G. V.

    2012-10-20

    The importance of studies of {alpha}-Cluster structure in N{ne}Z light nuclei is discussed. Spin-parity assignments for the low-lying levels in {sup 10}C are suggested.

  8. Methods of Using Alpha Channeling Together with Transformer Recharging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methods of Using Alpha Channeling Together with Transformer Recharging A tokamak current can be sustained using rf waves for transformer recharging at low density and high-Z with...

  9. NREL Releases Alpha-Version of MLife | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Alpha-Version of MLife NREL Releases Alpha-Version of MLife February 24, 2012 - 11:38am Addthis This is an excerpt from the First Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Computer modeling and turbine simulations are important elements of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program contributions to the industry's development of next-generation wind turbines. For more than two decades, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been developing advanced

  10. Labeled ALPHA4BETA2 ligands and methods therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Pichika, Ramaiah; Potkin, Steven; Leslie, Frances; Chattopadhyay, Sankha

    2013-02-19

    Contemplated compositions and methods are employed to bind in vitro and in vivo to an .alpha.4.beta.2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in a highly selective manner. Where such compounds are labeled, compositions and methods employing such compounds can be used for PET and SPECT analysis. Alternatively, and/or additionally contemplated compounds can be used as antagonists, partial agonists or agonists in the treatment of diseases or conditions associated with .alpha.4.beta..beta.2 dysfunction.

  11. Small-Molecule Inhibition of TNF-alpha

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small-Molecule Inhibition of TNF-alpha Tumour necrosis factor is a polypeptide cytokine involved in inflammation and the acute phase response. TNF-alpha is present in larger quantities in persons with rheumatoid arthritis or Crohn's disease. Direct inhibition of TNF-a by the commercial biological agents etanercept (Enbrel), infliximab (Remicade), adalimumab (Humira), has produced significant advances in rheumatoid arthritis treatment and validated the extra-cellular inhibition of this

  12. Producing Linear Alpha Olefins From Biomass - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Producing Linear Alpha Olefins From Biomass Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Linear alpha olefins (LAOs) are valuable commodity chemicals traditionally derived from petroleum. They are versatile building blocks for making a range of chemical products like polyethylene, synthetic oils, plasticizers, detergents and oilfield fluids. Relying on fossil fuel to manufacture LAOs is problematic. Not only are the standard methods

  13. Preparation and synthetic application of {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium compound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Y.; Matsubara, S.; Utimoto, K. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Although samarium(II) iodide-mediated reaction of organohalides with carbonyl compounds has been applied to various organic syntheses, intermediary organosamarium species could be detected only when HMPA exists in the reaction system. The authors now report the detection of {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium compound in the absence of HMPA and application to diastereoselective reaction with aldehydes. A treatment of the organosamarium reagent, prepared from 1-chloroethyl phenyl sulfide and samarium(II) iodide, with D{sub 2}O afforded 1-deuterioethyl phenyl sulfide in 53% yield (82% D). The reagent reacted with aldehyde containing a stereogenic center at {alpha}-position to give {beta}-hydroxysulfide with high diastereoselectivity. Reaction using Barbier type procedure afforded the same results. These results suggest that {alpha}-phenylthioethylsamarium species is also generated in the Barbier type reaction. Configurational stability of {alpha}-thiosubstituted alkylmetal compounds seems to depend on the applied metal. Hoffmann Test indicated that the configuration of {alpha}-phenylthloethylsamarium compound is unchanged during the reaction with aldehyde, while that of {alpha}-alkylthioalkyllithium is unstable.

  14. Minimal Determinants for Binding Activated G alpha from the Structure of a G alpha i1-Peptide Dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston,C.; Lobanova, E.; Shavkunov, A.; Low, J.; Ramer, J.; Blasesius, R.; Fredericks, Z.; willard, F.; Kuhlman, B.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    G-Proteins cycle between an inactive GDP-bound state and an active GTP-bound state, serving as molecular switches that coordinate cellular signaling. We recently used phage display to identify a series of peptides that bind G{alpha}subunits in a nucleotide-dependent manner [Johnston, C. A., Willard, F. S., Jezyk, M. R., Fredericks, Z., Bodor, E. T., Jones, M. B., Blaesius, R., Watts, V. J., Harden, T. K., Sondek, J., Ramer, J. K., and Siderovski, D. P. (2005) Structure 13, 1069-1080]. Here we describe the structural features and functions of KB-1753, a peptide that binds selectively to GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}}- and GTP{gamma}S-bound states of G{alpha}{sup i} subunits. KB-1753 blocks interaction of G{alpha}{sub transducin} with its effector, cGMP phosphodiesterase, and inhibits transducin-mediated activation of cGMP degradation. Additionally, KB-1753 interferes with RGS protein binding and resultant GAP activity. A fluorescent KB-1753 variant was found to act as a sensor for activated G{alpha} in vitro. The crystal structure of KB-1753 bound to G{alpha}{sub i1}-GDP{center_dot}AlF{sub 4{sup -}} reveals binding to a conserved hydrophobic groove between switch II and 3 helices and, along with supporting biochemical data and previous structural analyses, supports the notion that this is the site of effector interactions for G{alpha}i subunits.

  15. A modeling study of the effect of depth of burial of depleted uranium and thorium on radon gas flux at a dry desert alluvial soil radioactive waste management site (RWMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-08-01

    An integral part of designing low-level waste (LLW) disposal pits and their associated closure covers in very dry desert alluvium is the use of a radon gas transport and fate model. Radon-222 has the potential to be a real heath hazard. The production of radon-222 results from the radioactive decay (a particle emission) of radium-226 in the uranium-235 and 238 Bateman chains. It is also produced in the thorium-230 series. Both long lived radionuclides have been proposed for disposal in the shallow land burial pits in Area 5 RWMS compound of Nevada Test Site (NTS). The constructed physics based model includes diffusion and barometric pressure-induced advection of an M-chain of radionuclides. The usual Bateman decay mechanics are included for each radionuclide. Both linear reversible and linear irreversible first order sorption kinetics are assumed for each radionuclide. This report presents the details of using the noble gas transport model, CASCADR9, in an engineering design study mode. Given data on the low-level waste stream, which constitutes the ultimate source of radon-222 in the RWMS, CASCADR9 is used to generate the surface flux (pCi/cm{sup 2}-sec) of radon-222 under the realistic atmospheric and alluvial soil conditions found in the RWMS at Area 5, of the NTS. Specifically, this study examines the surface flux of radon-222 as a function of the depth of burial below the land surface.

  16. {open_quotes}Radon{close_quotes} - the system of Soviet designed regional waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horak, W.C.; Reisman, A.; Purvis, E.E. III

    1997-07-01

    The Soviet Union established a system of specialized regional facilities to dispose of radioactive waste generated by sources other than the nuclear fuel cycle. The system had 16 facilities in Russia, 5 in Ukraine, one in each of the other CIS states, and one in each of the Baltic Republics. These facilities are still being used. The major generators of radioactive waste they process these are research and industrial organizations, medical and agricultural institution and other activities not related to nuclear power. Waste handled by these facilities is mainly beta- and gamma-emitting nuclides with half lives of less than 30 years. The long-lived and alpha-emitting isotopic content is insignificant. Most of the radwaste has low and medium radioactivity levels. The facilities also handle spent radiation sources, which are highly radioactive and contain 95-98 percent of the activity of all the radwaste buried at these facilities.

  17. Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the Guidelines Establishing Criteria for Excluding Buildings from the Energy Performance Requirements of Section 543 of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act as Amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005

  18. Alpha-beta coordination method for collective search

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention comprises a decentralized coordination strategy called alpha-beta coordination. The alpha-beta coordination strategy is a family of collective search methods that allow teams of communicating agents to implicitly coordinate their search activities through a division of labor based on self-selected roles and self-determined status. An agent can play one of two complementary roles. An agent in the alpha role is motivated to improve its status by exploring new regions of the search space. An agent in the beta role is also motivated to improve its status, but is conservative and tends to remain aggregated with other agents until alpha agents have clearly identified and communicated better regions of the search space. An agent can select its role dynamically based on its current status value relative to the status values of neighboring team members. Status can be determined by a function of the agent's sensor readings, and can generally be a measurement of source intensity at the agent's current location. An agent's decision cycle can comprise three sequential decision rules: (1) selection of a current role based on the evaluation of the current status data, (2) selection of a specific subset of the current data, and (3) determination of the next heading using the selected data. Variations of the decision rules produce different versions of alpha and beta behaviors that lead to different collective behavior properties.

  19. Gross alpha analytical modifications that improve wastewater treatment compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, B.J.; Arndt, S.

    2007-07-01

    This paper will propose an improvement to the gross alpha measurement that will provide more accurate gross alpha determinations and thus allow for more efficient and cost-effective treatment of site wastewaters. To evaluate the influence of salts that may be present in wastewater samples from a potentially broad range of environmental conditions, two types of efficiency curves were developed, each using a thorium-230 (Th-230) standard spike. Two different aqueous salt solutions were evaluated, one using sodium chloride, and one using salts from tap water drawn from the Bergen County, New Jersey Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW). For each curve, 13 to 17 solutions were prepared, each with the same concentration of Th-230 spike, but differing in the total amount of salt in the range of 0 to 100 mg. The attenuation coefficients were evaluated for the two salt types by plotting the natural log of the counted efficiencies vs. the weight of the sample's dried residue retained on the planchet. The results show that the range of the slopes for each of the attenuation curves varied by approximately a factor of 2.5. In order to better ensure the accuracy of results, and thus verify compliance with the gross alpha wastewater effluent criterion, projects depending on gross alpha measurements of environmental waters and wastewaters should employ gross alpha efficiency curves prepared with salts that mimic, as closely as possible, the salt content of the aqueous environmental matrix. (authors)

  20. Utility of extracting {alpha}-particle energy by waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.; Herrmann, M.C.

    1994-05-01

    The utility of extracting {alpha}-particle power, and then diverting this power to fast fuel ions, is investigated. As power is diverted to fast ions and then to ions, a number of effects come into play, as the relative amounts of pressure taken up by electrons, fuel ions, and fast {alpha}-particles shift. In addition, if the {alpha}-particle power is diverted to fast fuel ions, there is an enhanced fusion reactivity because of the nonthermal component of the ion distribution. Some useful expressions for describing these effects are derived, and it is shown that fusion reactors with power density about twice what otherwise might be obtained can be contemplated, so long as a substantial amount of the {alpha}-particle power can be diverted. Interestingly, in this mode of operation, once the electron heat is sufficiently confined, further improvement in confinement is actually not desirable. A similar improvement in fusion power density can be obtained for advanced fuel mixtures such as D-He{sup 3}, where the power of both the energetic {alpha}-particles and the energetic protons might be diverted advantageously.

  1. Complexation of americium with {alpha}-d-iso-saccharinate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, S.; Knutsson, A.; Oedegaard-Jensen, A.; Ekberg, C.; Jolsteraa, R.

    2008-07-01

    Under alkaline conditions, cellulose will degrade, with iso-saccharinate being the dominant end-product. One of the formed diastereomers, the {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate, is a strong complexing agent for tri- and tetravalent actinides and is the dominant conformation at pH > 5, rendering other conformations insignificant at neutral to alkaline conditions. The presence of {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate increases the amount of metal in solution and also affects the surface interactions. Understanding this complexation is of relevance for long-term repository assessments. This study has investigated the complexation of americium with {alpha}-D-iso-saccharinate using solvent-extraction and radioanalytical techniques at 25 deg. C. The stability constants for the complexation reactions were determined by curve fitting of a distribution-ratio equation to experimental data.

  2. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steadman, P.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure is disclosed. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. 4 figs.

  3. Apparatus for detecting alpha radiation in difficult access areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steadman, Peter; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1997-09-02

    An electrostatic alpha radiation detector for measuring alpha radiation emitted from inside an enclosure comprising an electrically conductive expandable electrode for insertion into the enclosure. After insertion, the electrically conductive expandable electrode is insulated from the enclosure and defines a decay cavity between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure so that air ions generated in the decay cavity are electrostatically captured by the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure when an electric potential is applied between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure. Indicator means are attached to the electrically conductive expandable electrode for indicating an electrical current produced by generation of the air ions generated in the decay cavity by collisions between air molecules and the alpha particles emitted from the enclosure. A voltage source is connected between the indicator means and the electrically conductive enclosure for creating an electric field between the electrically conductive expandable electrode and the enclosure.

  4. Alpha detection in pipes using an inverting membrane scintillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrick, D.T.; Cremer, C.D.; Lowry, W.

    1995-10-01

    Characterization of surface alpha emitting contamination inside enclosed spaces such as piping systems presents an interesting radiological measurement challenge. Detection of these alpha particles from the exterior of the pipe is impossible since the alpha particles are completely absorbed by the pipe wall. Traditional survey techniques, using hand-held instruments, simply can not be used effectively inside pipes. Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. is currently developing an enhancement to its Pipe Explorer{trademark} system that will address this challenge. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} uses a unique sensor deployment method where an inverted tubular membrane is propagated through complex pipe runs via air pressure. The inversion process causes the membrane to fold out against the pipe wall, such that no part of the membrane drags along the pipe wall. This deployment methodology has been successfully demonstrated at several DOE sites to transport specially designed beta and gamma, scintillation detectors into pipes ranging in length up to 250 ft.

  5. Study of the Pygmy Dipole Resonance in {sup 124}Sn by means of the ({alpha},{alpha}'{gamma}) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endres, J.; Zilges, A.; Pietralla, N.; Savran, D.; Sonnabend, K.; Harakeh, M. N.; Stoica, V.; Woertche, H.; Butler, P.; Herzberg, R. D.; Scheck, M.; Kruecken, R.; Popescu, L.; Harissopulos, S.; Lagoyannis, A.

    2009-01-28

    In recent years {alpha}-{gamma} coincidence experiments at 136 MeV incident energy on {sup 48}Ca, {sup 140}Ce, {sup 138}Ba and {sup 124}Sn were performed at the KVI in Groningen to study the isospin character of electric dipole excitations below the particle threshold, frequently called Pygmy Dipole Resonance (PDR). An array of HPGe {gamma}-detectors has been used in coincidence with the Big-Bite Spectrometer (BBS) and a resolution of about 10 keV in the {gamma}-ray energy has been achieved. The results show that the excitation patterns of the PDR in the ({alpha},{alpha}') reaction seem to differ significantly from results obtained in Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF)({gamma},{gamma}') measurements. The PDR, which until now has been assigned to one excitation mode, splits up into two parts: One that is excited in ({alpha},{alpha}'{gamma}) and ({gamma},{gamma}') reactions (denoting a dominant isoscalar character), and one that is only excited in ({gamma},{gamma}')(denoting a dominant isovector character). This indicates that two different excitation mechanisms produce these low-lying E1 excitations [1], The preliminary results of the latest measurements on the N = 82 nucleus {sup 138}Ba and the Z = 50 nucleus {sup 124}Sn show that this break up into two parts is a common feature of the PDR in semi-magic nuclei.

  6. Development of a system for survey of radon concentration of the Dayton area using a liquid scintillation counter and analysis of the data. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T.

    1992-03-01

    A system to do a large scale survey was developed. The data obtained from the survey was analyzed using a database. The database incorporated an equation for converting cpm into radon concentration (pCi/1). The equation of conversion, protocol for measuring radon concentration, survey form, and a database program were modified (from previous theses) or developed for this thesis. The elution time constant, adsorption time constant, and calibration factor were calculated for equation of conversion. Two surveys were during the course of the thesis. On the first survey, the arithmetic average radon concentration with standard error of the mean was 2.9 + 0.5 pCi/1. The geometric mean (G.M.) was 1.5 pCi/1 with geometric standard deviation of 2.7 pCi/1. There were 85 samples taken during the first survey. On the second survey, with 156 samples The arithmetic average and std. deviation was 3.8 + 0.3 pCi/l. The G.M. was 3.8 pCi/l with geometric std. deviation of 2.2 pCi/1. The second survey was done during winter using a modified survey form. The results from both surveys indicated a log-normal distribution. The system is in process of begin certified by the EPA. The system is ready to be used for larger scale survey.

  7. Direct analysis of air filter samples for alpha emitting isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohagheghi, A.H.; Ghanbari, F.; Ebara, S.B.; Enghauser, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bakhtiar, S.N. [Westinghouse WIPP, Carlsbad, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The traditional method for determination of alpha emitting isotopes on air filters has been to process the samples by radiochemical methods. However, this method is too slow for cases of incidents involving radioactive materials where the determination of personnel received dose is urgent. A method is developed to directly analyze the air filters taken from personal and area air monitors. The site knowledge is used in combination with alpha spectral information to identify isotopes. A mathematical function is developed to estimate the activity for each isotope. The strengths and weaknesses of the method are discussed.

  8. First-principles elastic properties of (alpha)-Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderlind, P; Klepeis, J E

    2008-11-04

    Density-functional electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate the ambient pressure and low temperature elastic properties of the ground-state {alpha} phase of plutonium metal. The electronic structure and correlation effects are modeled within a fully relativistic anti-ferromagnetic treatment with a generalized gradient approximation for the electron exchange and correlation functionals. The 13 independent elastic constants, for the monoclinic {alpha}-Pu system, are calculated for the observed geometry. A comparison of the results with measured data from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy for a cast sample is made.

  9. {alpha} decay of {sup 180,181}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-11-15

    A detailed {alpha}-decay study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Pb has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt). In comparison with the literature, more precise data have been deduced for the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state in this nucleus, which is presumably based on the neutron {nu}h{sub 9/2} spherical orbital. Improved {alpha}-decay data were also measured for {sup 180}Pb.

  10. Alpha low-level stored waste systems design study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Teheranian, B.; Quapp, W.J.

    1992-08-01

    The Stored Waste System Design Study (SWSDS), commissioned by the Waste Technology Development Department at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), examines relative life-cycle costs associated with three system concepts for processing the alpha low-level waste (alpha-LLW) stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Transuranic Storage Area at the INEL. The three system concepts are incineration/melting; thermal treatment/solidification; and sort, treat, and repackage. The SWSDS identifies system functional and operational requirements and assesses implementability; effectiveness; cost; and demonstration, testing, and evaluation (DT&E) requirements for each of the three concepts.