Sample records for allowing greater mobility

  1. AGREEMENT FOR MOBILE TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND ALLOWANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    AGREEMENT FOR MOBILE TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND ALLOWANCE My signature on the "Mobile Technology Access and conditions identified in the Access to Mobile Technology and the Payment Options for Mobile Technology policies [http://hr.uoregon.edu/policy/MobileTechnologyDevice.html]. 2. I understand that that I must

  2. Multi-vehicle Mobility Allowance Shuttle Transit (MAST) System - An Analytical Model to Select the Fleet Size and a Scheduling Heuristic 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobility allowance shuttle transit (MAST) system is a hybrid transit system in which vehicles are allowed to deviate from a fixed route to serve flexible demand. A mixed integer programming (MIP) formulation for the static scheduling problem...

  3. Multi-vehicle Mobility Allowance Shuttle Transit (MAST) System - An Analytical Model to Select the Fleet Size and a Scheduling Heuristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Wei

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobility allowance shuttle transit (MAST) system is a hybrid transit system in which vehicles are allowed to deviate from a fixed route to serve flexible demand. A mixed integer programming (MIP) formulation for the static scheduling problem...

  4. Policy #3310 Allowance for Usage of Personal Mobile Devices and Wireless Service for University Business 1 OLD DOMINION UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a wireless service allowance must maintain an active wireless service contract for the life of the allowance

  5. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  6. Update on mobile applications in dermatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shivani; Eluri, Madhu; Boyers, Lindsay N; Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FDA regulation of mobile health technologies. N Engl J Med.providers. As technology advances, mobile applications maytechnology continues to advance and physicians have greater access to mobile-

  7. RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

  8. Greater West Texas State Employee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we change lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2013 Annual Report of Transportation-Odessa Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Local Campaign.ttuhsc.edu/relations/secc www.facebook.com/gwtsecc #12;2013 Top Greater West Texas State Agencies In Employee Participation 2013

  9. Distinguishing Between Greater and Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    .e. knee high), minimal cover at ground level, and an abundance of flowering plants that harbor insects, see Ecology and Management of the Greater Prairie-Chicken E-969 at nrem.okstate.edu/extension. Threats power devel- opment. GPCs can tolerate some minimal levels of fragmentation, but at higher levels

  10. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the SO{sub 2} allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO{sub 2} emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO{sub 2} for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO{sub x} emission averaging, the utility would average NO{sub x} emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  11. Allowance trading: Market operations and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the SO[sub 2] allowance system as defined by Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments offers utilities greater compliance flexibility than EPA technology standards, State Implementation Plan (SEP) performance standards, or EPA bubble/offset strategies. Traditional methods at best offered the utility the ability to trade emissions between different units at a particular plant. The SO[sub 2] emissions trading system advocated under Title IV will allow a utility to trade emissions across its utility system, and/or trade emissions between utilities to take advantage of interfirm control cost differences. The use of transferable emission allowances offers utilities greater flexibility in the choice of how to control emissions: the choices include fuel switching, flue gas scrubbing, environmental dispatch, repowering, and even the choice not to control emissions [as long as the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements are met]. The added flexibility allows utilities to choose the least cost manner of compliance with Title IV requirements. It is hoped (intended) that pollution control cost-minimization by individual utilities will in turn reduce the cost of controlling SO[sub 2] for the electric utility industry in aggregate. In addition, through the use of NO[sub x] emission averaging, the utility would average NO[sub x] emissions from different point sources in order to comply with the prescribed emission standard.

  12. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2011 Annual Report of Transportation Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Campaign Manager Nicole campaign information 2011 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (chair), Texas Tech University Health

  13. 2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign You will find, as you look,717 and West Central Texas SECC raised $131,797 for a combined total of $957,514! · 4,608 state employees gave a fan! www.facebook.com/pages/Greater-West-Texas-State- Employee-Charitable-Campaign/103542263037744

  14. Sinch : searching intelligently on a mobile device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nayak, Rajeev (Rajeev R.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sinch is an application that allows mobile device users to obtain answers to their questions without having to perform a web search in their mobile browser. Questions are answered by human beings using Mechanical Turk, an ...

  15. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2012 Annual Report campaign information 2012 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (Chair), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center David Abercia, Texas Tech University Dianah Ascencio, Texas Department of Transportation

  16. AGREEMENT FOR MOBILE TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND My signature on the "Mobile Technology Access and Payment Option Request"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    AGREEMENT FOR MOBILE TECHNOLOGY ACCESS AND ALLOWANCE My signature on the "Mobile Technology Access and conditions identified in the Access to Mobile Technology and the Payment Options for Mobile Technology policies [http://hr.uoregon.edu/policy/MobileTechnologyDevice.html]. 2. I understand that that I must

  17. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  18. Sketch Recognition on Mobile Devices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucchese, George 1987-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Sketch recognition allows computers to understand and model hand drawn sketches and diagrams. Traditionally sketch recognition systems required a pen based PC interface, but powerful mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones can provide a new...

  19. Strategic analysis of mobile viral marketing through a holistic study in technological evolution of mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surya, Yulia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid advancement in Electronic Communication gives rise to the popularity of Viral Marketing. Mobile Communication, in particular, offers greater potential in the utilization of this Word-of-Mouth phenomenon as a Marketing ...

  20. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  1. Mobile cinema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Pengkai, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops techniques and methods that extend the art and craft of storytelling, and in particular enable the creation of mobile cinema. Stories are always constrained by the medium in which they are told and the ...

  2. Mobile Media Poetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raley, Rita

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cell Phone Culture: Mobile Technology in Everyday Life.as well as mobile communication technologies. In turn, wefor distribution via mobile communication technologies. Such

  3. Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dourish,Paul

    Anchored Mobilities: Mobile Technology and Transnational Migration Amanda Williams Donald Bren Irvine, CA 92697-3440, USA jpd@ics.uci.edu ABSTRACT Mobile technologies are deployed into diverse social mobility. We present an ethnography of transnational Thai retirees and their uses of mobile technology

  4. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftware and hardware orIndexes LLC Jump

  5. Foot Tapping for Mobile Interaction Andrew Crossan, Stephen Brewster, Alexander Ng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, John

    become a standard part of mobile interfaces. Touch screens allow a user to quickly and easily perform

  6. The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

  7. Mobile Biomass Pelletizing System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Mason

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project examines multiple aspects of the pelletizing process to determine the feasibility of pelletizing biomass using a mobile form factor system. These aspects are: the automatic adjustment of the die height in a rotary-style pellet mill, the construction of the die head to allow the use of ceramic materials for extreme wear, integrating a heat exchanger network into the entire process from drying to cooling, the use of superheated steam for adjusting the moisture content to optimum, the economics of using diesel power to operate the system; a break-even analysis of estimated fixed operating costs vs. tons per hour capacity. Initial development work has created a viable mechanical model. The overall analysis of this model suggests that pelletizing can be economically done using a mobile platform.

  8. Asbestos : operating system security for mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Martijn

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a port of the Asbestos operating system to the ARM processor. The port to the ARM allows Asbestos to run on mobile devices such as cell phones and personal digital ...

  9. Mobile Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Alternative Fueling Station Locator is available on-the-go via cell phones, BlackBerrys, or other personal handheld devices. The mobile locator allows users to find the five closest biodiesel, electricity, E85, hydrogen, natural gas, and propane fueling sites using Google technology.

  10. PRESCRIPTIVE APPROACH 1. Actual and Allowed LPD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    METHOD #12;SECTION 5 CHANGES TO 140.6-B SLIDE 183 TYPE OF BUILDING ALLOWED LIGHTING POWER DENSITY (WATTS by ensuring that the actual lighting power installed in a space is less than the allowed lighting power for that space. SLIDE 1757/31/2014 PRESCRIPTIVE METHOD #12;SECTION 9 ACTUAL LIGHTING POWER The actual indoor

  11. The Clean Air Act and bonus allowances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markey, E.J.; Moorhead, C.J.

    1991-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses how utility companies can benefit in the form of bonus sulfur dioxide allowances from the Environmental Protection Agency by investing in renewable energy sources such as wind and promoting conservation. Topics discussed include the Clean Air Act Amendments, acid rain, energy conservation, renewable energy sources, and the procedure for gaining bonus allowances.

  12. Quasiconformal Hyperelasticity Cavitation is not Allowed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalev, Leonid

    Quasiconformal Hyperelasticity when Cavitation is not Allowed Tadeusz Iwaniec Jani Onninen Abstract that the lower bound at (3) prevents all sorts of cavitation from growing to higher dimensions. For instance

  13. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  14. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  15. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  16. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  17. Mobile Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7,AMission MissionMistakesMoMobile

  18. Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview DARRYL E. JORY and EDWIN S. IVERSEN mariculture in the greater Caribbean area (Fig. 1). Sea- food is and has been a staple for Carib- bean people since pre-Columbian times. ABSIRACF-Marine mollusks suitable for mariculture in the Caribbean area have

  19. Cooperating mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harrington, John J.; Eskridge, Steven E.; Hurtado, John E.; Byrne, Raymond H.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature mobile robot provides a relatively inexpensive mobile robot. A mobile robot for searching an area provides a way for multiple mobile robots in cooperating teams. A robotic system with a team of mobile robots communicating information among each other provides a way to locate a source in cooperation. A mobile robot with a sensor, a communication system, and a processor, provides a way to execute a strategy for searching an area.

  20. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  1. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  2. asymptomatic greater kudus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Cover Change (1975-2000) in the Greater Border Lakes Region Research Map NRS-3 United land cover classifications and change detection for a 13.8 million ha landscape...

  3. Captive propagation and brood behavior of greater prairie chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1994 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  4. How Mobility Increases Mobile Cloud Computing Processing Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    How Mobility Increases Mobile Cloud Computing Processing Capacity Anh-Dung Nguyen, Patrick S--In this paper, we address a important and still unanswered question in mobile cloud computing "how mobility the resilience of mobile cloud computing services. Keywords--Mobile cloud computing, mobility, quality of service

  5. Online Perfect Matching and Mobile Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove, Edward F.; Kao, Ming-Yang; Krishnan, P.; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction We present an online problem related to the emerging #0Celd of mobile comput- ing #5BAwP, DKM, IDJ, USE, Wei#5D. Current trends suggest that in the near future there will be many customers with portable computing boxes, trying to connect toahuge..., and the degree of each customer is greater than 2, because intuitively, more paths help the algorithm more than adversary. References #5BAwP#5D B. Awerbuch and D. Peleg, #5CConcurrent Online Tracking of Mobile Users," Pro- ceedings of SIGCOMM 1991. #5BABK#5D Y...

  6. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  7. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  8. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  9. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  10. Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mobile Museum Tours 1 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE MUSEUM TOURS Using mobile technologies for multimedia MUSEUM TOURS Abstract Mobile technology was used to deliver learner-centred experiences to visitors: Across generations and cultures, Banff : Canada (2006)" #12;Mobile Museum Tours 2 RUNNING HEAD: MOBILE

  11. Keeping Mobile Robots Connected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing robust algorithms for mobile agents with reliable communication is difficult due to the distributed nature of computation, in mobile ad hoc networks (MANETs) the matter is exacerbated by the need to ensure ...

  12. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  13. Tandem mobile robot system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle system for terrain navigation mobility provides a way to climb stairs, cross crevices, and navigate across difficult terrain by coupling two or more mobile robots with a coupling device and controlling the robots cooperatively in tandem.

  14. Mobile Proactive secret sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David Andrew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes mobile proactive secret sharing (MPSS), an extension of proactive secret sharing. Mobile proactive secret sharing is much more flexible than proactive secret sharing in terms of group membership: ...

  15. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  16. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  17. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes requirements, assigns responsibilities, and provides guidance for federal mobile technology management and employee use of both government furnished and personally-owned mobile devices within DOE and NNSA. Establishes requirements for use of User Agreements to govern mobile devices used for official duties. Does not cancel other directives.

  18. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discoveryo...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discoveryof virulence factors in Salmonella. Systems analysis of multiple regulator perturbations allows discoveryof...

  19. Transaction Networks: Evidence from Mobile Money in Kenya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack, William

    Mobile money allows households in Kenya to spread risk more efficiently. In this paper we show that these efficiencies are achieved through deeper financial integration and expanded informal networks. Active networks are ...

  20. Mastery and the mobile future of massively multiplayer games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Daniel, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What game design opportunities do we create when we extend massively multiplayer online games (MMOs) to cell phones? MMOs allow us to create representations of our own increasing mastery, and mobile gives us better access ...

  1. Guidelines for MOSFET Device Optimization accounting for L-dependent Mobility Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Guidelines for MOSFET Device Optimization accounting for L-dependent Mobility Degradation G. Bidal1 to monitor L-dependent mobility degradation based on empirical modeling of experimental results. This method allows benchmarking the impact on mobility degradation of different technological modules, thus giving

  2. Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater Long

  3. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater

  4. Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste treatment technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, T W; Fischer, D K

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed to provide the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program with criteria and a methodology to select candidate treatment technologies for Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) destined for dedicated storage and ultimately disposal. The technology selection criteria are provided in a Lotus spreadsheet format to allow the methodology to evolve as the GTCC LLW Program evolves. It is recognized that the final disposal facility is not yet defined; thus, the waste acceptance criteria and other facility-specific features are subject to change. The spreadsheet format will allow for these changes a they occur. As additional treatment information becomes available, it can be factored into the analysis. The technology selection criteria were established from program goals, draft waste acceptance criteria for dedicated storage (including applicable regulations), and accepted remedial investigation methods utilized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Kepner-Tregoe decisionmaking techniques are used to compare and rank technologies against the criteria.

  5. Testing Petri Nets for Mobile Robots Using Grbner Bases Angie Chandler1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blair, Lynne

    Testing Petri Nets for Mobile Robots Using Gröbner Bases Angie Chandler1 , Anne Heyworth2 , Lynne becomes greater. This paper discusses the use of Petri nets as a means of modeling and testing the control of a mobile robot, concentrating specifically on the reachability testing of the Petri net model through

  6. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  7. ARM Mobile Facilities

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

  8. Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

  9. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The directive will ensure that federal organizations and employees within the Department can use mobile technology to support mission requirements in a safe and secure manner.

  10. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  11. Applying Geocaching to Mobile Citizen Science through SCIENCE CACHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Saul

    Applying Geocaching to Mobile Citizen Science through SCIENCE CACHING Authors Matthew Alan Dunlap Citizen science occurs when volunteers work with scientists to collect data at particular field locations. The benefit is greater data collection at lesser cost. Yet this type of citizen science has a variety of known

  12. Jebeile. The Mobile Subject Assistant THE MOBILE SUBJECT ASSISTANT: A MOBILE COURSE TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Benjamin

    technologies suggests mobile phones may now be a viable tool for classroom use. In this paper we introduce phone technology has developed rapidly over the past decade and new age mobile phones now support muchJebeile. The Mobile Subject Assistant THE MOBILE SUBJECT ASSISTANT: A MOBILE COURSE TOOL

  13. Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Benefits of Using Mobile Transformers and Mobile Substations for Rapidly Restoring Electrical Service: a Report to the United States Congress Pursuant to Section 1816 of the Energy...

  14. Smart Mobility Dutch Automotive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Smart Mobility #12;Dutch Automotive Industry 300 companies 45k employees 17B revenue #12;Dutch Automotive Industry Focus area's: · Vehicle efficiency · Cooperative Mobility #12;Freedom, prosperity, fun;Automotive Technology Car as sustainable zero emission vehicles #12;Automotive Technology Electromagnetic car

  15. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  16. Locative Life: Geocaching, Mobile Gaming, and Embodiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farman, Jason

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaming, Geocaching, Mobile Technologies, GPS, Embodiment 1.activity for many mobile technology users. While Manovich

  17. Update on mobile applications in dermatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shivani; Eluri, Madhu; Boyers, Lindsay N; Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mobile application devices surpassed personal computers foruse of mobile devices surpasses that of personal computers,

  18. Westinghouse Lighting: Notice of Allowance (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation allowing Westinghouse Lighting to resume distribution of product code 0521000 after Westinghouse Lighting provided new test data performed according to DOE regulations.

  19. Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 1 Mobility Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 1 Mobility Support (Network Layer) #12;Edgar Nett updates take to long time (up to one day) è TCP connections break, security problems etc #12;Edgar Nett mobility (connection typically via a low bandwidth radio link) #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication

  20. 1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Mobility Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Mobility Support (Network Layer) #12;2 Edgar Nett updates take to long time (up to one day) TCP connections break, security problems etc #12;3 Edgar Nett bandwidth radio link) #12;4 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Roles and Definitions Mobile Node

  1. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  2. University of Pittsburgh FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Allowability of Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    University of Pittsburgh FINANCIAL GUIDELINE Subject: Allowability of Costs I. Scope This guideline establishes the requirements for determining the allowability of direct and indirect costs on the financial to ensure the allowability of the direct and indirect costs recorded on their sponsored projects

  3. Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Eyal Kushilevitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh Eyal Kushilevitz Rafail Ostrovsky William E to create a public- key encryption scheme for Alice that allows PIR searching over encrypted documents. Our allows for Single-Database PIR writing with sublinear communication complexity, which we consider

  4. Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Eyal Kushilevitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh Eyal Kushilevitz Rafail Ostrovsky William E. In this paper, we show how to create a public-key encryption scheme for Alice that allows PIR searching over allows for Single-Database PIR writing with sublinear communication complexity, which we consider

  5. Ten utilities receive acid rain bonus allowances from EPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently awarded 1,349 acid rain bonus allowances to ten utilities for energy efficiency and renewable energy measures. An allowance licensesthee emission of one ton of sulfur dioxide. A limited number of allowances are allocated to utilities to ensure that emissions will be cut to less than 9 million tons per year.

  6. PM PEM’s Pre-Measurement Allowance – On-Road Evaluation and Investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durbin, T; Jung, H; Cocker III, D R; Johnson, K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research and Technology’s (CE-CERT) Mobile EmissionsResearch and Technology’s (CE-CERT) Mobile EmissionsResearch and Technology’s (CE-CERT) Mobile Emissions

  7. Contextualizing urban mobile fabrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Michael Chia-Liang

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is focus on the urban fabric issues. To be more specific, I will focus on the "Mobile Fabrics" within the larger Asian urban context. Instead of working with a specific geographical site; I will focus on the ...

  8. Limits of social mobilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pentland, Alex Paul

    The Internet and social media have enabled the mobilization of large crowds to achieve time-critical feats, ranging from mapping crises in real time, to organizing mass rallies, to conducting search-and-rescue operations ...

  9. Howell, R.A., 2012 Living with a carbon allowance 1 Living with a carbon allowance: the experiences of Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, R.A., 2012 Living with a carbon allowance 1 Living with a carbon allowance: the experiences of Carbon Rationing Action Groups and implications for policy Rachel A. Howell Environmental Change with a carbon allowance: the experiences of Carbon Rationing Action Groups and implications for policy. Energy

  10. Agent-based Transaction management for Mobile Multidatabase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ongtang, Machigar [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Hurson, Ali R. [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Jiao, Yu [ORNL] [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements to access and manipulate data across multiple heterogeneous existing databases and the proliferation of mobile technologies have propelled the development of mobile multidatabase system (MDBS). In that environment, transaction management is not a trivial task due to the technological constraints. Agent technology is an evolving research area, which has been applied to several application domains. This paper proposes an Agent-based Transaction Management for Mobile Multidatabase (AT3M) system. AT3M applies static and mobile agents to manage the transaction processing in mobile multidatabase system. It enables a fully distributed transaction management, accommodates mobility of the mobile clients, and allows global subtransactions to process in parallel. The proposed algorithm utilizes the hierarchical meta data structure of Summary Schema Model (SSM) which captures semantic information of data objects in the underlying local databases at different levels of abstractions. It is shown by simulation that AT3M suits well in mobile multidatabase environment and outperforms the existing V-Locking algorithm designed for the same environment in many aspects.

  11. Contact method to allow benign failure in ceramic capacitor having self-clearing feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, John D.; Taylor, Ralph S.

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A capacitor exhibiting a benign failure mode has a first electrode layer, a first ceramic dielectric layer deposited on a surface of the first electrode, and a second electrode layer disposed on the ceramic dielectric layer, wherein selected areas of the ceramic dielectric layer have additional dielectric material of sufficient thickness to exhibit a higher dielectric breakdown voltage than the remaining majority of the dielectric layer. The added thickness of the dielectric layer in selected areas allows lead connections to be made at the selected areas of greater dielectric thickness while substantially eliminating a risk of dielectric breakdown and failure at the lead connections, whereby the benign failure mode is preserved.

  12. allowance price drivers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First evidence of asymmetric cost pass-through of Eu emissions allowances : examining wholesale electricity prices in Germany MIT - DSpace Summary: This paper applies the...

  13. Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The goal is to prepare a complete design package allowing reliable scale-up and optimization for any design. Innovation The proposed design substantially extends both upper and...

  14. Mobile Robot Sensing for Environmental Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile robot sensing for environmental applications Amarjeetwith Mobile robot sensing for environmental applications (a)Mobile robot sensing for environmental applications only a

  15. Mobile Persuasive Technologies for Rural Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandran, Divya Lalitha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential of mobile technologies to deliver healthmotivation for using mobile technology in this context, andfeatures of mobile technology could be advantageous for

  16. Addressing the needs of mobile users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Timothy Youngjin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based Localization Technology for Mobile Users . . . . . 3.1for designing future mobile technology. Methods There arefor ways future mobile technology might better address

  17. MOBILE-TERMINATED DATA User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    MOBILE-TERMINATED DATA User's Guide Iridium Satellite LLC Rev. 2; February 1, 2002 #12;MOBILE TERMINATED DATA................................................................................................................................3 1.1 IRIDIUM MOBILE TERMINATED DATA CONNECTIVITY

  18. Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response David DA SILVA. This will allow the identification of the electric appliance availability for demand response control strategies to be implemented in terms of demand response for electrical appliances. Introduction An important part

  19. Allowance trading: Correcting the past and looking to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, A.Y.; Canter, L.W. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Environmental and Ground Water Institute

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Allowance trading is basic to the Title IV acid rain provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in the United States; the provisions seek to achieve a 10-million-ton reduction in annual sulfur dioxide emissions from the electric power utility industry. Allowance trading, a market-based approach, is conceptually similar to the emissions trading policy of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). An allowance is defined as the authorization to emit, during or after a specified calendar year, one ton of sulfur dioxide. This paper provides an overview of the allowance trading program by summarizing some important features, particularly as they are responsive to limitations and concern as related to the precursor emissions trading program in the early to mid-1980s. Such features include a simple definition of baseline emission levels, encouragements for nationwide trading, disincentives for accumulation of excess allowance,s opportunities for leasing other short-term allowance transfer arrangements, enforcement provisions, and benefits of bonus allowances and early emission reductions. Adherence to implementation protocols for the acid rain provisions of Title IV of the CAAA will provide a good opportunity to evaluate this market-based approach for environmental quality management.

  20. Mobile systems capability plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

  1. Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings July 23, 2010 - 4:03pm Addthis Cindy Regnier,...

  2. Stochastic Differential Equations for Modeling, Estimation and Identification of Mobile-to-Mobile Communication Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Charalambous, Prof. Charalambos [University of Cyprus

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile-to-mobile networks are characterized by node mobility that makes the propagation environment time varying and subject to fading. As a consequence, the statistical characteristics of the received signal vary continuously, giving rise to a Doppler power spectral density (DPSD) which varies from one observation instant to the next. The current models do not capture and track the time varying characteristics. This paper is concerned with dynamical modelling of mobile-to-mobile channels, parameter estimation and identification from received signal measurements. The evolution of the propagation environment is described by stochastic differential equations. In particular, it is shown that the parameters of the models can be determined by approximating the band-limited DPSD using the Gauss-Newton method. However, since the DPSD is not available online, we propose to use a filter-based expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filter to estimate the channel parameters and states, respectively. The scheme results in a finite dimensional filter which only uses the first and second order statistics. The algorithm is recursive allowing the inphase and quadrature components and parameters to be estimated online from received signal measurements. The algorithms are tested using experimental data collected from moving sensor nodes in indoor and outdoor environments demonstrating the method s viability.

  3. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa’s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about “Mobile phones and Africa: a success story”. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss “Citizen Problem Solving”. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa’s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent’s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London’s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman’s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greate

  4. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures - 1) Mobile phones and Africa: a success story 2) Citizen Problem Solving

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are hosted by the partners of the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, CERN, The UN Institute of Training and Research and the University of Geneva. The goal of the Lectures is to provide an inspirational forum for participants from the various international organizations and academic institutions in Geneva to explore how information technology is enabling greater citizen participation in tackling global development challenges as well as global scientific research. The first Citizen Cyberscience Lectures will welcome two speakers who have both made major innovative contributions in this area. Dr. Mo Ibrahim, founder of Celtel International, one of Africa?s most successful mobile network operators, will talk about ?Mobile phones and Africa: a success story?. Dr. Alpheus Bingham, founder of InnoCentive, a Web-based community that solves industrial R&D; challenges, will discuss ?Citizen Problem Solving?. The Citizen Cyberscience Lectures are open and free of charge. Participants from outside CERN must register by sending an email to Yasemin.Hauser@cern.ch BEFORE the 23rd october to be able to access CERN. THE LECTURES Mobile phones and Africa: a success story Dr. Mo Ibrahim, Mo Ibrahim Foundation Abstract The introduction of mobile phones into Africa changed the continent, enabling business and the commercial sector, creating directly and indirectly, millions of jobs. It enriched the social lives of many people. Surprisingly, it supported the emerging civil society and advanced the course of democracy Bio Dr Mo Ibrahim is a global expert in mobile communications with a distinguished academic and business career. In 1998, Dr Ibrahim founded Celtel International to build and operate mobile networks in Africa. Celtel became one of Africa?s most successful companies with operations in 15 countries, covering more than a third of the continent?s population and investing more than US$750 million in Africa. The company was sold to MTC Kuwait in 2005 for $3.4billion. In 2006 Dr Ibrahim established the Mo Ibrahim Foundation to support great African leadership. The Foundation focuses on two major initiatives to stimulate debate around, and improve the quality of, governance in Africa. The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership recognises and celebrates excellence; and the Ibrahim Index of African Governance provides civil society with a comprehensive and quantifiable tool to promote government accountability. Dr Ibrahim is also Founding Chairman of Satya Capital Ltd, an investment company focused on opportunities in Africa. Dr Ibrahim has been awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of London?s School of Oriental and African Studies, the University of Birmingham and De Montfort University, Leicester as well as an Honorary Fellowship Award from the London Business School. He has also received the Chairman?s Award for Lifetime Achievement from the GSM Association in 2007 and the Economists Innovation Award 2007 for Social & Economic Innovation. In 2008 Dr Ibrahim was presented with the BNP Paribas Prize for Philanthropy, and also listed by TIME magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Citizen Problem Solving Dr. Alpheus Bingham, InnoCentive Abstract American playwright Damien Runyon (Guys and Dolls) once remarked, "the race is not always to the swift, nor the victory to the strong -- but that IS how you bet." Not only does a system of race handicapping follow from this logic, but the whole notion of expertise and technical qualifications. Such 'credentials' allow one to 'bet' on who might most likely solve a difficult challenge, whether as consultant, contractor or employee. Of course, the approach would differ if one were allowed to bet AFTER the race. When such systems came into broad use, i.e., chat rooms, usenets, innocentive, etc., and were subsequently studied, it was often found that the greatest probability of solu

  5. Correlation ion mobility spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rohde, Steven B. (Corrales, NM)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation ion mobility spectrometry (CIMS) uses gating modulation and correlation signal processing to improve IMS instrument performance. Closely spaced ion peaks can be resolved by adding discriminating codes to the gate and matched filtering for the received ion current signal, thereby improving sensitivity and resolution of an ion mobility spectrometer. CIMS can be used to improve the signal-to-noise ratio even for transient chemical samples. CIMS is especially advantageous for small geometry IMS drift tubes that can otherwise have poor resolution due to their small size.

  6. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shirey, David L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  7. Webinar: Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting, originally presented on November 13, 2012.

  8. A Nested Two Stage Game-Based Optimization Framework in Mobile Cloud Computing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    and virtualization techniques provide mobile devices with battery energy saving opportunities by allowing them on the backward induction principle, we derive the optimal or near-optimal strategy for all the mobile devices by the profits by charging clients for accessing these services. Clients are attracted by the opportunity

  9. Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies Environmental Technology Verification of Mobile Sources Control Technologies 2005 Diesel Engine...

  10. Mobile lighting apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roe, George Michael; Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rea, Gerald W; Drake, Robert A; Johnson, Terry A; Wingert, Steven John; Damberger, Thomas A; Skradski, Thomas J; Radley, Christopher James; Oros, James M; Schuttinger, Paul G; Grupp, David J; Prey, Stephen Carl

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile lighting apparatus includes a portable frame such as a moveable trailer or skid having a light tower thereon. The light tower is moveable from a stowed position to a deployed position. A hydrogen-powered fuel cell is located on the portable frame to provide electrical power to an array of the energy efficient lights located on the light tower.

  11. Solar: An Open Platform for Context-Aware Mobile Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotz, David

    Solar: An Open Platform for Context-Aware Mobile Applications Guanling Chen and David Kotz Dept the user state and the physical and computational environ- ment in which they run. Solar is a middleware into the in- frastructure, Solar allows applications to run on thin mo- bile clients more effectively

  12. INTRODUCTION In order to allow intelligent power control and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    requirements in smart grid by secur- ing the information on single customer data, incentive plans, and other of Attribute Based Encryption (ABE) for smart grid communication scenarios. In particular, we focusINTRODUCTION In order to allow intelligent power control and monitoring, the concept of smart grid

  13. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation...

  14. A demonstration mobility experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Howard Lawrence

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among under graduate physics students in the field of solid-stats physics. Ths Shocklsy Haynes mobility experiment, presented in this thesis, was selected because it is considered an excellent means of gaining these objectives by giving sn...& constructive criticism& and patience throughout the long period required to complete the experismntl Dr& J ~ R ~ haynes, of Bell Laboratories, for informat'on on exper- imental procedure and sm&ross of semiconductor samplssl Bill Closssr of' the Sandia...

  15. Allowable pillar to diameter ratio for strategic petroleum reserve caverns.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compiles 3-D finite element analyses performed to evaluate the stability of Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) caverns over multiple leach cycles. When oil is withdrawn from a cavern in salt using freshwater, the cavern enlarges. As a result, the pillar separating caverns in the SPR fields is reduced over time due to usage of the reserve. The enlarged cavern diameters and smaller pillars reduce underground stability. Advances in geomechanics modeling enable the allowable pillar to diameter ratio (P/D) to be defined. Prior to such modeling capabilities, the allowable P/D was established as 1.78 based on some very limited experience in other cavern fields. While appropriate for 1980, the ratio conservatively limits the allowable number of oil drawdowns and hence limits the overall utility and life of the SPR cavern field. Analyses from all four cavern fields are evaluated along with operating experience gained over the past 30 years to define a new P/D for the reserve. A new ratio of 1.0 is recommended. This ratio is applicable only to existing SPR caverns.

  16. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  17. 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    1 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) Julio A-mail:polimita@hotmail.com Nico M. Franz Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico PO Box 9012, Mayagüez, PR 00681, U.S.A. E-mail:franz@uprm.edu Abstract. The bee fauna of the Greater Puerto Rico area was studied. A review

  18. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  19. MOBILE AGENT MANAGEMENT Patricia Cuesta Rivalta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOBILE AGENT MANAGEMENT By Patricia Cuesta Rivalta A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty of Graduate to Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research acceptance of this thesis MOBILE AGENT MANAGEMENT Submitted with the mobile agent technology. This thesis extends the Mobile Code Toolkit of the Perpetuum Mobile Procura

  20. Parasitic mobility for sensate media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laibowitz, Matthew Joel, 1975-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed sensor networks offer many new capabilities for monitoring environments with applicability to medical, industrial, military, anthropological, and experiential fields. By making such systems mobile, we increase ...

  1. MobileMatch App

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised:7,AMissionMobileMatch VolunteerMatch

  2. Pore-scale analysis of solubilization and mobilization of trapped NAPL blobs in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Sun Hee

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    was modified to quantify the onset of blob mobilization. Its value for water flooding was nearly 2-3 orders of magnitude greater than that of surfactant foam flooding. Next, to investigate the blob flow regime in porous media, a blob velocity was computed...

  3. MobilityFirst: A Robust and Trustworthy Mobility-Centric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Seskar, K. Nagaraja, S. Nelson S. Bannerjee W. Lehr Z. Morley Mao B. Ramamurthy G. Chen X. Yang, R. Roy ~2B servers/PC's, ~10B notebooks, PDA's, smart phones, sensors ~2010 ~2020 Wireles s Edge Networ k: Near-term "mobile Internet" usage scenario ­ Mobile P2P and Infostations P2P and Infostations (DTN

  4. The Requirements for Personal Mobile Assistants in a Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huhns, Michael N.

    : information filtering and retrieving, scheduling meetings, mail management, etc. These agents act as PersonalThe Requirements for Personal Mobile Assistants in a Mobile Telecommunications Environment Barcin. The unique demands and needs of each user will require assistants that are customized or personalized

  5. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous mobile sensor networks consist of a number of autonomous mobile robots equipped with various sensors and tasked with a common mission. This thesis considers the topology control of such an ad hoc mobile sensor network. In particular, I...

  6. 2030 Transportation and Mobility Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi-State Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2006-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bi-State MPO 2030 T RANSPORTATION A N D MOBILITY PLAN Transport t at t i i on Invest t ment t s f f... 2030 Transportation and Mobility Plan Prepared by: The Bi-State MPO Staff In cooperation with: The Cities and Towns of Alma Arkoma Barling Bonanza Fort Smith Greenwood Kibler Lavaca Moffett Muldrow Pocola Roland Rudy Spiro...

  7. MOBILE PHONE, A SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    but mobile > fixed line household penetration) ITU, 2013 GSMA, 2013 Growth Operators activity Europe (EEA GSMA, 2014 Deloitte, 2012 Price of an entrylevel mobile broadband 12% of monthly GNI p.c. 1125Wh / year (own measures, Malmodin 2014) · network : 23kWh / user / year (Malmodin 2014) · French electricity

  8. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  9. Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

  10. You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and engineering. Our'Texas Aggie football team is nationally acclaimed, and every game brings a festive atmosphere

  11. An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates Siobhán B. Cookea from Haiti, Insulacebus toussaintiana, is described here from the most complete Caribbean subfossil

  12. Quantum Theory Allows Measurement of Non-Hermitian Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun Kumar Pati; Uttam Singh; Urbasi Sinha

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In quantum theory, a physical observable is represented by a Hermitian operator as it admits real eigenvalues. This stems from the fact that any measuring apparatus that is supposed to measure a physical observable will always yield a real number. However, reality of eigenvalue of some operator does not mean that it is necessarily Hermitian. There are examples of non-Hermitian operators which may admit real eigenvalues under some symmetry conditions. One may wonder if there is any way to measure a non-Hermitian operator, for example, the average of a non-Hermitian operator in a quantum state. We show that quantum theory allows direct measurement of any non-Hermitian operator via the weak measurement. The average of a non-Hermitian operator in a pure state is a complex multiple of the weak value of the positive semi-definite part of the non-Hermitian operator. We also prove a new uncertainty relation for any two non-Hermitian operators and illustrate this for the creation and annihilation operators, and the Kraus operators.

  13. Mobile Monolith Polymer Elements For Flow Control In Microfluidic Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasselbrink, Jr., Ernest F. (Saline, MI); Rehm, Jason E. (Alameda, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Kirby, Brian J. (San Francisco, CA)

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A cast-in-place and lithographically shaped mobile, monolithic polymer element for fluid flow control in microfluidic devices and method of manufacture. Microfluid flow control devices, or microvalves that provide for control of fluid or ionic current flow can be made incorporating a cast-in-place, mobile monolithic polymer element, disposed within a microchannel, and driven by fluid pressure (either liquid or gas) against a retaining or sealing surface. The polymer elements are made by the application of lithographic methods to monomer mixtures formulated in such a way that the polymer will not bond to microchannel walls. The polymer elements can seal against pressures greater than 5000 psi, and have a response time on the order of milliseconds. By the use of energetic radiation it is possible to depolymerize selected regions of the polymer element to form shapes that cannot be produced by conventional lithographic patterning and would be impossible to machine.

  14. A compact transport and charge model for GaN-based high electron mobility transistors for RF applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radhakrishna, Ujwal

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gallium Nitride (GaN)-based high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are rapidly emerging as front-runners in high-power mm-wave circuit applications. For circuit design with current devices and to allow sensible future ...

  15. Using Differential Adhesion to Control Self-Assembly and Self-Repair of Collections of Modular Mobile Robots 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottery, Peter

    This thesis presents a novel distributed control method which allows a collection of independently mobile robotic units, with two or three dimensional movement, to self-assemble into self-repairing hierarchical structures. ...

  16. Mobile applications for cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, Mark J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A smartphone user today carries around in his or her pocket more computing power than all of NASA had when it sent a man to the moon in 1969 (Miller, 2012). These devices allow us to extend our sense of our surroundings ...

  17. INITIATIVE MOBILE APPS DEVELOPMENT Description and details about the program or initiative that is being proposed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    mobile strategy will include the following: Mobile-friendly version of PAWS & responsive design (mobile

  18. UbiBot : a system for experimenting with mobile devices on a wireless network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vedar, Erwin Abad

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conference on mobile technology, applications, and systemshuman interaction in mobile technology (Mobility ‘07), pages

  19. Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 4 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 4 Introduction #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer to roam (handover) -à Integration of information and communication technology #12;Edgar Nett Mobile;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 8 General objectives: q Substitution of an inflexible wired

  20. Mobile Agents: An Introduction Gian Pietro Picco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picco, Gian Pietro

    , illustrating the foun- dations of architectures and technologies for mobile agents, and discussing some, including mobile agents. Section IV con- tains a critical discussion of the mobile agent technology1 Mobile Agents: An Introduction Gian Pietro Picco Dipartimento di Elettronica e Informazione

  1. Fundamental Challenges in Mobile Computing M. Satyanarayanan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and level of technology, but are intrinsic to mobility. Together, they complicate the considerationsFundamental Challenges in Mobile Computing M. Satyanarayanan School of Computer Science Carnegie different about mobile computing?" The paper begins by describing a set of constraints intrinsic to mobile

  2. Distributed services for mobile ad hoc networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guangtong

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile ad hoc network consists of certain nodes that communicate only through wireless medium and can move arbitrarily. The key feature of a mobile ad hoc network is the mobility of the nodes. Because of the mobility, communication links form...

  3. Waste Toolkit A-Z Mobile phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Mobile phones How to recycle your mobile phone Recycling your mobile phone makes the deep forests in the Congo in central Africa. The Congo's mining business has in recent years led and recycling can help to reduce the demand for new raw materials. Do not put mobile phones in the recycling

  4. Supporting Mobile Service Usage through Physical Mobile Interaction Gregor Broll1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service technology and Physical Mobile Interaction. This interaction paradigm uses mobile devicesSupporting Mobile Service Usage through Physical Mobile Interaction Gregor Broll1 , Sven Siorpaes1 albrecht.schmidt@ifi.lmu.de Abstract Although mobile services can be used ubiquitously, their employment

  5. Imaging mobile zinc in biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomat, Elisa

    Trafficking and regulation of mobile zinc pools influence cellular functions and pathological conditions in multiple organs, including brain, pancreas, and prostate. The quest for a dynamic description of zinc distribution ...

  6. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  7. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  8. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  9. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    community, grouse, hazard function, mortality, preda- tion, wind turbine *Correspondence author. EEffects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development

  10. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  11. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  12. Asthenospheric upwelling, oceanic slab retreat, and exhumation of UHP mantle rocks: Insights from Greater Antilles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Greater Antilles in Hispaniola. We use numerical models of intra-oceanic subduction to explain exhumation Antilles in Hispaniola [Abbott et al., 2006; Abbott et al., 2005]. Field observations show that the garnet and Hispaniola islands [e.g., Lewis et al., 2006]. It was formed during subduction of the Proto-Caribbean oceanic

  13. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (production of electricity at the point of use) may reduce CO2 emissions relative to the most likely of electricity and CO2 emissions. The results showed that while greater energy efficiency is achieved: December 10, 1999 #12;iii ABSTRACT The Canadian government is evaluating options to reduce CO2 emissions

  14. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  15. Competition and Collaboration in Mobile Banking: A Stakeholder Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurnia, Sherah

    of mobile technologies offers an opportunity for mobile carriers and banks to offer mobile banking services technology-aware customers. For banks, mobile banking is the next sequence after Internet banking. Thanks to the development of mobile technology which enables the delivery of banking services via mobile devices, mobile

  16. Route Optimization with MAP-Based Enhancement in Mobile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Jin

    technology and user de- mands for mobility support have motivated the IETF to introduce mobile IP, mobile IPv technology and demand for mobility support from users, the IETF has introduced mobile IP (MIP) [1], mobileRoute Optimization with MAP-Based Enhancement in Mobile Networks Jeonghoon Park, Tae-Jin Lee

  17. annulus spacer mobility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ja (more) Nousiainen, Sari 2013-01-01 92 Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion Mobility Spectrometry Physics Websites Summary: Results Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion...

  18. alters foot mobility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ja (more) Nousiainen, Sari 2013-01-01 57 Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion Mobility Spectrometry Physics Websites Summary: Results Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion...

  19. arachidonic acid mobilization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ja (more) Nousiainen, Sari 2013-01-01 58 Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion Mobility Spectrometry Physics Websites Summary: Results Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion...

  20. asymmetric ion mobility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Field Ion Mobility ions, including isotopomers and isobars, using ion mobility spectrometry (IMS), specifically, the field) and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS).1,2 Though both...

  1. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Fundamentals of Traveling Wave Ion Mobility Spectrometry. Abstract: Traveling-wave ion mobility spectrometry (TW IMS) is a...

  2. Mobile agents for e-commerce Roll No. : 99329011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Sridhar

    aspects of mobile agent technology. #12;2 1 Introduction..............................................................................................5 2 Mobile agent technology......................................................................................................10 3.1 Java as technology base for mobile agents

  3. Using Mobile Technology and Social Networking to Crowdsource Citizen Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robson, Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using Mobile Technology and Social Networking to CrowdsourceFall 2012 Using Mobile Technology and Social Networking toAbstract Using Mobile Technology and Social Networking to

  4. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Department of EnergyMobile

  5. Solid waste workers and livelihood strategies in Greater Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Claudel, E-mail: claudelnoel@gmail.co [University of the West Indies, Institute for Sustainable Development, Environmental Management Unit, 13 Gibraltar Camp Way, Mona Campus, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid waste management industry in Haiti is comprised of a formal and an informal sector. Many basic activities in the solid waste management sector are being carried out within the context of profound poverty, which exposes the failure of the socioeconomic and political system to provide sufficient job opportunities for the urban population. This paper examines the involvement of workers in the solid waste management industry in Greater Port-au-Prince and the implications for livelihood strategies. The findings revealed that the Greater Port-au-Prince solid waste management system is very inclusive with respect to age, while highly segregated with regard to gender. In terms of earning capacity, the results showed that workers hired by the State agencies were the most economically vulnerable group as more than 50% of them fell below the official nominal minimum wage. This paper calls for better salary scales and work compensation for the solid waste workers.

  6. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  7. Hindered mobility of a particle near a soft interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Bickel

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The translational motion of a solid sphere near a deformable fluid interface is studied in the low Reynolds number regime. In this problem, the fluid flow driven by the sphere is dynamically coupled the instantaneous conformation of the interface. Using a two-dimensional Fourier transform technique, we are able to account for the multiple backflows scattered from the interface. The mobility tensor is then obtained from the matrix elements of the relevant Green function. This analysis allows us to express the explicit position and frequency dependence of the mobility. We recover in the steady limit the result for a sphere near a perfectly flat interface. At intermediate time scales, the mobility exhibits an imaginary part, which is a signature of the elastic response of the interface. In the short time limit, we find the intriguing feature that the perpendicular mobility may, under some circumstances, become lower than the bulk value. All those results can be explained from the definition of the relaxation time of the soft interface.

  8. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 1, Sealed sources held by specific licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sealed sources are small, relatively high-activity radioactive sources typically encapsulated in a metallic container. The activities can range from less than 1 mCi to over 1,000 Ci. They are used in a variety of industries and are commonly available. Many of the sources will be classified as Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) for the purpose of waste disposal. The US Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of this class of low-level radioactive waste. To better understand the scope of the GTCC LLW situation regarding sealed sources and to provide data to a model that projects future quantities of GTCC material, data from a comprehensive 1991 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) survey and a related 1992 survey of Agreement States were analyzed to estimate the number, volume, and activity of Potential GTCC sealed sources currently available from specific licensees. Potential GTCC sealed sources are sources that exceed the limits stated in 10 CFR 61 when isotope concentrations are averaged over the volume of the capsule. Based on the surveys, the estimated number of existing Potential GTCC sealed sources held by specific licensees is 89,000, with an unpackaged volume of 0.93 m{sup 3} and an activity of 2,300,000 Ci. However, current disposal practices allow concentration averaging over the disposal container, substantially reducing the number of sealed sources which will actually be classified as GTCC LLW.

  9. Distributed Mobility Transparent Broadcast in Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikdar, Biplab

    and highly adaptive to node mobility. It does not demand any neighborhood information and incurs little£ciency and alleviated interference; on the other hand, the proposed protocol achieves network energy balance by randomly- mum Connected Dominating Set (MCDS) should be elected as relay nodes, and identifying the MCDS

  10. A taxonomy and business analysis for mobile web applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kevin H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile web applications refer to web applications on mobile devices, aimed at personalizing, integrating, and discovering mobile contents in user contexts. This thesis presents a comprehensive study of mobile web applications ...

  11. Virtual stationary timed automata for mobile networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, Tina Ann, 1979-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we formally define a programming abstraction for mobile networks called the Virtual Stationary Automata programming layer, consisting of real mobile clients, virtual timed I/O automata called virtual ...

  12. Random access wireless networks with controlled mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modiano, Eytan H.

    This paper considers wireless networks where messages arriving randomly (in time and space) are collected by a mobile receiver. The messages are transmitted to the mobile receiver according to a random access scheme and ...

  13. Characterizing User Mobility in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, Bruno Astuto Arouche

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Symmetry of User Mobility in Wireless Networks 3.1 MobilityAnalysis of a local-area wireless network. In ACM MOBI- COMand evaluation of wireless networks and their protocols.

  14. Innovative Mobile Technologies for Asset Tracking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liko, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO Session 15 - Innovative Mobile Technologies for Asset Tracking Agenda ? Learn how clients have mobilized their enterprise data to increase the consistent capture and reporting of important building information, from lease data to work...

  15. Ecotransology : integrated design for urban mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachim, Mitchell Whitney

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates a rethinking of urban mobility through ecological design. Human mobility and ecological accountability are inextricably linked in city design; our current world ecological crisis underscores this ...

  16. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design, Implementation, and EvaluationImplementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim Bolbrock, Guohong Cao, and Tom La of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation

  17. EcoMobile: Energy-aware Real-time Framework for Multicore Mobile Systems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Albert M. K.

    EcoMobile: Energy-aware Real-time Framework for Multicore Mobile Systems1 B. Liu, Y. Wen, F. Liu, Y://www.cs.uh.edu Technical Report Number UH-CS-11-09 October 23, 2011 Keywords: mobile system, energy-aware, real plan to build an energy-aware framework for multicore mobile systems which extends Android with two

  18. Mobile sensor network to monitor wastewater collection pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jungsoo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced pipeline monitoringDesign of mobile pipeline floating sensor “SewerSnortIllustration of mobile pipeline floating sensor monitoring

  19. Mobile Codes Localization in Ad hoc Networks: a Comparative Study of Centralized and Distributed Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zafoune, Youcef; kanawati, Rushed; 10.5121/ijcnc.2010.2213

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new approach in the management of mobile ad hoc networks. Our alternative, based on mobile agent technology, allows the design of mobile centralized server in ad hoc network, where it is not obvious to think about a centralized management, due to the absence of any administration or fixed infrastructure in these networks. The aim of this centralized approach is to provide permanent availability of services in ad hoc networks which are characterized by a distributed management. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, we apply it to solve the problem of mobile code localization in ad hoc networks. A comparative study, based upon a simulation, of centralized and distributed localization protocols in terms of messages number exchanged and response time shows that the centralized approach in a distributed form is more interesting than a totally centralized approach.

  20. Literature Review in Mobile Technologies and Learning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Literature Review in Mobile Technologies and Learning REPORT 11: FUTURELAB SERIES Laura Naismith to educational policy and practice. #12;FOREWORD Mobile technologies are a familiar part of the lives of most or the wider world. Newer developments in mobile phone technology are also beginning to offer the potential

  1. Batteries, mobile phones & small electrical devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , mobile phones and data collection equipment. Lithium Ion batteries are used in mobile phones, laptopsBatteries, mobile phones & small electrical devices IN-BUILDING RECYCLING STATIONS. A full list of acceptable items: Sealed batteries ­excludes vented NiCad and Lead acid batteries Cameras Laser printer

  2. Optimizing Offloading Strategies in Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hyytiä, Esa

    Optimizing Offloading Strategies in Mobile Cloud Computing Esa Hyyti¨a Department of Communications Abstract--We consider a dynamic offloading problem arising in the context of mobile cloud computing (MCC consider the task assignment problem arising in the context of the mobile cloud computing (MCC). In MCC

  3. Seminar: 'Mobile health technology intervention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühn, Reimer

    Seminar: 'Mobile health technology intervention for cancer patients' Wednesday 22 October Professor Nora Kearney Professor of Nursing and Cancer Care/Research Dean, College of Medicine Dentistry Higginson, Cicely Saunders Institute Director, Head of Division, Professor of Palliative Care and Policy

  4. Mobility 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Killeen-Temple Urban Transportation Study

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    totality to include the ecological, physical (natural and manmade), social, political, aesthetic, and economic environments.? The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) defines three basic principles of environmental justice: ? Avoid, minimize... ............................................................................................................... 2 Creation of Mobility 2035 and Who is Involved ...................................................................................... 2 Federal and State Requirements...

  5. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  6. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  7. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  8. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  9. Squeezing the Sandwich: A Mobile Pressure-Sensitive Two-Sided Multi-Touch Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .rohs,sven.kratz}@telekom.de ABSTRACT Two-sided pressure input is common in everyday interac- tions such as grabbing, sliding, twistingSqueezing the Sandwich: A Mobile Pressure-Sensitive Two-Sided Multi-Touch Prototype Georg Essl1,2 1 which allows for two- sided multitouch sensing with continuous pressure input at interactive rates

  10. Using Mobile Phones for Promoting Water Conservation Rahuvaran Pathmanathan1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Jon

    of when they were allowed to water their gardens, but there was and is still a lack of knowledge243 Using Mobile Phones for Promoting Water Conservation Rahuvaran Pathmanathan1, 2 , Jon Pearce2@unimelb.edu.au ABSTRACT We report a design investigation that seeks to help people to conserve water in their homes

  11. Department of Computer Science Spring 2012 Redesign of Mobile Application Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Computer Science Spring 2012 Redesign of Mobile Application Platform platforms. The application was supposed to track vehicle locations and to allow for lists of favorites for use on the iOS and Android platforms. This application was supposed to be created to be as general

  12. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  13. Mobile phone and my health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surducan, Aneta [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Nicolae Balcescu High School, 6 Constanta St., 400158 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Dabala, Dana [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Railways Medical Clinic,, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Republicii St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Neamtu, Camelia, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Vasile, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro; Surducan, Emanoil, E-mail: emanoil.surducan@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of the microwave radiation emitted by mobile phones with the user's body is analyzed from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) recommendations perspective as a correlation between the specific absorption ratio (SAR) of the mobile phone and the call duration. The relative position of the cell phone to the user's body, the dielectric properties of the exposed body parts, the SAR value and the call duration are considered in the local body temperature rise due to the microwave heating effect. The recommended local temperature rise limit in the human body is evaluated according to standards. The aim of this study is to disseminate information to young people, especially high school students, about the microwave thermal effects on the human body, to make them aware of the environmental electromagnetic pollution and to offer them a simple method of biological self protection.

  14. Policy Flash 2014-13 AL 2014-03: Allowability of Contractor Litigation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Flash 2014-13 AL 2014-03: Allowability of Contractor Litigation Defense and Settlement Costs Policy Flash 2014-13 AL 2014-03: Allowability of Contractor Litigation Defense and...

  15. T-702: Apache web servers that allows a DOS attack | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: Apache web servers that allows a DOS attack T-702: Apache web servers that allows a DOS attack August 25, 2011 - 8:00pm Addthis PROBLEM: A denial of service vulnerability has...

  16. Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

    2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

  17. Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh # Eyal Kushilevitz + Rafail Ostrovsky #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh # Eyal Kushilevitz + Rafail Ostrovsky a public­key encryption scheme for Alice that allows PIR searching over encrypted documents. Our solution­trivially small communication complexity. The main technique of our solution also allows for Single­Database PIR

  18. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  19. Distributed Transactions in a Mobile Computing Vivek R. Narasayya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Ansary, Sameh

    Introduction Mobile computing technology has produced a variety of devices ranging from simple pagers to the unique characteristics of mobile hardware and wireless technology [1] One class of mobile devices in data management for mobile computing sys­ tems are those that are arise because the mobile devices move

  20. IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. MobileFirst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. Mobile lab has been asked to lead key portions of IBM's mobile research agenda. IBM Research-Austin has

  1. Student use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile Technology In CiCS (Corporate Information and Computing Services) we are always looking to improve our services.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Stephen John

    Page 1 Student use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile TechnologyStudent use of Mobile Technology In CiCS (Corporate Information and Computing Services) we are always looking to improve our services. We are interested in your use of mobile technology (phones

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: graphene electron mobility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron mobility Three-Dimensional Graphene Architectures On July 29, 2013, in Capabilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Office of Science, Research & Capabilities The...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: mobile test system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mobile test system Solar Test Facility Upgrades Complete, Leading to Better Sandia Capabilities to Support Power Industry On January 8, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy,...

  4. Mobile Agents: Application to services in mobile computing and architectural improvements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouroupetroglou, Georgios

    to the rapidly increasing growth of technologies of mobile networks and the Internet. The penetration. Main characteristic of this thesis is the adoption of Mobile Agents (MA) technology, description and evaluation of a framework for resource management in MA networks. Keywords: Mobile computing

  5. Macro-level Attention to Mobile Agent Security: Introducing the Mobile Agent Secure Hub Infrastructure Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Volker

    for the safe management of mobile agents they deploy onto the Internet. Our in- frastructural approach is basedMacro-level Attention to Mobile Agent Security: Introducing the Mobile Agent Secure Hub Security Research Centre Queensland University of Technology Brisbane, Queensland, Australia and Dept

  6. Mobile and Physical User Interfaces for NFC-based Mobile Interaction with Multiple Tags

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Communication (NFC) is an emerging technology for mobile interaction with everyday objects and associated lives, its technologies affect the way we access and use information. Mobile devices can be used. An emerging technology for physical mobile interaction [14] is Near Field Communication (NFC) [20], a radio

  7. Distributed Mobile Disk Cover A Building Block for Mobile Backbone Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zussman, Gil

    1 Distributed Mobile Disk Cover ­ A Building Block for Mobile Backbone Networks Anand Srinivas, Gil of Technology Cambridge, MA 02139 {anand3, gilz, modiano}@mit.edu Abstract-- The novel hierarchical architecture of Mobile Backbone Networks has been recently studied by a few different approaches. An important subproblem

  8. A Mobility and Energy-aware Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System for Mobile ad hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    A Mobility and Energy-aware Hierarchical Intrusion Detection System for Mobile ad hoc Networks consumption. The proposed architecture adopts and enhances the Mobility and Energy Aware Clustering Algorithm and energy of nodes in the cluster formation in order to improve detection accuracy and re- duce energy

  9. Charged particle mobility refrigerant analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allman, S.L.; Chunghsuan Chen; Chen, F.C.

    1993-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for analyzing a gaseous electronegative species comprises the steps of providing an analysis chamber; providing an electric field of known potential within the analysis chamber; admitting into the analysis chamber a gaseous sample containing the gaseous electronegative species; providing a pulse of free electrons within the electric field so that the pulse of free electrons interacts with the gaseous electronegative species so that a swarm of electrically charged particles is produced within the electric field; and, measuring the mobility of the electrically charged particles within the electric field.

  10. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  11. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  12. A Low-Power Mobile Sensing Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabal

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requires greater energy- awareness and workload adaptivity.are severely energy-constrained. We show how awareness of

  13. Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion Mobility Spectrometry . Isotopic Effect on Ion Mobility and Separation of Isotopomers by High-Field Ion...

  14. A social networking approach for mobile innovation in emerging countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Jen-Hao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing the global challenges and the next billion mobile subscribers, the MIT NextLab course engages students, industry partners, entrepreneurs and the next billion mobile subscribers to develop innovative mobile ...

  15. Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 1 Organisatorisches (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 1 Organisatorisches (1) Lehrstuhl ,,Echtzeitsysteme und Vorlesung (in englisch) Übungsaufgaben Mitteilungen Literaturhinweise #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer, wahlweise in Englisch Terminabsprache mit mir via e-mail #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication 3

  16. “Cute” displays: Developing an Emotional Bond with Your Mobile Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rousi, Rebekah

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affectionate perception of mobile technology increases userof the icon to mobile communication technology. This sectiontechnology invented, it might not be inaccurate to say that users can and do treat their mobile

  17. A Tutorial on Automatic Speech Recognition for Wireless Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Richard

    will consist of a survey of existing mobile ASR applications, architecures, and supporting technology technology including specialized transducers, specialized devices,and language resources for mobile, and supporting technology 1. ASR applications on handheld, mobile devices Portable Devices processing power

  18. articulated body mobile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q mobile robots. The X4Y4 curve and a control algorithm for an articulated mobile robot following an X4Y4 for real-world mobile robots. Ill-designed curves on a path can...

  19. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Using nanoelectrospray ion mobility spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Tassos

    ORIGINAL PAPER Using nanoelectrospray ion mobility spectrometry (GEMMA) to determine the size-phase electrophoretic mobil- ity molecular analyzer (GEMMA) has received increased attention for such measurements, isolated and purified using standard biochemical protocols, were also analyzed using multi-angle laser

  1. Mobile Multimedia Sensor Networks: Architecture and Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Mobile Multimedia Sensor Networks: Architecture and Routing 1Min Chen, 2 Mohsen Guizani, 3 Minho Jo technology and multimedia systems have exhibited a strong potential and tendency on improving human life by enabling smart services in ubiquitous computing environments. This paper investigates a mobile multimedia

  2. Security in 3rd Generation Mobile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    Security in 3rd Generation Mobile Networks Christos Xenakis and Lazaros Merakos Communication In the last few years, we have witnessed an explosion in demand for security measures motivated stakeholders are interested in the security level supported in the new emerging mobile environment. This paper

  3. City of College Station's Thermographic Mobile Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shear, C. K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first quarter of 1986, the City of College Station conducted a thermographic mobile scan of the entire city. A thermographic mobile scan is a process by which heat loss/heat gain data is accumulated by a vehicle traveling the city...

  4. Mobility in Wireless Networks Christian Schindelhauer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    hoc networks, and sensor networks regarding mobility. Then, we present the most important mobility sensor nodes with radio transceiver and micro-controller in the size of a small coin (and within- men, Entwurfsmethoden, Anwendungen." and by the EU within the 6th Framework Programme under contract

  5. Information Technology The Mobile Semantic Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yuan-Fang

    Information Technology The Mobile Semantic Web Shonali Krishnaswamya & Yuan-Fang Lib a Institute of Infocomm Research, A*STAR, Singapore b Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University, Australia introduction to ontology languages & reasoning 3. Strategies & systems for mobile semantic reasoning 4. Future

  6. www.mobilevce.com 2009 Mobile VCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    & Manufacturer Perspective Increasing energy costs with higher base station site density and energy price trends A typical UK mobile network consumes 40 MW Overall this is a small % of total UK energy consumption.mobilevce.com © 2009 Mobile VCE Energy Consumption The Base Station (BS) is the most energy­intensive component of a 3

  7. Mobile Robotics: Research, Applications and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehmzow, Ulrich

    detection -- and presents one of the future challenges of mobile robotics research: that of applying quanti.g. descending stairs), and it must pose no risk to humans in the vicinity of the robot. Section 2 discussesMobile Robotics: Research, Applications and Challenges Ulrich Nehmzow Department of Computer

  8. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: A flat architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Form Contribution 97-0766. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. This contribution covers the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all reside at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. Future contributions will cover the general case where those top-most LGNs reside at different hierarchy levels. This contribution considers a flat ad hoc network architecture--in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the preconfigured level of its top-most LGN.

  9. PNNI routing support for ad hoc mobile networking: The multilevel case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution extends the Outside Nodal Hierarchy List (ONHL) procedures described in ATM Forum Contributions 97-0766 and 97-0933. These extensions allow multiple mobile networks to form either an ad hoc network or an extension of a fixed PNNI infrastructure. A previous contribution (97-1073) covered the simplest case where the top-most Logical Group Nodes (LGNs), in those mobile networks, all resided at the same level in a PNNI hierarchy. This contribution covers the more general case wherein those top-most LGNs may reside at different PNNI hierarchy levels. Both of the SNL contributions consider flat ad hoc network architectures in the sense that each mobile network always participates in the PNNI hierarchy at the pre-configured level of its top-most LGN.

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the “computer” as possible, the user’s ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Google’s Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile device’s operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nation’s critical infrastructure.

  11. Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize...

  12. On Optimal Information Capture by Energy-Constrained Mobile ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    mobile sensors often run on limited batteries. When they .... We assume that the mobile sensor runs on limited battery and is therefore energy constrained. The.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: fuel-cell-powered mobile lighting...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel-cell-powered mobile lighting system ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities, CRF, Energy, Energy...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: fuel cell mobile lighting system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel cell mobile lighting system Patent Awarded for the Fuel Cell Mobile Light On August 28, 2013, in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), CRF, Energy, Energy...

  15. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Pushing the Frontier of High-Definition Ion Mobility Spectrometry Using FAIMS. Abstract: Differential ion...

  16. Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile Hanford Solar Power: Cost Effective and Mobile February 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis EMs Richland Operations Office and its contractors...

  17. DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy Expo DOE and Partners Demonstrate Mobile Geothermal Power System at 2009 Geothermal Energy...

  18. Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel Catalyst for Oxidation of Hydrogen. Moving Protons with Pendant Amines: Proton Mobility in a Nickel Catalyst for...

  19. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced...

  20. The Fuel Cell Mobile Light Project - A DOE Market Transformation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program webinar, "Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting," held on November 13, 2012. Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications DOEBoeing Sponsored Projects...

  1. 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Mobile agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathi, Anand

    Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Mobile agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Historical perspective . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.3 Applications of mobile agents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.4 Drawbacks

  2. Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App Efficiency Nova Scotia Releases Energy Efficiency Mobile App Graphic of the inside of a house, with table and chairs,...

  3. Atmospheric effects in astroparticle physics experiments and the challenge of ever greater precision in measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Louedec

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Astroparticle physics and cosmology allow us to scan the universe through multiple messengers. It is the combination of these probes that improves our understanding of the universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. Unlike other areas in science, research in astroparticle physics has a real originality in detection techniques, in infrastructure locations, and in the observed physical phenomenon that is not created directly by humans. It is these features that make the minimisation of statistical and systematic errors a perpetual challenge. In all these projects, the environment is turned into a detector medium or a target. The atmosphere is probably the environment component the most common in astroparticle physics and requires a continuous monitoring of its properties to minimise as much as possible the systematic uncertainties associated. This paper introduces the different atmospheric effects to take into account in astroparticle physics measurements and provides a non-exhaustive list of techniques and instruments to monitor the different elements composing the atmosphere. A discussion on the close link between astroparticle physics and Earth sciences ends this paper.

  4. Statistical Directions for the Analysis of Participatory Mobile Health Asthma Management Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasenstab, Kyle Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using mobile phone technology for the management of theirmanagement. Usage studies of modern mobile technologies have

  5. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPAR?, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ? PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin attenuates arsenic-induced diabetes in mice. ? Encapsulated insulin acts effectively at nearly 10 fold lesser dose than insulin. ? Injection route is more effective than oral administration route. ? Nano-insulin can cross blood–brain barrier with added physiological implications. ? Nano-insulin acts mainly through regulation of mitochondrial signaling cascade.

  6. Ion mobility analysis of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry (Danville, CA); Krauss, Ronald M. (Berkeley, CA); Blanche, Patricia J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  7. Mobile inspection and repackaging unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, G.A.; Roberts, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States). Solid Waste Disposal Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of large volumes of radioactive mixed waste (RMW) generated over the past 20 years at the Hanford Site has resulted in various waste management challenges. Presently, disposal capacity for RMW does not exist. Containers holding RMW will be stored until processing facilities can be completed to provide treatment and final disposal. Because of the complexity of these wastes, special projects have been initiated to properly manage them. This paper addresses one such project. The goal of this project is to develop a mobile inspection and repackaging unit (IRU) for solid RMW. The paper describes the structural design, equipment, ventilation system, instruments and electrical systems, video monitors and recorders, materials handling, and waste processing of containers.

  8. A Mobile Network for Mobile Sensors Andrea Simonetto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scerri, Paul

    approach is to send additional communication robots to form the network and keep sensor robots and human, the robots may need to constantly rearrange to adjust to sensor robot movement or failed communication robots graphs [5], allow robust robot positioning [6] and provide good coverage [7], have been applied

  9. Vacuum energy densities of a field in a cavity with a mobile boundary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federico Armata; Roberto Passante

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the zero-point field fluctuations, and the related field energy densities, inside a one-dimensional and a three-dimensional cavity with a mobile wall. The mechanical degrees of freedom of the mobile wall are described quantum mechanically and they are fully included in the overall system dynamics. In this optomechanical system, the field and the wall can interact with each other through the radiation pressure on the wall, given by the photons inside the cavity or even by vacuum fluctuations. We consider two cases: the one-dimensional electromagnetic field and the three-dimensional scalar field, and use the Green's functions formalism, which allows extension of the results obtained for the scalar field to the electromagnetic field. We show that the quantum fluctuations of the position of the cavity's mobile wall significantly affect the field energy density inside the cavity, in particular at the very proximity of the mobile wall. The dependence of this effect from the ultraviolet cutoff frequency, related to the plasma frequency of the cavity walls, is discussed. We also compare our new results for the one-dimensional electromagnetic field and the three-dimensional massless scalar field to results recently obtained for the one-dimensional massless scalar field. We show that the presence of a mobile wall also changes the Casimir-Polder force on a polarizable body placed inside the cavity, giving the possibility to detect experimentally the new effects we have considered.

  10. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  11. Forecasting the market for SO sub 2 emission allowances under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.; Molburg, J.; Fisher, R.; Boyd, G.; Pandola, G.; Lurie, G.; Taxon, T.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), which are briefly reviewed here, provide for about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase 1 (1995--1999) than in Phase 2. Considering the scrubber incentives in Phase 1, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase 2. Allowance prices are expected to increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments, so utilities which are risk neutral, or potential speculators in the allowance market, are not expected to bank allowances. The allowances will be banked by utilities that are risk averse. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions. 1 fig.

  12. A two-period model of emission abatement and allowance banking under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase I (1995--1999) than in Phase II. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase I, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase II. Allowance prices may increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments with allowances being banked only by risk averse electric utilities. Speculators are likely to be willing to set allowances in forward markets, which will lower current market prices of allowances relative to a situation with only risk averse utilities in the market. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions.

  13. A two-period model of emission abatement and allowance banking under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) provide about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase I (1995--1999) than in Phase II. Also, considering the scrubber incentives in Phase I, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase II. Allowance prices may increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments with allowances being banked only by risk averse electric utilities. Speculators are likely to be willing to set allowances in forward markets, which will lower current market prices of allowances relative to a situation with only risk averse utilities in the market. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions.

  14. Method for enhancing the resolving power of ion mobility separations over a limited mobility range

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for raising the resolving power, specificity, and peak capacity of conventional ion mobility spectrometry is disclosed. Ions are separated in a dynamic electric field comprising an oscillatory field wave and opposing static field, or at least two counter propagating waves with different parameters (amplitude, profile, frequency, or speed). As the functional dependencies of mean drift velocity on the ion mobility in a wave and static field or in unequal waves differ, only single species is equilibrated while others drift in either direction and are mobility-separated. An ion mobility spectrum over a limited range is then acquired by measuring ion drift times through a fixed distance inside the gas-filled enclosure. The resolving power in the vicinity of equilibrium mobility substantially exceeds that for known traveling-wave or drift-tube IMS separations, with spectra over wider ranges obtainable by stitching multiple segments. The approach also enables low-cutoff, high-cutoff, and bandpass ion mobility filters.

  15. Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 1 General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 1 General Overview Wireless Transmission Medium Layer Mobile Transport Layer WLAN Security #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 2 Wireless LANs #12;Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'14 3 Characteristics of Wireless LANs Advantages

  16. 1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 General Overview Wireless Transmission Medium Layer Mobile Transport Layer WLAN Security #12;2 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Medium Access Control (MAC Layer) #12;3 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Can we apply media access

  17. Adaptive Route Optimization in Hierarchical Mobile IPv6 Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

    their attachment points freely while being con- nected. Therefore, mobility management is essential for tracking-generation wireless/ mobile networks are anticipated to be unified networks based on IP technology, i.e., all-IP networks, IP-based mobility management is critical. Many IP mobility protocols have been proposed

  18. Dynamic Adaptation of Mobile Agents in Heterogenous Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of network management where mobile agents seem to be a promising technology [BPW98,FKK99]. Java programs can, there are scenarios like IT-management, where mobile agents are forced to contain environment dependent technologies, design paradigms and applications of mobile code. Code mobility can also be de- scribed as motion

  19. Approaches for Broadcasting Temporal Data in Mobile Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Edward

    advances in mobile communication technology have spawned many new mobile applications. A key element: mobile computing, data broadcast, real-time data, cache management 1 Introduction Recent advances in wireless communication technology have greatly increased the feasibility of mobile information services

  20. Supporting Mobile Service Interaction through Semantic Service Description Annotation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to these characteristics, Semantic Web Service technology is probably the most promising candidate for connecting mobile devices supports this technology, the mobile usage of Web Services is still rather constrained that support and facilitate Physical Mobile Interaction. Semantic Web Service technology helps realising mobile

  1. 2013 NC Mobile CARE Awards October 14, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /or advanced transportation technology use. 2013 Mobile CARE Awardees Our Judges Seth Effron Communication2013 NC Mobile CARE Awards October 14, 2013 Background: The NC Mobile Clean Air Renewable Energy Department of Transportation, the Mobile CARE initiative brings together three state agencies

  2. An analysis of current mobile services and enabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    An analysis of current mobile services and enabling technologies Ivar Jørstad, Schahram Dustdar This paper presents the major technology enablers for mobile services in a comprehensive way and in relation be incomplete, inconsistent and overlapping with other technology enablers. Keywords: mobile services, mobile

  3. Integrating Mobile Agent Technology into an e-Marketplace Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrating Mobile Agent Technology into an e-Marketplace Solution - The InterMarket Marketplace. The mobile agent technology might take e-commerce trading to the next phase. Mobile agents are intelligent technology. A feasibility study, made for two existing software applications, the mobile-agent system Tracy

  4. Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Runtong

    Page 1 Computation Migration based on Mobile IP and Intelligent Agent Techniques Runtong Zhang, Dongmei Zhang, Zhigang Kan and Jian Ma Advanced Internet Technology, Nokia (China) R&D Center No. 11, He is to investigate the use of mobile agents in the platform of mobile IPv6, to provide adapted services to mobile

  5. Location of Mobile Terminals using Time Measurements and Survey Points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

    Location of Mobile Terminals using Time Measurements and Survey Points M. McGuire ,K.N. Plataniotis is the Time Difference of Arrival (TDoA)method where the location of the mobile terminal is estimated using research communityon technologiesthat can estimatethe loca- tion of mobile terminals. Mobile terminal

  6. Explaining low sulfur dioxide allowance prices : the effect of expectation errors and irreversibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan-Pablo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low price of allowances has been a frequently noted featured of the implementation of the sulfur dioxide emissions market of the U.S. Acid Rain Program. This paper presents theoretical and numerical analyses that explain ...

  7. The efficiency and robustness of allowance banking in the U.S. Acid Rain Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an empirical evaluation of the efficiency of allowance banking (i.e., abating more in early periods in order to abate less in later periods) in the nationwide market for sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission ...

  8. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  9. Recommendations for erosion-corrosion allowance for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos, W.C.; Brehm, W.F.; Larrick, A.P. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Divine, J.R. [ChemMet, Ltd., West Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility carbon steel tanks will contain mixer pumps that circulate the waste. On the basis of flow characteristics of the system and data from the literature, an erosion allowance of 0.075 mm/y (3 mil/year) was recommended for the tank bottoms, in addition to the 0.025 mm/y (1 mil/year) general corrosion allowance.

  10. Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The position is a Heavy Mobile Equipment Mechanic (One Mechanic Shop) located in Kent, Washington, and will be responsible for the safe and efficient operation of a field garage performing...

  11. Coupling Human Mobility and Social Ties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toole, Jameson L; Schneider, Christian M; Gonzalez, Marta C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies using massive, passively data collected from communication technologies have revealed many ubiquitous aspects of social networks, helping us understand and model social media, information diffusion, and organizational dynamics. More recently, these data have come tagged with geographic information, enabling studies of human mobility patterns and the science of cities. We combine these two pursuits and uncover reproducible mobility patterns amongst social contacts. First, we introduce measures of mobility similarity and predictability and measure them for populations of users in three large urban areas. We find individuals' visitations patterns are far more similar to and predictable by social contacts than strangers and that these measures are positively correlated with tie strength. Unsupervised clustering of hourly variations in mobility similarity identifies three categories of social ties and suggests geography is an important feature to contextualize social relationships. We find that the composi...

  12. Hadoop MapReduce for Mobile Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Johnu

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    capabilities on clusters of commodity hardware. Building Hadoop on a mobile net- work enables the devices to run data intensive computing applications without direct knowledge of underlying distributed systems complexities. However, these applications have...

  13. Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI CMRS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI ­ CMRS) Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor #12 caused by higher frequency of roadside safety inspections using wireless technologies. · Benefits

  14. Techniques for Mobile Location Estimation in UMTS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Nicholas J

    The subject area of this thesis is the locating of mobile users using the future 3rd generation spread spectrum communication system UMTS. The motivation behind this work is twofold: firstly the United States Federal ...

  15. Effective Protocols for Mobile Communications and Networking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinoza, J.; Sholander, P.; Van Leeuwen, B,

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines methods of mobile communications with an emphasis on mobile computing and wireless communications. Many of the advances in communications involve the use of Internet Protocol (IP), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and ad hoc network protocols. However, many of the advances in these protocols have been focused on wired communications. Recently much focus has been directed at advancing communication technology in the area of mobile wireless networks. This report discusses various protocols used in mobile communications and proposes a number of extensions to existing protocols. A detailed discussion is also included on desirable protocol characteristics and evaluation criteria. In addition, the report includes a discussion on several network simulation tools that maybe used to evaluate network protocols.

  16. Update on mobile applications in dermatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shivani; Eluri, Madhu; Boyers, Lindsay N; Karimkhani, Chante; Dellavalle, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    apps officially overtake PC web usage in January 2014.officially-overtake- take-pc-web-usage-in-january-2014/.in the mobile platform. Web-ready applications for

  17. Distributed algorithms for mobile ad hoc networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Navneet

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We first present two new leader election algorithms for mobile ad hoc networks. The algorithms ensure that eventually each connected component of the topology graph has exactly one leader. The algorithms are based on a routing algorithm called TORA...

  18. Incorporating video into Google Mobile Street View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Christina (Christina E.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile Street View is a compelling application but suffers from significant latency problems, especially in limited bandwidth circumstances. Currently, the application uses static images to display street level information. ...

  19. New Mobility Op.ons Elizabeth Deakin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    New Mobility Op.ons Elizabeth Deakin Professor of City and Regional Planning · Bike sharing · Carpooling ­ casual ­ dynamic · Smart transit and paratransit · Smart cars and highways Suppor5ng Ac5ons: · Seed funding; demonstra.on projects

  20. Computing with Mobile Agents in Distributed Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    .......................... 1-12 1.7 Network Decontamination and Black Holes ....... 1-15 Network decontamination · Black holes the decontamination problem and black hole search. 1.2 Modeling Mobile Agents in Distribu

  1. Clock synchronization for mobile ad hoc networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Rajan

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    As mobile networking advances, there is a need for services such as clock synchronization that improve performance and support the development of higher-level applications. This can be achieved by adapting existing algorithms (such as the Network...

  2. Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost from Mobile Source Emission Reduction Credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschein, Perry S.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Going Mobile: Emissions Trading Gets a Boost From Mobilehave tested various emissions trading policies to supplementAn Analysis of EPA's Emissions Trading Program, 6 YALE J. ON

  3. Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Computers, such as Facebook (FB) is also a somewhat prickly topic in higher education as the stakeholders listed above attempt

  4. Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total inter-vessel pit area per ves-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total cavitation safety and transport efficiency. Fourteen species of diverse growth form (vine, ring- and diffuse species total). Two types of vulnerability-to-cavitation curves were found. Ring-porous trees and vines

  5. The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    PROBLEM The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While Massachusetts' seismic building codes are adapted from Cali- fornia to damage from earthquakes of small magnitude, particularly if the fundamen- tal frequency of the seismic

  6. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for portable high-precision quantum sensors.

  7. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, Jan; Grzeschik, Christoph; Sternke, Tammo; Grote, Alexander; Popp, Manuel; Becker, Dennis; Müntinga, Hauke; Ahlers, Holger; Peters, Achim; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Sengstock, Klaus; Gaaloul, Naceur; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a technological challenge. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6 s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1 Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of...

  8. A high-flux BEC source for mobile atom interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Rudolph; Waldemar Herr; Christoph Grzeschik; Tammo Sternke; Alexander Grote; Manuel Popp; Dennis Becker; Hauke Müntinga; Holger Ahlers; Achim Peters; Claus Lämmerzahl; Klaus Sengstock; Naceur Gaaloul; Wolfgang Ertmer; Ernst M. Rasel

    2015-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum sensors based on coherent matter-waves are precise measurement devices whose ultimate accuracy is achieved with Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) in extended free fall. This is ideally realized in microgravity environments such as drop towers, ballistic rockets and space platforms. However, the transition from lab-based BEC machines to robust and mobile sources with comparable performance is a challenging endeavor. Here we report on the realization of a miniaturized setup, generating a flux of $4 \\times 10^5$ quantum degenerate $^{87}$Rb atoms every 1.6$\\,$s. Ensembles of $1 \\times 10^5$ atoms can be produced at a 1$\\,$Hz rate. This is achieved by loading a cold atomic beam directly into a multi-layer atom chip that is designed for efficient transfer from laser-cooled to magnetically trapped clouds. The attained flux of degenerate atoms is on par with current lab-based BEC experiments while offering significantly higher repetition rates. Additionally, the flux is approaching those of current interferometers employing Raman-type velocity selection of laser-cooled atoms. The compact and robust design allows for mobile operation in a variety of demanding environments and paves the way for transportable high-precision quantum sensors.

  9. Advanced structure-borne sound Wave mobilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    ^p e j(v -p ) · Wave mobilities © Prof. B.A.T. Petersson Advanced structure-borne sound · Decomposed1 Advanced structure-borne sound p(kx) v(kx) v = p Y = ^ve- jkx x ejv ^pe- jkx x e jp = ^v ^p = ^v;2 Advanced structure-borne sound · Interface mobilities s C kp = 2p C kq = 2q C ; p = 0 ±1 ±2 ±3... ; q = 0

  10. Innovative Mobile Technologies for Asset Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liko, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    orders to space & occupancy costs. ? Top 5 lessons learned implementing a mobile solution Who We Are ? Experts in both Real Property and Facilities Management Business and Technology ? Over 250 years of combined experience that encompasses facility... assigned by layer and not by block or object ? Do you have nested blocks ? Complexity and detail of predefined blocks Facility Surveys Facility Surveys Facility Surveys Workflow: do more in fewer steps with mobility ? Eliminate paper with instant...

  11. Mobile robotics research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morse, W.D.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia is a National Security Laboratory providing scientific and engineering solutions to meet national needs for both government and industry. As part of this mission, the Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center conducts research and development in robotics and intelligent machine technologies. An overview of Sandia`s mobile robotics research is provided. Recent achievements and future directions in the areas of coordinated mobile manipulation, small smart machines, world modeling, and special application robots are presented.

  12. OFFICIAL POLICY 10.17 / 3.2 Mobile Websites and Mobile Applications ("Apps") 08/01/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    OFFICIAL POLICY 10.17 / 3.2 Mobile Websites and Mobile Applications ("Apps") 08/01/12 Policy Statement All existing or proposed College of Charleston mobile website and mobile application ("apps/or the Android store), must be reviewed and approved by both Information Technology and the Division of Marketing

  13. Abstract --We describe the core components of a mobile RFID system, and they include components such as mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    . I. INTRODUCTION One of the key problems with mobile RFID technology is how to quickly use the mobile mobile RFID technology can focus on implementing commerce logic. WIPI (Wireless Internet Platform-357-D00255) application, Browser parser, and Phone GUI. Most functions for mobile RFID technology

  14. Supersampling and network reconstruction of urban mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagarra, Oleguer; Santi, Paolo; Diaz-Guilera, Albert; Ratti, Carlo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding human mobility is of vital importance for urban planning, epidemiology, and many other fields that aim to draw policies from the activities of humans in space. Despite recent availability of large scale data sets related to human mobility such as GPS traces, mobile phone data, etc., it is still true that such data sets represent a subsample of the population of interest, and then might give an incomplete picture of the entire population in question. Notwithstanding the abundant usage of such inherently limited data sets, the impact of sampling biases on mobility patterns is unclear -- we do not have methods available to reliably infer mobility information from a limited data set. Here, we investigate the effects of sampling using a data set of millions of taxi movements in New York City. On the one hand, we show that mobility patterns are highly stable once an appropriate simple rescaling is applied to the data, implying negligible loss of information due to subsampling over long time scales. On...

  15. Systematic distillation of composite Fibonacci anyons using one mobile quasiparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Ben W

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A topological quantum computer should allow intrinsically fault-tolerant quantum computation, but there remains uncertainty about how such a computer can be implemented. It is known that topological quantum computation can be implemented with limited quasiparticle braiding capabilities, in fact using only a single mobile quasiparticle, if the system can be properly initialized by measurements. It is also known that measurements alone suffice without any braiding, provided that the measurement devices can be dynamically created and modified. We study a model in which both measurement and braiding capabilities are limited. Given the ability to pull nontrivial Fibonacci anyon pairs from the vacuum with a certain success probability, we show how to simulate universal quantum computation by braiding one quasiparticle and with only one measurement, to read out the result. The difficulty lies in initializing the system. We give a systematic construction of a family of braid sequences that initialize to arbitrary acc...

  16. Compact and mobile high resolution PET brain imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw (Yorktown, VA); Proffitt, James (Newport News, VA)

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A brain imager includes a compact ring-like static PET imager mounted in a helmet-like structure. When attached to a patient's head, the helmet-like brain imager maintains the relative head-to-imager geometry fixed through the whole imaging procedure. The brain imaging helmet contains radiation sensors and minimal front-end electronics. A flexible mechanical suspension/harness system supports the weight of the helmet thereby allowing for patient to have limited movements of the head during imaging scans. The compact ring-like PET imager enables very high resolution imaging of neurological brain functions, cancer, and effects of trauma using a rather simple mobile scanner with limited space needs for use and storage.

  17. The effects of mobile ATM switches on PNNI peer group operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, L.; Sholander, P.; Tolendino, L.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This contribution discusses why, and how, mobile networks and mobile switches might be discussed during Phase 1 of the WATM standards process. Next, it reviews mobile routers within Mobile IP. That IP mobility architecture may not apply to the proposed mobile ATM switches. Finally, it discusses problems with PNNI peer group formation and operation when mobile ATM switches are present.

  18. UTILIZING SAP'S SYBASE UNWIRED PLATFORM AND MOBILE BUSINESS OBJECTS TO CREATE A MOBILE PLANT MAINTENANCE APPLICATION.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ElAarag, Hala

    .......................................................... 12 #12;1 ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to use System Analysis and Program DevelopmentUTILIZING SAP'S SYBASE UNWIRED PLATFORM AND MOBILE BUSINESS OBJECTS TO CREATE A MOBILE PLANT by System Analysis and Program Development and the server access they so graciously provided to both myself

  19. Design and Analysis ofDesign and Analysis of Mobile SystemsMobile Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Jennifer L.

    Video Games Virtual RealityVirtual Reality Smart Kindergarten (UCLA)Smart Kindergarten (UCLA) #12;3 OverviewGauss--Markov, Probabilistic, City SectionMarkov, Probabilistic, City Section ­­ Group MobilityGroup Mobility Correlated Random) ­­ Position in Destination/Room & Path betweenPosition in Destination/Room & Path between (floor plan grid

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MOBILE COMPUTING 1 Mobile Relay Configuration in Data-intensive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torng, Eric

    such as batteries or small solar panels. Therefore, a key chal- lenge faced by data-intensive WSNs is to minimize limited power supplies. We propose using low-cost disposable mobile relays to reduce the energy, it does not require complex motion planning of mobile nodes, so it can be implemented on a number of low-cost

  1. MuSIC: Mobility-Aware Optimal Service Allocation in Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    interpretation) - despite advances in device technology, resources (energy, storage, processing) at the mobileS goals such application delay, device power consumption and user cost/price. In this paper, we propose consumption and cost at the user side. In contrast, Wi-Fi deployments, e.g. 802.11 hotspots, exhibit low

  2. Adaptive and Personalized Interfaces for Mobile Web With the rapid advance of mobile technologies and the widely use of handheld mobile devices,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Wen-Chen

    the explosive growth of handheld mobile devices such as cell phones, palm pilots, and personal digital device and a user's preference. This paper proposes an innovative approach to adaptive and personalizedAdaptive and Personalized Interfaces for Mobile Web Abstract With the rapid advance of mobile

  3. Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

  4. alkyl-chain-length-independent hole mobility: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -filosofiaan ja (more) Nousiainen, Sari 2013-01-01 84 Theoretical Mobility Analysis of Ion Mobility Spectrometry Physics Websites Summary: Results Theoretical Mobility Analysis...

  5. A Highly Efficient And Linear RF Power Amplifier For Mobile Terminal Applications /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kheirkhahi, Alireza

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EIT) for Mobile Terminal Applications . . . . . . 2.1Envelope Equalization for Mobile Terminal Applications . 3.1and Termination for Mobile Terminal Applications,” IEEE

  6. Statistical Directions for the Analysis of Participatory Mobile Health Asthma Management Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasenstab, Kyle Andrew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mark Hansen, Chair Mobile technology has become increasinglyGeneral Introduction Mobile technology (laptops, readers,Usage studies of modern mobile technologies have also been

  7. Designing mobile digital library services for pre-engineering and technology literacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Wireless and Mobile Technologies in Education, http://new developments in mobile technology, with capabilities forof education and mobile technology requires an approach that

  8. Review: Mobile Interface Theory: Embodied Space and Locative Media by Jason Farman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crooks, Roderic

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consequences of mobile technology, one that contributesand mediation of mobile technologies. For the author, thesehappen together in uses of mobile technology. In successive

  9. Essays on the Economic Impacts of Mobile Phones in Sub-Saharan Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenstock, Joshua Evan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the distribution of mobile technology within the Rwandanfor understanding how mobile technologies influence economicby designing mobile-based technologies for deployment in

  10. Supporting Implicit Mobile Communication: Harnessing Ubiquitous Sensors for Context and Content to Support Social Connection /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bales, Elizabeth ShanLing Cheng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can be difficult. Designing mobile technologies that supportsystem to explore how mobile technology could be used tocontrast to other mobile technologies that they often used

  11. Missouri AHEC Housing *no pets allowed at any of the AHEC housing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    Missouri AHEC Housing *no pets allowed at any of the AHEC housing * Students are responsible for cleaning up after themselves Housing is occasionally shared with other healthcare professions students7146 Cost: No charge to students (utilities included) (limited number of units available) Housing in St

  12. Co-op is an academic program that allows students to gain paid industry work experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    16 Co-op is an academic program that allows students to gain paid industry work experience before and practice, helps fine-tune career goals, and provides examples of industry structure and practices. Co.careers@usc.edu cooperative education (co-op) benefiTS · Agreatwaytoevaluateyourcareer options. · Earnacademiccreditandgetpaid

  13. Co-op is an academic program that allows students to gain paid industry work experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    16 Co-op is an academic program that allows students to gain paid industry work experience before and practice, helps fine-tune career goals, and provides examples of industry structure and practices. Co.careers@usc.edu COOPERATIVEEDUCATION(CO-OP) BENEFITS · Agreatwaytoevaluateyourcareer options. · Earnacademiccreditandgetpaid

  14. Melanoma Cells Treated with GGTI and IFN-c Allow Murine Vaccination and Enhance Cytotoxic Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Melanoma Cells Treated with GGTI and IFN-c Allow Murine Vaccination and Enhance Cytotoxic Response against Human Melanoma Cells Guillaume Sarrabayrouse1,2,3 , Christine Pich1,2,3 , Raphae¨l Moriez4 activation of T lymphocytes by melanoma cells is often due to the defective expression of class I major

  15. Extending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao, Jianwei "John"

    , the radiation damage. While the radiation damage problem can be mitigated somewhat by using cryogenic techniques resolution without serious radiation damage to the specimens. Although X-ray crystallography becomesExtending The Methodology Of X-ray Crystallography To Allow X-ray Microscopy Without X-ray Optics

  16. STANDARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE 25.99.08.M1.01 Communication Allowances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    job responsibilities may be enhanced by the provision of personal communication devices. Departments and operation of personal communication devices under the provisions of this Procedure. Communication Allowances salary supplements for service plans. 1.2 A personal communication device acquired by provisions

  17. allowance for funds used during construction: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allowance for funds used during construction First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Principles...

  18. Risk-Neutral Models for Emission Allowance Prices and Option Valuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    liquidity of trading on futures contracts on CO2 emissions allowances, led naturally to the next step. For this reason, market-based mechanisms for emission reduction are supposed to yield pollution control of CO2 equivalent, the short end of the curve being clearly the most actively traded. In this work, we

  19. Electron mobility calculation for graphene on substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Hideki; Ogawa, Matsuto [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Hideaki, E-mail: tsuchiya@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1, Rokko-dai, Nada-ku, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Kamakura, Yoshinari; Mori, Nobuya [Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By a semiclassical Monte Carlo method, the electron mobility in graphene is calculated for three different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, HfO{sub 2}, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). The calculations account for polar and non-polar surface optical phonon (OP) scatterings induced by the substrates and charged impurity (CI) scattering, in addition to intrinsic phonon scattering in pristine graphene. It is found that HfO{sub 2} is unsuitable as a substrate, because the surface OP scattering of the substrate significantly degrades the electron mobility. The mobility on the SiO{sub 2} and h-BN substrates decreases due to CI scattering. However, the mobility on the h-BN substrate exhibits a high electron mobility of 170?000?cm{sup 2}/(V·s) for electron densities less than 10{sup 12?}cm{sup ?2}. Therefore, h-BN should be an appealing substrate for graphene devices, as confirmed experimentally.

  20. Michael Langley GREATER MSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    prosper here. People prosper here. OUR REGION'S STORY #12;RAPID URBANIZATION & GROWING MIDDLE CLASS Mumbai and Insurance Reports (examples) · Met Council: NARC Study · MGI: Game Changers Data Analysis · Sectors (Mc · Nutrition · Water filtration · Water purification Food & Water Solutions #12;BUSINESS AND PEOPLE PROSPER

  1. Model for isopaching Jurassic-age Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, L.F.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep gas was discovered in the Norphlet Sandstone of Mobile Bay Alabama in 1979. Sixteen wells, of which Exxon Company, U.S.A. has had an interest in eight, have tested gas from depths greater than 20,000 ft and at an average rate of 19 million ft/sub 3/ of gas per day. The dominant structural features in Mobile Bay are large east-west-trending salt-supported anticlines associated with salt pull-apart listric normal faulting. Throws on these faults measure up to 1000 ft. Individual structures have dimensions as large as 15 mi in an east-west strike direction and 8 mi in a north-south dip direction. The Jurassic age (Callovian) Norphlet of Mobile Bay is characterized by eolian dune sand deposits up to 700 ft thick. An important factor affecting future development drilling is the accurate prediction of reservoir thickness. This presentation shows that an integrated study of seismic and well data has facilitated the development of a geological model for isopaching the Norphlet Formation. The isopach exhibits a strong north-northwest-south-southeast orientation of parallel thicks and thins. These trends are believed to be the result of original eolian deposition of complex linear dunes in the Norphlet Sandstone. The major east-west structural grain of faults and anticlines overprints this preserved depositional trend.

  2. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. (Exxon Production Research Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  3. Mobil plans methanol plant in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobil Chemical (Houston) is in discussions with Nigerian National Petroleum Corp. (NNPC; Lagos) on a joint venture methanol plant at Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The U.S. firm has invited process owners to submit proposals for a 1-million m.t./year unit and hopes to select the technology by the end of this year. Three proposals have been submitted: Lurgi, offering its own low-pressure process; John Brown/Davy, with the ICI process; and M.W. Kellogg, proposing its own technology. Shareholding in the joint venture is yet to be decided, but it is likely to be a 50/50 tie-up. Marketing of Mobil's share or of the entire tonnage would be handled by Mobil Petrochemical International (Brussels). The plant could be onstream in late 1996.

  4. Mobile Information Collectors' Trajectory Data Warehouse Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    oueslati, wided

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To analyze complex phenomena which involve moving objects, Trajectory Data Warehouse (TDW) seems to be an answer for many recent decision problems related to various professions (physicians, commercial representatives, transporters, ecologists ...) concerned with mobility. This work aims to make trajectories as a first class concept in the trajectory data conceptual model and to design a TDW, in which data resulting from mobile information collectors' trajectory are gathered. These data will be analyzed, according to trajectory characteristics, for decision making purposes, such as new products commercialization, new commerce implementation, etc.

  5. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  6. Mobile Power Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers IncMississippi:Miyi ChengnanMobileMobile

  7. ARM - ARM Mobile Facility 1 Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (SeeCenterARM Mobile Facility 1ARM Mobile Facility 1

  8. Quantum mechanics allows setting initial conditions at a cosmological singularity: Gowdy model example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkas, S L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown, that initial conditions in the quasi-Heisenberg quantization scheme can be set at an initial cosmological singularity per se. This possibility is provided by finiteness of some quantities, namely momentums of the dynamical variables, at a singularity, in spite of infinity of the dynamical variables themselves. The uncertainty principle allows avoiding a necessity to set values of the dynamical variables at singularity, as a wave packet can be expressed through the finite momentums. The issue of a vacuum energy, arising during evolution when the gravitational waves appear, is addressed as well. It is shown that, in the certain gauge, the equations of motion contain a difference of kinetic and potential energies of the field oscillators. Thus, in this gauge, the leading divergent parts of the vacuum energy in the equations of motion cancel each other. It is conjectured that the UV cut-off allows physical interpretation of the weakly divergent part of the vacuum energy.

  9. Quantum mechanics allows setting initial conditions at a cosmological singularity: Gowdy model example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. L. Cherkas; V. L. Kalashnikov

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown, that initial conditions in the quasi-Heisenberg quantization scheme can be set at an initial cosmological singularity per se. This possibility is provided by finiteness of some quantities, namely momentums of the dynamical variables, at a singularity, in spite of infinity of the dynamical variables themselves. The uncertainty principle allows avoiding a necessity to set values of the dynamical variables at singularity, as a wave packet can be expressed through the finite momentums. The issue of a vacuum energy, arising during evolution when the gravitational waves appear, is addressed as well. It is shown that, in the certain gauge, the equations of motion contain a difference of kinetic and potential energies of the field oscillators. Thus, in this gauge, the leading divergent parts of the vacuum energy in the equations of motion cancel each other. It is conjectured that the UV cut-off allows physical interpretation of the weakly divergent part of the vacuum energy.

  10. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  11. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  12. Final Report-- A Novel Storage Method for Concentrating Solar Power Plants Allowing Storage at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of the proposed work was the development and testing of a storage method that has the potential to fundamentally change the solar thermal industry. The development of a mathematical model that describes the phenomena involved in the heat storage and recovery was also a main objective of this work. Therefore, the goal was to prepare a design package allowing reliable scale-up and optimization of design.

  13. FERC allows higher rate of return for independent projects: the Ocean State power project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ruling last February to allow a private owners of a powerplant to receive a higher rate of return than normal electric utilities if they assumed the risks of cogeneration without qualifying under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act also leaves an out for unusual situations. The key to the decisions was an acknowledgement that those assuming higher risk deserve higher compensation. The incentive package is unique in the way it handles cost recovery and availability contracts.

  14. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  15. 2012 NC Mobile CARE Awards April 20, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provided technology assessment and commercialization services to notable clients such as NASA. Our Judges2012 NC Mobile CARE Awards April 20, 2012 Background: The NC Mobile Clean Air Renewable Energy

  16. Ada : context-sensitive context-sensing on mobile devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yu-Han, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of Ada, a context-sensing service for mobile devices. Ada explores new points in the accuracy-energy-responsiveness design space for mobile context sensing. ...

  17. Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obraczka, Katia

    1 Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms Cintia B. Margi 1156 High Street Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract--- This paper approaches energy consumption charac­ terization in mobile computing platforms by assessing energy con­ sumption of ''basic'' application

  18. Businesses Mobilize Production through Markets: Parametric Modeling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Businesses Mobilize Production through Markets: Parametric Modeling of Path-dependent Outcomes; Revised September 3, 2002; Accepted September 3, 2002 Business is modeled as interlocking social constructions that emerge in mobilizing differentiated production flows amidst uncertainty. The model

  19. Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call Using Mobile Applications to Generate Customer Demand Peer Exchange Call March 12, 2015 3:00PM to 4:3...

  20. Mobile sensor systems for field estimation and "hot spot" identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sumeet, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust, low-cost mobile sensing enables effective monitoring and management of urban environment and infrastructure which contributes towards a sustainable future. While mobile sensor systems have attracted significant ...

  1. Improving the performance and reliability of mobile applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sivalingam, Lenin Ravindranath

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile application ("app") ecosystem has grown at a tremendous pace with millions of apps and hundreds of thousands of app developers. Mobile apps run across a wide range of network, hardware, location, and usage ...

  2. Dynamic address allocation protocols for Mobile ad hoc networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patchipulusu, Praveena

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Address allocation is an important issue in Mobile ad hoc networks. This thesis proposes solutions to assign unique IP addresses to nodes participating in Mobile ad hoc networks and evaluates the proposed solutions. Address allocation protocols...

  3. Sensor based localization for multiple mobile robots using virtual links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rynn, Andrew John

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile robots are used for a wide range of purposes such as mapping an environment and transporting material goods. Regardless of the specific application, the navigation of the mobile robot is usually divided into three separate parts: localization...

  4. Energy Optimizations for Mobile Terminals via Computation Offloading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    design trends of energy efficient mobile applications. Index Terms--Mobile terminal, energy, computation result demonstrates that although energy consumption widely varies drastically depending upon to reduce the energy consumption of computation ­ remote execution. One can offload computational tasks

  5. Understanding energy consumption of sensor enabled applications on mobile phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman

    Recent research in ubiquitous and mobile computing uses mobile phones and wearable accelerometers to monitor individuals' physical activities for personalized and proactive health care. The goal of this project is to measure ...

  6. Deployment algorithms for mobile robots under dynamic constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwok, Andrew Nicholas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for many mobile robot applications. It can perform one ofthe robots in the testbed. The first one is an application

  7. Human Robot Interaction in Mobile Robot Applications Akihisa Ohya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohya, Akihisa

    Human Robot Interaction in Mobile Robot Applications Akihisa Ohya PRESTO, JST / University the usefulness of mobile robots by showing concrete applications in human daily life through this study. Only a few mobile robot applications were de- signed and made with the purpose of supporting humans

  8. Real Time Control Design for Mobile Robot Fault Tolerant Control.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehnlenz, Kolja

    Mobile Robot. Cristian Axenie Automation and Industrial Informatics Department Razvan Solea, Lecturer, Ph-time distributed control application with fault tolerance capabilities for differential wheeled mobile robots mobile robot the author has been able to develop a hierarchical software application that minimizes costs

  9. Microbial Mobilization of Arsenic from Sediments of the Aberjona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morel, François M. M.

    Microbial Mobilization of Arsenic from Sediments of the Aberjona Watershed D I A N N E A H M A N N, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 Arsenic mobilization from aquatic sediments to this transport, mobilization of solid-phase arsenic was investigated in upper Aberjona sediment microcosms

  10. MOBILE LEARNING AND DIGITAL LIBRARIES Esha Datta, Department of Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    MOBILE LEARNING AND DIGITAL LIBRARIES Esha Datta, Department of Mechanical Engineering, UC Berkeley of settings. In particular, the use of mobile technologies to access digital libraries opens up doors the design and implementation of a mobile learning digital library infrastructure and test applications. We

  11. Mesh Geometry Compression for Mobile Graphics Jongseok Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seungyong

    , for mobile graphics, API standards such as OpenGL ES and JSR-184 have been proposed [8], and the graphicsMesh Geometry Compression for Mobile Graphics Jongseok Lee POSTECH thirdeye@postech.ac.kr Sungyul--This paper presents a compression scheme for mesh geometry, which is suitable for mobile graphics. The main

  12. Modeling, Characterizing, and Enhancing User Experience in Cloud Mobile Rendering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    Modeling, Characterizing, and Enhancing User Experience in Cloud Mobile Rendering Yao Liu, Shaoxuan of California, San Diego {yal019, shaoxuan, dey}@ece.ucsd.edu Abstract--Cloud Mobile Rendering (CMR), where compute intensive rendering is performed on cloud servers instead of on mobile devices, can be a promising

  13. Internet and Mobile Services Patrick Clara, Manuel Piubelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Francesco

    Domotics Internet and Mobile Services Patrick Clara, Manuel Piubelli 2010/11 Abstract People do and are considered to be annoying. Domotics, a J2ME mobile application provides a way to accomplish these tasks by a few keyboard hits from any place using the mobile phone. Moreover, Domotics implements an intelligence

  14. Controlling dynamic contact transition for nonholonomic mobile manipulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Controlling dynamic contact transition for nonholonomic mobile manipulators V. Padois and P. Chiron the Genom controller on the h2bis nonholonomic mobile manipulator. I. INTRODUCTION For many years, research proposed to deal with the control of mobile manipulators. Modeling issues can be found in [2], [4

  15. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design, Implementation, and Evaluation Jie Teng, Tim on implementation and evaluation due to the difficulty of building mobile sensors. In the litera- ture, some--Mobile sensors are useful in many environments because they can move to increase the sensing coverage

  16. Optimizing Mobile Application Performance with ModelDriven Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    describes current research in developing an MDE tool for modeling mobile software architectures and using the following contributions to the study of mobile software development: (1) it shows how models of a mobile it difficult to test power consumption and performance until late in the software lifecycle [14], e.g., during

  17. On the Energy Overhead of Mobile Storage Systems Anirudh Badam*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    On the Energy Overhead of Mobile Storage Systems Jing Li Anirudh Badam* Ranveer Chandra* Steven the energy consumption of the storage stack on mobile platforms. We conduct several experiments on mobile plat- forms to analyze the energy requirements of their re- spective storage stacks. Software storage

  18. Performance of data dissemination among mobile devices Maria Papadopouli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopouli, Maria

    Performance of data dissemination among mobile devices Maria Papadopouli # Henning Schulzrinne and an implementation enabling the exchange of data among peers that are not necessarily connected to the Internet. Peers can be either mobile or stationary. We present a general framework of mobile data access

  19. Performance of data dissemination among mobile devices Maria Papadopouli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papadopouli, Maria

    Performance of data dissemination among mobile devices Maria Papadopouli Henning Schulzrinne and an implementation enabling the exchange of data among peers that are not necessarily connected to the Internet. Peers can be either mobile or stationary. We present a general framework of mobile data access

  20. Code: A Lightweight and Flexible Mobile Code Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Picco, Gian Pietro

    evaluation of mobile code technology does not exist yet, some studies already evidenced that the powerful of client­server and mobile code in reducing the network traffic generated by management. The theoretical¯Code: A Lightweight and Flexible Mobile Code Toolkit Gian Pietro Picco Dip. Automatica e

  1. TR-IIS-11-004 An Integrated Network Mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    TR-IIS-11-004 An Integrated Network Mobility Management and Call Admission Control Scheme/tr11.html #12;An Integrated Network Mobility Management and Call Admission Control Scheme improvements however, are clashing with similarly impressive achievements in smart mobile device technology

  2. Managing Processes on Mobile Devices: The MARPLE Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    Managing Processes on Mobile Devices: The MARPLE Approach R¨udiger Pryss, Julian Tiedeken. In the MARPLE project we target at a tight integration of process management technol- ogy with mobile computing Introduction Mobile assistance in daily life as empowered by information and communication technology is a much

  3. Share this with Today's enterprises are mobile. With a multitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    Without MDM An enterprise mobile device management (MDM) strategy paired with the appropriate technology management platform can increase the costs associated with mobile inventory, and can reduce the organization's ability to respond to technology trends in a timely manner. Whether mobile devices are owned

  4. SYSTEM FRAMEWORK AND ITS APPLICATION IN MOBILE RFID SERVICE NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    @security.re.kr + dhwon@security.re.kr Mobile RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) is a newly emerging technology which uses the mobile phone as an RFID reader with a wireless technology and provides new valuable services and wireless internet. UHF Mobile RFID technology is based on ISO/IEC 18000-6C can share UHF RFID tags used

  5. Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitors D K Arvind & Michael Walters School of Informatics dka · Personal/Mobile Exposure Monitoring · Mapping the public space using numerous personal/mobile exposure Technology grant from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (C523881) · .... and industrial

  6. A Method for Creating Collaborative Mobile Learning Trails Kevin Walker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or exhibit of interest. Introduction This research explores the use of mobile technology to create project; · the Mobile Learning in Informal Science Settings project; · the Philosophy of Technology hypotheses? · How does the use of web-linked mobile technology change the process of the above activities

  7. GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR MOBILE FIELD DATA COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOSPATIAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR MOBILE FIELD DATA COLLECTION Sarah Nusser and Leslie Miller, and natural resources. These data are gathered largely by mobile field data collection. Although geospatial-linked data, it is nearly always used in printed forms due to limitations in mobile computing systems

  8. The Dark Side of Mobile Phones August 3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlini, David

    is convenient, but often makes for a poor nutritional choice. Deep-water rigs increase the world's access to oil, using cross-cultural data. To situate the study within the larger field of mobile phone research, we begin with a brief overview of mobile telephony in historical and social context. Mobile Phones

  9. Acceptance and Usability of Physical Mobile Applications Tanja Herting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    means for discovering, capturing and using this information. Physical Mobile Interaction (PMI) [10 to trust. In order to make mobile services easier to find and easier to use, the project adopts PMI of typical physical mobile applications (PMA) that use PMI to facilitate the user's interaction

  10. MOBILE FLEXIBLE NETWORKS: THE CHALLENGES AHEAD Merouane Debbah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MOBILE FLEXIBLE NETWORKS: THE CHALLENGES AHEAD M´erouane Debbah (Invited Paper) Supelec, 3 rue framework of Mobile Flexible Networks is to design self-organizing secure networks where terminals and base into a telecommunication network and the car users into terminals and you will get what is known as Mobile Flexible

  11. Deployment and coverage maintenance in mobile sensor networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jaeyong

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment of mobile nodes in a region of interest is a critical issue in building a mobile sensor network because it affects cost and detection capabilities of the system. The deployment of mobile sensors in essence is the movement of sensors from...

  12. Evolving Cellular Automata for Location Management in Mobile Computing Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    entering one of these reporting cells. To create such an evolving CA system, cells in the network for a number of test problems. Index Terms--Cellular automata, genetic algorithms, mobile computing, mobility to interferences. On the other hand, a miss on the location of a mobile terminal will necessitate a search

  13. UIA: A Global Connectivity Architecture for Mobile Personal Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Bryan

    UIA: A Global Connectivity Architecture for Mobile Personal Devices by Bryan Alexander Ford B Architecture for Mobile Personal Devices by Bryan Alexander Ford Submitted to the Department of Electrical multiple personal devices, many of them mobile, and need to share information securely among them using

  14. Challenges in Security and Privacy for Mobile Edge-Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of mobile personal devices such as smartphones and tablets today, with their growing com- putational and privacy of users' mobile devices and their personal data on these devices presents a significant obstacle-3890 Abstract Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets are ubiquitous today, and many of them possess

  15. Mobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breu, Ruth

    mobile networks with dynamic topology Optimized task allocation and communication based on application and energy constraints Secure communication and data management in mobile sensor networks Solution SpaceMobile RobotsSensor Networks Autonomous Sensor/Actuator Networks ROSES RObot assisted SEnsor

  16. Clock synchronization for mobile ad hoc networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandra, Rajan

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Time Protocol) used in wired networks (e.g. Internet) to Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANets). It may also be achieved by developing other algorithms that achieve clock synchronization and may be suitable for MANets. Using the Network Time Protocol (NTP...

  17. Mobile workstation for decontamination and decommissioning operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittaker, W.L.; Osborn, J.F.; Thompson, B.R. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Robotics Inst.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is an interdisciplinary effort to develop effective mobile worksystems for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of facilities within the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. These mobile worksystems will be configured to operate within the environmental and logistical constraints of such facilities and to perform a number of work tasks. Our program is designed to produce a mobile worksystem with capabilities and features that are matched to the particular needs of D&D work by evolving the design through a series of technological developments, performance tests and evaluations. The project has three phases. In this the first phase, an existing teleoperated worksystem, the Remote Work Vehicle (developed for use in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building basement), was enhanced for telerobotic performance of several D&D operations. Its ability to perform these operations was then assessed through a series of tests in a mockup facility that contained generic structures and equipment similar to those that D&D work machines will encounter in DOE facilities. Building upon the knowledge gained through those tests and evaluations, a next generation mobile worksystem, the RWV II, and a more advanced controller will be designed, integrated and tested in the second phase, which is scheduled for completion in January 1995. The third phase of the project will involve testing of the RWV II in the real DOE facility.

  18. Spring 2012 Mobile Learning Scholars Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    is an immersive semester of exploration focused on leveraging mobile learning strategies to achieve course goals and on student learning. During the Spring 2012 semester, two cohorts of faculty were supported. Each faculty of the experience was assessed in the following ways: a) students enrolled in these mLearning courses were surveyed

  19. Microbial controls on metal ion mobility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Karla Louise

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    iii ABSTRACT Karla Leslie, Ph.D. Department of Geology, December 2012 University of Kansas In this dissertation, the biogeochemical controls on metal mobility in the... mineralization. iv ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to acknowledge the many contributions that made completion of this work possible. My entire committee was not...

  20. Mobile Phone Based Drifting Lagrangian Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    predicting the outcome and impact of silt disturbed by dredging operations; maintaining the health of fish a new approach to the design of low-cost floating sensors for hydrodynamic studies, leveraging low-cost mobile phone sensor platforms have recently been developed to provide low-cost sensor data collection [1

  1. Towards Mobile Microrobot Swarms for Additive Micromanufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavlanos, Michael

    of independently controlled microrobots in advanced, additive manufacturing applications. Keywords Mobile Microrobotics, Multi-robot Control, Additive Manufacturing 1. Introduction Flexible manufacturing capabilities, and additive manufacturing has proven to be a disruptive technology at the small- to medium-scale. Many

  2. Emerging trends in mobile OS platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Irfan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smartphones with a market penetration of over 31% in US among mobile users have become a mass-market product within a short 4-year period since the launch of iPhone. Tablets are showing similar trajectory in terms of ...

  3. Graph-Theoretic Connectivity Control of Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    ]­[23]. This research has given rise to connectivity or topology control algorithms that regulate the transmission powerINVITED P A P E R Graph-Theoretic Connectivity Control of Mobile Robot Networks This paper develops an analysis for groups of vehicles connected by a communication network; control laws are formulated

  4. Control Freaks How Online and Mobile Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansky, Joshua

    : fighting wars, crunching numbers Photo caption: November 21, 1950, Princeton, NJ: "A new type of electronic Manufacture of computers: toxic waste Manufacture of mobile phones: depletion of rare metals 4 #12 Effects of New Language Technologies A "new" language exists Alternative names proposed include Electronic

  5. An integrated mobile system for port security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cester, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Pesente, S.; Stevanato, L.; Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, Via F. Marzolo 8, Padova I-35131 (Italy); Neri, F.; Petrucci, S.; Selmi, S.; Tintori, C. [CAEN S.p.A., Via Vetraia 11, I-55049, Viareggio LU (Italy)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated mobile system for port security is presented. The system is designed to perform active investigations, by using the tagged neutron inspection technique, of suspect dangerous materials as well as passive measurements of neutrons and gamma rays to search and identify radioactive and special nuclear materials. (authors)

  6. Portable control device for networked mobile robots

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Byrne, Raymond H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Jon R. (Edgewood, NM); Harrington, John J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gladwell, T. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A handheld control device provides a way for controlling one or multiple mobile robotic vehicles by incorporating a handheld computer with a radio board. The device and software use a personal data organizer as the handheld computer with an additional microprocessor and communication device on a radio board for use in controlling one robot or multiple networked robots.

  7. Mobile Device Management Android Device Enrollment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to manage your device. c. Enter your password. #12;d. Accept the Terms and Conditions e. You have completed. 2. Get Touchdown from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search for Touchdown. c. Use the application. #12;3. Get Citrix Mobile Connect from Google Play a. Open up the Google Play Store. b. Search

  8. Performances de protocoles transactionnels en environnement mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serrano Alvarado, Patricia

    indices de performance quantitatifs, et étudie ceux-ci sur quatre protocoles (2PC, UCM, CO2PC et TCOT that are studied on four protocols (2PC, UCM, CO2PC et TCOT). Three of them are specifics propositions for mobile revisited to propose adapted transaction models and proper- ties. Proposed algorithms and protocols try

  9. MyRED Mobiles Student Views

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    tap on Shopping Cart, then select term. Tap on Class Search to find courses to place in your shoppingMyRED Mobiles Student Views Mar 2014 Page 1 Login/Sign-in Enter your MyRED /TrueYou credentials. Tap on any Term bar to view a schedule for the selected term. Home Screen/Main Menu Class Schedule

  10. MobileEssence : a mobile non-invasive platform for meeting notes capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Anthony Morris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MobileEssence provides a light-weight, ubiquitous meeting capture tool which affords the user the ability to capture all important information, including recording what was just said, who said it, and what is being said ...

  11. The Bacillus subtilis conjugative transposon ICEBs1 mobilizes plasmids lacking dedicated mobilization functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Catherine Ann

    Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs, also known as conjugative transposons) are mobile elements that are found integrated in a host genome and can excise and transfer to recipient cells via conjugation. ICEs and ...

  12. Abstract This paper proposes Hierarchical Mobile Router Advertisement (HMRA) that manages hierarchy of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Ministry of Science and Technology, 2003, Korea. more mobile routers (MRs) that connect it to the globalAbstract ­ This paper proposes Hierarchical Mobile Router Advertisement (HMRA) that manages hierarchy of the mobile routers in nested mobile networks. Nested mobile network contains mobile networks

  13. A digital platform for marketing communications in the mobile and social media space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A digital platform for marketing communications in the mobile and social media space Otto Petrovic media. Keywords: digital marketing platform, mobile advertising, social media marketing, mobile of communications via mobile messaging with numerous other digital media, e.g. mobile websites, mobile clients for i

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study.

  15. Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 46 and 47- CO2 Budget Trading Program and Allowance Distribution (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purposes of these regulations, CO2 budget units are defined as units that serve an electricity generator with nameplate capacity greater than or equal to 25 MWe. The regulations describe...

  16. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  17. Risk-based evaluation of Allowed Outage Times (AOTs) considering risk of shutdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mankamo, T. (Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland)); Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When safety systems fail during power operation, Technical Specifications (TS) usually limit the repair within Allowed Outage Time (AOT). If the repair cannot be completed within the AOT, or no AOT is allowed, the plant is required to be shut down for the repair. However, if the capability to remove decay heat is degraded, shutting down the plant with the need to operate the affected decay-heat removal systems may impose a substantial risk compared to continued power operation over a usual repair time. Thus, defining a proper AOT in such situations can be considered as a risk-comparison between the repair in frill power state with a temporarily increased level of risk, and the altemative of shutting down the plant for the repair in zero power state with a specific associated risk. The methodology of the risk-comparison approach, with a due consideration of the shutdown risk, has been further developed and applied to the AOT considerations of residual heat removal and standby service water systems of a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant. Based on the completed work, several improvements to the TS requirements for the systems studied can be suggested.

  18. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates within an anarchical framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. In the standard picture, its rate is proportional to m{sub ee}, the e-e element of the Majorana neutrino mass matrix in the flavor basis. I explore minimally allowed m{sub ee} values within the framework of mass matrix anarchy where neutrino parameters are defined statistically at low energies. Distributions of mixing angles are well defined by the Haar integration measure, but masses are dependent on arbitrary weighting functions and boundary conditions. I survey the integration measure parameter space and find that for sufficiently convergent weightings, m{sub ee} is constrained between (0.01-0.4) eV at 90% confidence. Constraints from neutrino mixing data lower these bounds. Singular integration measures allow for arbitrarily small m{sub ee} values with the remaining elements ill-defined, but this condition constrains the flavor structure of the model's ultraviolet completion. {beta}{beta}0{nu} bounds below m{sub ee}{approx}5x10{sup -3} eV should indicate symmetry in the lepton sector, new light degrees of freedom, or the Dirac nature of the neutrino.

  19. Minimally allowed neutrinoless double beta decay rates from approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) and Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is among the only realistic probes of Majorana neutrinos. In the standard scenario, dominated by light neutrino exchange, the process amplitude is proportional to m{sub ee}, the e-e element of the Majorana mass matrix. Naively, current data allow for vanishing m{sub ee}, but this should be protected by an appropriate flavor symmetry. All such symmetries lead to mass matrices inconsistent with oscillation phenomenology. I perform a spurion analysis to break all possible Abelian symmetries that guarantee vanishing {beta}{beta}0{nu} rates and search for minimally allowed values. I survey 230 broken structures to yield m{sub ee} values and current phenomenological constraints under a variety of scenarios. This analysis also extracts predictions for both neutrino oscillation parameters and kinematic quantities. Assuming reasonable tuning levels, I find that m{sub ee}>4x10{sup -6} eV at 99% confidence. Bounds below this value might indicate the Dirac neutrino nature or the existence of new light (eV-MeV scale) degrees of freedom that can potentially be probed elsewhere.

  20. Surfactant Based Enhanced Oil Recovery and Foam Mobility Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Clarence A. Miller

    2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Surfactant flooding has the potential to significantly increase recovery over that of conventional waterflooding. The availability of a large number of surfactant structures makes it possible to conduct a systematic study of the relation between surfactant structure and its efficacy for oil recovery. A mixture of two surfactants was found to be particularly effective for application in carbonate formations at low temperature. The mixture is single phase for higher salinity or calcium concentrations than that for either surfactant used alone. This makes it possible to inject the surfactant slug with polymer close to optimal conditions and yet be single phase. A formulation has been designed for a particular field application. It uses partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide for mobility control. The addition of an alkali such as sodium carbonate makes possible in situ generation of naphthenic soap and significant reduction of synthetic surfactant adsorption. The design of the process to maximize the region of ultra-low IFT takes advantage of the observation that the ratio of soap to synthetic surfactant is a parameter in the conditions for optimal salinity. Even for a fixed ratio of soap to surfactant, the range of salinity for low IFT was wider than that reported for surfactant systems in the literature. Low temperature, forced displacement experiments in dolomite and silica sandpacks demonstrate that greater than 95% recovery of the waterflood remaining oil is possible with 0.2% surfactant concentration, 0.5 PV surfactant slug, with no alcohol. Compositional simulation of the displacement process demonstrates the role of soap/surfactant ratio on passage of the profile through the ultralow IFT region, the importance of a wide salinity range of low IFT, and the importance of the viscosity of the surfactant slug. Mobility control is essential for surfactant EOR. Foam is evaluated to improve the sweep efficiency of surfactant injected into fractured reservoirs as well as a drive fluid for ASP flooding. UTCHEM is a reservoir simulator specially designed for surfactant EOR. It has been modified to represent the effects of a change in wettability produced by surfactant injection.

  1. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  2. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  3. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  4. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  6. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  7. Enlargement of concrete blocks of arch dams with allowance of the formation of radial thermal cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbetskii, G.P.; Chogovadze, G.I.; Daneliya, A.I.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable acceleration of the construction of arch dams with the use of highly productive continuous concreting mechanisms is possible with enlargement of the blocks and allowance of the formation of thermal radial cracks in them. A theoretical analysis and the results of on-site observations show that under the effect of the hydrostatic head of water, radial joints and cracks in compressed zones of an arch dam close and the dam in these zones works as a solid dam. Thermal cracking in concrete blocks of arch dams enlarged in plan should be controlled by making radial notches to concentrate tensile stresses providing the formation of radial cracks at prescribed places and through the usual methods of thermal regulation. The block size along the face of an arch dam is then no longer limited by the condition of crack resistance but is determined by the rate of concreting. The technical and economic effects from concreting arch dams are cited.

  8. A New Item Response Theory Model for Open-Ended Online Homework with Multiple Allowed Attempts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gönülate?, Emre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Item Response Theory (IRT) was originally developed in traditional exam settings, and it has been shown that the model does not readily transfer to formative assessment in the form of online homework. We investigate if this is mostly due to learner traits that do not become apparent in exam settings, namely random guessing due to lack of diligence or dedication, and copying work from other students or resources. Both of these traits mask the true ability of the learner, which is the only trait considered in most mainstream unidimensional IRT models. We find that indeed the introduction of these traits allows to better assess the true ability of the learners, as well as to better gauge the quality of assessment items. Correspondence of the model traits to self-reported behavior is investigated and confirmed. We find that of these two traits, copying answers has a larger influence on initial homework attempts than random guessing.

  9. Minimally allowed beta beata 0_nu rates from approximate flavor symmetries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay ({beta}{beta}0{nu}) is the only realistic probe of Majorana neutrinos. In the standard scenario, dominated by light neutrino exchange, the process amplitude is proportional to m{sub ee} , the e - e element of the Majorana mass matrix. This is expected to hold true for small {beta}{beta}{nu} rates ({Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}), even in the presence of new physics. Naively, current data allows for vanishing m{sub ee} , but this should be protected by an appropriate flavor symmetry. All such symmetries lead to mass matrices inconsistent with oscillation phenomenology. Hence, Majorana neutrinos imply nonzero {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}}. I perform a spurion analysis to break all possible abelian symmetries that guarantee {Gamma}{sub {beta}{beta}0{nu}} = 0 and search for minimally allowed m{sub ee} values. Specifically, I survey 259 broken structures to yield m{sub ee} values and current phenomenological constraints under a variety of scenarios. This analysis also extracts predictions for both neutrino oscillation parameters and kinematic quantities. Assuming reasonable tuning levels, I find that m{sub ee} > 4 x 10{sup -6} eV at 99% confidence. Bounds below this value would indicate the Dirac neutrino nature or the existence of new light (eV-MeV scale) degrees of freedom that can potentially be probed elsewhere. This limit can be raised by improvements in neutrino parameter measurements, particularly of the reactor mixing angle, depending on the best fit parameter values. Such improvements will also significantly constrain the available model space and aid in future constructions.

  10. Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh # Eyal Kushilevitz + Rafail Ostrovsky # William E. Skeith III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    Public Key Encryption that Allows PIR Queries Dan Boneh # Eyal Kushilevitz + Rafail Ostrovsky a public­key encryption scheme for Alice that allows PIR searching over encrypted documents. Our solution­trivially small communication complexity. The main technique of our solution also allows for Single­Database PIR

  11. Daily rhythms in mobile telephone communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aledavood, Talayeh; Roberts, Sam G B; Reed-Tsochas, Felix; Moro, Esteban; Dunbar, Robin I M; Saramäki, Jari

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circadian rhythms are known to be important drivers of human activity and the recent availability of electronic records of human behaviour has provided fine-grained data of temporal patterns of activity on a large scale. Further, questionnaire studies have identified important individual differences in circadian rhythms, with people broadly categorised into morning-like or evening-like individuals. However, little is known about the social aspects of these circadian rhythms, or how they vary across individuals. In this study we use a unique 18-month dataset that combines mobile phone calls and questionnaire data to examine individual differences in the daily rhythms of mobile phone activity. We demonstrate clear individual differences in daily patterns of phone calls, and show that these individual differences are persistent despite a high degree of turnover in the individuals' social networks. Further, women's calls were longer than men's calls, especially during the evening and at night, and these calls wer...

  12. The Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, K.D.; Ward, C.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobile robot system called Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI) is under development by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) Robotics Group of Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform mandated inspections of waste drums stored in warehouse facilities. The system will reduce personnel exposure to potential hazards and create accurate, high-quality documentation to ensure regulatory compliance and enhance waste management operations. Development work is coordinated among several Department of Energy (DOE), academic, and commercial entities in accordance wit DOE`s technology transfer initiative. The prototype system, SWAMI I, was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) in November, 1993. SWAMI II is now under development for field trails at the Fernald site.

  13. Stackable differential mobility analyzer for aerosol measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Da-Ren (Creve Coeur, MO)

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-stage differential mobility analyzer (MDMA) for aerosol measurements includes a first electrode or grid including at least one inlet or injection slit for receiving an aerosol including charged particles for analysis. A second electrode or grid is spaced apart from the first electrode. The second electrode has at least one sampling outlet disposed at a plurality different distances along its length. A volume between the first and the second electrode or grid between the inlet or injection slit and a distal one of the plurality of sampling outlets forms a classifying region, the first and second electrodes for charging to suitable potentials to create an electric field within the classifying region. At least one inlet or injection slit in the second electrode receives a sheath gas flow into an upstream end of the classifying region, wherein each sampling outlet functions as an independent DMA stage and classifies different size ranges of charged particles based on electric mobility simultaneously.

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G. [Waste Management Group, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases.

  15. Authentication : can mobile environments be secured?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cropper, Charles Austin

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . An encryption scheme, i. e. a set of transformations that change readable text (plaintext) into secret text (ciphertext) [19]. Cryptography. The art of secret writing [17]. The branch of mathematics based on the transformation of data [26]. Mobile System. A... communication system requiring no physical link between the user and a service provider [27]. Protocols. Consists of a set of procedures by which activities transpire. Smart Card. Resembles a credit card in appearance. Smart cards have embedded, single...

  16. Diagenesis and porosity evolution, Norphlet Formation in Mobile Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lock, B.E.; Broussard, S.W.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major deposits of natural gas were discovered in the Norphlet Formation beneath Mobile Bay in 1979. The reservoirs are in arkosic sandstones at depths greater than 20,000 ft, yet the productive interval has porosities up to 25%. Overlying the porous zone is a tight cap of thoroughly cemented sandstone of variable thickness, which poses problems for exploration and production. The tight zone, which together with overlying basal Smackover forms the reservoir seal, may be so thick that the underlying productive interval is substantially reduced. The upper parts of the Norphlet, in common with many other eolian sands, were reworked during a subsequent transgression. There is not a full correspondence, however, between the tight rock and the reworked facies. The origin of the impermeable zone is better understood as a function of the diagenetic history only partially related to depositional facies. It is proposed that, at an early stage of diagenesis, brines derived from the underlying Louann Salt and Werner Formation deposited anhydrite and possibly halite cements in the lower part of the Norphlet Formation. Marine working of the upper sands may have helped to disperse these brines from the upper part of the Norphlet, and the depth of reworking may even have been partially influenced by incipient cementation. The zones not already cemented by evaporites were subsequently cemented by quartz and feldspar overgrowths. At a very late stage, deep in the subsurface, the evaporite cements were flushed from the lower parts of the Norphlet, and locally abundant small feldspar crystals randomly nucleated in the pores. Gas migrated into the formation shortly afterward. Evaporites may play another important role in the petroleum geology of the deep Norphlet: the source of the gas may have been the underlying evaporites.

  17. Mobile Robotics Activities in DOE Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ron Lujan; Jerry Harbour; John T. Feddema; Sharon Bailey; Jacob Barhen; David Reister

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will briefly outline major activities in Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories focused on mobile platforms, both Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGV’s) as well as Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAV’s). The activities will be discussed in the context of the science and technology construct used by the DOE Technology Roadmap for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM)1 published in 1998; namely, Perception, Reasoning, Action, and Integration. The activities to be discussed span from research and development to deployment in field operations. The activities support customers in other agencies. The discussion of "perception" will include hyperspectral sensors, complex patterns discrimination, multisensor fusion and advances in LADAR technologies, including real-world perception. "Reasoning" activities to be covered include cooperative controls, distributed systems, ad-hoc networks, platform-centric intelligence, and adaptable communications. The paper will discuss "action" activities such as advanced mobility and various air and ground platforms. In the RIM construct, "integration" includes the Human-Machine Integration. Accordingly the paper will discuss adjustable autonomy and the collaboration of operator(s) with distributed UGV’s and UAV’s. Integration also refers to the applications of these technologies into systems to perform operations such as perimeter surveillance, large-area monitoring and reconnaissance. Unique facilities and test beds for advanced mobile systems will be described. Given that this paper is an overview, rather than delve into specific detail in these activities, other more exhaustive references and sources will be cited extensively.

  18. Mobile water treatment plant special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of the level and extent of groundwater contamination in the vicinity of Title I mill sites began during the surface remedial action stage (Phase 1) of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Some of the contamination in the aquifer(s) at the abandoned sites is attributable to milling activities during the years the mills were in operation. To begin implementation of Phase 11 groundwater remediation, the US Department of Energy (DOE) requested that (1) the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) conduct a study to provide for the design of a mobile water treatment plant to treat groundwater extracted during site characterization studies at completed Phase I UMTRA sites, and (2) the results of the TAC investigations be documented in a special study report. This special study develops the design criteria for a water treatment plant that can be readily transported from one UMTRA site to another and operated as a complete treatment system. The 1991 study provides the basis for selecting a mobile water treatment system to meet the operating requirements recommended in this special study. The scope of work includes the following: Determining contaminants, flows, and loadings. Setting effluent quality criteria. Sizing water treatment unit(s). Evaluating non-monetary aspects of alternate treatment processes. Comparing costs of alternate treatment processes. Recommending the mobile water treatment plant design criteria.

  19. Modeling sequence-specific polymers using anisotropic coarse-grained sites allows quantitative comparison with experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Haxton; Ranjan V. Mannige; Ronald N. Zuckermann; Stephen Whitelam

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain sequences of peptoid polymers (synthetic analogs of peptides) assemble into bilayer nanosheets via a nonequilibrium assembly pathway of adsorption, compression, and collapse at an air-water interface. As with other large-scale dynamic processes in biology and materials science, understanding the details of this supramolecular assembly process requires a modeling approach that captures behavior on a wide range of length and time scales, from those on which individual sidechains fluctuate to those on which assemblies of polymers evolve. Here we demonstrate that a new coarse-grained modeling approach is accurate and computationally efficient enough to do so. Our approach uses only a minimal number of coarse-grained sites, but retains independently fluctuating orientational degrees of freedom for each site. These orientational degrees of freedom allow us to accurately parameterize both bonded and nonbonded interactions, and to generate all-atom configurations with sufficient accuracy to perform atomic scattering calculations and to interface with all-atom simulations. We have used this approach to reproduce all available experimental X-ray scattering spectra (for stacked nanosheets, and for peptoids adsorbed at air-water interfaces and in solution), in order to resolve the microscopic, real-space structures responsible for these Fourier-space features. By interfacing with all-atom simulations, we have also laid the foundations for future multiscale simulations of sequence-specific polymers that communicate in both directions across scales.

  20. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  1. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 3, Sealed sources held by general licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume in a series of three volumes characterizing the population of sealed sources that may become greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). In this volume, those sources possessed by general licensees are discussed. General-licensed devices may contain sealed sources with significant amounts of radioactive material. However, the devices are designed to be safe to use without special knowledge of radiological safety practices. Devices containing Am-241 or Cm-244 sources are most likely to become GTCC LLW after concentration averaging. This study estimates that there are about 16,000 GTCC devices held by general licensees; 15,000 of these contain Am-241 sources and 1,000 contain Cm-244 sources. Additionally, this study estimates that there are 1,600 GTCC devices sold to general licensees each year. However, due to a lack of available information on general licensees in Agreement States, these estimates are uncertain. This uncertainty is quantified in the low and high case estimates given in this report, which span approximately an order of magnitude.

  2. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  3. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  4. Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing! RFID Basics!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, George

    , inductive or near-field coupling! ­ Near field means that the wavelength is several times greater than versus Passive! · Power to operate the chip! · Active tags:! ­ Use battery to power up the chip by the tag! · Semi-passive tags! ­ Use battery to operate the chip! ­ Antenna optimized for data transmission

  5. ExxonMobil Olefins Plant Projects, Maintenance and Optimizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neely, M. M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ExxonMobil Olefins Plant Projects, Maintenance and Optimizations Matt Neely Utilities Coordinator ExxonMobil Baytown Olefins Plant 2014 IETC May 21, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-02 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New... Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 • ExxonMobil Approach to Energy Management • Baytown Complex • Steam Cracking 101 • Energy Efficiency Improvement Approach • Energy Efficiency Improvements Overview Baytown Olefins Plant ESL-IE-14-05-02 Proceedings...

  6. 1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Wireless LANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer Communication SS'10 Wireless LANs #12;2 Edgar Nett Mobile Computer) and QoS, take their time (e.g. IEEE 802.11a,g and 802.1x) Ultimate goal: Be as good as LAN's #12;3 Edgar, wireless communication in computing networks is quite a challenge! Major Drawbacks #12;4 Edgar Nett Mobile

  7. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  8. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  9. T-554: Race condition in Google Chrome before 9.0.597.84 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Race condition in Google Chrome before 9.0.597.84 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via vectors related to audio.

  10. AAAA ResourceResourceResourceResource DiscoveryDiscoveryDiscoveryDiscovery AlgorithmAlgorithmAlgorithmAlgorithm inininin MobileMobileMobileMobile GridGridGridGrid ComputingComputingComputingComputing basedbasedbasedbased onononon IP-pagingIP-pagingIP-pagi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on the mobile grid computing framework to manage idle mobile devices. Within this framework, we discuss several technology, the use of mobile devices is rapidly increasing. Researches in Grid computing [6] tried, the management of mobile devices deserve many careful considerations, such as mobility management, disconnected

  11. Mobile Networks and Applications 9, 455457, 2004 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madiraju, Praveen

    1999 was a milestone in a sense that it marked the end of an era in mobile database management research of mobility in mobile data management and can serve as a summary of the achievements of the past decade assistants (PDA) provide a pervasive base for mobile computing. As the mobile computing technology matures

  12. Combining Mobility and Heterogeneous Networking for Emergency Management: a PMIPv6 and HIP-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    management of Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6) with macro-mobility management, security, inter-technology handoverCombining Mobility and Heterogeneous Networking for Emergency Management: a PMIPv6 and HIP. General Terms Design, Performance, Security. Keywords Mobility Management, Proxy Mobile IPv6

  13. MSIP: A protocol for efficient handoffs of real-time multimedia sessions in mobile wireless scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iyer, Sridhar

    infrastructure is to efficiently manage user mobility. Mobility is handled by Mobile IP (at the network layer in this paper, MSIP, is a combination of network and application layer mobility management models reducesMSIP: A protocol for efficient handoffs of real-time multimedia sessions in mobile wireless

  14. Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” technologies and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuel- cell vehicles: “Mobile Electricity" technologies andFuel-Cell Vehicles: “Mobile Electricity” Technologies, Early4 2 Mobile Electricity technologies and

  15. The use of mobile phones as a data collection tool: A report from a household survey in South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of mobile technology, combined with the6]. The use of mobile technology as a research instrument issize. The benefits of mobile technology, combined with the

  16. Acceptance test report for the mobile color camera system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castleberry, J.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present test data recorded during acceptance testing of the Mobile Color Camera System (MCCS).

  17. MHK Technologies/New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable Mobile...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Renewable Mobile Wind and Wave Power Plant Platform < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage New Knowledge Wind and Wave Renewable...

  18. NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative launches mobile app...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Press Releases Video Gallery Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home NNSA Blog NNSA's Global Threat Reduction Initiative launches mobile app...

  19. High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Helium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helium-Rich Gases. High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Using Helium-Rich Gases. Abstract: Analyses of complex mixtures and characterization of ions increasingly...

  20. Differential Ion Mobility Separations in up to 100% Helium Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in up to 100% Helium Using Microchips. Differential Ion Mobility Separations in up to 100% Helium Using Microchips. Abstract: The performance of differential IMS (FAIMS) analyzers...

  1. Mobilization of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the Impact...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the Impact of Oxygen under Geological Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Mobilization of Metals from Eau Claire Siltstone and the...

  2. Controls on arsenic mobility in contaminated wetland and riverbed streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keon, Nicole E. (Nicole Elise), 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arsenic mobility and transport in the environment are strongly influenced by associations with solid phases. This dissertation investigates the mechanisms affecting arsenic retention in contaminated wetland and riverbed ...

  3. agents mobilize blood: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and driver comfort. Kumar, Rakesh 2011-01-01 159 A Sanctuary for Mobile Agents Bennet S. Yee Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary: is perhaps...

  4. applied mobile robot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    navigation, guidance, sensor interpretation, and architectures. The design of mobile robot involves conflicting needs and a wide mix of disciplines. The Terregator design...

  5. aaai mobile robot: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    navigation, guidance, sensor interpretation, and architectures. The design of mobile robot involves conflicting needs and a wide mix of disciplines. The Terregator design...

  6. Towards Mobile Z Schemas M. Bettaz, M. Maouche

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    notation, Mobile Z schemas. 1. Introduction In the late seventies, the International Standards Organization) and International Journal of Computer Science & Applications © 2005 Technomathematics Research Foundation Vol. II

  7. Lightweight social communication using visual media and mobile phones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Lisa G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comfortable handing their personal device over to anotherThese ubiquitous, personal devices have the capability tothe mobile phone is a personal device, it is possible that

  8. Method for determining hydrogen mobility as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    May, Robert (Virginia Beach, VA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the mobility of hydrogen as a function of temperature in superconducting niobium cavities comprising: 1) heating a cavity under test to remove free hydrogen; 2) introducing hydrogen-3 gas into the cavity; 3) cooling the cavity to allow absorption of hydrogen-3; and 4) measuring the amount of hydrogen-3 by: a) cooling the cavity to about 4.degree. K while flowing a known and regulated amount of inert carrier gas such as argon or helium into the cavity; b) allowing the cavity to warm at a stable rate from 4.degree. K to room temperature as it leaves the chamber; and c) directing the exit gas to an ion chamber radiation detector.

  9. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, W.H.; Ganoe, C.W.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine. 3 figs.

  10. Mobile machine hazardous working zone warning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiffbauer, William H. (Connellsville, PA); Ganoe, Carl W. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A warning system is provided for a mobile working machine to alert an individual of a potentially dangerous condition in the event the individual strays into a hazardous working zone of the machine. The warning system includes a transmitter mounted on the machine and operable to generate a uniform magnetic field projecting beyond an outer periphery of the machine in defining a hazardous working zone around the machine during operation thereof. A receiver, carried by the individual and activated by the magnetic field, provides an alarm signal to alert the individual when he enters the hazardous working zone of the machine.

  11. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  12. Mobile Business Innovation Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreen Polymers IncMississippi:Miyi ChengnanMobile

  13. WIPP Receives Waste Characterized With Mobile System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for WIPP Mobile4February

  14. GSTAR: Generalized Storage-Aware Routing for MobilityFirst in the Future Mobile Internet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    used to realize the key routing component of the Mo- bilityFirst architecture, which is a clean-slate]. As a result, there has been renewed interest in "clean-slate" proposals which try to fundamentally address the paradigm shift towards mobile communication. Research programs exploring clean- slate architecture include

  15. Mobile Notes: Mobile Devices in Creative Discussions Lars Bollen, Guillermo Juarez, H.U Hoppe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    owns the personal device ­ the institution or the student?) and homogeneity (will one device be used setting. This setting includes personal mobile devices (PDAs) as well as a publicly visible interactive focus with smaller personal devices. In our own previous work, we have explored extending collaborative

  16. Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Direct Isotope Abundance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manuel J. Manard, Stephan Weeks, Kevin Kyle

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear forensics community is currently engaged in the analysis of illicit nuclear or radioactive material for the purposes of non-proliferations and attribution. One technique commonly employed for gathering nuclear forensics information is isotope analysis. At present, the state-of-the-art methodology for obtaining isotopic distributions is thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). Although TIMS is highly accurate at determining isotope distributions, the technique requires an elementally pure sample to perform the measurement. The required radiochemical separations give rise to sample preparation times that can be in excess of one to two weeks. Clearly, the nuclear forensics community is in need of instrumentation and methods that can expedite their decision making process in the event of a radiological release or nuclear detonation. Accordingly, we are developing instrumentation that couples a high resolution IM drift cell to the front end of a MS. The IM cell provides a means of separating ions based upon their collision cross-section and mass-to-charge ratio (m/z). Two analytes with the same m/z, but with different collision cross-sections (shapes) would exit the cell at different times, essentially enabling the cell to function in a similar manner to a gas chromatography (GC) column. Thus, molecular and atomic isobaric interferences can be effectively removed from the ion beam. The mobility selected chemical species could then be introduced to a MS for high-resolution mass analysis to generate isotopic distributions of the target analytes. The outcome would be an IM/MS system capable of accurately measuring isotopic distributions while concurrently eliminating isobaric interferences and laboratory radiochemical sample preparation. The overall objective of this project is developing instrumentation and methods to produce near real-time isotope distributions with a modular mass spectrometric system that performs the required gas-phase chemistry and separations. The system couples a high-resolution ion mobility (IM) drift cell to the front end of a mass spectrometer (MS) allowing for chemical separation prior to isotope distribution analyses. This will yield isotope ratio measurement capabilities with minimal sample preparation.

  17. Assessment of Radio-Frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Selected Mobile Base Stations (MBS) in Lokoja, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor, U J Nwankwo; Dada, S S; Onugba, A A; Ushie, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acquisition and use of mobile phone is tremendously increasing especially in developing countries, but not without a concern. The greater concern among the public is principally over the proximity of mobile base stations (MBS) to residential areas rather than the use of handsets. In this paper, we present an assessment of Radio-Frequency (RF) radiation exposure level measurements and analysis of radiation power density (in \\mu W/sq m) from mobile base stations relative to radial distance (in metre). The minimum average power density from individual base station in the town was about 47\\mu W/sq m while the average maximum was about 1.5mW/sq m. Our result showed that average power density of a base station decreases with increase in distance (from base station) and that radiation intensity varies from one base station to another even at the same distance away. Our result (obtained signature of power density variation) was also compared with the 'expected' signature. It was found that radiation from external...

  18. 2/16/2014 Can You Charge Your Mobile With Wind Turbine? -TechTxr http://www.techtxr.com/can-charge-mobile-wind-turbine/ 1/7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    maximum functionality. Home Wind Generators comparestores.net Looking for Wind Turbines? Compare Latest Turbine? | February 9, 2014 Wind Energy Wind Mill Wind Power Wind Mobile About Wind Power Wind Generator Mobile Generator Mobile Building #12;2/16/2014 Can You Charge Your Mobile With Wind Turbine

  19. Marta Poblet, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain (Ed.) Mobile Technologies for Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autònoma de Barcelona, Universitat

    in conflict prevention and dispute management aiming to learn how mobile technologies can play a disruptive. Mobile Technologies, Conflict Management, and ODR: Exploring Common Grounds; Marta Poblet.- Part IMarta Poblet, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Spain (Ed.) Mobile Technologies for Conflict

  20. CAR SHARING AND MOBILITY MANAGEMENT: FACING NEW CHALLENGES WITH TECHNOLOGY AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    1 CAR SHARING AND MOBILITY MANAGEMENT: FACING NEW CHALLENGES WITH TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATIVE BUSINESS PLANNING Conrad Wagner, Consulting Manager Strategy & Development at Mobility Car passengers. This pa- per describes an important movement towards new "Mobility Management" in which competi

  1. Democratizing Mobile Technology in Support of Volunteer Activities in Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Democratizing Mobile Technology in Support of Volunteer Activities in Data Collection Sun Young Kim-computer interaction, mobile technology, technology adoption, volunteer, data collection, citizen science, participatory sensing, sustainability #12;III ABSTRACT Mobile technology is advancing our ability to connect

  2. Consecutive scanning scheme: applications to localization and navigation for mobile robots in a dynamic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jae Yong

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a mobile robot localization and obstacle detection algorithm based on consecutive range sensor scans. For a known environment, a mobile robot may scan the environment using a range sensor which can rotate 360o. The mobile robot...

  3. PILOT TESTING: PRETREATMENT OPTIONS TO ALLOW RE-USE OF FRAC FLOWBACK AND PRODUCED BRINE FOR GAS SHALE RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnett, David

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the A&M DOE NETL Project No. DE-FE0000847 was to develop a mobile, multifunctional water treatment capability designed specifically for “pre-treatment” of field waste brine. The project consisted of constructing s mobile “field laboratory” incorporating new technology for treating high salinity produced water and using the lab to conduct a side-by-side comparison between this new technology and that already existing in field operations. A series of four field trials were performed utilizing the mobile unit to demonstrate the effectiveness of different technology suitable for use with high salinity flow back brines and produced water. The design of the mobile unit was based on previous and current work at the Texas A&M Separation Sciences Pilot Plant. The several treatment techniques which have been found to be successful in both pilot plant and field tests had been tested to incorporate into a single multifunctional process train. Eight different components were evaluated during the trials, two types of oil and grease removal, one BTEX removal step, three micro-filters, and two different nanofilters. The performance of each technique was measured by its separation efficiency, power consumption, and ability to withstand fouling. The field trials were a success. Four different field brines were evaluated in the first trial in New York. Over 16,000 gallons of brine were processed. Using a power cost of $.10 per kWh, media pretreatment power use averaged $0.004 per barrel, solids removal $.04 per barrel and brine “softening” $.84 per barrel. Total power cost was approximately $1.00 per barrel of fluid treated. In Pennsylvania, brines collected from frac ponds were tested in two additional trials. Each of the brines was converted to an oil-free, solids-free brine with no biological activity. Brines were stable over time and would be good candidates for use as a make-up fluid in a subsequent fracturing fluid design. Reports on all of the field trials and subcontractor research have been summarized in this Final Report. Individual field trial reports and research reports are contained in the companion volume titled “Appendices”

  4. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  5. An autonomous mobile robot for known industrial environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milios, Evangelos E.

    An autonomous mobile robot for known industrial environments S. B. Nickerson1 , P. Jasiobedzki4 , D types of industrial operations and environments for which mobile robots can be used to reduce human to workers. It is this industrial survey and inspection task in that the ARK (Autonomous Robot for a Known

  6. EE631 Cooperating Autonomous Mobile Lecture 1: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    ;Plan Overview of Syllabus Introduction to Robotics Applications of Mobile Robots Ways of Operation Single Robot vs. Multi-Robots Topics of Study This Semester #12;Applications of Mobile Robots Indoor/K- family/ K-Team.html #12;Forester Robot Pulstech developed the first `industrial like' walking robot

  7. Experimental Comparison of Handoff Performance of SIGMA and Mobile IP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    to be eight seconds which is significantly higher than the six milliseconds handoff latency of SIGMA. The restExperimental Comparison of Handoff Performance of SIGMA and Mobile IP Surendra Kumar Sivagurunathan;1 Experimental Comparison of Handoff Performance of SIGMA and Mobile IP Surendra Kumar Sivagurunathan, Justin

  8. Call for Papers ACM/Springer Mobile Networks & Applications (MONET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    . Therefore, the design of energy efficiency network architecture & protocols is the key problem for green it is important to further explore the energy efficiency multi-base-station management in green mobile networks in Green Mobile Networks http://www.springer.com/engineering/signals/journal/**** Overview Global warming

  9. Sustaining mobile pastoralists in the mountains of northern Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Sustaining mobile pastoralists in the mountains of northern Pakistan Mobile pastoralism According-West Frontier Province), in northern Pakistan. But the provision of these goods and services is at risk payments for ecosystem services. Case studies featured here were conducted in: Pakistan, Tanzania

  10. The Cricket Compass for ContextAware Mobile Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cricket Compass for Context­Aware Mobile Applications Nissanka B. Priyantha, Allen K. L. Miu compass, knowledge of orientation through the Cricket com- pass attached to a mobile device enhances, and \\augmented-reality" displays. Our compass infrastructure enhances the spatial inference capability

  11. Virtual Compass: Relative Positioning To Sense Mobile Social Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    Virtual Compass: Relative Positioning To Sense Mobile Social Interactions Nilanjan Banerjee in availability and ac- curacy. Virtual Compass is a peer-based relative positioning system that relies solely movement. We have im- plemented Virtual Compass on mobile phones and laptops, and we eval- uate it using

  12. A Mobile Interactive Robot for Gathering Structured Social Video

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Mobile Interactive Robot for Gathering Structured Social Video ABSTRACT Documentaries an autonomous method for capturing structured cinéma vérité style documentaries through an interactive robotic camera, which was used as a mobile physical agent to facilitate interaction and story gathering within

  13. Reception-Aware Power Control in Ad Hoc Mobile Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mans, Bernard

    Reception-Aware Power Control in Ad Hoc Mobile Networks Nirisha Shrestha and Bernard Mans Macquarie resource in ad hoc mobile networks, mak- ing power control a popular, yet crucial, technique. The network of power control non-trivial. For sake of simplicity, most existing power control protocols only consider

  14. Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Power Control for Mobile Sensor Networks: An Experimental Approach JeongGil Ko Department--Techniques for controlling the transmission power of wireless mobile devices have been widely studied in ad-hoc and cellular characteristics of these networks, such as severe resource constraints, suggest that transmission power control

  15. Effect of Mobility on Power Control and System Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anurag

    Effect of Mobility on Power Control and System Capacity in CDMA Cellular Wireless Networks Munish control, admission control and user mobility. We compare two methods for power control: Constant Re­ ceived Power Control (CRPC) in which the total power received at each base station (BS) is kept constant

  16. Toward Plasma Proteome Profiling with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Toward Plasma Proteome Profiling with Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Stephen J. Valentine, Manolo D) analysis of a plasma digest sample where abundant proteins have not been removed. Protein database searches- for comparative plasma profiling studies. Keywords: ion mobility spectrometry · proteome profiling

  17. Dynamic Tracking Control of Uncertain Nonholonomic Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Yi

    by a kinematic model or a dynamic model, the tracking control problem of the system is classified as eitherDynamic Tracking Control of Uncertain Nonholonomic Mobile Robots Wenjie Dong and Yi Guo Department consider the tracking control of a nonholonomic mobile robot with parameter uncertainty and unknown dynam

  18. Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Obraczka, Katia

    1 Characterizing System Level Energy Consumption in Mobile Computing Platforms Cintia B. Margi 1156 High Street Santa Cruz, CA 95064 Abstract-- This paper approaches energy consumption charac- terization in mobile computing platforms by assessing energy con- sumption of "basic" application-level tasks

  19. Exhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    energy models and resources managers designed for laptops [20] and data cen- ters [4] inapplicableExhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets Narseo Vallina.surname@telekom.de ABSTRACT Despite the advances in battery technologies, mobile phones still suffer from severe energy

  20. Keys for growth in Japan's mature mobile market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oto, Hiroyuki

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to identify key factors that will produce further growth for NTT DoCoMo in Japan's mature mobile market. Since the early 1990s, the mobile phone market in Japan has grown rapidly, and ...

  1. Eye-Gaze Interaction for Mobile Phones Heiko Drewes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eye-Gaze Interaction for Mobile Phones Heiko Drewes Media Informatics Group Amalienstr. 17, 80333 the use of eye-gaze tracking technology for mobile phones. In particular we investigate how gaze interaction can be used to control applications on handheld devices. In contrast to eye-tracking systems

  2. PATH FOLLOWING CONTROL FOR A MOBILE ROBOT PUSHING A BALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    PATH FOLLOWING CONTROL FOR A MOBILE ROBOT PUSHING A BALL Xiang Li, Andreas Zell Wilhelm-Schickard-Institute, Department of Computer Architecture, University of Tübingen, Sand 1, 72076 Tübingen, Germany {lix, zell}@informatik.uni-tuebingen.de Abstract: This paper focuses on the control problem of a mobile robot pushing a ball. In order to drive

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Expression of genes involved in energy mobilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Expression of genes involved in energy mobilization and osmoprotectant synthesis, mobilizing carbohydrate energy reserves to promote synthesis of low-molecular-mass osmoprotectants Department of Entomology, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA e-mail: teets.23@osu.edu Y

  4. A MULTI AGENT CONTROLLER FOR A MOBILE ARM MANIPULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A MULTI AGENT CONTROLLER FOR A MOBILE ARM MANIPULATOR Sébatien Delarue, Philippe Hoppenot, Etienne, the person being strongly tributary of the assistance. The general method to control a manipulator arm manipulator, mobile platform Abstract: In the assistive robotics domain, and especially for disable people

  5. Survey: Techniques for Efficient energy consumption in Mobile Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Survey: Techniques for Efficient energy consumption in Mobile Architectures Sean Maloney University@cs.ucsb.edu March 16th, 2012 Abstract As the world becomes more dependent on mobile technologies, battery life battery life is a delicate balance of give and take between longer battery life and more functionality

  6. INTRODUCTION TO CLOUDY MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT Ron Coleman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Ron

    INTRODUCTION TO CLOUDY MOBILE APP DEVELOPMENT Ron Coleman School of Computer Science, and discussion of business cases related to the mobile and cloud computing industries. Given the length and scope is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Marist College, Poughkeepsie, NY. Dr. Coleman has lead

  7. Measuring air pollution using a mobile, bicycle-based platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measuring air pollution using a mobile, bicycle-based platform Steve Hankey University-walkability Physical activity Air pollution 2 #12;Approach: Mobile, bicycle-based sampling Air pollution measurements.5BlackCarbon Low PollutionHigh Pollution Franklin Ave S, 130,000 pt/cc 8th St S, 19.8 µg/m3 Franklin Ave

  8. SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011 Choose brands and models of mobile devices that have the options referenced below. Use all available security options that your or sensitive university information in un-approved off-campus services, such as public cloud based services

  9. Improving Mobility through a Hybrid Multipath Transport/LISP solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    ­ UdelaR, Uruguay #12;Improving Mobility through a Hybrid Multipath Transport/LISP solution Agenda Context) Eduardo Grampín (UdelaR, Uruguay) Roque Gagliano (UdelaR, Uruguay) Alberto Castro (UPC, Spain ­ UdelaR, Uruguay) Martín Germán (UPC, Spain ­ UdelaR, Uruguay) #12;Improving Mobility through a Hybrid Multipath

  10. Collaboration Support Through Mobile Processes and Entailment Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulm, Universität

    mobile process and task support. In this context, flexible process management technology offers promising in many business domains. Along this trend, process management technology is going to be enhanced entailment constraints to mobile task management. In the context of a business process, for example, two

  11. Accountable Anonymous Service Usage in Mobile Communication Systems \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bencsáth, Boldizsár

    to one particular physical location. From a technology perspective, mobile communication systems haveAccountable Anonymous Service Usage in Mobile Communication Systems \\Lambda Levente Butty of Technology CH­1015 Lausanne, Switzerland fLevente.Buttyan, Jean­Pierre.Hubauxg@epfl.ch 23rd June 1999

  12. Managing Concurrent Execution of Transactions in Mobile Ad-hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruenwald, Le

    : an Energy-Efficient Approach Zhaowen Xing University of Oklahoma School of Computer Science 110 West Boyd Systems: an Energy-Efficient Approach Abstract. A Mobile Ad-hoc Network (MANET) is a collection of mobile. In order to provide timely and correct results for multiple concurrent transactions, energy-efficient

  13. Power Save Adaptation Algorithm for Multimedia Streaming to Mobile Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Save Adaptation Algorithm for Multimedia Streaming to Mobile Devices Janet Adams Performance. This paper proposes a power save adaptation algorithm for mobile multimedia streaming that aims to increase stages: data reception, decoding and playing and power saving solutions for each of these stages

  14. Adaptive-Buffer Power Save Mechanism for Mobile Multimedia Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adaptive-Buffer Power Save Mechanism for Mobile Multimedia Streaming Janet Adams Performance such as those involving mobile multimedia streaming. This paper proposes an Adaptive-Buffer Power Save mecha and consequently saving power. Data is eventually delivered in one of the station's following attempts to receive

  15. DAG-based Multipath Routing for Mobile Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Lynn

    DAG-based Multipath Routing for Mobile Sensor Networks Ki-Sup Hong and Lynn Choi School of Electrical Engineering Korea University Seoul, Korea {mastaks, lchoi@korea.ac.kr} Abstract--We propose a new multipath routing protocol called DMR for mobile sensor networks, where any node can move anytime. DMR

  16. THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF MOBILE FLEXIBLE NETWORKS Merouane Debbah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS OF MOBILE FLEXIBLE NETWORKS M´erouane Debbah Alcatel-Lucent Chair.debbah@supelec.fr ABSTRACT The general framework of Mobile Flexible Networks (MFN) is to design dense self-organizing, self-healing and self-energy harvesting secure networks where terminals and base stations interact and self

  17. VISUAL-BASED PLANNING AND CONTROL FOR NONHOLONOMIC MOBILE ROBOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    in the cartesian space. The mobile robot SuperMARIO used in our experiments is a two-wheel differen- tially drivenVISUAL-BASED PLANNING AND CONTROL FOR NONHOLONOMIC MOBILE ROBOTS A. De Luca, G. Oriolo, L. Paone, P: Visual feedback, nonholonomic mo- bile robots, motion planning, nonlinear control Abstract An integrated

  18. An Authentication and Security Protocol for Mobile Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yuliang

    networks such as public switched telephone/data networks, and hence many security issues with wire-line-air transmission of signals and low power supply of a mobile user. #12;When examining security in a wirelessAn Authentication and Security Protocol for Mobile Computing Yuliang Zheng Monash University Mc

  19. Turbo Detection for Mobile MIMO Underwater Acoustic Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yahong Rosa

    Turbo Detection for Mobile MIMO Underwater Acoustic Communications Jun Tao , Yahong Rosa Zheng-- Turbo detection for high data-rate single-carrier mobile multiple-input, multiple-output (MIMO signal is then sent to a MIMO turbo equalization module for detection. In the MIMO turbo equalization

  20. Mobile phone-induced honeybee worker piping Daniel FAVRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waves originating from mobile phones were tested for potential effects on honeybee behavior. Mobile Honeybees are essential partners for the success of agriculture. The economical role of honeybees, pollen or nectar dearth), drought, monocultural practices, migratory stress (brought about by the moving