National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for allowed retail marketers

  1. Factors affecting robust retail energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelman, T.S.

    1999-04-01

    This paper briefly defines an active retail market, details the factors that influence market activity and their relative importance, compares activity in various retail energy markets to date, and predicts future retail energy market activity. Three primary factors translate into high market activity: supplier margins, translated into potential savings for actively shopping customers; market size; and market barriers. The author surveys activity nationwide and predicts hot spots for the coming year.

  2. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  3. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  4. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Goldman, Charles; Heffner, Grayson; Sedano, Richard

    2008-05-27

    The Organization of Midwest ISO States (OMS) launched the Midwest Demand Resource Initiative (MWDRI) in 2007 to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) region and develop policies to overcome them. The MWDRI stakeholders decided that a useful initial activity would be to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This additional detail could then be used to assess any"seams issues" affecting coordination and integration of retail DR resources with MISO's wholesale markets. Working with state regulatory agencies, we conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs, dynamic pricing tariffs, and their features in MISO states. Utilities were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g., seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. This report describes the results of this comprehensive survey and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into organized wholesale markets. Survey responses from 37 MISO members and 4 non-members provided information on 141 DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs with a peak load reduction potential of 4,727 MW of retail DR resource. Major findings of this study area:- About 72percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;18percent. Almost 90percent of the DR resources included in this survey are provided by investor-owned utilities. - Approximately, 90percent of the DR resources are available with less than

  5. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Solutions Corp.","IL","Power Marketer",477853,4492034,227638.8,5.0676108 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24959,190336,16176.4,8.4988652 "Homefield ...

  6. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",24967,198273,16620.1,8.3824323 "Homefield ...

  7. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Glacial Energy Holdings","IL","Power Marketer",2426,128194,8721.1,6.8030485 "Green Mountain Energy Company","IL","Power Marketer",8,7937,443.7,5.5902734 "Homefield ...

  8. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 6.03 Glacial Energy Holdings IL Power Marketer 2,426 128,194 8,721.1 6.80 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 8 7,937 443.7 5.59 Homefield Energy IL Power Marketer ...

  9. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Northern California Power Agny CA Political Subdivision 1 370,555 19,963.0 5.39 Constellation Energy Services, Inc. CT Power Marketer 1 25,227 1,811.7 7.18 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CT Power Marketer 1 5,612 446.3 7.95 NextEra Energy Services, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 78,948 6,712.4 8.50 Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC

  10. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 6.03 Glacial Energy Holdings IL Power Marketer 2,426 128,194 8,721.1 6.80 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 24,967 198,273 16,620.1 8.38 Homefield Energy IL ...

  11. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 227,638.8 5.07 Green Mountain Energy Company IL Power Marketer 24,959 190,336 16,176.4 8.50 Homefield Energy IL Power Marketer 677,675 5,726,072 347,820.0 6.07 IDT Energy, Inc. ...

  12. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 36 77,724 4,536.3 5.84 City of Cerritos - (CA) CA Municipal 8 12,150 902.7 7.43 City of Corona - (CA) CA Municipal 6 41,096 3,462.1 8.42 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc CA Power Marketer 42 2,181,766 137,745.7 6.31 Direct Energy Business CA Power Marketer 29 259,685 16,873.9 6.50 EDF Industrial

  13. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ELECTRIC ENERGY | Department of Energy REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY The enclosed report is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Section 1815 of the Act established a five-member Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005)1 was designed to provide a comprehensive

  14. Will regulation impede the market for emissions allowances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.S.; Casey, W.T.

    1994-03-15

    Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 allow for trading of allowances for SO[sub 2] emissions. For this process to be efficient and to achieve the goal of reducing emissions by 10 million tons from 1980 levels, a freely functioning market in allowance trading needs to exist. This market could be threatened by some state regulations that require utilities to obtain prior approval from state commissions before selling property. There are several solutions for state regulators to employ to avoid inadvertently interfering with the allowance trading market. This article describes some of those possible solutions.

  15. Unbundling the retail gas market: Current activities and guidance for serving residential and small customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.; Lemon, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    The restructuring of retail gas services has followed a typical pattern for previously heavily regulated industries: large customers are initially given rights to purchase unbundled services from different entities, with the same rights dispersed over time to smaller customers. For about ten years now industrial customers in most states have been able to {open_quotes}play the market{close_quotes}. Since the passage of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order 636 in 1992, interest has centered on expanding service unbundling to small retail customers, including residential customers. Importantly, the Order prohibited pipelines from providing bundled sales service. This is not surprising - in the telecommunications industry, for example, the unbundling of wholesale services was a strong stimulant for developing competition in the local exchange market. The push for small-customer service unbundling has derived from the basic but politically attractive idea that all retail customers should directly benefit from competitive forces in the natural gas industry. When one looks at the movement of prices since 1985, it is easy to see that large retail customers have enjoyed more favorable prices than other retail customers. For example, over the period 1985 to 1994 gas prices to industrial customers and electric utilities fell around 23 percent and 36 percent, respectively. In comparison, gas prices to residential customers increased by around 5 percent while gas prices to commercial customers decreased slightly by about 1 percent. This report examines various aspects of unbundling to small retail gas customers, with special emphasis on residential customers.

  16. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report ...

  17. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  18. A Mixed Nordic Experience: Implementing Competitive Retail Electricity Markets for Household Customers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Ole Jess; Johnsen, Tor Arnt; Lewis, Philip

    2006-11-15

    Although the Nordic countries were among the first to develop competition in the electricity industry, it took a long time to make retail competition work. In Norway and Sweden a considerable number of households are actively using the market but very few households are active in Finland and Denmark. One problem has been institutional barriers involving metering, limited unbundling of distribution and supply, and limited access to reliable information on contracts and prices. (author)

  19. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "3 Phases Renewables","CA","Power Marketer",36,77724,4536.3,5.8364212 "City of Cerritos - (CA)","CA","Municipal",8,12150,902.7,7.4296296 "City of Corona -

  20. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energy’s Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  1. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  2. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  4. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898 January 2013 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a

  5. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898

  7. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, NaĂŻm R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer

  8. Forecasting the market for SO sub 2 emission allowances under uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, D.; Molburg, J.; Fisher, R.; Boyd, G.; Pandola, G.; Lurie, G.; Taxon, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper deals with the effects of uncertainty and risk aversion on market outcomes for SO{sub 2} emission allowance prices and on electric utility compliance choices. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), which are briefly reviewed here, provide for about twice as many SO{sub 2} allowances to be issued per year in Phase 1 (1995--1999) than in Phase 2. Considering the scrubber incentives in Phase 1, there is likely to be substantial emission banking for use in Phase 2. Allowance prices are expected to increase over time at a rate less than the return on alternative investments, so utilities which are risk neutral, or potential speculators in the allowance market, are not expected to bank allowances. The allowances will be banked by utilities that are risk averse. The Argonne Utility Simulation Model (ARGUS2) is being revised to incorporate the provisions of the CAAA acid rain title and to simulate SO{sub 2} allowance prices, compliance choices, capacity expansion, system dispatch, fuel use, and emissions using a unit level data base and alternative scenario assumptions. 1 fig.

  9. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  10. S. 3047: A Bill to amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill defines limits on the purchases required of a retailer from the producer or refiner and defines the exceptions under which any large integrated refiner can operate any motor fuel service station in the US. The Federal Trade Commission is charged with the enforcement.

  11. Allowance markets, fossil generation trends and SO{sub 2} compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, K.; Hewson, T. Jr.; Van Horn, A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper evaluates prospects and uncertainties in the emission allowance and emission control markets of concern to electric utilities required to reduce SO{sub 2} emissions under the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Over-control in Phase One, 1995 through 1999, is projected to produce a surplus of about 10 million tons of banked emission allowances that can later be drawn down to delay costly controls otherwise required in Phase Two, starting in year 2000. Trading of emission allowances in Phase Two is projected to reach roughly 1.5 million tons per year. Aversion to trading may slightly depress the price of allowances. Long term (2010) allowance prices are estimated to fall in the $350--600 per ton range (1994$), depending on fossil generation levels. When discounted to reflect major uncertainties, this range may be consistent with today`s low prices. The delay of Phase Two controls may cause some projected Phase Two costs to fall beyond short planning horizons that are reflective of high levels of uncertainty. Such short planning horizons make FGD retrofits less attractive than longer term evaluations would suggest. Barring major developments, the authors anticipate allowance prices and trading volumes to move more in line with long term expectations (with appropriate discounting) as Phase Two approaches.

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  13. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.5 0.7 23.0 25.2 14.3 16.1 Houston 2A 11.6 12.4 16.2 18.9 14.6 16.9 Phoenix 2B 8.3 10.2 17.2 21.3 14.2 17.5 Atlanta 3A 24.9 26.2 9.2 11.2 15.1 17.4 Los Angeles 3B 6.9 7.7 3.3 3.9 13.4 14.1 Las Vegas 3B 15.4 17.9 11.6 14.8 12.7 16.9 San Francisco 3C 22.4 22.5 0.7 1.0 10.6 12.1 Baltimore 4A 43.0 46.9 6.2 7.9 13.3 16.2 Albuquerque 4B 30.2 33.8 5.3

  17. Learning Based Bidding Strategy for HVAC Systems in Double Auction Retail Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yannan; Somani, Abhishek; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bidding strategy is proposed using reinforcement learning for HVAC systems in a double auction market. The bidding strategy does not require a specific model-based representation of behavior, i.e., a functional form to translate indoor house temperatures into bid prices. The results from reinforcement learning based approach are compared with the HVAC bidding approach used in the AEP gridSMART® smart grid demonstration project and it is shown that the model-free (learning based) approach tracks well the results from the model-based behavior. Successful use of model-free approaches to represent device-level economic behavior may help develop similar approaches to represent behavior of more complex devices or groups of diverse devices, such as in a building. Distributed control requires an understanding of decision making processes of intelligent agents so that appropriate mechanisms may be developed to control and coordinate their responses, and model-free approaches to represent behavior will be extremely useful in that quest.

  18. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  19. Retail Power Marketer

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 0 6 All other costs 0 7 Approval Expires: 05312017 SCHEDULE 6. PART B. DEMAND RESPONSE PROGRAMS Schedule 6. Part B. Energy and Demand Savings -- Demand Response ANNUAL ...

  20. Reliant Energy Retail Services, LLC Smart Grid Project | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    deploys new services and market offerings for retail customers in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) region. Reliant is deploying in-home energy displays,...

  1. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  2. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  3. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  4. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  5. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Refi ner retail petroleum product prices U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 7 September 2016

  6. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    U.S. Refi ner retail petroleum product volumes U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 9 September 2016

  7. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  8. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  9. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  10. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) – Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte – New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) – Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) – Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) – Boston, MA

  11. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  12. The allowance exchange - ALEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mangis, J.K.; Miller, C.; Nicholas, J.

    1997-12-31

    The success of market approaches to pollution control in reducing the cost of compliance with environmental regulation, has insured the inclusion of emissions trading programs in current and future regulatory programs. As these environmental trading programs multiply, (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, Ozone Precursors, Wetlands, CO{sub 2} and others), utility companies will need a central location to buy, sell, and trade these allowances to meet regulatory needs. In response, SAIC has designed and prototyped an electronic trading system that can provide a common forum for the location and exchange of environmental allowances, marketable permits, and other market based instruments for environmental management. SAIC intends to open and operate the Allowance Exchange (ALEX) for the trading of all environmental allowances, associated with the operation of electric utilities, as a service to the nation, the industry, and the environmental community.

  13. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    data at a State level on 14 petroleum products for various retail and wholesale marketing categories. The Form EIA-782B collects resellerretailer monthly price and volume...

  14. Price-elastic demand in deregulated electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.

    2003-05-01

    The degree to which any deregulated market functions efficiently often depends on the ability of market agents to respond quickly to fluctuating conditions. Many restructured electricity markets, however, experience high prices caused by supply shortages and little demand-side response. We examine the implications for market operations when a risk-averse retailer's end-use consumers are allowed to perceive real-time variations in the electricity spot price. Using a market-equilibrium model, we find that price elasticity both increases the retailers revenue risk exposure and decreases the spot price. Since the latter induces the retailer to reduce forward electricity purchases, while the former has the opposite effect, the overall impact of price responsive demand on the relative magnitudes of its risk exposure and end-user price elasticity. Nevertheless, price elasticity decreases cumulative electricity consumption. By extending the analysis to allow for early settlement of demand, we find that forward stage end-user price responsiveness decreases the electricity forward price relative to the case with price-elastic demand only in real time. Moreover, we find that only if forward stage end-user demand is price elastic will the equilibrium electricity forward price be reduced.

  15. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  16. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  17. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  18. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  19. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other

  20. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  1. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  2. Power marketing and renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.M.

    1997-09-01

    Power marketing refers to wholesale and retail transactions of electric power made by companies other than public power entities and the regulated utilities that own the generation and distribution lines. The growth in power marketing has been a major development in the electric power industry during the last few years, and power marketers are expected to realize even more market opportunities as electric industry deregulation proceeds from wholesale competition to retail competition. This Topical Issues Brief examines the nature of the power marketing business and its relationship with renewable power. The information presented is based on interviews conducted with nine power marketing companies, which accounted for almost 54% of total power sales by power marketers in 1995. These interviews provided information on various viewpoints of power marketers, their experience with renewables, and their respective outlooks for including renewables in their resource portfolios. Some basic differences exist between wholesale and retail competition that should be recognized when discussing power marketing and renewable power. At the wholesale level, the majority of power marketers stress the commodity nature of electricity. The primary criteria for developing resource portfolios are the same as those of their wholesale customers: the cost and reliability of power supplies. At the retail level, electricity may be viewed as a product that includes value-added characteristics or services determined by customer preferences.

  3. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  4. ,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" ...

  5. Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems: Sensitivities to Changes in Future Electricity Market Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Naim; Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan

    2013-01-09

    This scoping study investigates the impact of, and interactions among, three key sources of uncertainty in the future value of bill savings from customer-sited PV, focusing in particular on residential customers. These three sources of uncertainty are: changes to electricity market conditions that would affect retail electricity prices, changes to the types of retail rate structures available to residential customers with PV, and shifts away from standard net-metering toward other compensation mechanisms for residential PV. We investigate the impact of a range of electricity market scenarios on retail electricity prices and rate structures, and the resulting effects on the value of bill savings from PV. The scenarios include various levels of renewable and solar energy deployment, high and low natural gas prices, the possible introduction of carbon pricing, and greater or lesser reliance on utility-scale storage and demand response. We examine the bill savings from PV with time-invariant, flat residential retail rates, as well as with time-varying retail rates, including time-of-use (TOU) rates and real-time pricing (RTP). In addition, we explore a flat rate with increasing-block pricing (IBP). We evaluate the bill savings from PV with net metering, as currently allowed in many states, as well as scenarios with hourly netting, a partial form of net metering. This scoping study is the first known effort to evaluate these types of interactions in a reasonably comprehensive fashion, though by no means have we considered every possible change to electricity market conditions, retail rate structures, or PV compensation mechanisms. It focuses solely on the private value of bill savings for residential PV and does not seek to quantify the broader social or economic cost or value of solar electricity. Our analysis applies assumptions based loosely on California’s electricity market in a future year (2030); however, it is neither intended to forecast California’s future

  6. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  7. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy ...

  8. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  9. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",2528,132247,20623,15.594305 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",48809,3782815,310903,8.2188265 ...

  10. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",39180,688117,81287,11.812962 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",283628,3270075,385380.5,11.785066 ...

  11. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Elec Coop, Inc","TX","Cooperative",41708,820364,101910,12.422534 "Green Mountain Energy Company","TX","Retail Energy Provider",332437,7052890,696283.5,9.8723148 ...

  12. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  13. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  14. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  15. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  17. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  18. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources

  19. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  20. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Ninth Edition)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2006-11-01

    Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied by renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering ''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from traditional utilities and from marketers operating in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than half of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. Currently, more than 600 utilities, or about 20% of utilities nationally, offer green power programs to customers. These programs allow customers to purchase some portion of their power supply as renewable energy--almost always at a higher price--or to contribute funds for the utility to invest in renewable energy development. The term ''green pricing'' is typically used to refer to these utility programs offered in regulated or noncompetitive electricity markets. This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States.

  1. Price Responsive Demand in New York Wholesale Electricity Market using OpenADR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joyce Jihyun; Kiliccote, Sila

    2012-06-01

    In New York State, the default electricity pricing for large customers is Mandatory Hourly Pricing (MHP), which is charged based on zonal day-ahead market price for energy. With MHP, retail customers can adjust their building load to an economically optimal level according to hourly electricity prices. Yet, many customers seek alternative pricing options such as fixed rates through retail access for their electricity supply. Open Automated Demand Response (OpenADR) is an XML (eXtensible Markup Language) based information exchange model that communicates price and reliability information. It allows customers to evaluate hourly prices and provide demand response in an automated fashion to minimize electricity costs. This document shows how OpenADR can support MHP and facilitate price responsive demand for large commercial customers in New York City.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Florida Furnishing Retailer Relies on

  3. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  4. Proceedings: 1996 EPRI conference on innovative approaches to electricity pricing: Managing the transition to market-based pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents the proceedings from the EPRI conference on innovative approaches to electricity pricing. Topics discussed include: power transmission pricing; retail pricing; price risk management; new pricing paradigms; changes from cost-based to a market-based pricing scheme; ancillary services; retail market strategies; profitability; unbundling; and value added services. This is the leading abstract. Papers are processed separately for the databases.

  5. Information Brief on Green Power Marketing, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweezey, B.; Houston, A.

    1998-02-01

    This document is the second in a series of information briefs on green power marketing activity in the United States. It includes descriptions of utility green pricing programs, green power marketing activity, retail access legislation and pilot programs, and other data and information supporting the development of green power markets.

  6. Smart Solar Marketing Strategies: Clean Energy State Program Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The report, based on recent research, informs states on how they can act more like retail marketers to establish the financial and energy value of solar technology for the consumer. According to the new solar marketing report, use of effective marketing strategies is the key to attracting new customers to solar and bringing this smart technology into the mainstream.

  7. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring of interstate pipeline companies has created new choices and challenges for local distribution companies (LDCs), their regulators, and their customers. The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

  8. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Transportation" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Northern California Power Agny","CA","Political Subdivision",1,370555,19963,5.3873244 "Constellation Energy Services, Inc.","CT","Power

  9. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... alternative suppliers to enter and obtain multiple, ... A broad range of terms is used in different states to denote ... will have incentives to search for an alternative ...

  10. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  11. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  12. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  13. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and ...

  14. ,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ... 4:27:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail ...

  15. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  16. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics ofCommercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan; Mills, Andrew; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2007-07-03

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer's underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems. Key conclusions for policymakers that emerge from our analysis are as follows: {sm_bullet} Rate design is fundamental to the economics of commercial PV. The rate-reduction value of PV for our sample of commercial customers, considering all available retail tariffs, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh, reflecting differences in rate structures, the revenue requirements of the various utilities, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shapes. For the average customer in our sample, differences in rate structure, alone, alter the value of PV by 25% to 75%, depending on the size of the PV system relative to building load. {sm_bullet} TOU-based energy-focused rates can provide substantial value to many PV customers. Retail rates that wrap all or most utility cost recovery needs into time-of-use (TOU)-based volumetric energy rates, and which exclude or limit demand-based charges, provide the most value to PV systems across a wide variety of circumstances. Expanding the availability of such rates will increase the value of many commercial PV systems. {sm_bullet} Offering commercial customers a variety of rate options would be of value to PV. Despite the advantages of energy-focused rates for PV

  17. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 41,708 820,364 101,910.0 12.42 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 332,437 7,052,890 696,283.5 9.87 Greenbelt ...

  18. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 39,180 688,117 81,287.0 11.81 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 283,628 3,270,075 385,380.5 11.79 Greenbelt ...

  19. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 7.13 Grayson-Collin Elec Coop, Inc TX Cooperative 2,528 132,247 20,623.0 15.59 Green Mountain Energy Company TX Retail Energy Provider 48,809 3,782,815 310,903.0 8.22 Greenbelt ...

  20. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection (1.3 MB) More

  1. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Pennsylvania) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pennsylvania) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Pennsylvania References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  2. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

  3. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  4. The unbundling and rebundling of transmission and market related functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolf, F.

    1996-12-01

    If generation and transmission are to continue in common hands, transmission ownership must be separated from system operations, necessitating creation of the independent system operator. But this approach can only work if the ISO is truly and totally independent in its role as the gamekeeper of serious market competition and the rules of the game (covering all the ISO functions) are clearly established. In a world where generation, transmission and distribution are restructured or unbundled with the aim of introducing competition at a wholesale and retail level, a number of functions related to system operations must be performed in order to allow the chosen market structure to operate. These functions are the key to putting buyers and sellers together. Indeed, they encompass nearly everything that happens between the power station fence and the customer meter. There has been much analysis of these functions and the services that are derived from them, both in international restructuring and, over the last two years, in North America. In this article the author looks at how transmission and market-related functions have been unbundled and rebundled in an attempt to illustrate some of the factors that should drive decisions as to the optimum grouping of functions and which entities should provide them. In particular the author discusses the separation of transmission ownership from system operations, which is a particular feature of the North American scene in systems where corporate unbundling - i.e., divestiture - of generation and transmission is not being imposed.

  5. Green marketing, renewables, and free riders: increasing customer demand for a public good

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Pickle, S.

    1997-09-01

    Retail electricity competition will allow customers to select their own power suppliers and some customers will make purchase decisions based, in part, on their concern for the environment. Green power marketing targets these customers under the assumption that they will pay a premium for ``green`` energy products such as renewable power generation. But renewable energy is not a traditional product because it supplies public goods; for example, a customer supporting renewable energy is unable to capture the environmental benefits that their investment provides to non-participating customers. As with all public goods, there is a risk that few customers will purchase ``green`` power and that many will instead ``free ride`` on others` participation. By free riding, an individual is able to enjoy the benefits of the public good while avoiding payment. This report reviews current green power marketing activities in the electric industry, introduces the extensive academic literature on public goods, free riders, and collective action problems, and explores in detail the implications of this literature for the green marketing of renewable energy. Specifically, the authors highlight the implications of the public goods literature for green power product design and marketing communications strategies. They emphasize four mechanisms that marketers can use to increase customer demand for renewable energy. Though the public goods literature can also contribute insights into the potential rationale for renewable energy policies, they leave most of these implications for future work (see Appendix A for a possible research agenda).

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2014" "Retail sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  3. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  5. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  6. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  7. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  8. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER...

  9. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar...

  10. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  11. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in...

  12. Industry Scalable Commercial Lighting Solutions for the Mainstream Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Carol C.; Puranik, Sucheta

    2008-08-17

    Inevitably the greatest obstacles to deep energy savings and mainstream market transformation include complexity and cost. Currently there is a tremendous marketplace gap between the need for widespread integrated lighting solutions and the capacity of the market to provide them. This paper will describe how a new USDOE commercial lighting program provides a multi-faceted strategy to provide the needed “how to” guidance in support of the numerous mandates and programs that are reaching far beyond codes and standards. The program provides lighting energy-efficiency solutions using high performance products, daylighting, and lighting controls. These lighting solutions are widely applicable to common spaces and are delivered via an interactive webtool, making them scalable to the mainstream market. Complexity is reduced by providing pre-designed vignettes and controls strategies that can be reviewed and selected by the end user or design team. The webtool provides analysis and documentation to show performance against energy goals in support of end-user applications for incentives, which addresses the cost obstacle. Utilities and Energy Effiency Program Sponsors (EEPS) benefit by having actionable guidance for customers and energy analysis sufficient to create programs designed around kWh rather than LPD or component-based rebates. The program is organized around the major commercial market sectors: retail, commercial real estate (e.g., offices, developers, lodging), and institutional (e.g., healthcare, education). This allows design solutions to be developed specifically for each sector with the input of the appropriate end users. The partnership model for the program is robust (including end users, design professionals, manufacturers, Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s), and EEPS) and provides the network by which feedback is gathered, lighting solutions are deployed, and performance is measured.

  13. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  14. Allowance trading: Correcting the past and looking to the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, A.Y.; Canter, L.W.

    1995-09-01

    Allowance trading is basic to the Title IV acid rain provisions of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in the United States; the provisions seek to achieve a 10-million-ton reduction in annual sulfur dioxide emissions from the electric power utility industry. Allowance trading, a market-based approach, is conceptually similar to the emissions trading policy of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). An allowance is defined as the authorization to emit, during or after a specified calendar year, one ton of sulfur dioxide. This paper provides an overview of the allowance trading program by summarizing some important features, particularly as they are responsive to limitations and concern as related to the precursor emissions trading program in the early to mid-1980s. Such features include a simple definition of baseline emission levels, encouragements for nationwide trading, disincentives for accumulation of excess allowance,s opportunities for leasing other short-term allowance transfer arrangements, enforcement provisions, and benefits of bonus allowances and early emission reductions. Adherence to implementation protocols for the acid rain provisions of Title IV of the CAAA will provide a good opportunity to evaluate this market-based approach for environmental quality management.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  16. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  17. The Fifth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Introduction Workshop |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Market Introduction Workshop The Fifth Annual DOE Solid-State Lighting Market Introduction Workshop More than 300 lighting leaders from across the continent gathered in Philadelphia July 20-22, 2010, for the fifth annual Solid-State Lighting (SSL) Market Introduction Workshop, hosted by DOE. The audience was diverse, spanning the spectrum from industry, to government, to efficiency organizations, to utilities, to municipalities, to designers and specifiers, to retailers

  18. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality ...

  19. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Melendez, M.

    2007-12-01

    NREL developed a model to test the investment profitability of adding E85 to retail stations. This report discusses this model and how retailers can make E85 a profitable business venture.

  20. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  1. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  2. Marketing Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Utility Resources News & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Marketing Resources Marketing Portal Reports, Publications, and Research Utility Toolkit...

  3. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  4. Strengthening Building Retrofit Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, Mary; Jackson, Robert

    2014-04-15

    The Business Energy Financing (BEF) program offered commercial businesses in Michigan affordable financing options and other incentives designed to support energy efficiency improvements. We worked through partnerships with Michigan utilities, lenders, building contractors, trade associations, and other community organizations to offer competitive interest rates and flexible financing terms to support energy efficiency projects that otherwise would not have happened. The BEF program targeted the retail food market, including restaurants, grocery stores, convenience stores, and wholesale food vendors, with the goal of achieving energy efficiency retrofits for 2 percent of the target market. We offered low interest rates, flexible payments, easy applications and approval processes, and access to other incentives and rebates. Through these efforts, we sought to help customers strive for energy savings retrofits that would save 20 percent or more on their energy use. This program helped Michigan businesses reduce costs by financing energy efficient lighting, heating and cooling systems, insulation, refrigeration, equipment upgrades, and more. Businesses completed the upgrades with the help of our authorized contractors, and, through our lending partners, we provided affordable financing options.

  5. Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy Local Officials, Business Leaders to Gather for Groundbreaking Ceremony For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., June 7, 1999 — A retail development owner who wants to set an example is helping make possible a new showcase for energy efficient buildings in the Colorado high country. Ground will be broken June 9 on the BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, which will boast a series of "firsts"

  6. Is the price squeeze doctrine still viable in fully-regulated energy markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiwak, L.J.

    1993-01-01

    Simply stated, a price squeeze occurs when a firm with monopoly power on the primary, or wholesale, level engages in a prolonged price increase that drives competitors out of the secondary, or retail level, and thereby extends its monopoly power to the secondary market. A price squeeze will not be found, however, for any short-term exercise in market power. Rather, because anticompetitive effects of a price squeeze are indirect, the price squeeze must last long enough and be severe enough to produce effects on actual or potential competition in the secondary market. In regulated electric industries, a price squeeze claim usually arises from the complex relationship between the supplier, the wholesale customer, the retail customer, and the federal and state regulators. The supplier sells electric power to both wholesale and retail customers. Wholesale transactions are regulated by federal regulators, and retail transactions are regulated at the state level. The wholesale customers in turn sell power to their retail customers. Over the last several years, there have been substantial developments in the application of the price squeeze doctrine to fully-regulated electric utilities. This article will examine the current developments in this area, and attempt to highlight the burdens potential litigants, both plaintiffs and defendants, must overcome to succeed.

  7. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  8. Marketing and Market Transformation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Marketing and Market Transformation Marketing and Market Transformation Presents how going green will grow your business, as well as how programs can overcome appraisal challenges. ...

  9. Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

  10. An overview of market power issues in today`s electricity industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guth, L.A.

    1998-07-01

    With the tendency for vertical disintegration of control and/or ownership of assets within the industry, however, properly defining the relevant product in horizontal competition at each stage of production, transmission, distribution, and marketing assumes increasing importance. There is every reason to expect that market power issues and antitrust concerns will arise in each of the five dimensions outlined above. In each case, the author believes the framework will continue to be properly measuring market shares and concentration for carefully defined product and geographic markets as a basis for making informed judgments about market power concerns. The modeling of industry demand, supply, and competitive interactions certainly helps to inform this process by testing the proper scopes of product and geographic markets and of the economic significance of productive assets in the market defined. Modeling should also help the screening process where the issue is possible market power in markets being restructured for retail competition.

  11. NREL: dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model - Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documentation The Distributed Generation Market Demand (dGen) model documentation summarizes the default data inputs and assumptions for the model. Input data for the model are regularly updated and include recent EIA Annual Energy Outlook projections, state-level net metering and incentive policies, and utility-level retail electricity rates. Note that the dGen model builds on, extends, and provides significant advances over NREL's deprecated SolarDS model. Documentation Outline Introduction

  12. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report, Sixth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2003-10-01

    Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent both from utilities and in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, nearly 50% of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. Currently, more than 350 investor-owned utilities, rural electric cooperatives, and other publicly owned utilities in 33 states offer green power programs. This report provides an overview of green power marketing activity in the United States. It describes green power product offerings, consumer response, and recent industry trends. The three distinct markets for green power are discussed in turn.

  13. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  14. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  15. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  16. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact 858 February 2, ... highly volatile and often varies substantially throughout any given year. ...

  17. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year to year.

  18. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",38670...

  19. The next gordian knot for state regulators and electric utilities: The unbundling of retail services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, K.W.

    1995-11-01

    Unbundling of retail electric services will accelerate competitive forces in a way that could radically change the future course of the electric power industry. Although simple in concept, unbundling raises a broad range of complex issues, many of which are fundamental to today`s concepts of regulation and utility management. This article addresses four questions: (1) What is retail unbundling? (2) What role might it play in the future electric power industry? (3) What lessons can be learned from retail unbundling in other regulated industries, specifically the natural gas industry? (4) What are the major issues associated with retail unbundling for electric utilities and state regulators?

  20. A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Goldman, Charles; Bartholomew, Emily

    2004-01-01

    Policymakers have increasingly recognized the structural impediments to effective competition in electricity markets, which has resulted in a renewed emphasis on the need for careful market design and market monitoring in wholesale and retail electricity markets. In this study, we review the market monitoring activities of four Independent System Operators in the United States, focusing on such topics as the organization of an independent market monitoring unit (MMU), the role and value of external market monitors, performance metrics and indices to aid in market analysis, issues associated with access to confidential market data, and market mitigation and investigation authority. There is consensus across the four ISOs that market monitoring must be organizationally independent from market participants and that ISOs should have authority to apply some degree of corrective actions on the market, though scope and implementation differ across the ISOs. Likewise, current practices regarding access to confidential market data by state energy regulators varies somewhat by ISO. Drawing on our interviews and research, we present five examples that illustrate the impact and potential contribution of ISO market monitoring activities to enhance functioning of wholesale electricity markets. We also discuss several key policy and implementation issues that Western state policymakers and regulators should consider as market monitoring activities evolve in the West.

  1. Reshaping power markets: Lessons from South America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalor, R.P.; Garcia, H.

    1996-03-01

    Does restructuring enhance efficiency and give consumers a portion of these gains? Evidence from Chile and Argentina - whose restructuring is well ahead of that in the U.S. - demonstrates that more efficient power markets can be created, and that the need remains for appropriate treatment of the competitive and monopolistic portions of the market. Centrally planned electric systems have a long history in industrial states around the world: Marxist and capitalist, totalitarian and democratic. A growing enthusiasm world-wide for economic democracy has recently brought the concept of central planning under greater scrutiny, and alternative solutions have been sought. This paper describes experiences with the deregulation of the utility industry in Chile and Argentina and assesses the relevance of those experiences to the ongoing evolution of market-based systems in the United States. The lessons of the Southern Cone are very relevant to the ongoing dialogue on deregulation in the U.S. Experience there suggests a number of conditions that are important for the creation of competitive and efficient energy markets: (1) Mandatory separation of regulated functions, and clear delineation of the limits of involvement by regulated entities in competitive markets; (2) Unbundling of transmission charges and provision of {open_quotes}comparable{close_quotes} fair transmission access; (3) Clearly defined, published nodal or zonal transmission prices reflecting incremental operating and upgrade costs; (4) Establishment of a centrally dispatched commodity market, spot markets for both capacity and energy priced at system marginal cost, and a parallel bilateral market based on long term contracts; and (5) Access by generators and marketers to at least a portion of the retail market.

  2. Sanyo: Notice of Allowance (2013-SE-1428)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Sanyo E & E Corporation, allowing Sanyo to resume distribution of refrigerator model SBC-500 after Sanyo provided documentation showing that it had modified the model to be in compliance with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  3. Harrington: Notice of Allowance (2014-SW-28011)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Harrington Brass Works allowing Harrington to resume distribution of kitchen faucet individual model 20-210-026 after Harrington provided documentation showing that it had modified the model to be in compliance with the applicable water conservation standard.

  4. Market Transformation

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  5. Market Acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2010-09-28

    The fact sheet summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market acceleration subprogram.

  6. Energy Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    will show a lower growth trajectory Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2013 carbon dioxide emissions billion metric tons 6 CSIS | Energy Markets Outlook November 16,...

  7. Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-02-15

    This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

  8. Market and policy barriers for demand response providing ancillary services in U.S. markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; MacDonald, Jason; Goldman, Charles

    2013-03-01

    This study provides an examination of various market and policy barriers to demand response providing ancillary services in both ISO/RTO and non-ISO/RTO regions, especially at the program provider level. It is useful to classify barriers in order to create a holistic understanding and identify parties that could be responsible for their removal. This study develops a typology of barriers focusing on smaller customers that must rely on a program provider (i.e., electric investor owned utility or IOU, ARC) to create an aggregated DR resource in order to bring ancillary services to the balancing authority. The barriers were identified through examinations of regulatory structures, market environments, and product offerings; and discussions with industry stakeholders and regulators. In order to help illustrate the differences in barriers among various wholesale market designs and their constituent retail environments, four regions were chosen to use as case studies: Colorado, Texas, Wisconsin, and New Jersey.

  9. 2014 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2 Presentations 2014 Reliability & Markets Peer Review - Day 2 Presentations The Transmission Reliability R&D Reliability & Markets Peer Review included 6 sessions over 2 days on August 5 - 6, 2014. Presentations from Day 2 (Sessions V and VI) are available below. Session V: Shmuel Oren, HyungSeon Oh, Tom Overbye Session VI: Dan Tylavsky, Eilyan Bitar 2014 R&M Peer Review - Business Model for Retail Aggregation of Responsive Load - Shmuel Oren (1.19 MB) 2014 R&M

  10. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer

  11. Property:EIA/861/ActivityRetailMarketing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + B BP Energy Company + true + Beaver City Corporation (Utility Company) + true + Blue Star Energy Services + true + Bluerock Energy, Inc. + true + Board of Water Electric &...

  12. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 2010 Top Chain Restaurants, by Sales Franchised Company-owned Total Chain Stores Stores Stores McDonald's 32.4 4.5% 1,550 Subway (1) 10.6 6.0% 0 Burger King (1,2) 8.6 -4.4% 873 Wendy's (1) 8.3 -0.6% 1,394 Starbucks Coffee (1) 7.6 -9.4% 6,707 Taco Bell 6.9 1.5% 1,245 Dunkin' Donuts (1) 6.0 5.3% 26 Pizza Hut 5.4 8.0% 459 KFC 4.7 -4.1% 780 Sonic 3.6 -5.7% 455 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Includes figures estimated by Technomic, Inc. 2) Total change in units calculated from data reported in 2010 QSR 50

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 2.2 2.2 11.8 12.4 0.4 0.4 11.1 11.1 Houston 2A 21.6 21.5 9.7 10.7 0.4 0.4 18.0 18.5 Phoenix 2B 21.4 21.2 11.2 13.2 0.4 0.4 13.6 15.6 Atlanta 3A 41.3 41.1 5.4 6.1 0.5 0.5 21.1 21.7 Los Angeles 3B 22.5 22.3 1.1 1.1 0.5 0.5 12.7 12.3 Las Vegas 3B 32.9 32.6 8.3 10.2 0.4 0.4 18.8 20.1 San Francisco 3C 50.0 48.4 0.3 0.3 0.5 0.5 13.2 13.1 Baltimore

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Supermarkets, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 145.6 0.3 0.6 20.5 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones. They are

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Number of Stores and Average Sales in the Grocery Industry as of 2007 Store Type Supermarket Convenience Grocery (<$2million) Wholesale Clubs Military Convenience Stores Total Source(s): 0.4 2.2 196.2 963.9 DOE/EERE/Navigant Consulting, Energy Savings Potential and R&D Opportunities for Commercial Refrigeration, Sept. 2009, Table 3-2, p. 27. 145.9 306.6 13.7 18.2 1.2 101.5 Number of Stores US Annual Sales (1,000s) ($ Billions) 35.0 535.4

  16. Unbundling services in a competitive electricity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiller, P.T.

    1996-03-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide an in-depth discussion of the possible evolution of unbundling of services in a competitive environment. The author discusses unbundling from both a technical/engineering and an economic perspective. The main thrust of the talk is threefold: (a) that in the long run the potential for unbundling of services is extremely large from an engineering perspective; (b) that the form of the initial industry structure will have an important impact on the extent of service unbundling; and (c) that unbundling of wholesale related services is where most of the initial demand will be. (A) Engineering Perspectives on Unbundling: A large proportion of ancillary services can be provided in a competitive framework with current technologies. The author discusses those that current technologies may not facilitate such a decentralized approach. (B) The relation between unbundling and industry structure: Not all industry structures provide the same incentives for the independent service operator (ISO) to unbundle its services. Direct access provides incentives to suppliers to provide ancillary services to its own customers. Such incentive is limited by more centralized organizational modes. (C) Different Demand for Wholesale and Retail Unbundling: Lessons from other sectors: The experience with unbundling in telecommunications is illuminating. Wholesale unbundling, when allowed, has turned out to be a key component of competition. Retail unbundling is limited by customer sophistication. Indeed, retail unbundling will evolve in waves: initially retail customers will demand bundled services, as complexity of services may overwhelm customer sophistication. As customer sophistication increases and technology improves, the demand for partial unbundling increases providing opportunities for speicialized firms to provide partially unbundled services.

  17. Configuring load as a resource for competitive electricity markets--Review of demand response programs in the U.S. and around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson C.

    2002-09-01

    The restructuring of regional and national electricity markets in the U.S. and around the world has been accompanied by numerous problems, including generation capacity shortages, transmission congestion, wholesale price volatility, and reduced system reliability. These problems have created new opportunities for technologies and business approaches that allow load serving entities and other aggregators to control and manage the load patterns of wholesale and retail end-users they serve. Demand Response Programs, once called Load Management, have re-emerged as an important element in the fine-tuning of newly restructured electricity markets. During the summers of 1999 and 2001 they played a vital role in stabilizing wholesale markets and providing a hedge against generation shortfalls throughout the U.S.A. Demand Response Programs include ''traditional'' capacity reservation and interruptible/curtailable rates programs as well as voluntary demand bidding programs offered by either Load Serving Entities (LSEs) or regional Independent System Operators (ISOs). The Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) has been monitoring the development of new types of Demand Response Programs both in the U.S. and around the world. This paper provides a survey and overview of the technologies and program designs that make up these emerging and important new programs.

  18. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    End Use: June 2016 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  19. Energy Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Markets November 16, 2015 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 biofuels geothermal solar wind waste hydroelectric wood 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010...

  20. Energy Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Markets October 22, 2015 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 biofuels geothermal solar wind waste hydroelectric wood 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010...

  1. Energy Markets

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Markets October 29, 2015 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 biofuels geothermal solar wind waste hydroelectric wood 0 2 4 6 8 10 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010...

  2. Selling green power in California: Product, industry, and market trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.H.; Pickle, S.J.

    1998-05-01

    As one of the first US stages to open its doors to retail electric competition, California offers an important opportunity to assess the effectiveness of green power marketing as a mechanism for supporting renewable energy. This report is an interim assessment of key green power product, industry, and market trends in California. The report identifies and analyzes: the potential size of the green power market in California; the companies participating in the green power market; the green power products being offered and their prices; the impact of the green market on renewable generators and the environment; and the influence of several public policies and non-governmental programs on the market for green power. Data used in this paper have been collected, in large part, from surveys and interviews with green power marketers that took place between December 1997 and April 1998. There remain legitimate concerns over the viability of green power marketing to support significant quantities of renewable energy and provide large environmental gains, and it is far too early to assess the overall strength of customer demand for renewable energy. A critical finding of this report is that, because of the high cost of acquiring and servicing residential customers and the low utility default service price, green power marketing affords new energy service providers one of the only viable entrees to California`s residential marketplace.

  3. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (2008 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Kreycik, C.; Friedman, B.

    2009-09-01

    Voluntary consumer decisions to buy electricity supplied from renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. In the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering 'green power' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from traditional utilities and from renewable energy marketers operating in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets or offering renewable energy certificates (RECs) online. Today, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, while all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents green power marketing activities and trends in the United States including utility green pricing programs offered in regulated electricity markets; green power marketing activity in competitive electricity markets, as well as green power sold to voluntary purchasers in the form of RECs; and renewable energy sold as greenhouse gas offsets in the United States. These sections are followed by a discussion of key market trends and issues. The final section offers conclusions and observations.

  4. Responsive pricing for retail competition - a customer perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meade, D.

    1994-12-31

    Market forces have motivated utility customers to institute a work process improvement program which has resulted in reorganizations, increased market focus, re-engineering and cost reductions. The market has also provided motivation to look for new and creative ways to work with customers and suppliers. Factors involved in competitive power sourcing strategies which play a role in customer decisions are discussed. Electricity users need efficient, flexible, customer-focused suppliers and a choice of competitively priced electrical service. Government and regulatory policy needs to support and encourgage competitive actions by utilities so that they can effectively participate in the evolving market.

  5. Coal Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Coal Markets | Archive Coal Markets Weekly production Dollars per short ton Dollars per mmbtu Average weekly coal commodity spot prices dollars per short ton Week ending Week ago change Central Appalachia 12,500 Btu, 1.2 SO2 Northern Appalachia 13,000 Btu, < 3.0 SO2 Illinois Basin 11,800 Btu, 5.0 SO2 Powder River Basin 8,800 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Uinta Basin 11,700 Btu, 0.8 SO2 Source: With permission, SNL Energy Note: Coal prices shown reflect those of relatively high-Btu coal selected in each region

  6. Horizontal subsea trees allow frequent deepwater workovers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenek, M.; Hall, G.; Sheng, W.Z.

    1995-05-01

    Horizontal subsea wellheads have found application in the Liuhua oil field in the South China Sea. These trees allow installation and retrieval of downhole equipment through the tree without having to disturb the tree or its external connections to flow lines, service lines, or control umbilicals. This access to the well is important because the Liuhua wells will be produced with electrical submersible pumps (ESPs), which may have relatively short intervals between maintenance, leading to frequent well work. The wells will be completed subsea in about 300 m of water. The large bore, horizontal trees allow all downhole equipment to be pulled without removal of the subsea tree. This wellhead configuration also provides well control and vertical access to downhole equipment through a conventional marine drilling riser and subsea blowout preventer (BOP), eliminating the need for costly specialized completion risers. Another benefit of the horizontal tree is its extremely compact profile with a low number of valves for well control. Valve size and spacing are decoupled from the size and bore spacing of the tubing hanger. The tree`s low profile geometry reduces costs of manufacturing the tree and framework and optimize load transfer to the wellhead.

  7. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Largest Decline since 2008 | Department of Energy 8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 In the second half of 2014, the national average retail price per gallon of gasoline (all grades) fell from a high of $3.77 in June to a low of $2.63 in December - a difference of $1.14 per gallon. This is the largest price drop since the recession of

  8. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) (2.29 MB) More Documents & Publications Report 20.5: Chromaticity Shift Modes

  9. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report; Seventh Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2004-09-01

    Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied from renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering ''green power'' options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent both from utilities and in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than 50% of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. This report provides an overview of green power marketing activity in the United States. The first section provides an overview of green power markets, consumer response, and recent industry trends. Section 2 provides brief descriptions of the utility green pricing programs available nationally. Section 3 describes companies that actively market green power in competitive markets and those that market renew able energy certificates nationally or regionally. The last section provides information on a select number of large, nonresidential green power purchasers, including governmental agencies, universities, and businesses.

  10. Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report (Eighth Edition)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2005-10-01

    Voluntary consumer decisions to purchase electricity supplied by renewable energy sources represent a powerful market support mechanism for renewable energy development. Beginning in the early 1990s, a small number of U.S. utilities began offering "green power" options to their customers. Since then, these products have become more prevalent, both from utilities and in states that have introduced competition into their retail electricity markets. Today, more than 50% of all U.S. consumers have an option to purchase some type of green power product from a retail electricity provider. This report provides an overview of green power marketing activity in the United States. The first section provides an overview of green power markets, consumer response, and recent industry trends. The second section provides brief descriptions of utility green pricing programs. The third section describes companies that actively market green power in competitive markets and those that market renewable energy certificates nationally or regionally. The final section provides information on a select number of large, nonresidential green power purchasers, including businesses, universities, and government agencies.

  11. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  12. Market Evolution: Wholesale Electricity Market Design for 21st Century Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Jaquelin; Miller, Mackay; Milligan, Michael; Ela, Erik; Arent, Douglas; Bloom, Aaron; Futch, Matthew; Kiviluoma, Juha; Holtinnen, Hannele; Orths, Antje; Gomez-Lazaro, Emilio; Martin-Martinez, Sergio; Kukoda, S.; Garcia, Glycon; Mikkelsen, Kim M.; Yongqiang, Zhao; Sandholt, Kaare

    2013-10-01

    Demand for affordable, reliable, domestically sourced, and low-carbon electricity is on the rise. This growing demand is driven in part by evolving public policy priorities, especially reducing the health and environmental impacts of electricity service and expanding energy access to under-served customers. Consequently, variable renewable energy resources comprise an increasing share ofelectricity generation globally. At the same time, new opportunities for addressing the variability of renewables are being strengthened through advances in smart grids, communications, and technologies that enable dispatchable demand response and distributed generation to extend to the mass market. A key challenge of merging these opportunities is market design -- determining how to createincentives and compensate providers justly for attributes and performance that ensure a reliable and secure grid -- in a context that fully realizes the potential of a broad array of sources of flexibility in both the wholesale power and retail markets. This report reviews the suite of wholesale power market designs in use and under consideration to ensure adequacy, security, and flexibilityin a landscape of significant variable renewable energy. It also examines considerations needed to ensure that wholesale market designs are inclusive of emerging technologies, such as demand response, distributed generation, and storage.

  13. Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petrolem Reports Petroleum Marketing Annual Archives The Petroleum Marketing Annual was discontinued in 2010. Choose the year from the archive Petroleum Marketing Annual you wish...

  14. Energy Imbalance Market Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in CAISO Market Jim Price, Senior Advisor, Market Development & Analysis California ISO CAISO Public Market minimizes bid costs, while accounting for multiple transmission...

  15. Caterpillar`s advanced reciprocating engine for distributed generation markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, G.; Brandes, D.; Reinhart, M.; Nagel, G.; Wong, E.

    1999-11-01

    Competition in energy markets and federal and state policy advocating clean, advanced technologies as means to achieve environmental and global climate change goals are clear drivers to original equipment manufacturers of prime movers. Underpinning competition are the principle of consumer choice to facilitate retail competition, and the desire to improve system and grid reliability. Caterpillar`s Gas Engine Division is responding to the market`s demand for a more efficient, lower lifecycle cost engine with reduced emissions. Cat`s first generation TARGET engine will be positioned to effectively serve distributed generation and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. TARGET (The Advanced Reciprocating Gas Engine Technology) will embody Cat`s product attributes: durability, reliability, and competitively priced life cycle cost products. Further, Caterpillar`s nationwide, fully established dealer sales and service ensure continued product support subsequent to the sale and installation of the product.

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  17. Effect of increases in energy-related labor forces upon retailing in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robicheaux, R.A.

    1983-06-01

    The heightened mining employment that will result from increased extraction of coal from Alabama's Warrior Coal Basin will boost retail sales and employment. The Warrior Coal Basin counties (Fayette, Jefferson, Tuscaloosa and Walker) are heavily dependent upon coal mining as a source of employment and wages. Further, since the counties' economies grew increasingly dependent upon coal mining activities throughout the 1970s, it was believed that it would be possible to measure, with some acceptable level of reliability, the impact of the steadily rising mining activity upon the area's retailing sector. Therefore, a small scale econometric model was developed which represents the interrelationships among income, mining and trade employment and retail sales in the four-county Warrior Coal Basin area. The results of two versions of the model are presented. In the first version, area-wide retail sales are treated in the aggregate. In the second version, retail sales are disaggregated into twelve categories (e.g., food, apparel, furniture, etc.). The models were specified using 1960 to 1976 data. The mining employment growth scenario used in this report called for steady increases in mining employment that culminated in an employment level that is 4000 above the baseline employment projections by 1985. Both versions of the model predicted that cumulative real regional income would increase by $1.39 billion over seven years with the added mining employment. The predicted impacts on trade employment and real retail sales varied between the two models, however. The aggregate model predicts the addition of 7500 trade workers and an additional $1.35 billion in real retail sales. The disaggregate model suggests that food stores, automobile dealers, general merchandise stores, gas stations and lumber and building materials retailers would enjoy the greatest positive benefits.

  18. Liberalization of the Japanese electricity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimazaki, Masaki

    1994-12-31

    The Japanese electricity industry is shackled by more regulations than other domestic industries. Electricity liberalization, however, is one of the few areas in which discussion of deregulation has been making steady progress although the outcome of deregulation has become uncertain due to the turbulence of politics and bureaucratic resistance. This study examines the liberalization of the Japanese electricity market focusing on the characteristics of (1) entering the electricity generation business, (2) access to power companies` transmission facilities, (3) beginning an electricity retail business, and (4) reforming the electricity rating system. The article follows three themes. First, the background of the Japanese electricity liberalization can be explained from economic, political, and bureaucratic points of view. Second, international electricity price comparison should not only depend on exchange rates but should also take other factors into account. Finally, liberalization will increase fossil fuel consumption, which could have unwelcome consequences.

  19. Allowance trading activity and state regulatory rulings: Evidence from the US Acid Rain Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, E.M.

    1997-12-31

    The US Acid Rain Program is one of the first, and by far the most extensive, applications of a market based approach to pollution control. From the beginning, there has been concern whether utilities would participate in allowance trading, and whether regulatory activity at the state level would further complicate utilities` decision to trade allowances. This paper finds that public utility commission regulation has encouraged allowance trading activity in states with regulatory rulings, but that allowance trading activity has not been limited to states issuing regulations. Until there is evidence suggesting that significant additional cost savings could have been obtained if additional allowance trading activity had occurred in states without regulations or that utilities in states with regulations are still not taking advantage of all cost saving trading opportunities, this analysis suggests that there is little reason to believe that allowance trading activity is impeded by public utility commission regulations.

  20. Technology to Market Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology to Market Team Technology to Market Team Lizmarie Carter Headshot Lizmarie-Carter.jpg Company: RedHorse International As a financial program analyst, Lizmarie is responsible for overseeing the federal funds of the Technology to Market subprogram. Reviewing invoices for reasonable, allocable, and allowable spending requirements of SunShot funding recipients and providing recommendations to the federal government are her main responsibilities. Others include: preparing technical

  1. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Emission Market Opportunities for Federal Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Shah, C.

    2005-06-01

    This document assists federal agencies in incorporating emissions market opportunities in their energy projects, including emission reduction credit markets and cap and trade. It looks at how potential emissions costs/revenues can be incorporated into project proposals, how groups can apply for emissions allowances, and how agencies can sell emissions allowances and receive the financial benefit. The fact sheet also outlines how FEMP can provide assistance throughout the process.

  3. Marketing Strategy and Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-30

    This report documents the preparation of materials for the marketing campaign that has been designed for middle and high school students in New Mexico to increase interest in participation in national security careers at the National Nuclear Security Administration. The materials and the marketing campaign build on the research that was previously completed, as well as the focus groups that were conducted. This work is a part of the National Nuclear Security Preparedness Project (NSPP). Previous research included outcome analysis to determine appropriate marketing strategies. The analysis was based upon focus groups with middle school and high school students, student interactions, and surveys completed by students to understand and gauge student interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) subjects, interest in careers at NNSA, future job considerations, and student desire to pursue post-secondary education. Further, through the focus groups, students were asked to attend a presentation on NNSA job opportunities and employee requirements. The feedback received from the students was utilized to develop the focus and components of a marketing campaign divided into DISCO (Discovering Intelligence and Security Career Opportunities) for the middle school age group and DISCO…..Your Way! for high school age groups. Both campaigns have an intertwined message that focuses on the education of students in the various national security career opportunities at NNSA using the STEM concepts and the notion that almost any career they can think of has a fit within NNSA. Further, a special emphasis has been placed on the importance of obtaining a national security clearance when working at NNSA and the steps that will need to be taken during middle school, high school, and college to be allowed this opportunity.

  4. Price changes in the gasoline market: Are Midwestern gasoline prices downward sticky?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    This report examines a recurring question about gasoline markets: why, especially in times of high price volatility, do retail gasoline prices seem to rise quickly but fall back more slowly? Do gasoline prices actually rise faster than they fall, or does this just appear to be the case because people tend to pay more attention to prices when they`re rising? This question is more complex than it might appear to be initially, and it has been addressed by numerous analysts in government, academia and industry. The question is very important, because perceived problems with retail gasoline pricing have been used in arguments for government regulation of prices. The phenomenon of prices at different market levels tending to move differently relative to each other depending on direction is known as price asymmetry. This report summarizes the previous work on gasoline price asymmetry and provides a method for testing for asymmetry in a wide variety of situations. The major finding of this paper is that there is some amount of asymmetry and pattern asymmetry, especially at the retail level, in the Midwestern states that are the focus of the analysis. Nevertheless, both the amount asymmetry and pattern asymmetry are relatively small. In addition, much of the pattern asymmetry detected in this and previous studies could be a statistical artifact caused by the time lags between price changes at different points in the gasoline distribution system. In other words, retail gasoline prices do sometimes rise faster than they fall, but this is largely a lagged market response to an upward shock in the underlying wholesale gasoline or crude oil prices, followed by a return toward the previous baseline. After consistent time lags are factored out, most apparent asymmetry disappears.

  5. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  6. Sandia Energy - Solar Market Transformation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Market Transformation Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Solar Market TransformationTara...

  7. The political economy of retail wheeling, or how to not re-fight the last war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, A.; Kihm, S.

    1994-04-01

    Disparities in utility rates - observably the result of poor supply-side resource planning - have been small before and will be small once again. Retail wheeling`s promise of short-run gains for a few would, ironically, destroy integrated resource processes in place today that guard against a repeat of yesterday`s planning mistakes. The authors argue that retail wheeling is a troubling answer to a mis-diagnosis of yesterday`s problem. They believe that a variety of other policies offer most of the benefits and few of the risks that retail wheeling poses. These include aggressive wholesale competition, judicious pruning of uneconomic capacity, and serious incorporation of environmental risks into utility planning and regulation.

  8. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  9. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to $3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region, at 4.16 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.68 a gallon, down 1.7

  10. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to $3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Prices increased in all regions across the U.S. The highest prices were found in the New England region, at 4.18 a gallon, up 2.3 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.74 a gallon,

  11. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grocery Stores | Department of Energy Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores Find the presentation for the June 3, 2015 webinar on the 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Grocery Stores below. The guide shows practical ways for grocery stores to achieve a 50% energy savings over ASHRAE 90.1-2004 and exceeds the requirements of 90.1-2013. Intended for grocery

  12. Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Attached is...

  13. Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing Operation at High Temperature Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing Operation at High Temperature CCNY logo ...

  14. Uranium Marketing Annual Report -

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2. Maximum anticipated uranium market requirements of owners and operators of U.S. ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration: Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual ...

  15. Petroleum Marketing Annual

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PDF 1.2MB . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . Summary Statistics ...

  16. Petroleum Marketing Annual

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    PDF 2.9MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . ...

  17. Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PDF 1.2MB . . Front Matter . Petroleum Marketing Annual Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents PDF . . Highlights . Petroleum Marketing Annual Highlights PDF . . ...

  18. Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 2009 Released: August 6, 2010 Next Release Date: Discontinued find annual data in Petroleum Marketing Monthly Monthly price and volume statistics on...

  19. Northwest Energy Market Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Northwest Energy Market Assessment Pages Northwest-Energy-Market-Assessment Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects &...

  20. Demonstration & Market Transformation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Demonstration & Market Transformation Peer Review Break-Out Presentation Jim Spaeth Program Manager Demonstration & Market Transformation March 23, 2015 2 | Bioenergy Technologies ...

  1. Turkey opens electricity markets as demand grows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeigue, J.; Da Cunha, A.; Severino, D. [Global Business Reports (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Turkey's growing power market has attracted investors and project developers for over a decade, yet their plans have been dashed by unexpected political or financial crises or, worse, obstructed by a lengthy bureaucratic approval process. Now, with a more transparent retail electricity market, government regulators and investors are bullish on Turkey. Is Turkey ready to turn the power on? This report closely examine Turkey's plans to create a power infrastructure capable of providing the reliable electricity supplies necessary for sustained economic growth. It was compiled with on-the-ground research and extensive interview with key industrial and political figures. Today, hard coal and lignite account for 21% of Turkey's electricity generation and gas-fired plants account for 50%. The Alfin Elbistan-B lignite-fired plant has attracted criticism for its lack of desulfurization units and ash dam facilities that have tarnished the industry's image. A 1,100 MW hard-coal fired plant using supercritical technology is under construction. 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Status and Trends in U.S. Compliance and Voluntary Renewable Energy Certificate Markets (2010 Data)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2011-10-01

    This report documents the status and trends of 'compliance'--renewable energy certificate (REC) markets used to meet state renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requirements--and 'voluntary' markets--those in which consumers and institutions purchase renewable energy to match their electricity needs on a voluntary basis. Today, 29 states and the District of Columbia have an RPS, more than half of all U.S. electricity customers have an option to purchase some type of green power product directly from a retail electricity provider, and all consumers have the option to purchase RECs. This report documents REC activities and trends in the United States. The compliance REC market analysis includes analysis of REC trading, regional REC markets, REC tracking systems, types of compliance RECs, compliance REC pricing trends, and an overview of compliance with RPS polices. The voluntary REC analysis presents data and analysis on voluntary market sales and customer participation, products and premiums, green pricing marketing and administrative expenses, voluntary REC pricing, and the voluntary carbon offsets market. The report concludes with a discussion of upcoming guidance from the Federal Trade Commission on green marketing claims, the emergence of community solar programs, and the potential impact of Dodd-Frank regulations on the REC market.

  3. Petroleum Marketing Monthly

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude oil prices U.S. Energy Information Administration | Petroleum Marketing Monthly 3 September 2016

  4. Westinghouse Lighting: Notice of Allowance (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation allowing Westinghouse Lighting to resume distribution of various lamp products after Westinghouse Lighting provided new test data performed according to DOE regulations.

  5. AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name: AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Place: New York, New York Zip: 10170 Product: AirShares is a commodity...

  6. Westinghouse Lighting: Notice of Allowance (2010-CE-09/1001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation allowing Westinghouse Lighting to resume distribution of product code 0521000 after Westinghouse Lighting provided new test data performed according to DOE regulations.

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Refuse Collection in Sacramento Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner Refuse Collection in Sacramento to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner Refuse Collection in Sacramento on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner Refuse Collection in Sacramento on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Natural Gas Allows for Cleaner Refuse Collection in Sacramento on

  8. Clean Markets | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Markets Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Markets Place: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Zip: 19118 Sector: Services Product: Philadelphia-based provider of market development...

  9. World Bio Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Held in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the 10th anniversary World Bio Markets convened from March 1– 4, 2015.

  10. Acquisition Letter on Allowability of Incurred Costs Due to Contractor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Errors | Department of Energy on Allowability of Incurred Costs Due to Contractor Errors Acquisition Letter on Allowability of Incurred Costs Due to Contractor Errors The attached Acquisition Letter has been issued to provide application guidance to contracting officers for determining the allowability of incurred costs due to contractor errors. It applies to all contracts, including management and operating contracts, whose price or cost reimbursement is based on estimated or incurred

  11. Assessment of allowance mechanism China's carbon trading pilots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Ling; Shen, Bo; Qi, Shaozhou; Price, Lynn

    2015-08-28

    The allowance mechanism is one of the core and sensitive aspects in design of a carbon trading scheme and affects the compliance cost for each company covered under the scheme. By examining China's allowance mechanism from two aspects including allowance allocation and allowance distribution, this paper compares China's carbon trading pilots with the EU Emissions Trading System and California Cap-and-Trade Program, and through the comparison identify issues that affect the efficiency of the pilots. The paper also recommends course of actions to strengthen China's existing pilots and build valuable experiences for the establishment of the national cap-and-trade system in China.

  12. Attached is Policy Flash 2013-44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    44 Acquisition Guide- Allowability of Incurred Costs Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy...

  13. Assessment of Allowance Mechanismin China's Carbon Trading Pilots

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiong, Ling; Shen, Bo; Qi, Shaozhou; Price, Lynn

    2015-08-01

    The allowance mechanism is one of the core and sensitive aspects in design of a carbon trading scheme and affects the compliance cost for each company covered under the scheme. By examining China's allowance mechanism from two aspects including allowance allocation and allowance distribution, this paper compares China's carbon trading pilots with the EU Emissions Trading System and California Cap-and-Trade Program, and through the comparison identify issues that affect the efficiency of the pilots. The paper also recommends course of actions to strengthen China's existing pilots and build valuable experiences for the establishment of the national cap-and-trade system in China.

  14. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  15. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  16. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  17. Certificate-Based Approach to Marketing Green Power and Constructing New Wind Energy Facilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blank, E.; Bird, L.; Swezey, B.

    2002-05-01

    The availability of wind energy certificates in Pennsylvania's retail electricity market has made a critical difference in the economic feasibility of developing 140 MW of new wind energy projects in the region. Certificates offer important benefits to both green power suppliers and buyers by reducing transaction barriers and thus lowering the cost of renewable energy. Buyers also benefit through the increased flexibility offered by certificate products. The experience described in this paper offers important insights for selling green power certificates and achieving new wind energy development in other areas of the country.

  18. Technology-to-Market Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO’s Technology-to-Market (T2M) team drives high impact technologies from R&D to market readiness, preparing these technologies for real building demonstration, market deployment, and ultimately mass-market adoption.

  19. Market review - Market values summary/October market review/current market data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This article is the October 1995 uranium market summary. In this reporting period, there were four transactions in the natural uranium market, no activity in the spot UF6 market, no activity in the spot conversion market, and only a single activity in the enrichment services market. Spot uranium volume dropped sharply, and active uranium supply rose. The rise in demand, however, more than offset this increase. Unrestricted exchange prices rose slightly, as did the unrestricted UF6 value. All other prices remained steady.

  20. Sanden Vendo America: Notice of Allowance (2014-SE-52002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Sanden Vendo America, Inc., allowing Sanden Vendo America to resume distribution of Class A refrigerated bottled or canned beverage vending machine model Vue30 (with 1128127 cassette refrigeration deck) after Sanden Vendo America provided documentation showing that it had modified the model to be in compliance with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  1. Zoe Industries: Notice of Allowance (2011-SW-2912)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Zoe Industries, Inc., allowing Zoe to resume distribution of showerhead model 150043-N after Zoe provided documentation showing that it had modified the model to be in compliance with the applicable water conservation standard.

  2. T-578: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 8: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure T-578: Vulnerability in MHTML Could Allow Information Disclosure March 15, 2011 - 3:05pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Windows is prone to a vulnerability that may allow attackers to inject arbitrary script code into the current browser session. PLATFORM: Windows 2003 SP2, Vista SP2, 2008 SP2, XP SP3, 7; and prior service packs ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in Microsoft MHTML. A remote user can conduct

  3. Utilizing the market to control sulfur dioxide emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loeher, C.F. III

    1995-12-01

    Environmental policy in the United States is evolving; command and control approaches are being slowly replaced with market-based incentives. Market-based regulation is favorable because it provides the regulated community with flexibility in choosing between pollution control options. A recent application of a market-based approach is Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. This paper evaluates the advantages of utilizing market-based incentives to control sulfur dioxide emissions. The evaluation embodies an extensive methodology, which provides an overview of the policy governing air quality, discusses pollution control philosophies and analyzes their associated advantages and limitations. Further, it describes the development and operation of a market for emissions trading, impediments to the market, and recommends strategies to improve the market. The evaluation concludes by analyzing the results of five empirical simulations demonstrating the cost-effectiveness of employing market-based incentives versus command-and-control regulation for controlling sulfur dioxide emissions. The results of the evaluation indicate that regulatory barriers and market impediments have inhibited allowance trading. However, many of these obstacles have been or are being eliminated through Federal and state regulations, and through enhancement of the market. Results also demonstrate that sulfur dioxide allowance trading can obtain identical levels of environmental protection as command-and-control approaches while realizing cost savings to government and industry.

  4. Global gas processing will strengthen to meet expanding markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R.; Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C.; Gist, R.L.

    1996-07-01

    The worldwide LPG industry continues to expand faster than the petroleum industry -- 4%/year for LPG vs. 2%/year for petroleum in 1995 and less than 1%/year in the early 1990s. This rapid expansion of LPG markets is occurring in virtually every region of the world, including such developing countries as China. The Far East is the focus of much of the LPG industry`s attention, but many opportunities exist in other regions such as the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The investment climate is improving in all phases of downstream LPG marketing, including terminaling, storage, and wholesale and retail distribution. The world LPG supply/demand balance has been relatively tight since the Gulf War and should remain so. Base demand (the portion of demand that is not highly price-sensitive) is expanding more rapidly than supplies. As a result, the proportion of total LPG supplies available for price-sensitive petrochemical feedstock markets is declining, at least in the short term. The paper discusses importers, price patterns, world LPG demand, world LPG supply, US NGL supply, US gas processing, ethane and propane supply, butane, isobutane, and natural gasoline supply, and US NGL demand.

  5. Leader Electronics: Notice of Allowance (2010-SE-2301)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Resume Distribution to Leader Electronics Inc., authorizing Leader Electronics to resume distribution of the external power supply model "MU03-F050040-A1(MU03-F1050-AKOS)".

  6. Mueller Streamline: Notice of Allowance (2011-SW-2802)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued a Notice of Allowance to Resume Distribution to Mueller Streamline Co., authorizing Mueller Streamline to resume distribution of faucet basic model 120-003NLA, formerly basic model 120-003NL.

  7. Novel Tool Allows Quicker, More Versatile Analysis of Energy Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Novel Tool Allows Quicker, More Versatile Analysis of Energy Production Technologies Novel Tool Allows Quicker, More Versatile Analysis of Energy Production Technologies June 19, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A new energy production technology analysis tool that could lead to cost-effective improvements for energy generation and lower costs for consumers is now available on the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) website. Available at no

  8. Interested Parties - Allowing Multiple Projects per Application for Section

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1705 Loan Guarantees | Department of Energy Allowing Multiple Projects per Application for Section 1705 Loan Guarantees Interested Parties - Allowing Multiple Projects per Application for Section 1705 Loan Guarantees Multiple_Projects_Section_1705_Loan_Guarantees.pdf (24.78 KB) More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - Multiple Loan Applications per Developer under Section 1705 Program Interested Parties - K&L Group Lobbyist Disclosure Form - John Thorne

  9. Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

    2004-07-01

    There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

  10. World Bio Markets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The World Bio Markets meeting will held from March 14-17, 2016 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The meeting will gather experts in the bioenergy industry from all over the world. Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Manager Jim Spaeth will be giving a presentation entitled, “Policy updates and outlooks from key biofuel markets,” and will discuss technical, policy and investment developments, and success stories.