Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report summarizes the methodology used to split the heat content of municipal solid waste (MSW) into its biogenic and non-biogenic shares.

Marie LaRiviere

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

2

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

3

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

4

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSo...

5

Characteristics Of Fresh Municipal Solid Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hossain, Sahadat The characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) are critical in planning, designing, operating or upgrading solid waste management systems. Physical composition, moisture… (more)

Taufiq, Tashfeena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Municipal Solid Waste in The United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-06-011 October 2006 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2005 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page EXECUTIVE

Barlaz, Morton A.

7

Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Municipal Consortium 0 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2010 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

8

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Municipal Consortium 1 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications

9

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff Webcast on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings

10

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff to someone by Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Kickoff on

11

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Municipal Consortium North 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings

12

Environmental impact on municipal solid waste management system in Chaiyaphum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continually increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the limited capacity of the existing waste management system are serious problems that Chaiyaphum municipality must deal with. The optimal waste management system should be adopted. Explicit ... Keywords: decision making, environmental evaluation, life cycle assessment, municipal solid waste

S. Piyaphant; K. Prayong

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts

14

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

15

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

16

Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Digg

17

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

SciTech Connect

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium Annual Meeting Presentations and Materials-Phoenix, AZ on Digg

19

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northwest Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northwest Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

20

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consortium North Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium North Central Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Northeast Region Workshop Materials to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Northeast Region Workshop Materials on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network

22

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Angeles, CA to someone Los Angeles, CA to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Los Angeles, CA on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium

23

Federal Energy Management Program: Municipal Solid Waste Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal...

24

UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPOST IN HORTICULTURE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) has long been considered an attractive waste management tool for effective reduction of waste volume and beneficial utilization of… (more)

Lu, Wenliang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An Environment Friendly Energy Recovery Technology: Municipal Solid Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy from waste, is a perspective source to replace fossil fuels in the future, municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification is a new technique for waste treatment. MSW can be combusted directly to generate heat and electricity, and by means of gasification ... Keywords: municipal solid waste, gasification, incineration

Lei Ma; Chuanhua Liao; Yuezhao Zhu; Haijun Chen; Yanghuiqin Ding

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Webcast on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Text-Alternative Version: Municipal

27

Mathematical Models in Municipal Solid Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two mathematical models developed as tools for solid waste planners in decisions concerning the overall management of solid waste in a municipality are described. The models have respectively been formulated as integer and mixed integer linear programming problems. The choice between the two models from the practical point of view depends on the user and the technology used. One user may prefer to measure the transportation costs in terms of costs per trip made from the waste source, in which case the first model is more appropriate. In this case we replace the coefficients of the decision variables in the objective function with the total cost per trip from the waste collection point. At the same time, instead of measuring the amount of waste using the number of trucks used multiplied by their capacities, continuous variables can be introduced to measure directly the amount of waste that goes to the plants and landfills. The integer linear problem is then transformed into a mixed integer problem that gives better total cost estimates and more precise waste amount measurements, but measuring transportation costs in terms of costs per trip. For instance, at the moment the first model is more relevant to the Ugandan situation, where the technology to measure waste as it is carried away from the waste sources is not available. Another user may prefer to measure the transportation costs in terms of costs per unit mass of

Michael K. Nganda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

29

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Municipal solid waste management in Beijing City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Beijing City. Beijing, the capital of China, has a land area of approximately 1368.32 km{sup 2} with an urban population of about 13.33 million in 2006. Over the past three decades, MSW generation in Beijing City has increased tremendously from 1.04 million tons in 1978 to 4.134 million tons in 2006. The average generation rate of MSW in 2006 was 0.85 kg/capita/day. Food waste comprised 63.39%, followed by paper (11.07%), plastics (12.7%) and dust (5.78%). While all other wastes including tiles, textiles, glass, metals and wood accounted for less than 3%. Currently, 90% of MSW generated in Beijing is landfilled, 8% is incinerated and 2% is composted. Source separation collection, as a waste reduction method, has been carried out in a total of 2255 demonstration residential and commercial areas (covering about 4.7 million people) up to the end of 2007. Demonstration districts should be promoted over a wider range instead of demonstration communities. The capacity of transfer stations and treatment plants is an urgent problem as these sites are seriously overloaded. These problems should first be solved by constructing more sites and converting to new treatment technologies. Improvements in legislation, public education and the management of waste pickers are problematic issues which need to be addressed.

Li Zhenshan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)], E-mail: lizhenshan@pku.edu.cn; Yang Lei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu XiaoYan [Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Sui Yumei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Information Resources: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2010 webcast served as the first official meeting of the new DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Ed Smalley of Seattle City Light and Bruce Kinzey of Pacific...

32

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Boston, MA to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Boston, MA on Facebook Tweet about...

33

Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dallas, TX to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Municipal Consortium LED Street Lighting Workshop Presentations and Materials-Dallas, TX on Facebook Tweet about...

34

Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

35

Information Resources: Webcast: Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool This April 3, 2012 webcast presented information about the Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool developed by DOE"s Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. Doug Elliott of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory provided a guided walk-through of what the tool can do and how to use it to evaluate costs and benefits associated with converting to LED street and roadway lighting. The webcast showed how city and other government agencies, utilities, finance and budget offices, and energy efficiency organizations can use the tool to compute annualized energy-cost savings, maintenance savings, greenhouse gas reductions, net present value, and simple payback, which can be helpful when putting together construction and conservation grant applications, as well as for preparing budgets and comparing incumbent costs to new costs.

36

Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

Lebersorger, S. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria); Beigl, P., E-mail: peter.beigl@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: Practices and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal.

Manaf, Latifah Abd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: latifah@env.upm.my; Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Topics: Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unescap.org/esd/environment/publications/cdm/Guide.pdf UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

39

Sustainable recycling of municipal solid waste in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on recycling in developing countries as one form of sustainable municipal solid waste management (MSWM). Twenty-three case studies provided municipal solid waste (MSW) generation and recovery rates and composition for compilation and assessment. The average MSW generation rate was 0.77 kg/person/day, with recovery rates from 5-40%. The waste streams of 19 of these case studies consisted of 0-70% recyclables and 17-80% organics. Qualitative analysis of all 23 case studies identified barriers or incentives to recycling, which resulted in the development of factors influencing recycling of MSW in developing countries. The factors are government policy, government finances, waste characterization, waste collection and segregation, household education, household economics, MSWM (municipal solid waste management) administration, MSWM personnel education, MSWM plan, local recycled-material market, technological and human resources, and land availability. Necessary and beneficial relationships drawn among these factors revealed the collaborative nature of sustainable MSWM. The functionality of the factor relationships greatly influenced the success of sustainable MSWM. A correlation existed between stakeholder involvement and the three dimensions of sustainability: environment, society, and economy. The only factors driven by all three dimensions (waste collection and segregation, MSWM plan, and local recycled-material market) were those requiring the greatest collaboration with other factors.

Troschinetz, Alexis M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)], E-mail: alexis_troschinetz@yahoo.com; Mihelcic, James R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Municipal solid waste to electricity in Bangkok, Thailand (prefeasibility study)  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the problem of municipal waste disposal in Bangkok and the potential for energy recovery, the Royal Government of Thailand requested the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) to provide assistance in conducting an initial assessment of the potential options for managing Bangkok's waste disposal problem. Before undertaking a detailed feasibility study of a relatively attractive option for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal in Bangkok, the Thai government wanted to determine whether a project for waste disposal and energy recovery could be developed with the involvement of the private sector such that over time the project could be totally owned and operated in the private domain. In response to the request made by the National Energy Administration (NEA) and Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA), TDP asked Engineering and Economics Research Inc. (EER) to send a team of consultants to conduct a definitional study to make a preliminary assessment of a municipal waste solid disposal system which recovers energy in conjunction with the treatment/disposal of waste in an environmentally safe manner. The consultants visited Thailand for a period of 3 weeks and worked with officials from NEA and BMA.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of mixing systems for biogasification of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two specially selected mixing systems were tested and evaluated to determine how effectively they could prevent the formation of fibrous mats and stringers during the anaerobic digestion of a slurried mixture of preprocessed municipal solid waste and sewage sludge to produce methane gas. The tests were conducted in a modified 10.7-m (35-ft) diameter, nominal 378,000-liter (100,000-gal) capacity concrete vessel in the Franklin, Ohio, environmental complex. Between August 1977 and September 1978, nine tests were conducted with 3:1 and 9:1 solid waste/sewage sludge ratios and with 4, 7, and 10 percent total solids in the feedstock. Though the microbial culture was healthy in most tests, the mixing systems were not effective in preventing excessive fibrous mat and stringer formations. These formations occurred because of the high cellulosic content of the feedstock. The test with the best energy recovery had a gas production of 805 liters/kg of volatile solids destroyed. However, the energy recovered was only 50 percent of the energy available in the solid waste, and only four times greater than the mixing energy expended for that test. The solids accumulations were generally the same for the two mixing systems when they had common test conditions. In all tests, the percent solids for the top level were higher than those for the middle and bottom levels. As the feed ratio and the percent solids in the feedstock were increased, this differential became progressively more pronounced. Moreover, the percent of volatile solids (in a given amount of total solids) for the top level became disproportionately higher than those for the other two levels.

Swartzbaugh, J T; Smith, R B

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Co-firing coal and municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how different the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) or municipal solid waste (MSW) utilizing strategies affects the gas emission in simple fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of biomass. In this study, ground OFMSW and pulverized coal (PC) were used for co-firing tests. The tests were carried out in a bench-scale bubbling FBC. Coal and bio-waste fuels are quite different in composition. Ash composition of the bio-waste fuels is fundamentally different from ash composition of the coal. Chlorine (Cl) in the MSW may affect operation by corrosion. Ash deposits reduce heat transfer and also may result in severe corrosion at high temperatures. Nitrogen (N) and carbon ) assessments can play an important role in a strategy to control carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions while raising revenue. Regulations such as subsidies for oil, liquid petroleum gas (LPG) for natural gas powered vehicles, and renewables, especially biomass lines, to reduce emissions may be more cost-effective than assessments. Research and development (RD) resources are driven by energy policy goals and can change the competitiveness of renewables, especially solid waste. The future supply of co-firing depends on energy prices and technical progress, both of which are driven by energy policy priorities.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

44

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste's origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Evaluating the efficiency of municipalities in collecting and processing municipal solid waste: A shared input DEA-model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity in local waste management calls for more in depth efficiency analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shared-input Data Envelopment Analysis can provide solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable room for the Flemish municipalities to improve their cost efficiency. - Abstract: This paper proposed an adjusted 'shared-input' version of the popular efficiency measurement technique Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) that enables evaluating municipality waste collection and processing performances in settings in which one input (waste costs) is shared among treatment efforts of multiple municipal solid waste fractions. The main advantage of this version of DEA is that it not only provides an estimate of the municipalities overall cost efficiency but also estimates of the municipalities' cost efficiency in the treatment of the different fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW). To illustrate the practical usefulness of the shared input DEA-model, we apply the model to data on 293 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, for the year 2008.

Rogge, Nicky, E-mail: Nicky.Rogge@hubrussel.be [Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel (HUBrussel), Center for Business Management Research (CBMR), Warmoesberg 26, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KULeuven), Faculty of Business and Economics, Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Jaeger, Simon [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KULeuven), Faculty of Business and Economics, Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel (HUBrussel), Center for Economics and Corporate Sustainability (CEDON), Warmoesberg 26, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Municipal solid waste management in Kolkata, India - A review  

SciTech Connect

Kolkata is one of four metropolitan cities in India. With an area of 187.33 sq km and a population of about 8 million, it generates around 3,000 t d{sup -1} of municipal solid waste (MSW) at a rate of 450-500 g per capita per day. With rapid urbanization as a result of planned and unplanned growth and industrialization, the problems associated with handling MSW have increased at an alarming rate over the past few years. No source segregation arrangement exists; there is only limited (60%) house-to-house collection; and 50-55% open vats are used in the present collection system. The operational efficiency of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) transport system is about 50%, with a fleet composed of about 30-35% old vehicles. The majority (80%) of these, particularly the hired vehicles, are more than 20 years old. The newly added areas covered by KMC have even lower collection efficiencies, and only an informal recycling system exists. The waste collected has a low energy value (3,350-4,200 kJ kg{sup -1}) with high moisture and inert content. A 700 t d{sup -1} compost plant set up in 2000 has not been functioning effectively since 2003. Open dumping (without liners and without a leachate management facility) and the threat of groundwater pollution, as well as saturation of an existing landfill site (Dhapa) are the most pressing problems for the city today. KMC spends 70-75% of its total expenditures on collection of solid waste, 25-30% on transportation, and less than 5% on final disposal arrangements. The Kolkata Environmental Improvement Project, funded by the Asian Development Bank, is seen as only a partial solution to the problem. A detailed plan should emphasize segregation at the source, investment in disposal arrangements (including the use of liners and leachate collection), and an optimized transport arrangement, among improvements.

Chattopadhyay, Subhasish [Solid Waste Management Department, KMC, Department of Civil Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)], E-mail: subharpita@rediffmail.com; Dutta, Amit [Department of Civil Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, P.O. Botanic Garden, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India)], E-mail: amit@civil.becs.ac.in; Ray, Subhabrata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)], E-mail: sray@che.iitkhp.ernet.in

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80 l to containers of 2400 l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60 l or 80 l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400 l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

Rives, Jesus, E-mail: Jesus.Rives@uab.ca [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited  

SciTech Connect

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Use of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of efforts to integrate municipal solid waste combustion ash into a high strength portland cement concrete matrix comprised of multiple waste materials. The material developed by this research was to be used to construct a large underground storage vault to house the Friendly Mobile Barrier, a safety barrier system for use at highway crossings for the high speed rail system. The subcontractor, Environmental Solutions, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, worked with researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the State University of New York--Stony Brook to develop and test the material. The result of this work is a portland cement concrete matrix which utilizes 80.01% recycled materials, and a field-applicable method for incorporating MSW ash as a component at volumes up to 9.78%. Twenty-eight day strengths of over 4000 psi were achieved, with 315 day strengths of 6500 psi. All structural, chemical and environmental testing showed the material to be competitive with conventional concrete.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns

Columbia University

53

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Minimum project size for the full $5,000 grant is 20 fixtures; smaller projects will receive a $250 per-fixture grant. Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Up to $5,000 Provider MidAmerican Energy Company MidAmerican Energy offers grants to munipalities which implement solid-state roadway street lighting upgrades. Grants of up to $5,000 are available to participating entities who install eligible roadway lighting fixtures. Participants must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of

54

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program (Iowa) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Summary Last modified on November 9, 2012. Financial Incentive Program Place Iowa Additional Place applies to MidAmerican Energy Name MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting Grant Program Incentive Type Utility Grant Program Applicable Sector Local Government Eligible Technologies Lighting, Lighting Controls/Sensors, Induction Lighitng, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs Amount Up to $5,000 Equipment Requirements Fixtures must have an efficiency rating equal to or greater than 66 lumens per watt as tested under Illuminating Engineering Society of North America LM-79-08 testing to qualify for a grant.

56

Biogas generation by two-phase anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic fraction of municipal solid waste can be a significant energy source for renewable energy generation. The total production of municipal solid waste in Turkey was 25?×?106 tones per year. Anaerobic digestion (AD) process may be a solution to the problems of energy demand and waste management since it provides biomethanation along with waste stabilization. AD can be operated in single or two phase configurations. Two-phase processes have some advantages over one phase systems in terms of selection of microorganisms

Eylem Dogan; Göksel N. Demirer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Syn-Gas Production from Catalytic Steam Gasification of Municipal Solid Wastes in a Combined Fixed Bed Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic steam gasi?cation of municipal solid wastes (MSW) for syn-gas production was experimentally investigated in a combined fixed bed reactor using the newly developed tri-metallic catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore ... Keywords: Biomass gasification, municipal solid wastes, catalyst, hydrogen production, energy recovery

Jianfen Li; Jianjun Liu; Shiyan Liao; Xiaorong Zhou; Rong Yan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Municipal Solid-State Lighting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

must be an Iowa electric governmental customer of MidAmerican Energy Company. Light-emitting diode and induction types of solid state lighting (SSL) qualify under this program....

60

High temperature behavior of electrostatic precipitator ash from municipal solid waste combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion may cause the oxidation of mercury, and chloride mercury #12;13 13 species may be the major form combustion and gasification flue gases, Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2421-2426. [23] S.B. Ghorishi, C Ms. Ref. No.: HAZMAT-D-07-00176 Accepted manuscript #12;2 2 Abstract Municipal solid waste (MSW) flue

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEMS POWERED THROUGH THE COMBUSTION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.assure.org Biography: Mr. Tomberlin has 21 years of experience in the design of power generation facilities having & Brad Moorman Barlow Projects, Inc. 2000 Vermont Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80525 (970) 226-8557 info municipal solid waste (MSW) by 90%-95% creating energy in the form of steam and/or electricity

Columbia University

62

THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ­ WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T By: Jack D devil burns and the Lord recycles." Perhaps these negative references to waste burning come from, the Valley of Hinnom south of ancient Jerusalem. This was the site of a foul, smoking, open burning garbage

Columbia University

63

Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

NONE

1996-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Constructed wetlands for municipal solid waste landfill leachate treatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the US Geological Survey and Cornell University, in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Tompkins County Solid Waste Department, began a three-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, New York, to test the effectiveness of leachate treatment with constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. A parallel study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Fenton, New York was conducted by researchers at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hawk Engineering (Trautmann and others, 1989). Results are described.

Peverly, J.; Sanford, W.E.; Steenhuis, T.S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

Mutch Jr, R. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mahony, J. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

A study of the metal content of municipal solid waste. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the content of toxic components, so called pollutant precursors, in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream is essential to development of the strategies for source reduction and reuse, recycling, composting and disposal. Data are scarce; trends in composition for any locality even more so. In a previous study the total and water soluble chlorine content of the components of municipal solid waste were determined from sampling studies at two sites, Baltimore County, MD, and Brooklyn, NY, each for a five day period. The total sulfur content of the combined combustible components was also determined. Because of the scarcity of data and synergistic effects, it seemed appropriate to determine the heavy metal content of the preceding material prior to its disposal. The metals chosen were the so-called priority pollutant metals (PPM): antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, and zinc.

Churney, K.L.; Domalski, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units  

SciTech Connect

This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

None

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: • MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis • expected process scale required for favorable economics • the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements • the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

Shepherd, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid wastes: Development of the WASTED model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of the Waste Analysis Software Tool for Environmental Decisions (WASTED) model. This model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management systems. The model consists of a number of separate submodels that describe a typical waste management process: waste collection, material recovery, composting, energy recovery from waste and landfilling. These submodels are combined to represent a complete waste management system. WASTED uses compensatory systems to account for the avoided environmental impacts derived from energy recovery and material recycling. The model is designed to provide solid waste decision-makers and environmental researchers with a tool to evaluate waste management plans and to improve the environmental performance of solid waste management strategies. The model is user-friendly and compares favourably with other earlier models.

Diaz, R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Warith, M. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)]. E-mail: mwarith@ryerson.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Renewable and Non-renewable Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plastic. MillionBtus to total. Heat Content. Btus. Total Btus/Total Tons. ... Containers & Packaging. Material Group (million tons)a (million Btu per ton) b. Heat ...

76

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

National survey of industrial markets for steam produced from burning municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodology and findings of an analysis to determine the maximum size of the industrial market for steam produced from municipal solid waste in the United States. The data used in the analysis were developed from the 1980 census report and the US Chamber of Commerce's 1979 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) listing. The process used to match potential steam users with populations large enough to generate suitable quantities of waste is presented. No attempt was made to rank the markets or analyze the market economics.

Pearson, C.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluation of Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste in Oil-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five methods of energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in oil-fired power plants are evaluated: preparation and supplemental firing of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with oil in a utility boiler originally designed for coal firing; 100% firing of either RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and use of the steam to drive a dedicated turbine generator unit; and 100% firing of RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and integration of the steam into the power plant steam cycle.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste, an environmental and safety mini-overview survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and safety aspects of processing municipal solid wastes to recover energy and materials are reviewed in some detail. The state of the art in energy recovery, energy potential for the near and long-term, and constraints to commercialization are discussed. Under the environmental and safety aspects the state of the art, need for research and development, and need for coordination among federal agencies and private industry are considered. Eleven principal types of refuse-to-energy processes are described and a projected energy balance is derived for each process. (JSR)

Johnson, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Methanogenic Population Dynamics during Start-Up of Anaerobic Digesters Treating Municipal Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An aggressive start-up strategy was used to initiate codigestion in two anaerobic, continuously mixed bench-top reactors at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The digesters were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sewage sludge and cattle manure and were fed a mixture of simulated municipal solid waste and biosolids in proportions that reflect U.S. production rates. The design organic loading rate was 3.1 kg volatile solids/m 3 /day and the retention time was 20 days. Ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to determine the methanogenic community structure in the inocula and the digesters. Chemical analyses were performed to evaluate digester performance. The aggressive start-up strategy was successful for the thermophilic reactor, despite the use of a

Biosolids; Matt E. Griffin; Katherine D. Mcmahon; Roderick I. Mackie; Lutgarde Raskin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Municipal solid waste management challenges in developing countries - Kenyan case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) by local authorities in Kenya as a case study of a low-income developing country. Approaches of possible solutions that can be undertaken to improve municipal solid waste (MSW) services are discussed. Poor economic growth (1.1% in 1993) has resulted in an increase in the poverty level which presently stands at 56%. Migration from the rural areas to the urban areas has resulted in unplanned settlements in suburban areas accommodating about 60% of the urban population on only 5% urban land area. Political interference also hampers smooth running of local authorities. Vulnerability of pollution of surface and groundwater is high because local authorities rarely considered environmental impact in siting MSW disposal sites. Illegal dumping of MSW on the river banks or on the roadside poses environmental and economic threats on nearby properties. Poor servicing of MSW collection vehicles, poor state of infrastructure and the lack of adequate funding militate against optimization of MSW disposal service. The rural economy needs to be improved if rural-urban migration is to be managed. Involvement of stakeholders is important to achieve any meaningful and sustainable MSWM. The role of the informal sector through community-based organizations (CBOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in offering solutions towards improvement of MSWM also is explored.

Henry, Rotich K. [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zhao Yongsheng [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)]. E-mail: zhaoyongsheng@jlu.edu.cn; Dong Jun [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Municipal solid waste source-separated collection in China: A comparative analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot program focusing on municipal solid waste (MSW) source-separated collection was launched in eight major cities throughout China in 2000. Detailed investigations were carried out and a comprehensive system was constructed to evaluate the effects of the eight-year implementation in those cities. This paper provides an overview of different methods of collection, transportation, and treatment of MSW in the eight cities; as well as making a comparative analysis of MSW source-separated collection in China. Information about the quantity and composition of MSW shows that the characteristics of MSW are similar, which are low calorific value, high moisture content and high proportion of organisms. Differences which exist among the eight cities in municipal solid waste management (MSWM) are presented in this paper. Only Beijing and Shanghai demonstrated a relatively effective result in the implementation of MSW source-separated collection. While the six remaining cities result in poor performance. Considering the current status of MSWM, source-separated collection should be a key priority. Thus, a wider range of cities should participate in this program instead of merely the eight pilot cities. It is evident that an integrated MSWM system is urgently needed. Kitchen waste and recyclables are encouraged to be separated at the source. Stakeholders involved play an important role in MSWM, thus their responsibilities should be clearly identified. Improvement in legislation, coordination mechanisms and public education are problematic issues that need to be addressed.

Tai Jun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Shanghai Environmental Engineering Design Research Institute, Shanghai 200232 (China); Zhang Weiqian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Che Yue, E-mail: yche@des.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Feng Di [Shanghai Environmental Engineering Design Research Institute, Shanghai 200232 (China)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 1, Report text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste`s origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

On-line early fault detection and diagnosis of municipal solid waste incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fault detection and diagnosis framework is proposed in this paper for early fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in order to improve the safety and continuity of production. In this framework, principal component analysis (PCA), one of the multivariate statistical technologies, is used for detecting abnormal events, while rule-based reasoning performs the fault diagnosis and consequence prediction, and also generates recommendations for fault mitigation once an abnormal event is detected. A software package, SWIFT, is developed based on the proposed framework, and has been applied in an actual industrial MSWI. The application shows that automated real-time abnormal situation management (ASM) of the MSWI can be achieved by using SWIFT, resulting in an industrially acceptable low rate of wrong diagnosis, which has resulted in improved process continuity and environmental performance of the MSWI.

Zhao Jinsong [College of Information Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)], E-mail: jinsongzhao@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Huang Jianchao [College of Information Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 10086 (China); Sun Wei [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

An analytic network process model for municipal solid waste disposal options  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to present an evaluation method that can aid decision makers in a local civic body to prioritize and select appropriate municipal solid waste disposal methods. We introduce a hierarchical network (hiernet) decision structure and apply the analytic network process (ANP) super-matrix approach to measure the relative desirability of disposal alternatives using value judgments as the input of the various stakeholders. ANP is a flexible analytical program that enables decision makers to find the best possible solution to complex problems by breaking down a problem into a systematic network of inter-relationships among the various levels and attributes. This method therefore may not only aid in selecting the best alternative but also helps decision makers to understand why an alternative is preferred over the other options.

Khan, Sheeba [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Youngstown State University, OH 44555, United States of America (United States)], E-mail: sheebanishat@yahoo.com; Faisal, Mohd Nishat [Department of Management Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)], E-mail: nishat786@yahoo.com

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable of the compost. In addition, anaerobic decomposition followed by vermicomposting is pointed as one of the best

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

90

Processing high solids concentration of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digester for methane production  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic solids are pretreated by calcium hydroxide to produce salts of volatile orangic acids and other water-soluble substances. Pure cellulose, sawdust, and waste paper are used as model substances for the study of alkaline degradation. It is found that sawdust is more difficult to degrade than the other two substances. The cooking conditions for high conversion of model substances and high yeild of orangic acids are found to be 275/degree/C to 300/degree/C with the corresponding reaction time from 30 minutes to 15 minutes. The cooking liquor can be readily fermented in an anaerobic fluidized-bed digester for methane production. The cooking liquor from different reaction conditions can all be digested by the methanogens. Higher than 90% of COD can be removed under the conditions of low organic loading rate (<2.0 g COD/1/day) and low hydraulic retention time (1.5 to 2.0 days). 14 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Tsao, G.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuzzy multicriteria disposal method and site selection for municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fuzzy multiple criteria analysis (MCA) in solid waste management has the advantage of rendering subjective and implicit decision making more objective and analytical, with its ability to accommodate both quantitative and qualitative data. In this paper a modified fuzzy TOPSIS methodology is proposed for the selection of appropriate disposal method and site for municipal solid waste (MSW). Our method is superior to existing methods since it has capability of representing vague qualitative data and presenting all possible results with different degrees of membership. In the first stage of the proposed methodology, a set of criteria of cost, reliability, feasibility, pollution and emission levels, waste and energy recovery is optimized to determine the best MSW disposal method. Landfilling, composting, conventional incineration, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) combustion are the alternatives considered. The weights of the selection criteria are determined by fuzzy pairwise comparison matrices of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). It is found that RDF combustion is the best disposal method alternative for Istanbul. In the second stage, the same methodology is used to determine the optimum RDF combustion plant location using adjacent land use, climate, road access and cost as the criteria. The results of this study illustrate the importance of the weights on the various factors in deciding the optimized location, with the best site located in Catalca. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted to monitor how sensitive our model is to changes in the various criteria weights.

Ekmekcioglu, Mehmet, E-mail: meceng3584@yahoo.co [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Management Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey); Kaya, Tolga [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Management Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey); Kahraman, Cengiz [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Industrial Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

The impact of municipal solid waste treatment methods on greenhouse gas emissions in Lahore, Pakistan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contribution of existing municipal solid waste management to emission of greenhouse gases and the alternative scenarios to reduce emissions were analyzed for Data Ganj Bukhsh Town (DGBT) in Lahore, Pakistan using the life cycle assessment methodology. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 people living in 232,024 dwellings. Total waste generated is 500,000 tons per year with an average per capita rate of 0.84 kg per day. Alternative scenarios were developed and evaluated according to the environmental, economic, and social atmosphere of the study area. Solid waste management options considered include the collection and transportation of waste, collection of recyclables with single and mixed material bank container systems (SMBCS, MMBCS), material recovery facilities (MRF), composting, biogasification and landfilling. A life cycle inventory (LCI) of the six scenarios along with the baseline scenario was completed; this helped to quantify the CO{sub 2} equivalents, emitted and avoided, for energy consumption, production, fuel consumption, and methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. LCI results showed that the contribution of the baseline scenario to the global warming potential as CO{sub 2} equivalents was a maximum of 838,116 tons. The sixth scenario had a maximum reduction of GHG emissions in terms of CO{sub 2} equivalents of -33,773 tons, but the most workable scenario for the current situation in the study area is scenario 5. It saves 25% in CO{sub 2} equivalents compared to the baseline scenario.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Chuadhry, Muhammad Nawaz [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

O'Leary, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Leachability of heavy metals from growth media containing source-separated municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of heavy metals in source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW) compost was determined by irrigation leaching of growth medium, admixed with varying amounts of compost, used for container grown plants. Perennial flowers (black-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta L.) were grown in 2-L containers filled with the growth medium for a 10-wk period. Rainfall was supplemented with overhead irrigation to supply 2 cm of water per day. Leachates collected over each 2-wk period were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn using atomic spectrometry. Concentrations of the heavy metals in the leachates increased with increasing proportions of MSW compost in the growth medium, but decreased with time of leaching. Leaching of the metals occurred at relatively high concentrations initially, followed by continued leaching at low concentrations. The initial leaching of heavy metals is attributed to their soluble or exchangeable forms and the subsequent slow leaching to the solid compounds. The concentrations of the heavy metals remained below the current drinking water standards in all treatments throughout the leaching period. The results thus suggest that contamination of groundwater with heavy metals from source-separated MSW compost applied as a soil amendment should be negligible, as the low concentrations in the leachates leaving the surface soil would be further attenuated by the subsoil. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Sawhney, B.L.; Bugbee, G.J.; Stilwell, D.E. [Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station, New Haven, CT (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Characterization and kinetic studies of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the main solid residue which is produced by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) facilities. To be reused in public works, it has to be stored previously a few months. This material is composed primarily of a mineral matrix but also contains unburnt organic matter. The mineral content and its change in the course of aging are relatively well-known, in contrast with the organic content. So in order to detect the phenomena responsible for changes in organic matter and their effects during aging, the concentrations of the main organic compounds previously characterized, the number of microorganisms, and the release of carbon dioxide were followed kinetically in model laboratory conditions. The results showed that the aging process led to the natural biodegradation of the organic matter available in bottom ash, composed essentially of carboxylic acids and n-alkanes (steroids and PAH`s to a lesser extent), and consequently that it would improve the bottom ash quality. Furthermore these results were confirmed by the study of aging conducted in conditions used in the industrial scale.

Dugenest, S.; Casabianca, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Vernaison (France). Service central d`Analyse; Combrisson, J. [Univ. Claude Bernard-Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d`Ecologie Microbienne du Sol

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification technologies are expected to play a key role in the future of solid waste management since the conversion of municipal and industrial solid wastes to a gaseous fuel significantly increases its value. Municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification for electrical power generation was conducted in a fluidized bed gasifier and the feasibility of using a control system was evaluated to facilitate its management and operation. The performance of an engine using the gas produced was evaluated. A procedure was also tested to upgrade the quality of the gas and optimize its production. The devices installed and automated control system developed was able to achieve and maintain the set conditions for optimum gasification. The most important parameters of reaction temperature and equivalence ratio were fully controlled. Gas production went at a rate of 4.00 kg min-1 with a yield of 2.78 m3 kg-1 of fuel and a heating value (HV) of 7.94 MJ Nm-3. Within the set limits of the tests, the highest production of synthesis gas and the net heating value of 8.97 MJ Nm-3 resulted from gasification at 725°C and ER of 0.25 which was very close to the predicted value of 7.47 MJ Nm-3. This was not affected by temperature but significantly affected by the equivalence ratio. The overall engine-generator efficiency at 7.5 kW electrical power load was lower at 19.81% for gasoline fueled engine compared to 35.27% for synthesis gas. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system increased the net heating value of the product gas by an average of 38% gas over that of inlet gas. There were no traces of carbon dioxide in the product gas indicating that it had been completely adsorbed by the system. MSW showed relatively lower fouling and slagging tendencies than cotton gin trash (CGT) and dairy manure (DM). This was further supported by the compressive strength measurements of the ash of MSW, CGT and DM and the EDS elemental analysis of the MSW ash.

Maglinao, Amado Latayan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

Parrot, Laurent [Centre de Cooperation Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpement (CIRAD), Montpellier 34398 Cedex 5 (France)], E-mail: laurent.parrot@cirad.fr; Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia [University of Yaounde II - Soa, Faculty of Economics and Management, P.O. Box 1365, Yaounde (Cameroon)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?  

SciTech Connect

Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

Narayana, Tapan [Hidayatullah National Law University, HNLU Bhawan, Civil Lines, Raipur 492001, Chhattisgarh (India)], E-mail: tapan.narayana@gmail.com

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Guide to implementing reclamation processes at Department of Defense municipal solid waste and construction debris landfills. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis serves as a guide for implementing landfill reclamation techniques on municipal solid waste or construction debris landfills owned, operated, or used by the DoD. The research describes historical and current methods for disposing of solid waste including open dumping, sanitary landfilling, and the development of state-of-the-art sanitary landfill cell technology. The thesis also identifies the factors which have led to the need for new methods of managing municipal solid waste. The vast majority of the study is devoted to identifying actions which should be taken before, during, and after implementation of a landfill reclamation project. These actions include the development of health, safety, and contingency planning documents, the establishment of systems for characterizing and monitoring site conditions, and the identification of other procedures and processes necessary for performing successful operations. Finally, this study contains a model for analyzing under which conditions reclamation is economically feasible. The model examines economic feasibility in four separate conditions and shows that reclamation is economically feasible in a wide variety of markets. However, the model also shows that feasibility is directly associated with a continuance of normal landfilling operations. Landfill, Landfill reclamation, Landfill mining, Municipal solid waste, Recycling, Construction debris.

Tures, G.L.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A., E-mail: alberto.fdezguelfo@uca.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alvarez-Gallego, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D. [Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Romero Garcia, L.I. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

104

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Integrated municipal solid waste treatment using a grate furnace incinerator: The Indaver case  

SciTech Connect

An integrated installation for treatment of municipal solid waste and comparable waste from industrial origin is described. It consists of three grate furnace lines with flue gas treatment by half-wet scrubbing followed by wet scrubbing, and an installation for wet treatment of bottom ash. It is demonstrated that this integrated installation combines high recovery of energy (40.8% net) with high materials recovery. The following fractions were obtained after wet treatment of the bottom ash: ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, three granulate fractions with different particle sizes, and sludge. The ferrous and non-ferrous metal fractions can both be recycled as high quality raw materials; the two larger particle size particle fractions can be applied as secondary raw materials in building applications; the sand fraction can be used for applications on a landfill; and the sludge is landfilled. For all components of interest, emissions to air are below the limit values. The integrated grate furnace installation is characterised by zero wastewater discharge and high occupational safety. Moreover, with the considered installation, major pollutants, such as PCDD/PCDF, Hg and iodine-136 are to a large extent removed from the environment and concentrated in a small residual waste stream (flue gas cleaning residue), which can be landfilled after stabilisation.

Vandecasteele, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: carlo.vandecasteele@cit.kuleuven.be; Wauters, G. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Arickx, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Jaspers, M. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Van Gerven, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A comparison of municipal solid waste management in Berlin and Singapore  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in Singapore and Berlin was carried out in order to identify its current status, and highlight the prevailing conditions of MSWM. An overview of the various aspects of MSWM in these two cities is provided, with emphasis on comparing the legal, technical, and managerial aspects of MSW. Collection systems and recycling practiced with respect to the involvement of the government and the private sector, are also presented. Over last two decades, the city of Berlin has made impressive progress with respect to its waste management. The amounts of waste have declined significantly, and at the same time the proportion that could be recovered and recycled has increased. In contrast, although Singapore's recycling rate has been increasing over the past few years, rapid economic and population growth as well as change in consumption patterns in this city-state has caused waste generation to continue to increase. Landfilling of MSW plays minor role in both cities, one due to geography (Singapore) and the other due to legislative prohibition (Berlin). Consequently, both in Singapore and Berlin, waste is increasingly being used as a valuable resource and great efforts have been made for the development of incineration technology and energy recovery, as well as climate protection.

Zhang Dongqing, E-mail: dqzhang@ntu.edu.s [DHI-NTU Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Keat, Tan Soon [Maritime Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Gersberg, Richard M. [Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, Hardy Tower 119, 5500 Campanile, San Diego CA 92182-4162 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Oxygen respirometry to assess stability and maturity of composted municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability and maturity of compost prepared from municipal solid waste (MSW) at a full-scale composting plant was assessed through chemical, physical, and biological assays. Respiration bioassays used to determine stability (O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} respirometry) were sensitive to process control problems at the composting plant and indicated increasing stability with time. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) growth bioassays revealed that immature compost samples inhibited growth. Growth of ryegrass in potting mix prepared with cured compost not amended with fertilizer was enhanced as compared to a pest control. Garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed germination, used as an indicator of phytotoxicity, revealed inhibition of germination at all compost maturity levels. The phytotoxicity was though to be salt-related. Spearman rank-order correlations demonstrated that O{sub 2} respirometry, water-soluble organic C, and the water extract organic C to organic N ratio, significantly correlated with compost age and best indicated an acceptable level of stability. Oxygen respirometry also best predicted the potential for ryegrass growth, and an acceptable level of compost maturity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Iannotti, D.A.; Grebus, M.E.; Toth, B.L.; Madden, L.V.; Hoitink, A.J. [Ohio State Univ./Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Flow analysis of metals in a municipal solid waste management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to identify the metal flow in a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system. Outputs of a resource recovery facility, refuse derived fuel (RDF) production facility, carbonization facility, plastics liquefaction facility, composting facility, and bio-gasification facility were analyzed for metal content and leaching concentration. In terms of metal content, bulky and incombustible waste had the highest values. Char from a carbonization facility, which treats household waste, had a higher metal content than MSW incinerator bottom ash. A leaching test revealed that Cd and Pb in char and Pb in RDF production residue exceeded the Japanese regulatory criteria for landfilling, so special attention should be paid to final disposal of these substances. By multiplying metal content and the generation rate of outputs, the metal content of input waste to each facility was estimated. For most metals except Cr, the total contribution ratio of paper/textile/plastics, bulky waste, and incombustible waste was over 80%. Approximately 30% of Cr originated from plastic packaging. Finally, several MSW management scenarios showed that most metals are transferred to landfills and the leaching potential of metals to the environment is quite small.

Jung, C.H. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, T. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Tanaka, N. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a progress report for the Project Description of Grant No. DE-FG01-94CE15612, {open_quotes}Develop a Combustion of Municipal Solid Waste with Oil Shale in Circulating Fluidized Bed{close_quotes}, dated September 2, 1994. The Project Description lists and describes six tasks, four of which are complete, and two others nearing completion. A summary of progress on each task is presented in this report.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management in the Philippines - What does it need?  

SciTech Connect

The integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management is a challenge many developing countries face. In Iloilo City, Philippines around 220 tons of municipal solid waste are collected every day and disposed at a 10 ha large dumpsite. In order to improve the local waste management system the Local Government decided to develop a new Waste Management Center with integrated landfill. However, the proposed area is adjacent to the presently used dumpsite where more than 300 waste pickers dwell and depend on waste picking as their source of livelihood. The Local Government recognized the hidden threat imposed by the waste picker's presence for this development project and proposed various measures to integrate the informal sector into the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) program. As a key intervention a Waste Workers Association, called USWAG Calahunan Livelihood Association Inc. (UCLA) was initiated and registered as a formal business enterprise in May 2009. Up to date, UCLA counts 240 members who commit to follow certain rules and to work within a team that jointly recovers wasted materials. As a cooperative they are empowered to explore new livelihood options such as the recovery of Alternative Fuels for commercial (cement industry) and household use, production of compost and making of handicrafts out of used packages. These activities do not only provide alternative livelihood for them but also lessen the generation of leachate and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions from waste disposal, whereby the life time of the proposed new sanitary landfill can be extended likewise.

Paul, Johannes G., E-mail: jp.aht.p3@gmail.com [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Arce-Jaque, Joan [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ravena, Neil; Villamor, Salome P. [General Service Office, City Government, Iloilo City (Philippines)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Nitrogen availability and leaching from soil amended with municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beneficial use of municipal solid waste compost depends on identifying a management strategy that supports crop production and protects water quality. Effects of compost and N fertilizer management strategies on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching were evaluated in a 3-yr study on a Hubbard loamy sand soil. Two composts were each applied at either 90 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} from 1993 to 1995, or at 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} in one application in 1993. The compost and non-amended plots were side dressed annually with N fertilizer as urea at 0, 125, and 250 kg ha{sup {minus}1}. Biochemical properties of the compost as well as compost management strongly affected crop response and fate of N. Compost increased grain yield with no significant yield response to N fertilizer with the single compost application in Year 1 and the annual compost application in Year 3. Plant N uptake increased with N fertilizer rate, except in the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost treatments in Year 1. Over the 3-yr period, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching with the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost application was 1.8 times greater compared to that with the annual application. The estimated N mineralization ranged from 0 to 12% and 3 to 6% in the annual and single compost addition, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, annual compost application with reduced supplemental N fertilizer was the best management strategy to reach optimum crop yield while minimizing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching losses.

Mamo, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Halbach, T.R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that cocombustion of municipal solid waste and oil shale can reduce emissions of gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2} and HCl) to acceptable levels. Tests in 6- and 15-inch units showed that the oil shale absorbs acid gas pollutants and produces an ash which could be, at the least, disposed of in a normal landfill. Further analysis of the results are underway to estimate scale-up to commercial size. Additional work will be done to evaluate the cementitious properties of oil shale ash.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Solute transport under steady and transient conditions in biodegraded municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of a conservative tracer (lithium) in a large (3.5 m3) undisturbed municipal solid waste sample has been investigated under steady and fully transient conditions using a simple model. The model comprises a kinematic wave approximation for water movement, presented in a previous paper, and a strict convective solute flux law. The waste medium is conceptualized as a three-domain system consisting of a mobile domain (channels), an immobile fast domain, and an immobile slow domain. The mobile domain constitutes only a minor fraction of the medium, and the access to the major part of medium is constrained by diffusive transport. Thus the system is in a state of physical nonequilibrium. The fast immobile domain is the part of the matrix which surrounds the channels and forms the boundary between the channels and the matrix. Owing to its exposure to mobile water, which enhances the biodegradation process, this domain is assumed to be more porous and loose in its structure and therefore to respond faster to a change in solute concentration in the mobile domain compared to the regions deep inside the matrix. The diffusive mass exchange between the domains is modeled with two first-order mass transfer expressions coupled in series. Under transient conditions the system will also be in a state of hydraulic nonequilibrium. Hydraulic gradients build up between the channel domain and the matrix in response to the water input events. The gradients will govern a reversible flow and convective transport between the domains, here represented as a source/sink term in the governing equation. The model has been used to interpret and compare the results from a steady state experiment and an unsteady state experiment. By solely adjusting the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain that is active in transferring solute, the model is capable of accurately reproducing the measured outflow breakthrough curves for both the steady and unsteady state experiments. During transient conditions the fraction of the immobile fast domain that is active in transferring solute is found to be about 65% larger than that under steady state conditions. It is therefore concluded that the water input pattern governs the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain which, in turn, governs the solute residence time in the solid waste. It can be concluded that the contaminant transport process in landfills is likely to be in a state of both physical, hydraulic, and chemical nonequilibrium. The transport process for a conservative solute is here shown to be dominated by convective transport in the channels and a fast diffusive mass exchange with the surrounding matrix. This may imply that the observed leachate quality from landfills mainly reflects the biochemical conditions in these regions. The water input pattern is of great importance for the transport process since it governs the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain which is active in transferring solute. This may be the reason for leachate quality to be seasonally or water flux dependent, which has been observed in several investigations. The result also has a significant practical implication for efforts to enhance the biodegradation process in landfills by recycling of the leachate.

Bendz, David; Singh, Vijay P.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

Henry Liu; Yadong Li

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Two-year performance by evapotranspiration covers for municipal solid waste landfills in northwest Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All ET covers produced rates of percolation less than 32 cm yr{sup -1}, the maximum allowable rate by the Ohio EPA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dredged sediment provided sufficient water storage and promoted growth by native plant species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Native plant mixtures attained acceptable rates of evapotranspiration throughout the growing season. - Abstract: Evapotranspiration (ET) covers have gained interest as an alternative to conventional covers for the closure of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills because they are less costly to construct and are expected to have a longer service life. Whereas ET covers have gained acceptance in arid and semi-arid regions (defined by a precipitation (P) to potential evapotranspiration (PET) ratio less than 0.75) by meeting performance standards (e.g. rate of percolation), it remains unclear whether they are suitable for humid regions (P:PET greater than 0.75). The goal of this project is to extend their application to northwest Ohio (P:PET equals 1.29) by designing covers that produce a rate of percolation less than 32 cm yr{sup -1}, the maximum acceptable rate by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). Test ET covers were constructed in drainage lysimeters (1.52 m diameter, 1.52 m depth) using dredged sediment amended with organic material and consisted of immature (I, plants seeded onto soil) or mature (M, plants transferred from a restored tall-grass prairie) plant mixtures. The water balance for the ET covers was monitored from June 2009 to June 2011, which included measured precipitation and percolation, and estimated soil water storage and evapotranspiration. Precipitation was applied at a rate of 94 cm yr{sup -1} in the first year and at rate of 69 cm yr{sup -1} in the second year. During the first year, covers with the M plant mixture produced noticeably less percolation (4 cm) than covers with the I plant mixture (17 cm). However, during the second year, covers with the M plant mixture produced considerably more percolation (10 cm) than covers with the I plant mixture (3 cm). This is likely due to a decrease in the aboveground biomass for the M plant mixture from year 1 (1008 g m{sup -2}) to year 2 (794 g m{sup -2}) and an increase for the I plant mixture from year 1 (644 g m{sup -2}) to year 2 (1314 g m{sup -2}). Over the 2-year period, the mean annual rates of percolation for the covers with the M and I plant mixtures were 7 and 8 cm yr{sup -1}, which are below the OEPA standard. The results suggest the application of ET covers be extended to northwest Ohio and other humid regions.

Barnswell, Kristopher D., E-mail: kristopher.barnswell2@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Lake Erie Center, 6200 Bayshore Rd., Oregon, OH 43616 (United States); Dwyer, Daryl F., E-mail: daryl.dwyer@utoledo.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Mail Stop 604, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure fails to extract oxoanion-forming elements that are extracted by municipal solid waste leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US EPA and state regulatory agencies rely on standard extraction tests to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate surface water or groundwater. To evaluate the predictive abilities of these extraction tests, the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), the Waste Extraction Test (WET), and the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) were compared with actual municipal solid waste leachates (MSWLs) for their ability to extract regulated elements from a variety of industrial solid wastes in short- and long-term extractions. Short-term extractions used MSWLs from a variety of California landfills. Long-term sequential extractions simulated longer term leaching, as might occur in MSW landfills. For most regulated elements, the TCLP roughly predicted the maximum concentrations extracted by the MSWLs. For regulated elements that form oxoanions (e.g., Sb, As, Mo, Se, V), however the TCLP underpredicted the levels extracted by the MSWL. None of the standard tests adequately predicted these levels. The results emphasize the need for better standardized techniques to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate groundwater with oxoanion-forming elements, particularly arsenic.

Hooper, K.; Iskander, M.; Sivia, G. [California Dept. of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Lab.] [and others

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Environmental & economical optimization for municipal solid waste collection problems, a modeling and algorithmic approach case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing environmental concerns and interests in material and energy conservation have lead to increasing advancement in the management of solid waste over the past two decades. The field of modeling of waste management system, as opposed to the modeling ... Keywords: CO2 emission, MSW collection and routing, MSW costs analysis, network design

F. Rhoma; Z. Zhang; Y. Luo; B. Noche

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Site hydrogeologic/geotechnical characterization report for Site B new municipal solid waste landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Site Hydrogeologic/Geotechnical Characterization Report (SHCR) presents the results of a comprehensive study conducted on a proposed solid waste landfill site, identified herein as Site B, at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report is intended to satisfy all requirements of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with regard to landfill siting requirements and ground water and environmental protection. In addition, this report provides substantial geotechnical data pertinent to the landfill design process.

Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluation of oxygen utilization as an indicator of municipal solid-waste compost stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research evaluated oxygen utilization parameters as indicators of MSW compost stability. Parameters evaluated were the oxygen utilization rate (OUR), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), five-day biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. In addition, other suggested indicators of stability were investigated including percent volatile solids, volatile solids reduction, nitrogen content, carbon: nitrogen ratio, and reheating potential (RP). OUR is a measure of the rate of oxygen utilization by the microorganisms in the decomposition of organic matter in compost. OUR was observed to be sensitive to the degree of stabilization and decreased with increasing compost age and stability. OUR values near zero indicate that the compost microorganisms are in a state of endogenous respiration, which is characteristic of a stable compost. Therefore, OUR is an excellent indicator of stability. A number of disadvantages are associated with OUR for practical application. Therefore, other parameters were evaluated as indicators of stability based on their statistical correlation to OUR. RP exhibited the strongest correlation to OUR. In combination, RP and SOUR were the two parameters which exhibited the strongest correlation to OUR. OUR, RP, and SOUR are all measures of microbial activity which reflect the degree of organic decomposition, and therefore, stability. Based on the results of this research; OUR, RP, and SOUR are useful parameters in assessing compost stability.

Zimmerman, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report {number_sign}6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground carbonized RDF slurry from the grinding trials at IKA Works at approximately 50 wt.% solids was sealed in drums and shipped to the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) for the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion tests. In addition, a fuel characterization and trace component analysis was completed for this final carbonized RDF slurry fuel. This final fuel was a blend of several fuels from the pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments. As can be seen from the data, the final carbonized RDF has an exceptional heating value and volatile matter content. In addition, trace components are significantly lower than the raw RDF pellets. The report summarizes results from combustion tests and air pollution monitoring of these tests. For the upcoming time period 10/96--01/97, it is anticipated that the analysis of the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion test will be completed. This analysis includes rheology and particle size distribution analysis of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, carbon content and TCLP of the combustion ash, trace heavy metal balances around combustor, and dioxin/furan emissions. Finally, the slurry carbonization computer model and computer simulations will be completed in the next reporting period (including the waste water treatment subsystem). Based upon this computer model, initial economic estimates and optimizations of the slurry carbonization process will be completed in the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

130

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Second quarterly report ending March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Project Description lists and describes six tasks, three of which are virtually complete, with three others underway. A summary of progress on each task follows. Task 1: Development of a Detailed Test Plan. This task is complete. Task 2: Preparation of Test Equipment. This task is complete. Two test units (a six-inch internal diameter and a fifteen-inch internal diameter unit) were prepared and used as described under Task 4. Task 3: Obtain test materials. The required amounts of oil shale and pelletized municipal solid waste have been obtained, tested, and found to be suitable. We have obtained an adequate quantity of a pelletized ``standard`` MSW from BEPR/BFI, Eden Prairie, MN. For test purposes, we synthesized the desired ``worst probable case`` of MSW by the addition of sulfur and chlorine to reach the sulfur and chlorine levels characteristic of such waste. Task 4: Execute Feasibility Demonstration Program. The fluidized bed tests associated with the program have been completed. Analysis of the results is continuing. Testing of the waste stream material generated from these runs will begin about 6 April to evaluate its possible use as cement for specific applications. Information on the technical feasibility of the invention as indicated by the fluid bed test program is included as Attachment A. The results demonstrate that the process is technically feasible. Task 5: Data Analysis. This task is beginning. Task 6: Project Management, Reporting, and Necessary Liaison Activities. Those portions of this task associated with work done on Tasks 1 through 4 have been completed. This task will continue throughout the period of the study. In summary, work is proceeding within budget. No serious problems in the next scheduled tasks are foreseen.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

Weng, Yu-Chi, E-mail: clyde.weng@gmail.com [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fujiwara, Takeshi [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Risk assessment of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the risk of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste (MSW). The goal is to determine the probability that the composted MSW could be a health hazard if it were used as a soil amendment. The research limited the assessment of the exposure risk to heavy metals found in raw MSW and its resulting compost. The thesis uses reviews of present literature to examine the food and soil ingestion exposure pathways. These pathways are assessed using the heavy metal concentrations found in MSW compost and the soil-plant partition coefficients of vegetables grown in soil mixed with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge leachate. The recommendation resulting from this research is that the Air Force should not use MSW composting as part of its future solid waste management plan. This alternative to landfilling contains a chronic health risk that is greater than the Environmental Protection Agency's guideline. If the Air Force would use MSW composting in the future, it may endanger Air Force personnel and others who use the compost created from Air Force MSW. Risk assessment, Heavy metals, Recycling municipal solid waste, Pollution, Composting.

Merrymon, T.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part 2. Tradeoffs of municipal solid-waste-processing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to assess the comparative performance and advantages of the various garbage-processing or disposal (landfill) techniques, and to address the issue of large-scale recycling of waste material. Five general methods are discussed: close-in landfill, remote landfill, refuse-derived solid fuel (RDSF), pyrolysis, and incineration. The major issue at this time concerning municipal solid waste disposal is whether to continue with landfill as the primary method or to use some combination of source separation, resource recovery, and energy generation. The constraints surrounding this issue are capital and labor costs, technical feasibility, environmental impacts--especially air pollution--marketability of the derived energy and recycled resources, and public cooperation. (MCW)

Codina, R.; Langlois, C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Reducing Mercury Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Combustion (Results of Investigations and Testing at the Camden Resource Recovery Facility)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for mercury control for flue gases of Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) not only ecological hydrochloric acid (HCl) and elemental mercury (Hg") under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream to the decreasing gas temperature, the elemental mercury is able to react with other flue gas components. The main

Columbia University

137

Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

Shahriari, Haleh, E-mail: haleh.shahriari@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hamoda, Mohamed [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Kennedy, Kevin J. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Alameda Municipal Power- Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

'''''Note: Alameda Municipal Power had a budget of $4.2 million to support this program. The utility has allocated the full budget and is no longer accepting applications. The information below is...

139

Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to plan waste management activities at local scale including waste minimization, collection, treatment, and disposal. At global scale, the MSW generation rates in Turkey are significantly related to unemployment rate and asphalt-paved roads ratio. Yet, significances of these variables may diminish at local scale for some provinces. At local scale, different factors may be important in affecting MSW generation rates.

Keser, Saniye [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Duzgun, Sebnem [Department of Mining Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Geodetic and Geographic Information Technologies, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Aksoy, Aysegul, E-mail: aaksoy@metu.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Allocation Reductions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Allocation Reductions Quarterly Allocation Reductions MPP (or computational) repositories that haven't used significant amounts of time are adjusted at certain times by transferring a part of the unused balance to the corresponding DOE Office reserve. The following schedule will be used for allocation year 2014 (which runs 14 January 2014 through 132January 2015). On April 9: if usage is less than 10% remove 25% of the unused balance On July 9: if usage is less than 25% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 50% of the unused balance On October 8: if usage is less than 50% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 25% remove 75% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 90% of the unused balance On November 5:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reducing volatilization of heavy metals in phosphate-pretreated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigated the feasibility of reducing volatilization of heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals via phosphate pre-treatment. To evaluate the evaporation characteristics of three heavy metals from phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash, volatilization tests have been performed by means of a dedicated apparatus in the 100-1000 deg. C range. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and BCR sequential extraction procedure were applied to assess phosphate stabilization process. The results showed that the volatilization behavior in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash could be reduced effectively. Pyromorphite-like minerals formed in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash were mainly responsible for the volatilization reduction of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash at higher temperature, due to their chemical fixation and thermal stabilization for heavy metals. The stabilization effects were encouraging for the potential reuse of MSWI fly ash.

Sun Ying; Zheng Jianchang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zou Luquan [Shanghai Center of Solid Waste Disposal, Shanghai (China); Liu Qiang; Zhu Ping [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Qian Guangren, E-mail: grqian@mail.shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

Lu, X. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H. [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Matsubae, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Bai, H. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nagasaka, T., E-mail: t-nagasaka@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

144

Municipal Solid Waste Combustion : Fuel Testing and Characterization : Task 1 Report, May 30, 1990-October 1, 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, Dwight J.; Canova, Joseph H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uniformity. Shredding of mixed waste to about 10 centimetersand untreated mixed municipal waste. GTZ/Holcim (2006) givesCEMBUREAU 2009). Mixed municipal waste must be pre-processed

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

Forster, G.A. [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)] [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburg, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy allocations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Data Environmental Review-NEPA Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Financial Data Environmental Review-NEPA Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Post 2004 SHP Energy Determination CRSP MC 12/8/2003 Proposed Allocations FY2005 Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2006 Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2007 Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2008 Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2009 & After Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2005 New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2006 New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2007 New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2008 New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2009 & After New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) CRSP MC Documents and Meeting Handouts Customer Meetings & Rate Adjustment Schedule For Long-Term Solution (pdf) GC Lake Elevations Graph - 8/2003 Hydrology Study (pdf)

151

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reconsidering custom memory allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programmers hoping to achieve performance improvements often use custom memory allocators. This in-depth study examines eight applications that use custom allocators. Surprisingly, for six of these applications, a state-of-the-art general-purpose allocator ...

Emery D. Berger; Benjamin G. Zorn; Kathryn S. McKinley

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bond Allocation (Missouri) Bond Allocation (Missouri) Private Activity Bond Allocation (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate Total Program Cap 2012: $571,015,360 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Bond Program Provider Missouri Department of Economic Development The Private Activity Bond Allocation Program provides low-interest financing through tax-exempt bonds for certain types of projects, including electric and gas utility projects. Eligible applicants include certain state agencies, cities, counties and industrial development authorities

154

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Economic and Social Commission for...

155

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering.de/116/) Co-firing of MSW and sewage sludge indevice for solid waste fuel co-firing Solid waste fuels areand HF produced during firing. ? CO is largely unaffected. ?

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Allocations | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Management Determining Allocation Requirements Querying Allocations Using cbank Decommissioning of BGP Systems and Resources Blue GeneQ Versus Blue GeneP MiraCetus...

157

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

2009 Resource Allocations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-2009 Resource Allocations Post-2009 Resource Allocations On March 27, 2009, Western Area Power Administration's Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) published the Federal Register Notice of Proposed Power Allocation. A Public Comment Forum is scheduled for Thursday, April 16, 2009, at 1:00 p.m. MDT at the Ramada Plaza and Conference Center, 10 East 120th Avenue, Northglenn, Colorado 80233, telephone number (303) 452-4100. Interested Parties and Loveland Area Projects Customers are encouraged to attend. Interest Parties and Loveland Area Projects Customers have 30 days to comment on the proposed allocations; comments are due to RMR by 4:00 p.m. on April 27, 2009. Once comments are received, RMR will determine final allocations, and publish those as well as responses to comments in the Federal Register. The new contracts (and revised exhibits for existing customers) must be executed before October 1, 2009, when the new firm electric service allocations become effective for all customers.

160

NERSC 2012 Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Awards 2012 Allocation Awards L by Principal Investigator by DOE Office ast edited: 2013-04-01 10:00:28...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NERSC 2011 Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Awards 2011 Allocation Awards & by Principal Investigator by DOE Office ast edited: 2011-05-03 17:20:29...

162

NERSC 2013 Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Awards 2013 Allocation Awards L by Principal Investigator by DOE Office ast edited: 2012-12-14 12:51:49...

163

NERSC Accounts and Allocations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocations NIM (NERSC Information Management portal) Awarded projects Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements...

164

Allocation Year Rollover  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover Allocation Year Rollover: 2013 to 2014 Note: Allocation Year 2013 (AY13) ends at 23:59:59 on Monday, January 13, 2014. AY14 runs from Tuesday, January 14, 2014 through Monday, January 12, 2015. Below are major changes that will go into effect with the beginning of AY14 on Tuesday, January 14, 2014. All times listed are PST. Scheduled System Downtimes There will be no service disruption during the allocation year rollover this year. Interactive and batch use will continue uninterrupted (except for "premium" jobs on Hopper; see below). Charging Across AY Boundary All batch jobs will continue running during the rollover. Time accrued before midnight will be charged to AY13 repos; time accrued after midnight will be charged to AY14 repos. Running batch jobs that are associated with

165

Evaluation of the Natick enzymatic hydrolysis process for use in the production of ethanol from municipal solid waste or from wood. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic evaluation of a conceptual, large-scale, commercial ethanol production facility using the enzymatic hydrolysis technology are presented. Designs and cost estimates for the mechanical processing and the ethanol fermentation and recovery are included. Production of ethanol from both wood and solid wastes is covered. (MHR)

Jones, J. L.; Fong, W. S.; Chatterjee, A. K.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

NERSC Allocations: For Principal Investigators and Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocations NERSC Allocations: for Principal Investigators and Account Managers Allocations Overview and Eligibility A researcher may apply for an allocation of NERSC resources if...

167

Post-2014 Resource Allocations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-2014 Resource Allocations Post-2014 Resource Allocations On December 17, 2010, Western Area Power Administration's Rocky Mountain Region published its Post-2014 Resource Pool-Loveland Area Projects (LAP), Allocation Procedures and Call for Applications (75 FR 78988). Through the Post-2014 Resource Pool (Resource Pool), Western will allocate up to 1 percent of the LAP long-term firm hydroelectric resource available as of October 1, 2014, that is estimated to be approximately 6.9 megawatts for the summer season and 6.1 megawatts for the winter season. The Resource Pool will be created by reducing existing customers' allocations by up to 1 percent. A public information forum was held on February 2, 2011, prior to the application deadline, which was March 4, 2011. Of the seven applications received, Western determined that six of the applicants met the Resource Pool General Eligibility Criteria. Western published the Resource Pool proposed power allocation and initiated a public comment period in the Federal Register (76 FR 45551, July 29, 2011). A public comment forum on the proposed power allocation was held August 25, 2011, and public comments were due to Western by September 12, 2011. There were no comments received during the public comment period.

168

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

169

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

170

Comparison of municipal solid waste management systems in Canada and Ghana: A case study of the cities of London, Ontario, and Kumasi, Ghana  

SciTech Connect

Integrated waste management has been accepted as a sustainable approach to solid waste management in any region. It can be applied in both developed and developing countries. The difference is the approach taken to develop the integrated waste management system. This review looks at the integrated waste management system operating in the city of London, Ontario-Canada and how lessons can be drawn from the system's development and operation that will help implement a sustainable waste management system in the city of Kumasi, Ghana. The waste management system in London is designed such that all waste generated in the city is handled and disposed of appropriately. The responsibility of each sector handling waste is clearly defined and monitored. All major services are provided and delivered by a combination of public and private sector forces. The sustainability of the waste management in the city of London is attributed to the continuous improvement strategy framework adopted by the city based on the principles of integrated waste management. It is perceived that adopting a strategic framework based on the principles of integrated waste management with a strong political and social will, can transform the current waste management in Kumasi and other cities in developing countries in the bid for finding lasting solutions to the problems that have plagued the waste management system in these cities.

Asase, Mizpah [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Yanful, Ernest K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada)], E-mail: eyanful@eng.uwo.ca; Mensah, Moses [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Stanford, Jay [City of London, 300 Dufferin Ave. P.O. Box 5035, Ontario, N6A 4L9 (Canada); Amponsah, Samuel [Mathematics Department, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

172

Automated task allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the paradigm shift in Air Traffic Management (ATM) is to increase its overall performance by means of redesigning processes, evolving to a more automated, autonomous and predictable system. Nevertheless, when dealing with automation, it is ... Keywords: ATM, anticipatory, autonomous, centric, compensatory, decision support tools, level of automation, operations research, optimisation, performance metrics, task allocation

Rocío Barragán Montes, Eduardo García, Francisco Javier Sáez Nieto

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

Martin-Gonzalez, L., E-mail: lucia.martin@uab.ca [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Colturato, L.F. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, X.; Vicent, T. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental (ICTA) Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

allocation requests due September 22 2014 NERSC allocation requests due September 22 August 13, 2013 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) NERSC's allocation submission system is...

175

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

176

High solids fermentation reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fermentation reactor and method for fermentation of materials having greater than about 10% solids. The reactor includes a rotatable shaft along the central axis, the shaft including rods extending outwardly to mix the materials. The reactor and method are useful for anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes to produce methane, for production of commodity chemicals from organic materials, and for microbial fermentation processes.

Wyman, Charles E. (Lakewood, CO); Grohmann, Karel (Littleton, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO); Richard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Clean energy from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes a slurry grinding trial where a carbonized refuse derived fuel was dispersed in water. The RDF slurry produced in this study is to subjected to dioxin combustion tests.

Klosky, M.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Managing America`s solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Municipalities and Renewable Energy Opportunities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipalities and Renewable Energy Opportunities Municipalities and Renewable Energy Opportunities Jump to: navigation, search BUILDING COMMUNITIES WITH RENEWABLE ENERGY --Rsiegent 20:06, 20 January 2010 (UTC) BC communities and renewable energy walk hand-in-hand. "Investments made today in established renewable energy technologies can reduce building operating costs, the savings of which can be allocated [for instance] to community programs." Municipal buildings are ideally suited, as they are built for the long-term with quality and durability, and social and environmental responsibility in mind. Renewable energy systems such as GeoExchange (geothermal heat pumps) and Solar Hot Water ("Solar") are common renewable energy technologies used in commercial scale buildings. They are durable, proven, and low

180

Alameda Municipal Power - Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program Alameda Municipal Power - Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Expiration Date December 31, 2017 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Program is closed Provider Alameda Power and Telecom '''''Note: Alameda Municipal Power had a budget of $4.2 million to support this program. The utility has allocated the full budget and is no longer accepting applications. The information below is provided for historical purposes. ''''' Alameda Municipal Power offers an incentive program to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebates will be provided to commercial and residential customers on a per-watt AC basis, which, in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

182

2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 2013 Allocation Request Submissions Due September 28 August 1, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) The deadline for submissions...

183

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Roadway Improvement Project Cost Allocation CTS 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference costs #12;Potential Applications · Roadway Project Feasibility Studies ­ Identified potential roadway infrastructure improvement ­ Documentation of estimated project costs ­ Determine property assessments

Minnesota, University of

184

Bayesian Proportional Resource Allocation Games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a proportional allocation mechanism that gives to each user an amount of a resource proportional to the user's bid. We study a corresponding Bayesian game in which each user has incomplete information on the ...

Tsitsiklis, John N.

185

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trench c) Liner Deployment d) Seaming Double Hot wedge Fillet Extrusion Seam properties ­ ASTM D6392 e-wise construction of landfill #12;Daily cell, cover, lift & phase of a landfill #12;Operational Points Provisions (contd) Check for compatibilities of different wastes. Divide landfill into cells. Non

Columbia University

186

Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Solid Waste Management 0: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) Quality Services: Solid Wastes, Part 360: Solid Waste Management Facilities (New York) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider NY Department of Environmental Conservation These regulations apply to all solid wastes with the exception of hazardous or radioactive waste. Proposed solid waste processing facilities are required to obtain permits prior to construction, and the regulations provide details about permitting, construction, registration, and operation requirements. The regulations contain specific guidance for land

187

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, J.L.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Consecutive conveyors may be connected by an intermediate vibratory plate. An air knife can be used to further separate materials based on weight.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NERSC 2007 Initial Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Awards 7 Awards 2007 Initial Allocation Awards The following table lists the initial allocation awards for NERSC for the 2007 allocation year (Jan 9, 2007 through Jan 7, 2008). The list is in alphabetical order by the last name of the Principal Investigator. Note - Letters following the repository name indicate the following: 'I' DOE ASCR INCITE award 'S' NERSC Startup award A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Principal Site Request Repo SP HPSS Project Title Investigator Id Hours SRUs Agarwal, Deborah Berkeley Lab 81665 bwc m510 S 50,000 5,000 Berkeley Water Center (formerly National Center for Hydrology Synthesis) Agarwal, Deborah Berkeley Lab 82063 mpdsd 10,000 100,000 CRD Distributed Systems

191

Beam Time Allocation Committee (BAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Time Allocation Committee (BAC) Charter Purpose: Allocates general user beam time by instrument to promote diverse and high- impact science and a broad-based user community to meet DOE and NSSD goals. Participants: BAC Chair (appointed by NSSD Director), Instrument Group Leaders, User Office Schedule: Tied to proposal calls - expected to meet at least 2 times/year with meetings scheduled about 6 weeks after the proposal call has closed and at least 1 month prior to scheduled operations. Process: 1. Instrument Group Leaders (with group members): a. Confirm feasibility (equipment requirements and instrument capabilities) and safe operations b. Review amount of beam time requested and adjust as needed with consideration for instrument and sample environment availability.

192

NERSC 2009 Initial Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Awards 9 Awards 2009 Awards 2009 Initial Allocations Awards The following table lists the initial allocation awards for NERSC for the 2009 allocation year (Jan 13, 2009 through Jan 11, 2010). The list is in alphabetical order by the last name of the Principal Investigator. Note - Letters following the repository name indicate the following: 'S' NERSC Startup award 'I' INCITE award A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Principal Site Request Repo MPP HPSS Project Title Investigator Id 'Hours' SRUs Adams, Paul Berkeley Lab 83193 m811 80,000 200,000 The Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI) Adams, Paul Berkeley Lab 83306 jbei 600,000 JBEI Archive

193

Municipal spotlight: Working together in Northern Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Virginia region is one of the nation`s liveliest centers of commerce as measured by job creation, new business formation, residential and commercial construction, and retail sales. The region also has one of the most advanced integrated waste management programs. In 1994, more than 1.6 million tons of municipal solid (MSW) were generated in the Northern Virginia region. Of that amount, 1 million tons were recovered as energy and more than 500,000 tons were landfilled. Additionally, more than 500,000 tons were recycled. The jurisdictions in this region have built an extensive network of solid waste management programs that are handled on the local government level, through cooperative programs, and through implementation of unique interjurisdictional agreements. These programs are arranged in the following hierarchy: source reduction, composting, recycling, energy recovery, and landfilling. This article provides a description of how this hierarchy is implemented in the region.

Arner, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Utah Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Utah Municipal Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name Utah Municipal Power Agency...

195

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider Santee Cooper Santee Cooper's Green Power Program was launched in September of 2001. All of the state's 20 electric cooperatives and the City of Georgetown participate in the Green Power Program, which is Green-e accredited. The renewable resources sold under the Green Power Program are comprised of 99% landfill gas (methane) and less than 1% solar energy. Santee Cooper is currently using landfill gas (methane) to produce electricity at six facilities in South Carolina: Horry Solid Waste

196

EERE EnergyStar State Allocations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EERE EnergyStar State Allocations EERE EnergyStar State Allocations EEEnergyStarStateAllocations.pdf More Documents & Publications State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate...

197

Fair resource allocation in multiple access channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of resource allocation in a multiple access channel. Our objective is to obtain rate and power allocation policies that maximize a general concave utility function of average transmission rates over ...

ParandehGheibi, Ali

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Decentralized, adaptive resource allocation for sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of resource allocation in sensor networks. We are concerned with how to allocate limited energy, radio bandwidth, and other resources to maximize the value of each node's contribution to the network. Sensor networks present ...

Geoffrey Mainland; David C. Parkes; Matt Welsh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Allocation Management | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

if there is an active allocation, check Running Jobs. For information to run the query or email support, check alcf.anl.gov and ask for all active allocations. Determining...

200

Municipal waste incineration; An environmentally benign energy source for district heating  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste should be regarded as a good fuel. Emissions from solid waste incineration can be kept within any reasonable limit. Compared with fossil fuels, waste can be regarded as a renewable source of energy that does not contribute to the greenhouse effect. Finally, waste incineration for district heating can be very economical.

Astrand, L.E. (Uppsala Energi AB, Uppsala (SE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NERSC 2004 Initial Allocation Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Awards 4 Awards 2004 Initial Allocation Awards The following table lists the allocation awards for NERSC for the extended 2004 fiscal year (Oct 1, 2003 through Nov 30, 2004). The list is in alphabetical order by the last name of the Principal Investigator. Note - Letters following the repository name indicate the following: 'I' DOE ASCR INCITE award 'S' NERSC Startup award A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Principal Site Request Repo SP HPSS Project Title Investigator Id Hours SRUs Agarwal, Deborah Berkeley Lab 80586 mpdsd 5,000 40,000 NERSC Distributed Systems Department Guest Accounts Ahmed, Musa Berkeley Lab 80530 m252 S 20,000 100 Chemical Dynamics and

202

Scalability of Dynamic Storage Allocation Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic storage allocation has a significant impact on computer performance. A dynamic storage allocator manages space for objects whose lifetimes are not known by the system at the time of their creation. A good dynamic storage allocator should utilize storage efficiently and satisfy requests in as few instructions as possible. A dynamic storage allocator on a multiprocessor should have the ability to satisfy multiple requests concurrently. This paper examines parallel dynamic storage allocation algorithms and how performancescales with increasing numbers of processors. The highest throughputs and lowest instruction counts are achieved with multiple free list fit I. The best memory utilization is achieved using a best fit system.

Arun Iyengar

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Photovoltaics for municipal planners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This booklet is intended for city and county government personnel, as well as community organizations, who deal with supplying, regulating, or recommending electric power resources. Specifically, this document deals with photovoltaic (PV) power, or power from solar cells, which is currently the most cost-effective energy source for electricity requirements that are relatively small, located in isolated areas, or difficult to serve with conventional technology. Recently, PV has been documented to be more cost-effective than conventional alternatives (such as line extensions or engine generators) in dozens of applications within the service territories of electric, gas, and communications utilities. Here, we document numerous cost-effective urban applications, chosen by planners and utilities because they were the most cost-effective option or because they were appropriate for environmental or logistical reasons. These applications occur within various municipal departments, including utility, parks and recreation, traffic engineering, transportation, and planning, and they include lighting applications, communications equipment, corrosion protection, irrigation control equipment, remote monitoring, and even portable power supplies for emergency situations.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

207

SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The Chelan County Public Works Department would like to thank the following organizations and individuals for their assistance in the development of this plan: ? Chelan County’s Solid Waste Council members, past and present, and the municipalities they represent. ? Chelan County’s Solid Waste Advisory Committee members, past and present, and the agencies and businesses they represented. ? the Chelan–Douglas Health District staff. ? Washington Department of Ecology staff. Chelan County residents and businesses also contributed to this document through comments provided during public meetings and through various other channels. The Board of County Commissioners and the Public Works Department gratefully acknowledge this input by the

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

Calabro, Paolo S. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, via Graziella - loc. Feo di Vito, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.calabro@unirc.it

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Querying Allocations Using cbank | Argonne Leadership Computing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

apply to the resource (machine) to which a user is currently logged in. For example, a query on Surveyor about PROJECTNAME will return information about the Surveyor allocation...

210

Illinois Municipal Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Agency - Electric Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Municipal Utility Nonprofit Schools Savings Category Home...

211

Budget allocation and the analytic hierarchy process  

SciTech Connect

This report demonstrates that the priorities calculated by the Analytic Hierarchy Process can be used as measures of benefit for budget allocation. A procedure is described that optimally allocates a budget among competing DOE waste minimization projects. The projects are compared using an analytic hierarchy already developed by Sandia National Laboratories. 2 refs., 3 tabs.

Hulme, B.L. (Hulme Mathematics (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The NERSC Allocation Request Form (ERCAP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIM (NERSC Information Management portal) NIM (NERSC Information Management portal) Awarded projects Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Data Management Policies Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov accounts@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 2 or 510-486-8612 Consulting http://help.nersc.gov consult@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or 510-486-8611 How to Submit a 2014 ERCAP Request Home » For Users » Accounts & Allocations » Allocations » Allocation Request Form (ERCAP) Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 16 | Next » The NERSC Allocation Request Form (ERCAP) Requests to use NERSC resources are submitted annually via a web form known as the ERCAP (Energy Research Computing Allocations Process) Request Form.

213

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs Unable to allocate hugepages in running jobs January 14, 2013 by Helen He (0 Comments) Symptom User job sometimes get an error message similar to the following, usually at the start of a batch job, causing the job to abort: MPICH2 ERROR [Rank 7436] [job id 14638087] [Sat Jan 12 04:56:54 2013] [c11-2c1s3n1] [nid04487] - MPIU_nem_gni_get_hugepages(): Unable to mmap 4194304 bytes for file /var/lib/hugetlbfs/global/pagesize-2097152/hugepagefile.MPICH.0.5841.kvs_14638087, err Cannot allocate memory This is caused by available huge page memory being not sufficient on one or more of the allocated compute nodes. The above error happens more often with jobs using the "-ss" option for the aprun command. It is confirmed

214

Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Commercial, Industrial and Municipal Buildings Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

215

Energy implications of integrated solid waste management systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study develops estimates of energy use and recovery from managing municipal solid waste (MSW) under various collection, processing, and disposal scenarios. We estimate use and recovery -- or energy balance -- resulting from MSW management activities such as waste collection, transport, processing, and disposal, as well as indirect use and recovery linked to secondary materials manufacturing using recycled materials. In our analysis, secondary materials manufacturing displaces virgin materials manufacturing for 13 representative products. Energy implications are expressed as coefficients that measure the net energy saving (or use) of displacing products made from virgin versus recycled materials. Using data developed for the 1992 New York City Master Plan as a starting point, we apply our method to an analysis of various collection systems and 30 types of facilities to illustrate bow energy balances shift as management systems are modified. In sum, all four scenarios show a positive energy balance indicating the energy and advantage of integrated systems versus reliance on one or few technology options. That is, energy produced or saved exceeds the energy used to operate the solid waste system. The largest energy use impacts are attributable to processing, including materials separation and composting. Collection and transportation energy are relatively minor contributors. The largest two contributors to net energy savings are waste combustion and energy saved by processing recycled versus virgin materials. An accompanying spatial analysis methodology allocates energy use and recovery to New York City, New York State outside the city, the U.S., and outside the U.S. Our analytical approach is embodied in a spreadsheet model that can be used by energy and solid waste analysts to estimate impacts of management scenarios at the state and substate level.

Little, R.E.; McClain, G.; Becker, M.; Ligon, P.; Shapiro, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate $100 limit per customer account for appliances purchased in the same calendar year. Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2014 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $100 Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washing Machines: $100 Dishwashers: $75 Dehumidifiers: $50 Window Air Conditioners: $50 Provider Mansfield Municipal Electric Department Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency

217

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Bring the Right People Together, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects[1]

218

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program Massachusetts Municipal Commercial Industrial Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies depending on utility Program Info Start Date Varies Expiration Date Varies State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on utility Provider Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company Certain municipal utilities in Massachusetts, in cooperation with

219

American Municipal Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Power Municipal Power Jump to: navigation, search Name American Municipal Power Place Columbus, Ohio Zip 43219 Product AMP is a non-profit corporation that owns and operates electric facilities. AMP purchases wholesale electric power and energy, and develops alternate power resources for its members. References American Municipal Power[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. American Municipal Power is a company located in Columbus, Ohio . References ↑ "American Municipal Power" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=American_Municipal_Power&oldid=342122" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs

220

Microsoft PowerPoint - Cost-Allocation Customer Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 19-20, 2011 Agenda Agenda OCPOCI U d t OCPOCI Update Interim Cost Allocation Methodology P d C All i Proposed Cost Allocation Analysis of Proposed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation...

222

Internal Markets for Supply Chain Capacity Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the possibility of solving supply chain capacity allocation problems using internal markets among employees of the same company. Unlike earlier forms of transfer pricing, IT now makes it easier for such ...

McAdams, David

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

223

The dynamics of naval resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naval policy planning requires viewing the entire spectrum of annual resource allocation, over a long period. Emerging research into the trade offs between force asset levels and fund flows to support those assets is described. The method underlying ...

Rolf Clark

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Multiattribute Decision Making by Sequential Resource Allocation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, California (Received November 1978;accepted July 1979) A new approach is proposed for addressing decision by inspection. Our experience indicates that these resource allocation tasks are considerably simpler and more

Oren, Shmuel S.

225

Solid-State Lighting: 2011 Municipal Consortium Southwest Region...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Market Assessment of Networked Outdoor Lighting Controls Mark Rehley, NEEA; Jordan Shackelford, Energy Solutions MSSLC Specification for Remote Monitoring and...

226

Municipal solid waste plants convert garbage to electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

227

PYROLYSIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE M. IGARASHI Y. HAYAFUNE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modern biomass can produce a bio-char by-product through pyrolysis which results in 30.6 kg C, pyrolysis and gasification of biomass. In the context of bio-char sequestration, only pyrolysis yields in bio-char was the type of biomass used for pyrolysis. Greater concentrations of lignin increased

Columbia University

228

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The aim of the project was to demonstrate the environmental and combustion performance advantages of a carbonized refuse derived fuel (RDF) slurry, produced from EnerTech`s slurry carbonization process, using continuous pilot scale equipment and its suitability as an alternative fuel for utility and industrial boilers.

Klosky, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Engineering and Economic Evaluation of Municipal Solid Waste Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2006, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a project to conduct engineering and economic evaluations of renewable energy technologies, including wind, biomass, solar, geothermal, hydro, and ocean tidal and wave (Program 84). The goal of the evaluations is to develop an objective and consistent assessment of the current performance and project the future performance of the technologies with regard to thermal efficiency, capital and operation and maintenance costs, resource requirement...

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

230

PYROLISIS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE M. IGARASHI Y. HAYAFUNE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-energy Pyrolysis is one of many technologies to produce energy from biomass (Bridgwater 2003). What distinguishes pyrolysis from alternative ways of converting biomass to energy is that pyrolysis produces a carbon-temperature pyrolysis"), using a variety of different reactor configurations. At these tem- peratures, biomass undergoes

Columbia University

231

Municipal solid waste management in Lahore City District, Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with generation, composition, collection, transportation, and disposal, as well as the present cost of the waste management on the basis of 60% collection of the total waste and the cost of proposed improved system of management on the basis of 100% waste collection using the IWM-2 LCI model. A GIS map of Data Ganj Bakhsh Town (DGBT) of Lahore City District showing communal storage facilities is also provided. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 living in 232,024 dwellings. The total waste generated per year is 500,000 tons, or 0.84/kg/cap/day. Presently 60% of the MSW is collected and disposed in open dumps, while 40% is not collected and lies along roadsides, streets railway lines, depressions, vacant plots, drains, storm drains and open sewers. In DGBT, 129 containers of 5-m{sup 3} capacity, 120 containers of 10-m{sup 3} capacity and 380 skips of 2.5-m{sup 3} capacity are placed for waste collection. The overall collection and disposal cost of the MSW of DGBT is $3,177,900/yr, which is $10.29/ton. Modeling was conducted using the IWM-2 model for improved collection and disposal on the basis of 100% service, compared to the current 60% service. The modelled cost is $8.3/per ton, which is 20% less than the present cost, but the overall cost of 100% collection and disposal increases to $4,155,737/yr.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Muhammad Nawaz Ch [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Allocation, incentives and distortions: the impact of EU ETS emissions allowance allocations to the electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE allocation is used. The allocation results in accelerated construction and operation of combined cycle gas turbines and thus lower CO2 emissions. For our given set of input parameters, the results for uniform-benchmark or fuel-specific benchmark... allocation on activities in Phase I is explicitly prohibited by the EU Directive, some MSs update allocations using fuel-specific benchmarks (FSB) where the benchmark is set higher for coal-fired plants than for gas-fired plants. Here, we assess the impact...

Neuhoff, Karsten; Keats, Kim; Sato, Misato

233

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Municipal Alternative Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Municipal Alternative Fuel Tax Regulation

234

Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating &...

235

Mansfield Municipal Electric Department - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50 Mansfield Municipal Electric Department encourages energy efficiency through the ENERGY STAR Appliance Rebate Incentive Program. Cash rebates are offered for ENERGY STAR...

236

Energy management in municipal street lighting  

SciTech Connect

This report presents strategies to reduce the energy used in street lighting and, at the same time, reduce or stabilize the cost of street lighting to municipalities.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential Renewable Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Summary Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers rebates of 1.00watt for solar photovoltaic and small wind installations for residential customers. A 0.25watt...

238

North Branch Municipal Water & Light - Commercial & Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (http:...

239

Mora Municipal Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (http:...

240

Saint Peter Municipal Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

150 - 400 Dishwashers: 300 - 1,000 Ventilation Hood Controllers: 165HP Low-Flow Spray Valve: 50% of installed cost Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Financing Strategies for Municipal Energy Efficiency.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy efficiency represents a significant opportunity to reduce energy use, save money and reduce environmental impacts. For municipalities that are facing increasingly tight budgets and… (more)

Lubershane, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities J. Daw and K. Hallett National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. DeWolfe and I. Venner Malcolm Pirnie, the Water Division of ARCADIS...

243

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refrigerator: 100 Clothes Washing Machine: 75 Central AC: 100 Room AC Unit: 50 Dishwasher: 75 Dehumidifier: 50 Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) offers a number of...

244

Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Design Competitions on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions Design Competitions National design competitions heighten awareness and market adoption of high-performance solid-state lighting products.

245

Cogeneration in municipalities. Workshop proceedings for local governments and municipal utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five papers from workshops for local governments and municipal utilities are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each one.

Patterson, S. (ed.)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Municipals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hillsboro Hope Lakota Maddock Northwood Park River Riverdale Sharon Stanton Valley City South Dakota Aberdeen Arlington Aurora Badger Beresford Big Stone City Brookings Bryant...

247

DOE Office of Science Programs and NERSC Allocation Managers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE DOE Allocation Managers Department of Energy Science Offices, Programs and Allocation Managers NERSC is overseen by the DOE NERSC Program Manager, Dave Goodwin (Dave.Goodwin@science.doe.gov; 301-903-6474). He is assisted by the DOE Allocation Managers in each of the six offices. They are listed in the table below. The DOE Allocation Managers are responsible for managing the NERSC allocations. To find your Allocation Manager, check under the Office and Program which sponsors your work, locate your DOE Program Manager, and find the corresponding Allocation Manager. You should contact your Allocation Manager with questions concerning your allocation at NERSC. NERSC manages Startup, Education, NISE and Data Pilot allocations. Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

248

Feasibility study on the management of the disposal of Bangkok municipal waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1985, the Government of Thailand sought assistance from the United States Trade and Development Program (USTDP) to undertake a feasibility study to review and update the solid waste management master plan, with particular emphasis to be placed on waste disposal methods. In April, 1985, the USTDP engaged the firm of Engineering and Economic Research, Inc. to carry out a definitional/prefeasibility study to assess the potential of a project for solid waste management and energy production using municipal solid waste as fuel.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Agency/Company /Organization: Brookhaven National Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iea-etsap.org/web/Markal.asp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool References: MARKAL website[1] Related Tools Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) General Equilibrium Model for Economy - Energy - Environment (GEM-E3) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS An integrated energy systems modeling platform that can be used to analyze

250

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) (Redirected from MARKAL) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) Agency/Company /Organization: Brookhaven National Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.iea-etsap.org/web/Markal.asp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool References: MARKAL website[1] Related Tools Ventana's Energy, Environment, Economy-Society (E3S) Model Ex Ante Appraisal Carbon-Balance Tool (EX-ACT) General Equilibrium Model for Economy - Energy - Environment (GEM-E3) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS

251

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Resource Allocation Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman, Yolanda Lin, Trieu Mai, Andrew Martinez, David Mulcahy, Walter Short, Travis Simpkins, and Caroline Uriarte National Renewable Energy Laboratory Corey Peck Lexidyne, LLC Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-54217 May 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses Emily Newes, Brian Bush, Daniel Inman,

252

Biomass Resource Allocation among Competing End Uses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) is a system dynamics model developed by the U.S. Department of Energy as a tool to better understand the interaction of complex policies and their potential effects on the biofuels industry in the United States. However, it does not currently have the capability to account for allocation of biomass resources among the various end uses, which limits its utilization in analysis of policies that target biomass uses outside the biofuels industry. This report provides a more holistic understanding of the dynamics surrounding the allocation of biomass among uses that include traditional use, wood pellet exports, bio-based products and bioproducts, biopower, and biofuels by (1) highlighting the methods used in existing models' treatments of competition for biomass resources; (2) identifying coverage and gaps in industry data regarding the competing end uses; and (3) exploring options for developing models of biomass allocation that could be integrated with the BSM to actively exchange and incorporate relevant information.

Newes, E.; Bush, B.; Inman, D.; Lin, Y.; Mai, T.; Martinez, A.; Mulcahy, D.; Short, W.; Simpkins, T.; Uriarte, C.; Peck, C.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

254

Factors determining municipal broadband strategies across Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recognizing that high-speed broadband connectivity emerges as a key element for growth, city authorities engage in fiber access deployments to empower their local communities in the digital economy. Currently, a growing number of municipal fiber projects ... Keywords: Broadband, Europe, Infrastructure development, Municipal strategies

Costas Troulos; Vasilis Maglaris

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hull Municipal Light Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Light Plant Municipal Light Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Hull Municipal Light Plant Place Massachusetts Utility Id 8797 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Area Lights Rate 150 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 250 WATT Lighting Area Lights Rate 400 WATT Lighting Large Power Rate 35 Industrial Large Power Taxable Rate 39 Industrial Municipal Lighting Rate 33 Lighting Municipal Rate 36 Commercial Residential Rate 31 Residential

256

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Replacement: Up to $100 Second Refrigerator Pickup: $35 CFLs: 3 free replacement bulbs Motors: $0.18/per kWh saved Lighting: $0.20/per kWh saved HVAC: $0.22/per kWh saved Refrigeration: $0.22/per kWh saved Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has multiple program in place to help

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Incremental Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the

258

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Eligibility...

259

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Municipal Alternative Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Municipal Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on AddThis.com...

260

Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects Webinar Exploring How Municipal Utilities Fund Solar Energy Projects Webinar February 19, 2013 1:00PM MST Webinar This...

262

Wakefield Municipal Gas & Light Department- Residential Conservation Services Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wakefield Municipal Gas & Light Department (WMGLD), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company (MMWEC), offers the "Incentive Rebate Program" to encourage...

263

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential Energy Star Appliance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program Eligibility...

264

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Painesville Municipal Electric Power Vanadium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Painesville Municipal Electric Power Vanadium Redox Battery Demonstration Project Jodi Startari Ashlawn Energy LLC Briefing Overview * Painesville Municipal Electric Power Plant...

265

Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: LED Lighting Facts on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions LED Lighting Facts LED lighting facts - A Program of the U.S. DOE DOE's LED Lighting Facts® program showcases LED products for general

266

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct, alter or operate a solid waste processing facility or a solid waste disposal area of a solid waste management system, except for clean rubble disposal sites, without first obtaining a permit from the secretary. Every person desiring to obtain a permit shall make application for such a permit on forms

267

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) Louisiana Solid Waste Management and Resource Recovery Law (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality manages solid waste for the state of Louisiana under the authority of the Solid Waste Management and Resource Recover Law. The Department makes rules and regulations that establish standards governing the storage, collection, processing, recovery and reuse, and disposal of solid waste; implement a management program that

268

Module Allocation for Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synthesis of dynamically reconfigurable systems poses some new challenges for high-level synthesis tools. In this paper, we deal with the task of module allocation as this step has a direct influence on the performance of the dynamically reconfigudreasbiglne. ...

Xue-Jie Zhang; Kam-Wing Ng

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Distributed Power Allocation in Prosumer Thiagarajan Ramachandran,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

balancing agent: the prosumer, which was introduced in Grijalva and Tariq [2011]. As the electricityDistributed Power Allocation in Prosumer Networks Thiagarajan Ramachandran, Zak Costello, Peter for its solution. We show that the information required by the individual prosumers to solve the problem

Egerstedt, Magnus

270

Book Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Sex Allocation. Stuart West. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2009. xii þ 466 offspring. This vast literature is now elegantly sum- marized and synthesized in Stuart West's book entitled, as evident in this book, has a commanding grasp of the large body of theoretical and empirical work

West, Stuart

271

Approximating the buffer allocation problem using epochs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The correctness of applications that perform asynchronous message passing typically relies on the underlying hardware having a sufficient amount of memory (message buffers) to hold all undelivered messages-such applications may deadlock when executed ... Keywords: Buffer allocation, Complexity, Message passing systems, Parallel and distributed programming

Jan Bíkgaard Pedersen; Alex Brodsky; Jeffrey Sampson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy emergency conservation and allocation plan  

SciTech Connect

In 1974 the Minnesota State Legislature directed that an Energy Emergency Conservation and Allocation Plan be prepared for use in the event of an energy supply emergency. The plan is intended to establish priorities of energy usage and to provide conservation actions for reducing energy usage. This report discusses details of the plan.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

On the optimal allocation of adversarial resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security is important for mission-critical wireless sensor networks (WSNs). This is especially so because powerful adversaries could compromise and control a significant fraction of the network nodes. A plethora of schemes has been developed to secure ... Keywords: adversary modeling, resource allocation, security analysis

Stylianos Gisdakis; Panos Papadimitratos

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solids irradiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel facility for irradiation of solids embodying pathogens wherein solids are conveyed through an irradiation chamber in individual containers of an endless conveyor.

Morris, Marvin E. (Albuquerque, NM); Pierce, Jim D. (Albuquerque, NM); Whitfield, Willis J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Facility Osage Municipal Utilities Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Osage Municipal Utilities Developer Osage Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Osage Municipal Utilities Location West of Osage IA Coordinates 43.298363°, -92.84096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.298363,"lon":-92.84096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate $400,000 Program Info Start Date 3/17/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount $5,000 to $400,000 Provider New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority In March 2010, the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) launched a revolving loan program to encourage the state's

277

Dynamic Memory Optimization using Pool Allocation and Prefetching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heap memory allocation plays an important role in modern applications. Conventional heap allocators, however, generally ignore the underlying memory hierarchy of the system, favoring instead a low runtime overhead and fast ...

Zhao, Qin

278

UEN IP Address Allocation Policy Version: 1.0  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Provider (ISP) for its customers. According to the ARIN Number Resource Policy Manual (ANRPM) as an ISP UEN............................................................................................... 3 3. Allocation to Customers......................................................................................... 6 5.2. Additional Customer IPv6 Allocations

Capecchi, Mario R.

279

Members of the Carnarvon Water Allocation Advisory Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Groundwater Management Strategy has been prepared by the Water Allocation Branch and the Midwest/Gascoyne Region of the Water and Rivers Commission, with the assistance of the Carnarvon Water Allocation Advisory Committee. The Strategy development team consisted of:

Carnarvon Wa; Lower Gascoyne River; Ron Shepherd; Alan Bradley; Wayne Astill; Kevin Firth; Claire Thorstensen; Darryl Abbott; Rebecca Blyton; Phillip Kalaitzis; Bruce Teede; Bruce Munro; Marcus Holla; Paul Nevill; Bill Doble; Dale Rogers; Ron Copeland; Dave Bauer; Steve Greeve

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Essays on the real and financial allocation of capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three papers studying how firms allocate real and financial capital, and how taxes, the labor market and asymmetric information affect these allocation decisions. The first paper studies the ...

Ramírez Verdugo, Arturo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A generalized multistage optimization modeling framework for life cycle assessment-based integrated solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management (SWM) is an integral component of civil infrastructure and the global economy, and is a growing concern due to increases in population, urbanization, and economic development. In 2011, 1.3 billion metric tons of municipal solid ... Keywords: Decision support, Life cycle assessment, Multi-stage, Optimization, Solid waste

James W. Levis, Morton A. Barlaz, Joseph F. Decarolis, S. Ranji Ranjithan

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fuzzy parametric programming model for multi-objective integrated solid waste management under uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid waste management is increasingly becoming a challenging task for the municipal authorities due to increasing waste quantities, changing waste composition, decreasing land availability for waste disposal sites and increasing awareness about the ... Keywords: Fuzzy parametric programming, Integrated solid waste management system, Long term planning, Multi-objective and multi-period planning, Solid waste management

Amitabh Kumar Srivastava; Arvind K. Nema

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

DOE O 544.1, Priorities and Allocations Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes responsibilities for administration of the DOE and NNSA priorities and allocations program for industrial products, materials, and ...

2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) Management of Solid Waste (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality The Solid Waste Management Division of the Department of Environmental Quality regulates solid waste disposal or any person who generates, collects, transports, processes, and/or disposes of solid waste and/or waste tires. The following solid waste disposal facilities require a solid waste permit prior to construction and/or operation: land disposal facilities; solid waste processing facilities, including: transfer stations; solid waste incinerators receiving waste from off-site sources; regulated medical waste

285

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs in Wildfire Suppression Nada Petrovic1: Petrovic N, Alderson DL, Carlson JM (2012) Dynamic Resource Allocation in Disaster Response: Tradeoffs with the allocation of limited resources to mitigate the impact of natural disasters inspire fundamentally new

Carlson, Jean

286

Woodstock Municipal Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Wind Municipal Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodstock Municipal Wind Facility Woodstock Municipal Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Juhl Wind Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Woodstock MN Coordinates 44.009957°, -96.100552° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.009957,"lon":-96.100552,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

New London Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New London Municipal Utilities New London Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 13468 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png City All-Electric Residential Residential City Residential Residential General Service and Municipal Commercial Large General Service and Municipal (Demand) Commercial Rural Resident and Farm Residential Rural Resident and Farm All-Electric Residential Security Lights 100w HPS Metered light Lighting

288

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Business Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Will match Focus on Energy incentive to 5,000 Commercial Central AC Tune-Up: 50 LED Exit Signs: Free Installation River Falls Municipal Utility (RFMU) offers a variety of...

289

Waverly Municipal Elec Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Elec Utility Municipal Elec Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Waverly Municipal Elec Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 20214 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial Commercial and Municipal time of Use Service Commercial Electric Heat Rate for Residential Service Residential General Service General and Minicipal Demand Time of Use Service Commercial

290

Sacramento Municipal Utility District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utility District Municipal Utility District (Redirected from Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD)) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sacramento Municipal Util Dist Place Sacramento, California Website www.smud.org Utility Id 16534 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration

291

Gowrie Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gowrie Municipal Utilities Gowrie Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Gowrie Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 7424 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0976/kWh Commercial: $0.0900/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gowrie_Municipal_Utilities&oldid=41075

292

Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Jump to: navigation, search Name Lawrenceburg Municipal Utils Place Indiana Utility Id 10798 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates Residential: $0.0749/kWh Commercial: $0.1150/kWh Industrial: $0.0597/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Lawrenceburg_Municipal_Utils&oldid=410978

293

Minnesota Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Minnesota Municipal Power Agny) (Redirected from Minnesota Municipal Power Agny) Jump to: navigation, search Name Minnesota Municipal Power Agency Place Minnesota Utility Id 12667 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Minnesota_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=412260

294

Texas Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Power Agency Municipal Power Agency Jump to: navigation, search Name Texas Municipal Power Agency Place Texas Utility Id 18715 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Texas_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=411659" Categories:

295

Hudson Municipal Electric Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Electric Utility Municipal Electric Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Municipal Electric Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 8966 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Residential All-Electric Residential School Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0993/kWh Commercial: $0.0905/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hudson_Municipal_Electric_Utility&oldid=410846

296

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Municipal Power Start Date 01/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Ohio Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Ceiling Fan with Lights: $15 Dehumidifier: $25 Select Clothes Washer: $50 ENERGY STAR Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Furnace Fan with ECM: $100 Heat Pump Water Heaters: $250 CFLs: up to 85% of cost Efficiency Smart (tm) provides energy efficiency incentives to the American

297

Alameda Municipal Power- Residential Energy Efficiency Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has multiple program in place to help encourage its customers to adopt energy efficient equipment and practices in their homes.  The first of these initiatives is a...

298

On Allocation Policies for Power and Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the increasing popularity of Internet-based services and applications, power efficiency is becoming a major concern for data center operators, as high electricity consumption not only increases greenhouse gas emissions, but also increases the cost of running the server farm itself. In this paper we address the problem of maximizing the revenue of a service provider by means of dynamic allocation policies that run the minimum amount of servers necessary to meet user's requirements in terms of performance. The results of several experiments executed using Wikipedia traces are described, showing that the proposed schemes work well, even if the workload is non-stationary. Since any resource allocation policy requires the use of forecasting mechanisms, various schemes allowing compensating errors in the load forecasts are presented and evaluated.

Dyachuk, Dmytro; 10.1109/GRID.2010.5697986

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Municipal bond financing of solar energy facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the laws of municipal bond financing to solar facilities is examined. The type of facilities under consideration are outlined. The general legal principles of municipal securities financing are discussed. The effect of recent decisions applying antitrust liability to municipal corporations is also discussed. Five specific types of municipal bonds are explained. The application of Section 103 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, to the issuance of municipal bonds for solar facility financing is examined also. Five bond laws of five representative states are examined and whether the eight types of solar facilities under consideration could be financed under such law is discussed. The application of the general legal principle is illustrated. Three hypothetical situations are set forth and common legal issues to be confronted by city officials in proposing such financing are discussed. These issues will be raised in most financings, but the purpose is to examine the common context in which they are raised. It is concluded that if it can be shown that the purpose of the solar facilities to be financed is to benefit the public, all legal obstacles to the use of municipal financing of solar facilities can be substantially overcome.

White, S.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Illinois Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; ... from fossil fuels, non-biogenic ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - All Fuels  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1Municipal Solid Waste net generation is allocated according to the biogenic and non-biogenic components of the fuel; ... from fossil fuels, non-biogenic ...

302

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) Chapter 47 Solid Waste Facilities (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Division of Waste Management This chapter establishes the permitting standards for solid waste sites or facilities, the standards applicable to all solid waste sites or

303

Solving Energy-Latency Dilemma: Task Allocation for Parallel Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parallel applications with energy and low-latency constraints are emerging in various networked embedded systems like digital signal processing, vehicle tracking, and infrastructure monitoring. However, conventional energy-driven task allocation schemes for a cluster of embedded nodes only concentrate on energy-saving when making allocation decisions. Consequently, the length of the schedules could be very long, which is unfavorable or in some situations even not tolerated. In this paper, we address the issue of allocating a group of parallel tasks on a heterogeneous embedded system with an objective of energy-saving and short-latency. A novel task allocation strategy, or BEATA (Balanced Energy-Aware Task Allocation), is developed to find an optimal allocation that minimizes overall energy consumption while confining the length of schedule to an ideal range. Experimental results show that BEATA significantly improves the performance of embedded systems in terms of energy-saving and schedule length over an existing allocation scheme. 1.

Tao Xie; Xiao Qin; Mais Nijim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Municipal performance: does mayoral quality matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research addresses the question of what explains municipal performance in terms of delivering social services and fiscal performance. While the existing literature explains governmental performance with political, institutional and socio-demographic factors, I suggest that the greatest influence on municipal performance comes from having qualified managers. Specifically, I argue that that mayoral qualifications influence municipal performance. By qualifications I mean mayors’ human capital, that is, their educational and job-related experience. The rationale for my proposition rests on the fact that in developing municipalities the mayor is not just the elected leader but also the public manager, as s/he performs not just political but also administrative functions. Under certain circumstances, however, mayoral qualifications may not have the same influential power on municipal performance. Therefore, I also argue that in unfavorable municipal contexts, the potential influence of mayoral qualifications on performance decreases. I use both statistical and survey-experimental methodologies to test the hypotheses derived from the proposed “mayoral quality theory.” I collected six years of data for the statistical analyses by doing field research across the 40 municipalities that comprise the Colombian Department of Norte of Santander. For the surveyexperimental analysis, I gathered data from interviews and surveys with 120 mayors from 12 Latin American countries, who participated in the II Latin American Congress of Cities and Local Governments held in Cali, Colombia, on July 26-29, 2006. The statistical findings reveal that mayoral qualifications—education and jobrelated experience—positively influence municipal performance with respect to education enrollment, tax property collection, and social program investment. However, the positive impact that mayoral qualifications have on such performance indicators decreases under external constraints, such as the presence of illegal armed groups. From the survey-experimental study, findings show that issue salience (or nature of municipal need) moderates the impact that mayoral qualifications have on mayors’ decision-making. In education issues, for example, qualified mayors are more likely to perform better, while in infrastructure issues they are less likely to do so.

Avellaneda, Claudia Nancy

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $100,000 Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Matching Funds up to $100,000 Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers the Demand and Energy Efficiency Program (DEEP) to eligible commercial, industrial, and municipal

307

Trenton Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trenton Municipal Utilities Trenton Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Trenton Municipal Utilities Place Missouri Utility Id 19150 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Church Rate Commercial Commercial All Electric Rate Commercial Commercial General Electric Rate Commercial Commercial Power Rate Commercial Grundy Electric Rate for City Line Usage Commercial

308

Philippi Municipal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippi Municipal Electric Philippi Municipal Electric Place West Virginia Utility Id 14954 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Economic Development Rate Industrial General Service Commercial Large Power Commercial Outdoor Lighting- 175W High Pressure Sodium Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0904/kWh Commercial: $0.0800/kWh Industrial: $0.0976/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Philippi_Municipal_Electric&oldid=411361

309

Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rancho Cucamonga Municipal Utility Place California Utility Id 56224 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Irrigation Systems Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Medium Commercial Commercial Medium Commercial (Time-Of-Use) Commercial Net Energy Metering Commercial Outdoor Area Lighting Lighting Small Comercial Commercial Small Commercial Three Phase Commercial

310

Wyoming Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming Municipal Power Agency Wyoming Municipal Power Agency Place Wyoming Utility Id 40603 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wyoming_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=412214

311

Mohawk Municipal Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Comm Municipal Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mohawk Municipal Comm Place New York Utility Id 12759 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Industrial Rate Industrial Large Commercial Commercial Public Street Lighting Lighting Security Lighting 150 w lamp Lighting Security Lighting 175 w lamp Lighting Security Lighting 250 w lamp Lighting Security Lighting 400 w lamp Lighting Single-Phase Residential Residential Small Commercial Business Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0366/kWh

312

Lassen Municipal Utility District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utility District Municipal Utility District Jump to: navigation, search Name Lassen Municipal Utility District Place California Utility Id 10724 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Agricultural Pumping Commercial Domestic Residential General Service (Non-Demand) Commercial General Service Metered Demand Commercial Industrial Industrial Outdoor Area Lighting 100W Lighting Outdoor Area Lighting 200W Lighting Standby Reactive Rate Commercial Average Rates

313

Willmar Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utilities Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Willmar Municipal Utilities Place Minnesota Website wmu.willmar.mn.us/main/ Utility Id 20737 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General service rate Commercial Heat pump rate Commercial Industrial(≥500KW;Primary Service) Industrial Industrial;≥500KW(Secondary Service) Industrial

314

Price Municipal Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Corporation Municipal Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Price Municipal Corporation Place Utah Utility Id 14198 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electrical substation delivery discount Commercial General Service- Large Industrial General service-small Industrial Residential Residential Security area lighting-250 watts and up Lighting Security area lighting-Less than 250 watts Lighting Special service-Non profit charitable organization Commercial

315

Rochelle Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utilities Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Rochelle Municipal Utilities Place Illinois Utility Id 16179 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large General Service Commercial Large General Service Time of Day Commercial

316

Edinburg Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edinburg Municipal Utilities Edinburg Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Edinburg Municipal Utilities Place Indiana Utility Id 5655 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Residential and Farm Residential Electric Commercial Commercial Electric General Power Industrial Industrial Power(Transformer capacity Greater than 999kVA) Industrial Residential Residential Rural Commercial Commercial Rural Residential and Farm Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0912/kWh

317

Indiana Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Power Agency Municipal Power Agency Place Indiana Utility Id 9234 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes RTO PJM Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Indiana_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=41086

318

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Program Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Single family, duplex, or triplex: $960 per unit Multi-family dwelling (four or more units): $480 per unit. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 80% of the cost Do-It-Yourself Weatherization: 70% of the cost Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) offers a grant to help its residential customers who have electric heat weatherize homes to increase efficiency.

319

Canton Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canton Municipal Utilities Canton Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Canton Municipal Utilities Place Mississippi Utility Id 2974 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png E01 RESIDENTIAL ALL ELECTRIC Residential E04 COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC Commercial E08 LARGE INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC Industrial E09 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC Residential E12 SMALL INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC Industrial E13 ELECTRIC WATER HEATER Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0978/kWh

320

Delano Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Utilities Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Delano Municipal Utilities Place Minnesota Utility Id 5015 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commerical Rate Commercial Industrial Rate Industrial Residential Rate Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1060/kWh Commercial: $0.0995/kWh Industrial: $0.0854/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Illinois Municipal Elec Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Illinois Municipal Elec Agency Illinois Municipal Elec Agency Place Illinois Utility Id 9286 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location RFC & SERC NERC RFC Yes NERC SERC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Illinois_Municipal_Elec_Agency&oldid=410862

322

Bancroft Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bancroft Municipal Utilities Bancroft Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Bancroft Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 1172 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Rates Commercial Schedule 1 Residential Schedule 2 Commercial Schedule 3 Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1020/kWh Commercial: $0.0990/kWh Industrial: $0.0932/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

323

Tipton Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tipton Municipal Electric Util Tipton Municipal Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Tipton Municipal Electric Util Place Indiana Utility Id 18942 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Rate A- Residential Electric Service Residential Rate B- Commercial Electric Service Commercial Rate C- General and Industrial Power Service, Single Phase Industrial Rate C- General and Industrial Power Service, Three Phase Industrial Rate CG- Cogeneration Commercial Rate D- Primary Power and Lighting Service

324

Indianola Municipal Utilities - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indianola Municipal Utilities - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Indianola Municipal Utilities - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Indianola Municipal Utilities - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Central AC: $250 maximum; 10 unit maximum per customer per year Commercial Lighting: $5,000 per customer per year Air Source Heat Pumps: $500 maximum; 10 units per customer per year Geothermal Heat Pumps: $1,000 maximum, 5 units per customer per year Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $100/unit; $50 for each SEER above minimum Commercial Lighting: $2 - $25/fixture depending on type and efficiency

325

Thurmont Municipal Light Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thurmont Municipal Light Co Thurmont Municipal Light Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Thurmont Municipal Light Co Place Maryland Utility Id 18901 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png LARGE GENERAL SERVICE Primary Voltage Industrial LARGE GENERAL SERVICE Secondary Voltage Industrial MEDIUM GENERAL SERVICE Industrial OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(11,000) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(20,000) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(400w) Lighting OUTDOOR LIGHTING SERVICE(7,000) Lighting RESIDENTIAL SERVICE Residential

326

Cascade Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cascade Municipal Utilities Cascade Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Cascade Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 3137 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All Electric Rate Residential City/Interdept. Rate Commercial Commercial Rate 3-phase Commercial Commercial Rate Single-phase Commercial Demand Rate Industrial Residential Rates Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1040/kWh

327

Indianola Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indianola Municipal Utilities Indianola Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Indianola Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 9275 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Rates Commercial Electric Heat Source Commercial Government Commercial Large Industrial Industrial Outside City Limits Residential Residential Rates Residential Small Industrial Industrial

328

Chillicothe Municipal Utils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chillicothe Municipal Utils Chillicothe Municipal Utils Jump to: navigation, search Name Chillicothe Municipal Utils Place Missouri Utility Id 3486 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png COMMERCIAL (NON DEMAND)SERVICE SCHEDULE - CO Commercial LARGE COMMERCIAL SERVICE SCHEDULE - LP Commercial LARGE INDUSTRIAL SERVICE SCHEDULE - LI-01 Industrial RESIDENTIAL SERVICE SCHEDULE Residential SMALL INDUSTRIAL (NON DEMAND) SERVICE SCHEDULE - CO-06 Industrial Average Rates

329

Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marblehead Municipal Light Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Maximum Rebate Insulation: $1,600 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $100, plus $25 for disposal of old refrigerator Clothes Washers: $50 - $100 Dishwashers: $25 - $50 Room A/C Units: 50% of purchase price up to $50 Central A/C: $325 - $525, varies by efficiency and technology Heat Pumps: $325 - $675, varies by efficiency and technology Programmable Thermostat: up to 50% of the purchase price

330

Dublin Municipal Electric Util | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dublin Municipal Electric Util Dublin Municipal Electric Util Jump to: navigation, search Name Dublin Municipal Electric Util Place Indiana Utility Id 5392 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial General Power Rate OL: Outdoor Lighting (Security Lights) Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, All Public Street Lighting Lighting Rate SL: Street Lighting, State Highway Stoplight Lighting Residential Residential Residential: Space Heating and/or Air Conditioning Service Residential

331

Kenyon Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenyon Municipal Utilities Kenyon Municipal Utilities Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenyon Municipal Utilities Place Minnesota Utility Id 10179 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Rate Commercial Large Commercial/Demand Service Rate Commercial Residential Service Rate Residential Security Lights Lighting Street Lights Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.1200/kWh Commercial: $0.1100/kWh

332

Winner Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winner Municipal Utility Winner Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Winner Municipal Utility Place South Dakota Utility Id 20823 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Large Commercial Rate Commercial Mutiple Dwelling Rate Residential Residential Rate Residential Security Lighting Rate Lighting Small Commercial Rate Commercial Average Rates Residential: $0.0929/kWh Commercial: $0.0845/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from

333

Rock Rapids Municipal Utility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rapids Municipal Utility Rapids Municipal Utility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock Rapids Municipal Utility Place Iowa Utility Id 16206 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Power (Single-Phase) Commercial Commercial Power (Three-Phase) Commercial Residential Power Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0807/kWh Commercial: $0.0633/kWh Industrial: $0.0899/kWh

334

Albertville Municipal Utils Bd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Jump to: navigation, search Name Albertville Municipal Utils Bd Place Alabama Utility Id 241 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Rate - SGSC Commercial General Power Rate - SGSD Industrial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 1 Commercial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 2 Commercial General Power Rate(Schedule GSA)-Part 3 Commercial Manufacturing Service Rate - SMSB Industrial Manufacturing Service Rate - SMSC Industrial

335

Madisonville Municipal Utils | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Madisonville Municipal Utils Madisonville Municipal Utils Jump to: navigation, search Name Madisonville Municipal Utils Place Kentucky Utility Id 11488 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Electric Service-less than 50 KW Commercial Demand Commercial Electric Service-50 KW per month or more Commercial Residential Electric Service Residential Security Lights Overhead Flood Light HPS 400 W Lighting Security Lights Overhead Flood Light MH 400 W Lighting Security Lights Overhead HPS 150 W Lighting

336

Address Allocation ModelsAddress Allocation Models Clean Slate Research "Agenda"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

----------------------------------------- Clean Slate Research "Agenda" R G iR. Guerin University of Pennsylvania 1 Some Level Setting · What does "clean slate research" have to do with allocation of IP addresses? ­ Learn from past mistakes and try ­ As a matter of fact the IPv6 vs. IPv4 story holds many lessons that clean slate proposals can benefit from

Guerin, Roch

337

Integrated solid waste management of Minneapolis, Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the City of Minneapolis, Minnesota (Hennepin County) integrated municipal solid waste management (IMSWM) system, the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for municipal solid waste (MSW) management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWM system.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A new way to stabilize fly ash from municipal incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated organics, added to very low grain-size distributions, make fly ashes from municipal incinerators a very hazardous waste. For their disposal, the present general trend is, not only to stabilize chemically the ashes, i.e., to reduce the leachability of the toxic substances, but also to stabilize them mechanically, i.e., to convert them into massive, resistant, and unleachable solids. This paper describes various stabilization methods used on representative European fly ash samples, which led to the development of a new stabilization technique taking place in four stages: elimination of the alkali chlorides by dissolution; addition of a moderate quantity of phosphoric acid; calcination; and solidification with Portland clinker or cement. The principal advantages of the process are as follows: the polychlorodibenzodioxins-polychlorodibenzofurans are destroyed, the reactivity of the heavy metals is reduced drastically, the final solids have satisfactory mechanical properties, and the increase in weight of the waste to be disposed of does not exceed one fourth. Comparative results of TCLP extraction tests are presented.

Derie, R. [Free Univ. of Brussels (Belgium). Dept. of Ore Dressing

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Allocating Allowances to Renewable Energy: Overview and Alternatives  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Allocating Allowances to Renewable Allocating Allowances to Renewable Energy: Overview and Alternatives Joel Bluestein Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. January 12, 2006 Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. 2 Overview Structure and operation of emission trading programs Why allocate to renewables Allowance allocation options Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. 3 Command and Control Programs Specific emission limit set for each plant. - Emission rate or technology requirement Each plant must meet specific limit. Total emissions can increase as new plants are built. Implementation and enforcement can be complicated. Energy and Environmental Analysis, Inc. 4 Allowance Trading Programs Establish emissions tonnage cap for group of affected sources. Distribute emission allowances equal to

340

The Challenge of Allocation in LCA - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One common challenge in LCA stems from allocation of burden when multiple ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Packet-based power allocation for forward link data traffic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the corresponding utility rate. The results show that itthe time- averaged utility rate, subject to a constraint onillustrate the achievable utility rate and power allocation

Liu, Peijuan; Berry, Randall A.; Honig, Michael L.; Jordan, Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes in summary fashion some present transmission cost allocation methods, especially as this relates to the development of utility-scale renewable power sources.

Coles, L.; Porter, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

DOE INCITE Program Awards Large Allocations at NERSC to Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE INCITE Program Awards Large Allocations at NERSC to Study Supernovae, Fusion Energy, Climate Change, Combustion, Chemistry and Accelerator Design DOE INCITE Program Awards...

345

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Allocation Model - Comparing alternative uses of scarce biomass energy resource through estimations of future biomass use for liquid fuels and electricity. Title Biomass...

346

North Branch Municipal Water & Light- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency ([http://www.smmpa.com SMMPA]) is a joint-action agency which generates and sells reliable electricity at wholesale to its eighteen non-profit, municipally...

347

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) Solid Waste Management Act (Oklahoma) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality This Act establishes rules for the permitting, posting of security, construction, operation, closure, maintenance and remediation of solid waste disposal sites; disposal of solid waste in ways that are environmentally safe and sanitary, as well as economically feasible; submission of laboratory reports or analyses performed by certified laboratories for the purposes of compliance monitoring and testing and for

349

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Facilities Regulations (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Protection This chapter of the Massachusetts General Laws governs the operation of solid waste facilities. It seeks to encourage sustainable waste management

350

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection as well as the Department of Public

351

Doing business with business: Municipal utility energy audits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article is a review of the ways in which municipal utilities can use energy audits to identify the energy efficiency measures that are most effective for themselves and their customers. Two examples, Osage Municipal Utilities in Iowa and Sacramento Municipal Utility District in California, are used to illustrate the strategies that are most cost effective.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Allocation and Admission Policies for Service Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A service provisioning system is examined, where a number of servers are used to offer different types of services to paying customers. A customer is charged for the execution of a stream of jobs; the number of jobs in the stream and the rate of their submission is specified. On the other hand, the provider promises a certain quality of service (QoS), measured by the average waiting time of the jobs in the stream. A penalty is paid if the agreed QoS requirement is not met. The objective is to maximize the total average revenue per unit time. Dynamic policies for making server allocation and stream admission decisions are introduced and evaluated. The results of several simulations are described.

Mazzucco, Michele; Fisher, Mike; McKee, Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Distributed Rate Allocation for Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a distributed algorithm for rate allocation in wireless networks. As the main result, the paper establishes that this algorithm is throughput-optimal for very general class of throughput regions. In contrast to distributed on-off scheduling algorithms, this algorithm enables optimal utilization of physical layer schemes by scheduling multiple rate levels. The algorithm is based on a Markov process on these discrete set of rates with certain transition rates. For dealing with multiple rate levels, the paper introduces an important structure for the transition rates, which enable the design of appropriate update rule for these transition rates. The update uses local queue length information alone, and thus does not require global exchange of queue length information. In addition, the algorithm requires that each link can determine the feasibility of increasing its data-rate from the current value without reducing the data-rates of other links. Determining rate feasibility does not introduce...

Jose, Jubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Optimal Power Allocation for Renewable Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Battery powered transmitters face energy constraint, replenishing their energy by a renewable energy source (like solar or wind power) can lead to longer lifetime. We consider here the problem of finding the optimal power allocation under random channel conditions for a wireless transmitter, such that rate of information transfer is maximized. Here a rechargeable battery, which is periodically charged by renewable source, is used to power the transmitter. All of above is formulated as a Markov Decision Process. Structural properties like the monotonicity of the optimal value and policy derived in this paper will be of vital importance in understanding the kind of algorithms and approximations needed in real-life scenarios. The effect of curse of dimensionality which is prevalent in Dynamic programming problems can thus be reduced. We show our results under the most general of assumptions.

Sinha, Abhinav

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Connecticut) Connecticut) Solid Waste Management (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Solid waste facilities operating in Connecticut must abide by these regulations, which describe requirements and procedures for issuing construction and operating permits; environmental considerations;

356

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

357

Solid Waste Management (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan) Michigan) Solid Waste Management (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality This Act encourages the Department of Environmental Quality and Health Department representatives to develop and encourage methods for disposing solid waste that are environmentally sound, that maximize the utilization

358

Biogas From Municipal WWTPs: Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Municipal WWTPs From Municipal WWTPs Fuel Cells Viewed as a Value Proposition Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado June 12, 2012 WWTP Anaerobic Digestion * Common method of processing sludge to reduce volume of solids & volatile content * Reduces sludge disposal cost & increases outlets for disposal * Since motivation is disposal rather than digester gas (DG) production, the DG is available at no cost * This is unlike many other organic waste digestion facilities, where the energy project must bear cost of the digester(s) WWTP Anaerobic Digestion * WWTP anaerobic digesters require heat * Typically a portion of the DG is used to produce steam or hot water to provide the heat * The heat required varies seasonally,

359

SHALE: an efficient algorithm for allocation of guaranteed display advertising  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by the problem of optimizing allocation in guaranteed display advertising, we develop an efficient, lightweight method of generating a compact allocation plan that can be used to guide ad server decisions. The plan itself uses just O(1) ... Keywords: display advertising, online advertising

Vijay Bharadwaj; Peiji Chen; Wenjing Ma; Chandrashekhar Nagarajan; John Tomlin; Sergei Vassilvitskii; Erik Vee; Jian Yang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Negotiation on Data Allocation in Multi-Agent Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the problem of data allocation in environments of self-motivated servers, where information servers respond to queries from users. New data items arrive frequently and have to be allocated in the distributed system. The servers ...

Rina Azoulay-Schwartz; Sarit Kraus

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Resource allocation in OFDMA wireless communications systems supporting multimedia services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We design a resource allocation algorithm for down-link of orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA) systems supporting real-time (RT) and best-effort (BE) services simultaneously over a time-varying wireless channel. The proposed algorithm ... Keywords: multimedia communications, orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA), quality of service (QoS), radio resource allocation, wireless network

Kae Won Choi; Wha Sook Jeon; Dong Geun Jeong

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Allowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allowance Allocation and Effects on the Electricity Sector Karen Palmer Resources for the Future of Earthweek #12;Allocation and Electricity · Prior cap-and-trade programs grandfather (GF) allowances on electricity markets depends on CO2 emissions rates · Different regional effect of GF on electricity markets

363

Optimal resource allocation for time-reservation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the optimal resource allocation in time-reservation systems. Customers arrive at a service facility and receive service in two steps; in the first step information is gathered from the customer, which is then sent to a pool of computing ... Keywords: Constrained Markov decision problems, Monotonicity, Optimal resource allocation, Queueing theory, Time-reservation systems

Ran Yang; Sandjai Bhulai; Rob van der Mei; Frank Seinstra

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

365

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious of converting waste into different forms of energy. The process of using waste as a fuel source and converting

Columbia University

366

Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Jump to: navigation, search Name Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority Place Cape May Court House, New Jersey Zip 8210 Product The CMCMUA was created to design, construct and operate efficient wastewater treatment facilities. References Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority is a company located in Cape May Court House, New Jersey . References ↑ "Cap May County Municipal Utilities Authority" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Cap_May_County_Municipal_Utilities_Authority&oldid=343207"

367

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate 90,000 Program Info Expiration Date 11/29/2013 State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Rebate Amount 50 percent of eligible costs Ontario is supporting local energy planning by introducing the Municipal Energy Plan (MEP) program. The MEP program is designed to help municipalities better understand their local energy needs and conservation opportunities, set goals and develop implementation plans. A MEP takes an integrated approach to energy planning by aligning energy, infrastructure and land use planning. MEPs will help municipalities:

368

Valley Center Municipal Water District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Water District Municipal Water District Jump to: navigation, search Name Valley Center Municipal Water District Place Valley Center, California Zip 92082 Product VCMWD is the second largest water provider in San Diego County behind the City of San Diego. References Valley Center Municipal Water District[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Valley Center Municipal Water District is a company located in Valley Center, California . References ↑ "Valley Center Municipal Water District" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Valley_Center_Municipal_Water_District&oldid=352717" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

369

Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Retrofit Financial Analysis Tool on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium About the Consortium FAQs

370

Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: CALiPER Program on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program About the Program FAQs Summary Reports Detailed Reports Benchmark Reports Exploratory Studies Testing Laboratories Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions CALiPER Program

371

Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Street Lighting Adaptive Street Lighting Controls to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Adaptive Street Lighting Controls on AddThis.com... Conferences & Meetings Presentations Publications Webcasts Videos Tools Adaptive Street Lighting Controls This two-part DOE Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium webinar focused on LED street lighting equipped with adaptive control components.

372

Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market-Based Programs Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on Facebook Tweet about Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on Twitter Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on Google Bookmark Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on Delicious Rank Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on Digg Find More places to share Solid-State Lighting: Market-Based Programs on AddThis.com... LED Lighting Facts CALiPER Program Standards Development Technical Information Network Gateway Demonstrations Municipal Consortium Design Competitions Market-Based Programs To facilitate successful market introduction of high-quality,

373

Integrating Enhanced Building Operations into Municipal Sustainability Programming: A Report from NYC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With municipalities setting goals for greenhouse gas reductions, there is an emerging need for model program designs based on quantitative analysis. Evidence is cited that commercial-institutional building retrofit programs can be significantly improved by commissioning and enhanced operation activities. Dimensions are defined along which program value is added: capture of high-payback O&M measures, early action, achievement of projections, and persistence. Based on parameters in the NYC Mayor's Office PlaNYC2030, a spreadsheet model is developed to quantify the value of including an EBO component with a Capital Projects program. Given project-cycle considerations, including EBO enables actions and associated energy reduction to begin more quickly under Operating Budget allocations. Although impressive quantified benefits are indicated market difficulties will inhibit the expansion of EBO. Engineering consultants, mechanical-electrical contractors, ESCOs, and facilities staff are at a relatively low level of readiness for undertaking true operational improvement programs. Root cause of this market condition is suggested to lie in the predominant capital-projects business model of the engineering and construction industry. Large municipal programs can be a lever in changing these market conditions. A set of recommendations is developed for program design the will facilitate incorporation of longterm EBO into more traditional energy efficiency programs.

Bobker, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Optimal Resource Allocation in Electrical Network Defense  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infrastructure networks supplying electricity, natural gas, water, and other commodities are at risk of disruption due to well-engineered and coordinated terrorist attacks. Countermeasures such as hardening targets, acquisition of spare critical components, and surveillance can be undertaken to detect and deter these attacks. Allocation of available countermeasures resources to sites or activities in a manner that maximizes their effectiveness is a challenging problem. This allocation must take into account the adversary's response after the countermeasure assets are in place and consequence mitigation measures the infrastructure operation can undertake after the attack. The adversary may simply switch strategies to avoid countermeasures when executing the attack. Stockpiling spares of critical energy infrastructure components has been identified as a key element of a grid infrastructure defense strategy in a recent National Academy of Sciences report [1]. Consider a scenario where an attacker attempts to interrupt the service of an electrical network by disabling some of its facilities while a defender wants to prevent or minimize the effectiveness of any attack. The interaction between the attacker and the defender can be described in three stages: (1) The defender deploys countermeasures, (2) The attacker disrupts the network, and (3) The defender responds to the attack by rerouting power to maintain service while trying to repair damage. In the first stage, the defender considers all possible attack scenarios and deploys countermeasures to defend against the worst scenarios. Countermeasures can include hardening targets, acquiring spare critical components, and installing surveillance devices. In the second stage, the attacker, with full knowledge of the deployed countermeasures, attempts to disable some nodes or links in the network to inflict the greatest loss on the defender. In the third stage, the defender re-dispatches power and restores disabled nodes or links to minimize the loss. The loss can be measured in costs, including the costs of using more expensive generators and the economic losses that can be attributed to loss of load. The defender's goal is to minimize the loss while the attacker wants to maximize it. Assuming some level of budget constraint, each side can only defend or attack a limited number of network elements. When an element is attacked, it is assumed that it will be totally disabled. It is assumed that when an element is defended it cannot be disabled, which may mean that it will be restored in a very short time after being attacked. The rest of the paper is organized as follows. Section 2 will briefly review literature related to multilevel programming and network defense. Section 3 presents a mathematical formulation of the electrical network defense problem. Section 4 describes the solution algorithms. Section 5 discusses computational results. Finally, Sec. 6 explores future research directions.

Yao, Y; Edmunds, T; Papageorgiou, D; Alvarez, R

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Genetic and phenotypic variation in resource acquisition and allocation: testing a fundamental model for life-history evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy acquisition and allocation for a life history trade-energy allocation in variable environ- ments: Life historyenergy acquisition and allocation for a life history trade-

King, Elizabeth Griep

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Oklahoma Municipal Power Auth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Auth Auth Jump to: navigation, search Name Oklahoma Municipal Power Auth Place Oklahoma Utility Id 14077 Utility Location Yes Ownership S NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Oklahoma_Municipal_Power_Auth&oldid=411268

377

Shawano Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shawano Municipal Utilities Shawano Municipal Utilities Place Wisconsin Utility Id 17011 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Field Lighting Service Lighting General Single Phase Commercial General Single Phase TOD Commercial General Single Phase TOD 2 Commercial General Single Phase TOD 3 Commercial General Three Phase Commercial General Three Phase TOD Commercial General Three Phase TOD 2 Commercial General Three Phase TOD 3 Commercial Industrial Time-of-day Industrial Interdepartmental Commercial

378

Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm Wyandotte Municipal Serv Comm Place Michigan Utility Id 21048 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png HEATING STEAM RATE Residential HOT WATER DISTRICT HEATING RATE Commercial LARGE GENERAL SERVICE RATE Commercial Commercial LARGE GENERAL SERVICE RATE Commercial (Time-Differentiated Meter) Commercial LARGE GENERAL SERVICE RATE Industrial (Time-Differentiated Meter)

379

Atlantic Municipal Utilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atlantic Municipal Utilities Atlantic Municipal Utilities Place Iowa Utility Id 965 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png All- Electric Residential (Single Phase) Residential All- Electric Residential (Three Phase) Residential Commercial All- Electric Commercial Commercial Supplemental Electric Heat Commercial Industrial Electric Service (over 2,000kW) Industrial

380

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Distributed processor allocation for launching applications in a massively connected processors complex  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compute processor allocator architecture for allocating compute processors to run applications in a multiple processor computing apparatus is distributed among a subset of processors within the computing apparatus. Each processor of the subset includes a compute processor allocator. The compute processor allocators can share a common database of information pertinent to compute processor allocation. A communication path permits retrieval of information from the database independently of the compute processor allocators.

Pedretti, Kevin (Goleta, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) Water Use Registration and Allocation (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources This rule states regulations for water withdrawals, permits required for withdrawals and water use during water droughts and emergencies. Self-supplied business and industrial water users subject to the water withdrawal registration shall prepare a written plan, for responding to water shortages that is consistent with industry water efficiency and

383

Technological analysis of options for generating electricity with solid waste fuel in the Bangkok metropolitan area  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of relatively current techniques for converting mixed municipal waste into electricity is presented. A brief review of the comparative capabilities of the relevant energy recovery systems is documented in this section. The discussion is focused on the principal system and technological strategies that would be best suited for the municipal solid waste recovery project in Thailand. Emphasis in the review was placed on mixed waste processing in a mass burning waterwalled system.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities Mandatory Green Power Option for Large Municipal Utilities < Back Eligibility Municipal Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Mandatory Utility Green Power Option Provider Colorado Public Utilities Commission Municipal electric utilities serving more than 40,000 customers in Colorado must offer an optional green-power program that allows retail customers the choice of supporting emerging renewable technologies. This policy complements Colorado's renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which requires municipal utilities serving more than 40,000 customers to use renewable energy and energy recycling to account for 10% of retail sales by 2020.

385

A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Partner: New York Planning Federation Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nyserda.org/publications/09-06GuidetoDieselIdlingReduction.pdf Language: English References: A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction[1] References ↑ "A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Municipal_Official%27s_Guide_to_Diesel_Idling_Reduction&oldid=390471"

386

Decentralized method for complex task allocation in massive MAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Task allocation is still a fundamental problem in Multi?Agents System (MAS). It allows the formation a coalition of agents to cooperate together in order to carry out a complex task. Generally

Zaki Brahmi; M. M. Gammoudi; Research Unit (URPAH)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation Guidance July 18, 2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal Economic Development Bonds (TEDBs). The TEDB program was established under the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act, and provides Tribes with the authority to issue tax-exempt debt for a wider range of activities to spur job creation and promote economic growth in Indian country. Providing Tribes with the ability to issue tax-exempt debt for a broader scope of activities similar to that available to states and local governments lowers

388

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Greenhouse Gas Protocol Initiative: Allocation of Emissions from a Combined Heat and Power Plant Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute, World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Climate Focus Area: - Central Plant, Buildings, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools Cost: Free References: CHP Guidance v1.0[1] The Greenhouse Gas Protocol tool for allocation of GHG emissions from a combined heat and power (CHP) plant is a free Excel spreadsheet calculator

389

Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes transmission cost allocation methodologies for transmission projects developed to maintain or enhance reliability, to interconnect new generators, or to access new resources and enhance competitive bulk power markets, otherwise known as economic transmission projects.

Fink, S.; Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Optimum Power and Rate Allocation for Coded V-BLAST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analytical framework for minimizing the outage probability of a coded spatial multiplexing system while keeping the rate close to the capacity is developed. Based on this framework, specific strategies of optimum power and rate allocation for the coded V-BLAST architecture are obtained and its performance is analyzed. A fractional waterfilling algorithm, which is shown to optimize both the capacity and the outage probability of the coded V-BLAST, is proposed. Compact, closed-form expressions for the optimum allocation of the average power are given. The uniform allocation of average power is shown to be near optimum at moderate to high SNR for the coded V-BLAST with the average rate allocation (when per-stream rates are set to match the per-stream capacity). The results reported also apply to multiuser detection and channel equalization relying on successive interference cancelation.

Kostina, Victoria

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Availability-Aware Spare Capacity Allocation with Partially Protected Rings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis work focuses on designing a survivable IP-core network with the minimal investment of spare capacity. A span-oriented spare capacity allocation (SCA) scheme is… (more)

Zulhasnine, Mohammad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal-induced leakage power optimization by redundant resource allocation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, at early design stages, leakage power is associated with the number of transistors in a design. Hence, intuitively an implementation with minimum resource usage would be best for low leakage. Such an allocation would generally be followed ...

Min Ni; Seda Ogrenci Memik

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Multi-commodity allocation for dynamic demands using pagerank vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a variant of the contact process concerning multi-commodity allocation on networks. In this process, the demands for several types of commodities are initially given at some specified vertices and then the demands spread interactively on ...

Fan Chung; Paul Horn; Jacob Hughes

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Biomass Allocation Data Set Released February 19, 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released February 19, 2004 The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Biomass Allocation and Growth Data of Seeded Plants." This data set of leaf, stem, and root...

395

Dynamic Asset Allocation and Downside-Risk Aversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper considers dynamic asset allocation in a mean versus downside-risk framework. We derive closed-form solutions for the optimal portfolio weights when returns are lognormally distributed. Moreover, we study the impact of skewed and fat-tailed return distributions. We nd that the optimal fraction invested in stocks is V-shaped: at low and high levels of wealth the investor increases the stock weight. The optimal strategy also exhibits reverse time-eects: the investor allocates more to stocks as the horizon approaches. Furthermore, the investment strategy becomes more risky for negatively skewed and fat-tailed return distributions. Keywords: optimal asset allocation, downside-risk. JEL Classications Codes: G12 Dynamic Asset Allocation and Downside-Risk Aversion 1 1 Introduction A growing number of practitioners are using downside-risk measures in various portfolio management applications. Due to the concern of regulating authorities and the need for establishing risk manag...

Arjan Berkelaar; Roy Kouwenberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Risk Allocation for Multi-agent Systems using Tatonnement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new market-based distributed planning algorithm for multi-agent systems under uncertainty, called MIRA (Market-based Iterative Risk Allocation). In large coordination problems, from power grid management ...

Williams, Brian C.

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dynamic Distributed Resource Allocation: A Distributed Constraint Satisfaction Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In distributed resource allocation a set of agents must assign their resources to a set of tasks. This problem arises in many real-world domains such as distributed sensor networks, disaster rescue, hospital scheduling and others. Despite the variety ...

Pragnesh Jay Modi; Hyuckchul Jung; Milind Tambe; Wei-Min Shen; Shriniwas Kulkarni

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Using Cyclic Memory Allocation to Eliminate Memory Leaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present and evaluate a new memory management technique for eliminating memory leaks in programs with dynamic memory allocation. This technique observes the execution of the program on a sequence of training inputs to ...

Nguyen, Huu Hai

399

IRS Announces New Tribal Economic Development Bond Allocation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 - 3:46pm Addthis To promote economic growth in tribal communities, Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) published new guidance on July 18, 2012, allocating Tribal...

400

Report on Transmission Cost Allocation for RTOs and Others (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the MARC 2011 Annual Conference, 6 June 2011, Rapid City, South Dakota. This presentation provides an overview of the latest research findings and policy developments pertaining to cost allocation and new variable generation resources on the power grid.

Coles, L.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Two-stage allocations for stochastic linear programming games with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which include minimum cost spanning trees (Granot and Huberman 1981) as a special case. .... for all S ? 2N \\ {?}, there does not exist an allocation ? ? ZS ...... In Proceedings of the Computer Science and Statistics Seventh Symposium at.

402

Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) Gaines County Solid Waste Management Act (Texas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Gaines County Solid Waste Management District This Act establishes the Gaines County Solid Waste Management District, a governmental body to develop and carry out a regional water quality protection program through solid waste management and regulation of waste disposal. The District has the power to prepare, adopt plans for, purchase, obtain permits for, construct, acquire, own, operate, maintain, repair, improve, and extend inside and outside the boundaries of the district any works,

403

Emissions Trading with Profit-Neutral Permit Allocations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Trading with Profit-Neutral Permit Allocations Cameron J. Hepburn, John K.-H. Quah, and Robert A. Ritz August 2012 CWPE 1235 EMISSIONS TRADING WITH PROFIT-NEUTRAL PERMIT ALLOCATIONS Cameron J... or technologies. However, there is a significant disadvantage to the use of taxes or trading: inframarginal wealth 1 The authors are affiliated to, respectively, the Grantham Research Institute, London School of Economics and Political Science (c.j...

Hepburn, Cameron J.; Quah, John K.-H.; Ritz, Robert A.

2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

404

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) Hazardous and Nonhazardous Solid Waste Applicant Disclosure Regulations (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type

405

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

406

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) Nonhazardous Solid Waste Management Regulations and Criteria (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations

407

Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act (West Virginia) Act (West Virginia) Solid Waste Management Act (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection In addition to establishing a comprehensive program of controlling all phases of solid waste management and assigning responsibilities for solid waste management to the Secretary of Department of Environmental

408

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) Municipal Water Pollution Control (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This statute applies to a city, sanitary district, or other governmental subdivision or public corporation. The statute gives the Pollution Control Agency the authority to prepare and enforce a long-range plan pertaining to

409

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

410

Delivering energy services: the emerging role of California's municipal utilities  

SciTech Connect

The financial circumstances and energy service opportunities for California's municipal electric utilities are explored. The structure and financial operation of municipal utilities, including the new role of joint powers agency financing, are analyzed. The advantages which conservation and alternative energy resources can offer municipal utilities are discussed: reduced capital requirements, increased cash flow, oil displacement, improved air quality, reduced risk of large plant outages, and matching new capacity to uncertain load growth. Recommendations are presented for removing the existing barriers which discourage prospects for municipal utility energy service investments, such as wholesale rate design reflecting flat or declining block rates and high demand charges, control of bulk power transmission lines by investor-owned utilities, failure of federal power-marketing agencies to provide conservation incentives to their municipal utility customers, and tax credit provisions of the Crude Oil Windfall Profit Tax Act of 1980. Appendices include the municipal utilities' current resource plans, the history and process of the formation of new municipal utilities, and the energy service role of municipal agencies in cities which may not have municipal utilities.

Dawson, M.H.; Praul, C.G.; Marcus, W.B.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Heat Pumps Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $50,000 Program Info Expiration Date 04/30/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Up to $50,000 Provider Incentive Programs Reading Municipal Light Department (RMLD) offers energy efficiency incentives to eligible commercial and industrial customers. Rebates of up to $50,000 are available to customers who wish to reduce energy consumption

412

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Lighting Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Commercial Customers: $10,000 per calendar year Municipal Customers: $15,000 per calendar year Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount T-8/T-5 Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $11 - $35/fixture Interior High Output Lamp with Electronic Ballasts: $100/fixture De-lamping: $4 - $9/lamp Lighting Sensors: $20/sensor LED Exit Signs: $20/fixture Provider Incentive Programs

413

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Wellesley Municipal Light Plant - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Two equipment rebates per customer per calendar year Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $100 Clothes Washing Machine: $75 Central AC: $100 Room AC Unit: $50 Dishwasher: $75 Dehumidifier: $50 Provider Appliance Rebate Program Wellesley Municipal Light Plant (WMLP) offers a number of appliance rebates to residential customers who purchase and install energy efficient equipment. Rebates are available for refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes

414

New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings New York City - Green Building Requirements for Municipal Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Solar Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Mayor's Office of Operations In 2005 New York City passed a law (Local Law No. 86) making a variety of green building and energy efficiency requirements for municipal buildings and other projects funded with money from the city treasury. The building

415

Environmental training for municipality officers in Bosnia and Herzegovina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This is a study that aims to help create a better world. As big as it sounds, it is the truth. Every day municipality… (more)

Jonsson, Åsa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Business Case for CNG in Municipal Fleets (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation about compressed natural gas in municipal fleets, assessing investment profitability, the VICE model, base-case scenarios, and pressing questions for fleet owners.

Johnson, C.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Solar Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

625kW AC Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical...

418

Frisco - Municipal Green Building Program (Texas) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rules Regulations Policies Program Place Texas Name Frisco - Municipal Green Building Program Incentive Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Applicable Sector Local...

419

State Clean Energy Policies Analysis: State, Utility, and Municipal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technical Report State Clean Energy Policies NRELTP-6A2-47376 Analysis: State, Utility, and May 2010 Municipal Loan Programs Eric Lantz Technical Report State Clean Energy...

420

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Solar Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Light Plant Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to customers who install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems that are designed to offset the customer's electrical...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Commercial Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart™ provides energy efficiency incentives and technical assistance to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. The Efficiency Smart service...

422

Concord Municipal Light Plant- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers its residential customers rebates on energy-efficient appliances through the Appliance Rebate Program. Rebates are available for Energy Star...

423

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities)- Residential Efficiency Smart Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Efficiency Smart ™ provides energy efficiency incentives to the American Municipal Power, Inc (AMP) network of public power communities. Efficiency Smart assists residential, commercial , and...

424

RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Page 1 01 :L RECIPIENT:Hull Municipal Light Plant STATE: MA PROJECT TITLE: Hull Offshore Wind Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement...

425

Land application systems for municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect

The production of treated municipal sludge requiring disposal or recycling has increased substantially in the last 10 years as a result of more stringent waste-water treatment requirements. In 1974, for example, there were 3.2 million dry tons of sludge requiring disposal. By 1982 that number had more than doubled to 6.5 million dry tons/year. Land application of municipal sludge is widely practiced in the United States as a method of handling these increasing tonnages. For wastewater treatment plants with less than 10 mgd capacity, 39 percent of the sludge produced is managed by land application. Currently, for all size treatment plants, about 25 percent of the nation's sludge is land applied. The experience with land application has shown it to be a safe and effective sludge management practice. In particular, research and studies of the practice over the past 10 years have produced new knowledge which allows the benefits of land application to be realized with minimal adverse impact. 11 references.

Crites, R.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

The equivalence of uniform and Shapley value-based cost allocations in a specific game  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concerns the possible equivalence of the Shapley value and other allocations in specific games. For a group buying game with a linear quantity discount schedule, the uniform allocation results in the same cost allocation as the Shapley value. ... Keywords: Cooperative game, Core, Group buying, Shapley value, Uniform cost allocation

Rachel R. Chen; Shuya Yin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Bit and Power Allocation for Goodput Optimization in Coded Parallel Subchannels With ARQ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of adaptively allocating the bits and the power among a set of parallel subchannels. A frame-oriented transmission with convolutional coding, hard Viterbi decoding, and automatic repeat request (ARQ) retransmission protocol ... Keywords: Bit allocation, MIMO, OFDM, bit allocation, goodput, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO), orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM), power allocation

B. Devillers; J. Louveaux; L. Vandendorpe

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Potential for Materials and Energy RecoveryPotential for Materials and Energy Recovery the Municipal Solid Wastes (the Municipal Solid Wastes (MSWMSW) of Beograd) of Beograd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%) and glass (15%). · Recovery of energy by anaerobic digestion: The natural organics in MSW react anaerobically (in absence of O2).to form methane gas · Recovery of soil nutrients: By aerobic composting (in + 6.5O2 = 6CO2 + 5H2O + 23,000 kJ/kg On basis of chemical analysis, the average composition

Columbia University

429

PSNH - Municipal Smart Start Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PSNH - Municipal Smart Start Program PSNH - Municipal Smart Start Program PSNH - Municipal Smart Start Program < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount No up front costs: Payments made over time with the savings obtained from lower energy costs. Provider Public Service of New Hampshire Public Service of New Hampshire (PSNH), an electric utility, offers the Smart Start Program to Municipal customers. This program assists municipalities in reducing energy consumption and electric bills at facilities by installing energy-saving measures. Payment for services and products will be made over time with the savings obtained from lower energy costs. Under the Smart Start Program, PSNH pays all of the costs associated

430

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - WISE Energy Efficiency Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - WISE Energy Efficiency Loan Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - WISE Energy Efficiency Loan Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - WISE Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Water Heating Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Unsecured Loan: $5,000 - $35,000 Home Equity Loan: $1,000 - $100,000 Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) offers loans for a variety of

431

Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program Lassen Municipal Utility District - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $5,000 or 50% of system cost, whichever is less Commercial: $23,000 or 50% of system cost, whichever is less. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential: $3.00/W-AC Commercial: $2.10/W-AC Provider Lassen Municipal Utility District Lassen Municipal Utility District (LMUD) is providing incentives for its customers to purchase solar electric photovoltaic (PV) systems. Rebate levels will decrease annually over the life of the program. Through June 30, 2014, rebates of $3.00 per watt-AC up to $5,000 are available for

432

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff River Falls Municipal Utilities - Distributed Solar Tariff < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Amount $0.30/kWh Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU), a member of WPPI Energy, offers a special energy purchase rate to its customers that generate electricity using solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The special rate, $0.30/kilowatt-hour (kWh), is available to all the RFMU customers on a first-come, first-served basis for systems up to 4 kilowatts (kW). The RFMU

433

Hercules Municipal Utility - PV Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hercules Municipal Utility - PV Rebate Program Hercules Municipal Utility - PV Rebate Program Hercules Municipal Utility - PV Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Systems 10 kW or less: 10,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''2012:''' Systems up to 10 kW: 2.25/watt AC Systems larger than 10 kW: 0.17/kWh for 5 years'''''' Provider Hercules Municipal Utility '''''Note: This program has been temporarily suspended. Contact the utility for more information.''''' Hercules Municipal Utility offers a $2.25-per-watt AC rebate (2012 rebate level) to its residential and commercial customers who purchase and install solar photovoltaic (PV) systems smaller than 10 kilowatts (kW). Systems 10

434

Anoka Municipal Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anoka Municipal Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Anoka Municipal Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Anoka Municipal Utility - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Maximum Rebate 60% of the project cost or 100,000, whichever is less Program Info Expiration Date 3/31/13 State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies, See Program Website Motors: $200 - $5,400 Variable Speed Drives: $400 - $8,000 Provider Anoka Municipal Utility Anoka Municipal Utility (AMU) offers the Commercial and Industrial Lighting and Motor Rebate Program for commercial and industrial customers who

435

FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) - Municipal and Street Lighting Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) - Municipal and Street Lighting FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) - Municipal and Street Lighting Program (Maryland) FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) - Municipal and Street Lighting Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Maryland Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Street Lighting'''br/> High Pressure Sodium Fixtures: $10 - $50/unit LED/Induction Fixtures: $50 '''Traffic/Pedestrian Signals''' Lamp/Signal/Arrows: $35/unit Provider FirstEnergy (Potomac Edison) FirstEnergy offers several incentives for non-residential and municipal customers to upgrade traffic signals, pedestrian signals, street lights to more efficient fixtures. The Municipal Lighting Incentive Program offers

436

Willmar Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Willmar Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Willmar Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Willmar Municipal Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: 50 Clothes Washer: 50 Dishwasher: 50 Central A/C: 200 Water Heater: 1.25/gallon (bonus 100 to convert to an electric water heater from another fuel source) Provider Willmar Municipal Utilities Willmar Municipal Utilities offer rebates on Energy Star rated appliances and air conditioners and Marathon water heaters. In addition to these rebates, WMU also offers a Load Sharing Program. Participating customers

437

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority - Geothermal Heat Pump Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Maximum Rebate 1,000/ton Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 State Oklahoma Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $800 - $1,000/ton Provider Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority Program funds currently exhausted, additional funds have been requested. Visit the program website for the most up to date information on fund availability and to register for the waiting list for this program. The Oklahoma Municipal Power Authority (OMPA) and the Oklahoma Department of Commerce currently offer the Oklahoma Comfort Program for geothermal

438

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act of 1990 (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The Georgia Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Act (SWMA) of 1990 was implemented in order to improve solid waste management procedures,

439

Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) Solid Waste Assessment Fee Exemptions (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Rebate Program A person who owns, operates, or leases an approved solid waste disposal facility is exempt from the payment of solid waste assessment fees, upon the receipt of a Certificate of Exemption from the director, if that

440

Sacramento Municipal Utility District | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District District (Redirected from SMUD) Jump to: navigation, search Name Sacramento Municipal Util Dist Place Sacramento, California Website www.smud.org Utility Id 16534 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes ISO CA Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] SGIC[3] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "allocating municipal solid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Minnesota Municipal Power Agency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Place Minnesota Place Minnesota Utility Id 12667 Utility Location Yes Ownership A NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Minnesota_Municipal_Power_Agency&oldid=412260" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases

442

Explicit Allocation of Best-Effort Packet Delivery Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the “allocated-capacity” framework for providing different levels of best-effort service in times of network congestion. The “allocatedcapacity” framework—extensions to the Internet protocols and algorithms—can allocate bandwidth to different users in a controlled and predictable way during network congestion. The framework supports two complementary ways of controlling the bandwidth allocation: sender-based and receiver-based. In today’s heterogeneous and commercial Internet the framework can serve as a basis for charging for usage and for more efficiently utilizing the network resources. We focus on algorithms for essential components of the framework: a differential dropping algorithm for network routers and a tagging algorithm for profile meters at the edge of the network for bulk-data transfers. We present simulation results to illustrate the effectiveness of the combined algorithms in controlling transmission control protocol (TCP) traffic to achieve certain targeted sending rates.

David D. Clark; et al.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Resource allocation using quantification of margins and uncertainty.  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing need to assess the performance of high consequence systems using a modeling and simulation based approach. Central to this approach are the need to quantify the uncertainties present in the system and to compare the system response to an expected performance measure. At Sandia National Laboratories, this process is referred to as quantification of margins and uncertainties or QMU. Depending on the outcome of the assessment, there might be a need to increase the confidence in the predicted response of a system model; thus a need to understand where resources need to be allocated to increase this confidence. This paper examines the problem of resource allocation done within the context of QMU. An optimization based approach to solving the resource allocation is considered and sources of aleatoric and epistemic uncertainty are included in the calculations.

Mahadevan, Sankaran (Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN); Urbina, Angel; Paez, Thomas Lee (Thomas Paez Consulting, Durango, CO)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Demand response compensation, net Benefits and cost allocation: comments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FERC's Supplemental Notice of Public Rulemaking addresses the question of proper compensation for demand response in organized wholesale electricity markets. Assuming that the Commission would proceed with the proposal ''to require tariff provisions allowing demand response resources to participate in wholesale energy markets by reducing consumption of electricity from expected levels in response to price signals, to pay those demand response resources, in all hours, the market price of energy for such reductions,'' the Commission posed questions about applying a net benefits test and rules for cost allocation. This article summarizes critical points and poses implications for the issues of net benefit tests and cost allocation. (author)

Hogan, William W.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Running Title: C and N Allocation in Pine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A long standing challenge has been understanding how plants and ecosystems respond to shifts in the balance of resource availabilities. The continuing rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will induce changes in the availability and use of several terrestrial ecosystem resources. We report on the acquisition and allocation of carbon and nitrogen in Pinus ponderosa Laws. seedlings grown at three levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (370, 525, and 700 {micro}mol mol{sup -1}) and three levels of soil nitrogen supply in a controlled environment experiment. Nitrogen was applied (0, 100, and 200 {micro}g N g soil{sup -1}) at planting and again at week 26 of a 58-week, 4-harvest experiment. At the final harvest, plants grown with variety low available soil nitrogen showed no significant response to atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Plants at higher N levels responded positively to CO{sub 2} with the highest biomass at the middle CO{sub 2} level. Plants growing at the lowest N levels immediately allocated a relatively large portion of their nitrogen and biomass to roots. Plants growing at near present ambient CO{sub 2} levels allocated relatively little material to roots when N was abundant but moved both carbon and nitrogen below-ground when N was withheld. Plants growing at higher CO{sub 2} levels, allocated more C and N to roots even when N was abundant, and made only small shifts in allocation patterns when N was no longer supplied. In general, allocation of C and N to roots tended to increase when N supply was restricted and also with increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} level. These allocation responses were consistent with patterns suggesting a functional balance in the acquisition of above-ground versus below-ground resources. In particular, variation in whole tree average nitrogen concentration can explain 68% of the variation ratio of root biomass to shoot biomass across the harvests. The capability to respond to temporal variation in nutrient conditions, the dynamics of nutrient uptake, and the dynamics of nutrient use were all seen to be influenced by the interplay between previous N supply, previous C supply, and the concentration of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The data suggest that in an elevated CO{sub 2} atmosphere ponderosa pine seedlings will have higher root biomass and be likely to capture more N compared to seedlings today. Further, the combined growth and allocation responses of Ponderosa pine at elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in higher growth per unit N (nitrogen productivity) and lower N per gram of tissue (all tissues not just leaves) when nitrogen was not in abundant supply.

Ball, J. Timothy

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stuart Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Stuart Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Stuart Municipal Utilities Developer Stuart Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Stuart Municipal Utilities Location Stuart IA Coordinates 41.493988°, -94.327403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.493988,"lon":-94.327403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Developer Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965°, -95.094098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.281965,"lon":-95.094098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lenox Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Lenox Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Lenox Municipal Utilities Developer Lenox Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Lenox Municipal Utilities Location Lenox IA Coordinates 40.880592°, -94.559029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.880592,"lon":-94.559029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dibari, J.C. [Heritage College, Toppenish, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

Reaven, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department - Residential Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department - Residential Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department - Residential Conservation Services Program Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department - Residential Conservation Services Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Energy Audit Recommended Measures: $300 Programmable Thermostats: 2 units Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit Recommended Measures: 25% of total cost Refrigerators: $50 Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room AC: $50

452

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Denton Municipal Electric - GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Installer/Contractor Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Solar Screens: $200 Energy Efficient Windows: $500 Programmable Thermostat: $50 Attic Insulation (Retrofit): $400 Attic Insulation (New Construction): $400 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central AC: $600/unit Central Heat Pumps: $700/unit Geothermal Heat Pumps: $700/unit Attic Reflective Radiant Barrier: $200 - $300

453

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Sunscreens: 50% of cost, Maximum rebate of $100 Insulation (ceiling): Up to $150 per home Insulation (walls): Up to $200 per home Insulation (floor): Up to $75 per home Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $1 per sq. ft. Insulation (ceiling): $150 per home Insulation (walls): $200 per home Insulation (floor): $75 per home Sunscreens: $1 per sq. ft. Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washers: $75

454

Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marshall Municipal Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Construction Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Custom Measures: 75% of the incremental cost of the measure Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: Varies by fixture type, wattage and application Central A/C: $100/ton Air-Source Heat Pumps: $150/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $200/ton Commercial Refrigeration: See Program Website

455

Local Option - Municipal Sustainable Energy Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Sustainable Energy Programs Municipal Sustainable Energy Programs Local Option - Municipal Sustainable Energy Programs < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Typ