Sample records for all-stars shine bright

  1. Jennifer Granholm (Energy All Stars Presentation)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm delivered this presentation advocating for an energy Race to the Top competition between the states at the Energy All Stars event on January 19, 2013, at...

  2. Collaboration Shines in Materials Project Success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration Shines in Materials Project Success Collaboration Shines in Materials Project Success Many Hands at Lab Lift 'World-Changing Idea' to New Heights December 12, 2013 |...

  3. Recent results from NA61/SHINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Gazdzicki; for the NA61/SHINE Collaboration

    2014-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper briefly presents the NA61/SHINE facility at the CERN SPS and its measurements motivated by physics of strong interactions, neutrinos and cosmic rays.

  4. Special announcement: Building 9731 shines again

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Special announcement: Building 9731 shines again Over the past several weeks, concentrated activity in and around Building 9731, the first building completed at Y-12 and the...

  5. Argonne Researchers Shine "Light" on Origins of Wind Turbine...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Argonne Researchers Shine "Light" on Origins of Wind Turbine Bearing Failures Argonne Researchers Shine "Light" on Origins of Wind Turbine Bearing Failures September 12, 2014 -...

  6. NA61/SHINE ion program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maja Mackowiak for the NA61 Collaboration

    2010-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) at CERN covers one of the most interesting regions of the phase diagram (T - \\mu_{B}) of strongly interacting matter. The study of central Pb+Pb collisions by NA49 indicate that the threshold for deconfinement is reached already at the low SPS energies. Theoretical considerations predict a critical point of strongly interacting matter at energies accessible at the SPS. The NA61/SHINE experiment, a successor of the NA49 project, will study hadron production in p+p, p+A, h+A, and A+A reactions at various energies. The broad physics program includes the investigation of the properties of strongly interacting matter, as well as precision measurements of hadron spectra for the T2K neutrino experiment and for the Pierre Auger Observatory and KASCADE cosmic-ray projects. The main physics goals of the NA61/SHINE ion program are to study the properties of the onset of deconfinement at low SPS energies and to find signatures of the critical point of strongly interacting matter. To achieve these goals a broad range in the (T - \\mu_{B}) phase diagram will be covered by performing an energy (10A-158A GeV/c) and system size (p+p, B+C, Ar+Ca, Xe+La) scan. The first data for this 2-D scan were taken in 2009, i.e. p+p interactions at 20, 30, 40, 80, 158 GeV/c beam energy. This contribution will summarize physics arguments for the NA61/SHINE ion program, show the detector performance and present the current status of the experiment and plans for the next years.

  7. New OLED Lighting Systems Shine Bright, Save Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEngines | Department ofUniversal Display Corporation

  8. SHINE Vacuum Pump Test Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Gregg A; Peters, Brent

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Normetex pumps used world-wide for tritium service are no longer available. DOE and other researchers worldwide have spent significant funds characterizing this pump. Identification of alternate pumps is required for performance and compatibility with tritium gas. Many of the pumps that could be used to meet the functional performance requirements (e.g. pressure and flow conditions) of the Normetex pump have features that include the use of polymers or oils and greases that are not directly compatible with tritium service. This study assembles a test system to determine the flow characteristics for candidate alternate pumps. These tests are critical to the movement of tritium through the SHINE Tritium Purification System (TPS). The purpose of the pump testing is two-fold: (1) obtain baseline vacuum pump characteristics for an alternate (i.e. ''Normetex replacement'') pump intended for use in tritium service; and (2) verify that low pressure hydrogen gas can be transported over distances up to 300 feet by the candidate pumps. Flow rates and nominal system pressures have been identified for the SHINE Mo-99 production process Tritium Purification System (TPS). To minimize the line sizes for the transfer of low pressure tritium from the Neutron Driver Accelerator System (NDAS) to the primary processing systems in the TPS, a ''booster'' pump has been located near the accelerator in the design. A series of pump tests were performed at various configurations using hydrogen gas (no tritium) to ensure that this concept is practical and maintains adequate flow rates and required pressures. This report summarizes the results of the tests that have been performed using various pump configurations. The current design of the Tritium Purification System requires the ''booster'' pump to discharge to or to be backed by another vacuum pump. Since Normetex pumps are no longer manufactured, a commercially available Edwards scroll pump will be used to back the booster pump. In this case the ''booster pump'' is an Adixen Molecular Drag Pump (MDP 5011) and the backing pump is an Edwards (nXDS15iC) scroll pump. Various configurations of the two pumps and associated lengths of 3/4 inch tubing (0 feet to 300 feet) were used in combination with hydrogen and nitrogen flow rates ranging from 25-400 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) to determine whether the proposed pump configuration meets the design criteria for SHINE. The results of this study indicate that even under the most severe conditions (300 feet of tubing and 400 sccm flow rate) the Adixen 5011 MDP can serve as a booster pump to transport gases from the accelerator (NDAS) to the TPS. The Target Gas Receiving System pump (Edwards nXDS15iC) located approximately 300 feet from the accelerator can effectively back the Adixen MDP. The molecular drag pump was able to maintain its full rotational speed even when the flow rate was 400 sccm hydrogen or nitrogen and 300 feet of tubing was installed between the drag pump and the Edwards scroll pump. In addition to maintaining adequate rotation, the pressure in the system was maintained below the target pressure of 30 torr for all flow rates, lengths of tubing, and process gases. This configuration is therefore adequate to meet the SHINE design requirements in terms of flow and pressure.

  9. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch Utility-scale PV Solar Market Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch...

  10. Light-shining-through-walls with lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederike Januschek

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-shining-through-walls experiments are the search experiments for weakly interacting slim particles (WISPs) with the smallest model dependence. They have the advantage that not only the detection, but also the production of the WISPs takes place in the laboratory and can thus be controlled. Using lasers is the preferred option for most of the mass region and has led to the world's most stringent laboratory limits (ALPS I) there. At CERN, OSQAR promises to surpass these and at DESY ALPS II is currently set up, which is planning to probe the axion-like particle to photon coupling down to $|g_{a\\gamma}|\\gtrsim 2\\cdot10^{-11}$ GeV$^{-1}$, which is in a region favored by many astrophysical hints.

  11. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsourc...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shining Light on Catalysis Tuesday, July 19, 2011 - 4:38pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Jeroen A. van Bokhoven, Professor for Heterogeneous Catalysis Institute for Chemical and...

  12. LET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    /kWh, depending on its location as well as on the size and type of PV system used (EPIA Report, 2011). InvestmentLET THE SUN SHINE: OPTIMAL DEPLOYMENT OF PHOTOVOLTAICS IN GERMANY Anna CRETI Jérôme JOAUG Cahier n:chantal.poujouly@polytechnique.edu hal-00751743,version1-14Nov2012 #12;Let the sun shine: optimal deployment of photovoltaics in Germany

  13. A high brightness field emission display

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palevsky, A. [Raytheon Co., Quincy, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The military requirement for avionics display performance requires that displays be legible with 10,000 foot-candles (fc) bright light shining into the pilot`s eyes, or 10,000 fc shining directly on the display. The contrast ratio under these conditions must be at least 4.66:1. In addition, instant-on operation is sought for temperatures as low as {minus}54 C. Currently these specifications can barely be met by monochrome CRTs whose use is counter-indicated by other factors. No color display can achieve optimum performance in the areas mentioned, nor do any current contenders, primarily AMLCD`s, have any prospects of achieving full compliance. The FED being developed by Raytheon shows strong promise of being able to achieve the brightness and contrast ratios desired. The FED is also inherently able to provide instant-on functionality at any terrestrial temperature and does not require any heating at low temperatures. The technical objective of the Raytheon development program is to develop a high performance, full color, FED Panel that meets the performance and environmental operating condition requirements specified for military and other high performance display applications.

  14. Shining Stars of Solar: Meet Three SunShot Postdoctoral Award...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Shining Stars of Solar: Meet Three SunShot Postdoctoral Award Recipients Who Are Making a Difference Shining Stars of Solar: Meet Three SunShot Postdoctoral Award Recipients Who...

  15. Metamaterials Shine Bright as New Terahertz Source | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    than conventional materials that are presently used for these applications. Detailed analysis of the directionality and polarization of the emitted radiation reveals the...

  16. New OLED Lighting Systems Shine Bright, Save Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEW HAMPSHIREof EnergyBulbs | Department ofofWins R&DCyberOLED

  17. Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV (SHINES) Funding Opportunity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sustainable and Holistic Integration of Energy Storage and Solar PV (SHINES) solution as envisioned by SunShot will have the following features:

  18. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New Light

  19. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a New

  20. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALS

  1. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral FellowshipALS X-Rays Shine a NewALSALS

  2. Smart Grid Shines after California Earthquake | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistmaSinosteel Corporation JumpShines after California

  3. Los Alamos instrument to shine light on Mars habitability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceeds waste shippingInstrument to shine

  4. EM Shines with Five DOE Sustainability Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan Department ofNotices |Notice of38:3:1:EM OfficialAugustJulySSABEM Shines

  5. arXiv:astro-ph/0009259v219Sep2000 How the Sun Shines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    arXiv:astro-ph/0009259v219Sep2000 How the Sun Shines John N. Bahcall What makes the sun shine? How does the sun produce the vast amount of energy necessary to support life on earth? These questions 1833 Treatise on Astronomy: The sun's rays are the ultimate source of almost every motion which takes

  6. Fusion energy Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion energy Fusion powers the Sun, and all stars, in which light nuclei fuse together at high temperatures (15 million degrees) releasing a large amount of energy. The aim of fusion research is to use of hydrogen). In the plasma the deuterium and tritium fuse to produce energy. Fusion is a very efficient

  7. Why Does the Sun Shine? What is the source of solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    Why Does the Sun Shine? #12;What is the source of solar luminosity? There were three plausible contraction #12;Fire Suppose the Sun were a mixture of carbon and oxygen on fire. ·Each chemical reaction releases an energy of about 10-11 ergs. ·The mass of the Sun could contain 3x1055 Carbon atoms plus twice

  8. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Plant cuticles shine: advances in wax biosynthesis and export

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunst, Ljerka

    Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Plant cuticles shine: advances in wax biosynthesis stresses. It is composed of cutin polymer matrix and waxes, produced and secreted by epidermal cells involved in fatty acid elongation and biosynthesis of wax components, as well as transporters required

  9. August 4, 2006 Eco-lights shine new hope on `gorillas in the mist'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    August 4, 2006 Eco-lights shine new hope on `gorillas in the mist' Gorilla reserve, Amazon basin and Sri Lankan refugee camps among new Light Up The World Foundation projects The cloud forests deep-powered light and electricity to villages surrounding the Virunga/Bwindi Gorilla Reserve, The U of C-based Light

  10. AP STAR AWARDS Who is the shining star in your department?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AP STAR AWARDS Who is the shining star in your department? Give them the honor they deserve! Deadline for application is February 4, 2011 The AP Stars award was created to express appreciation individual performance at CSU. Anyone can nominate an AP employee for this award! The goal

  11. High brightness electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM); Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM); Young, Lloyd M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

  12. AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF BRIGHT M DWARFS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, Division of Physical Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Gaidos, Eric [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, 1680 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an all-sky catalog of M dwarf stars with apparent infrared magnitude J < 10. The 8889 stars are selected from the ongoing SUPERBLINK survey of stars with proper motion {mu} > 40 mas yr{sup -1}, supplemented on the bright end with the Tycho-2 catalog. Completeness tests which account for kinematic (proper motion) bias suggest that our catalog represents {approx}75% of the estimated {approx}11, 900 M dwarfs with J < 10 expected to populate the entire sky. Our catalog is, however, significantly more complete for the northern sky ({approx}90%) than it is for the south ({approx}60%). Stars are identified as cool, red M dwarfs from a combination of optical and infrared color cuts, and are distinguished from background M giants and highly reddened stars using either existing parallax measurements or, if such measurements are lacking, using their location in an optical-to-infrared reduced proper motion diagram. These bright M dwarfs are all prime targets for exoplanet surveys using the Doppler radial velocity or transit methods; the combination of low-mass and bright apparent magnitude should make possible the detection of Earth-size planets on short-period orbits using currently available techniques. Parallax measurements, when available, and photometric distance estimates are provided for all stars, and these place most systems within 60 pc of the Sun. Spectral type estimated from V - J color shows that most of the stars range from K7 to M4, with only a few late M dwarfs, all within 20 pc. Proximity to the Sun also makes these stars good targets for high-resolution exoplanet imaging searches, especially if younger objects can be identified on the basis of X-ray or UV excess. For that purpose, we include X-ray flux from ROSAT and FUV/NUV ultraviolet magnitudes from GALEX for all stars for which a counterpart can be identified in those catalogs. Additional photometric data include optical magnitudes from Digitized Sky Survey plates and infrared magnitudes from the Two Micron All Sky Survey.

  13. Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PMDepartmentPresentation from the U.S.DutyShines

  14. Axions and 'light shining through a wall': A detailed theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, Stephen L. [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)], E-mail: adler@ias.edu; Gamboa, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: jgamboa@usach.cl; Mendez, F. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Casilla 307, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: fmendez@usach.cl; Lopez-Sarrion, J. [Department of Physics, The City College of the CUNY, NY 10031 (United States)], E-mail: justinux75@gmail.com

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a detailed study of axion-photon and photon-axion conversion amplitudes, which enter the analysis of 'light shining through a wall' experiments. Several different calculational methods are employed and compared, and in all cases we retain a nonzero axion mass. To leading order, we find that when the photon frequency {omega} is very close to the axion mass m, there is a threshold cusp which significantly enhances the photon to axion conversion amplitude, by a factor {omega}/{radical}({omega}{sup 2}-m{sup 2}) relative to the corresponding axion to photon conversion process. When m=0, the enhancement factor reduces to unity and the results of previous calculations are recovered. Our calculations include an exact wave matching analysis, which shows how unitarity is maintained near threshold at {omega}=m, and a discussion of the case when the magnetic field extends into the 'wall' region.

  15. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanmurthy, Prajwal; Formaggio, Joseph; Fowler, Nicholas; Gaerlan, Mikhail; Jiang, Yipeng; Madsen, John; Oblath, Noah; Powers, Adam; Ray, Amy; Riehle, Robertson

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  16. Mississippi State Axion Search: A Light Shining though a Wall ALP Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prajwal Mohanmurthy; Dipangkar Dutta; Joseph Formaggio; Nicholas Fowler; Mikhail Gaerlan; Yipeng Jiang; John Madsen; Noah Oblath; Adam Powers; Amy Ray; Robertson Riehle

    2015-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The elegant solutions to the strong CP problem predict the existence of a particle called axion. Thus, the search for axion like particles (ALP) has been an ongoing endeavor. The possibility that these axion like particles couple to photons in presence of magnetic field gives rise to a technique of detecting these particles known as light shining through a wall (LSW). Mississippi State Axion Search (MASS) is an experiment employing the LSW technique in search for axion like particles. The apparatus consists of two radio frequency (RF) cavities, both under the influence of strong magnetic field and separated by a lead wall. While one of the cavities houses a strong RF generator, the other cavity houses the detector systems. The MASS apparatus looks for excesses in RF photons that tunnel through the wall as a signature of candidate axion-like particles. The concept behind the experiment as well as the projected sensitivities are presented here.

  17. Probing braneworld hypothesis with a "neutron-shining-through-a-wall" experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarrazin, Michael; Lamblin, Jacob; Petit, Fabrice; Terwagne, Guy; Nesvizhevsky, Valery V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility for our visible world to be a 3-brane embedded in a multidimensional bulk is at the heart of many theoretical edifices in high energy physics. Probing the braneworld hypothesis is then a major experimental challenge. Following recent theoretical works showing that matter swapping can occur between braneworlds, we propose a "neutron-shining-through-a-wall" experiment. We first show that an intense neutron source such as a nuclear reactor core can induce a hidden neutron flux in an adjacent hidden braneworld. We then describe how a low background detector can detect neutrons arising from the hidden world and we quantify the expected sensitivity to the swapping probability. As a proof of concept, a constraint is derived from previous experiments.

  18. Probing the braneworld hypothesis with a neutron-shining-through-a-wall experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Sarrazin; Guillaume Pignol; Jacob Lamblin; Fabrice Petit; Guy Terwagne; Valery V. Nesvizhevsky

    2015-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility for our visible world to be a 3-brane embedded in a multidimensional bulk is at the heart of many theoretical edifices in high-energy physics. Probing the braneworld hypothesis is thus a major experimental challenge. Following recent theoretical works showing that matter swapping between braneworlds can occur, we propose a neutron-shining-through-a-wall experiment. We first show that an intense neutron source such as a nuclear reactor core can induce a hidden neutron flux in an adjacent hidden braneworld. We then describe how a low-background detector can detect neutrons arising from the hidden world and quantify the expected sensitivity to the swapping probability. As a proof of concept, a constraint is derived from previous experiments.

  19. LED Record Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

  20. Bright Future NW Energy Coalition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quickly set CO2 emission limits and establish mechanisms to meet them. But the Northwest must not waitAs Usual We have two choices for providing our electrical needs by 2050. We can either develop more of ourCoal Energy Efficiency/CHP 6/kWh With this extra 1,500 aMW in Bright Future we can power more electric

  1. Surface Brightness Profiles of Seyfert Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We built r-band surface brightness profiles by SDSS data for 16 Seyfert galaxies observed in Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. Obtained profiles can be used for finding more accurate lightcurves for these galaxies.

  2. PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 Bright minds and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 Bright minds and organic matter THE 80% Amount by which-friendly behaviour Psychology grad student Reuven Sussman (centre) at the Hillside Centre food court where he

  3. Massive Disks in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An update of the set of low surface brightness galaxies is presented which can be used to set constraints on the otherwise ambiguous decompositions of their rotation curves into contributions due to the various components of the galaxies. The selected galaxies show all clear spiral structure and arguments of density wave theory of galactic spiral arms are used to estimate the masses of the galactic disks. Again these estimates seem to indicate that the disks of low surface brightness galaxies might be much more massive than currently thought. This puzzling result contradicts stellar population synthesis models. This would mean also that low surface brightness galaxies are not dominated by dark matter in their inner parts.

  4. Dark and bright photovoltaic spatial solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valley, G.C. (Hughes Research Laboratories, Malibu, California 90265 (United States)); Segev, M.; Crosignani, B.; Yariv, A. (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)); Fejer, M.M.; Bashaw, M.C. (Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark (bright) planar spatial solitons are predicted for photovoltaic photorefractive materials when the diffraction of an optical beam is exactly compensated by nonlinear self-defocusing (focusing) due to the photovoltaic field and electro-optic effect. These solitons may have steady-state irradiances of microwatts to milliwatts per square centimeter and widths as small as 10 [mu]m in lithium niobate. Optical control is provided by incoherent illumination, and the nonlinear index of a dark soliton may be used to trap a bright soliton by rotating the plane of polarization of the soliton field.

  5. Business Honors Program A Bright Business Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Business Honors Program Achieve! #12;2page A Bright Business Future If you are a talented no further. The Business Honors Program at Mihaylo College of Business and Economics provides a socially and professionally stimulating academic environment to a select group of business administration students. As you

  6. Laser Power Meter Large, bright, backlit LCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodall, Jerry M.

    Laser Power Meter FEATURES Large, bright, backlit LCD display Digital accuracy with analog-like movement for laser tuning Works with thermopile and optical sensors Intuitive button-driven user COMPATIBILITY PowerMax thermal sensors Optical sensors FieldMaxII-TO Coherent Laser Measurement and Control

  7. Surface brightness in plasma-redshift cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Brynjolfsson

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2001 Lori M. Lubin and Allan Sandage, using big-bang cosmology for interpreting the data, found the surface brightness of galaxies to be inversely proportional to about the third power of (1+z), while the contemporary big-bang cosmology predicts that the surface brightness is inversely proportional to the fourth power of (1+z). In contrast, these surface brightness observations are in agreement with the predictions of the plasma-redshift cosmology. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), who surmised the big-bang expansion, interpreted the observations to indicate that the diameters of galaxies are inversely proportional to (1+z). In contrast, when assuming plasma-redshift cosmology, the diameters of galaxies are observed to be constant independent of redshift and any expansion. Lubin and Sandage (2001) and Barden et al. (2005), when using big-bang cosmology, observed the average absolute magnitude of galaxies to decrease with redshift; while in plasma redshift cosmology it is a constant. Lubin and Sandage and Barden et al. suggested that a coherent evolution could explain the discrepancy between the observed relations and those predicted in the big-bang cosmology. We have failed to find support for this explanation. We consider the observed relations between the redshift and the surface-brightness, the galaxy diameter, and the absolute magnitude to be robust confirmations of plasma-redshift cosmology.

  8. New Exclusion Limits for the Search of Scalar and Pseudoscalar Axion-Like Particles from "Light Shining Through a Wall"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Ballou; G. Deferne; M. Finger Jr.; M. Finger; L. Flekova; J. Hosek; S. Kunc; K. Macuchova; K. A. Meissner; P. Pugnat; M. Schott; A. Siemko; M. Slunecka; M. Sulc; C. Weinsheimer; J. Zicha

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics beyond the Standard Model predicts the possible existence of new particles that can be searched at the low energy frontier in the sub-eV range. The OSQAR photon regeneration experiment looks for "Light Shining through a Wall" from the quantum oscillation of optical photons into "Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles", such as axion or Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), in a 9 T transverse magnetic field over the unprecedented length of $2 \\times 14.3$ m. In 2014, this experiment has been run with an outstanding sensitivity, using an 18.5 W continuous wave laser emitting in the green spectral regime (532 nm). No regenerated photons have been detected after the wall, pushing the limits for the existence of axions and ALPs down to an unprecedented level for such a type of laboratory experiment. The di-photon couplings of possible pseudo-scalar and scalar ALPs can be constrained in the nearly massless limit to be less than $3.5\\cdot 10^{-8}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and $3.2\\cdot 10^{-8}$ GeV$^{-1}$, respectively.

  9. New Exclusion Limits for the Search of Scalar and Pseudoscalar Axion-Like Particles from "Light Shining Through a Wall"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballou, R; Finger, M; Finger, M; Flekova, L; Hosek, J; Kunc, S; Macuchova, K; Meissner, K A; Pugnat, P; Schott, M; Siemko, A; Slunecka, M; Sulc, M; Weinsheimer, C; Zicha, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physics beyond the Standard Model predicts the possible existence of new particles that can be searched at the low energy frontier in the sub-eV range. The OSQAR photon regeneration experiment looks for "Light Shining through a Wall" from the quantum oscillation of optical photons into "Weakly Interacting Sub-eV Particles", such as axion or Axion-Like Particles (ALPs), in a 9 T transverse magnetic field over the unprecedented length of $2 \\times 14.3$ m. In 2014, this experiment has been run with an outstanding sensitivity, using an 18.5 W continuous wave laser emitting in the green spectral regime (532 nm). No regenerated photons have been detected after the wall, pushing the limits for the existence of axions and ALPs down to an unprecedented level for such a type of laboratory experiment. The di-photon couplings of possible pseudo-scalar and scalar ALPs can be constrained in the nearly massless limit to be less than $3.5\\cdot 10^{-8}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and $3.2\\cdot 10^{-8}$ GeV$^{-1}$, respectively.

  10. An ultra-bright atom laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bolpasi; N. K. Efremidis; M. J. Morrissey; P. Condylis; D. Sahagun; M. Baker; W. von Klitzing

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel, ultra-bright atom-laser and ultra-cold thermal atom beam. Using rf-radiation we strongly couple the magnetic hyperfine levels of 87Rb atoms in a magnetically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. At low rf-frequencies gravity opens a small hole in the trapping potenital and a well collimated, extremely bright atom laser emerges from just below the condensate. As opposed to traditional atom lasers based on weak coupling, this technique allows us to outcouple atoms at an arbitrarily large rate. We demonstrate an increase in flux per atom in the BEC by a factor of sixteen compared to the brightest quasi-continuous atom laser. Furthermore, we produce by two orders of magnitude the coldest thermal atom beam to date (200 nK).

  11. EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library EECBG Success Story: Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 9:53am Addthis Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing...

  12. Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library Bright Green Spot: Fort Worth Library September 30, 2010 - 4:07pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell Fort Worth's Central Library is seeing tremendous...

  13. Search for bright stars with infrared excess

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raharto, Moedji, E-mail: moedji@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright stars, stars with visual magnitude smaller than 6.5, can be studied using small telescope. In general, if stars are assumed as black body radiator, then the color in infrared (IR) region is usually equal to zero. Infrared data from IRAS observations at 12 and 25?m (micron) with good flux quality are used to search for bright stars (from Bright Stars Catalogues) with infrared excess. In magnitude scale, stars with IR excess is defined as stars with IR color m{sub 12}?m{sub 25}>0; where m{sub 12}?m{sub 25}?=??2.5log(F{sub 12}/F{sub 25})+1.56, where F{sub 12} and F{sub 25} are flux density in Jansky at 12 and 25?m, respectively. Stars with similar spectral type are expected to have similar color. The existence of infrared excess in the same spectral type indicates the existence of circum-stellar dust, the origin of which is probably due to the remnant of pre main-sequence evolution during star formation or post AGB evolution or due to physical process such as the rotation of those stars.

  14. All-Star Nanocrystals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic|Aljazeera story on rareAll8.

  15. BrightPhase Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and Innovative Energy Technologies | OpenBrigham CityBrightPhase

  16. BrightSource Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumAguaBBBWind- GeradoraBorealBradBrightSource

  17. Bright Automotive Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridger Valley Elec Assn, Inc (Utah)Bright

  18. The IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, D B; Kim, D C; Surace, J A; Soifer, B T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IRAS flux densities, redshifts, and infrared luminosities are reported for all sources identified in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS), a complete flux-limited survey of all extragalactic objects with total 60 micron flux density greater than 5.24 Jy, covering the entire sky surveyed by IRAS at Galactic latitude |b| > 5 degrees. The RBGS includes 629 objects, with a median (mean) sample redshift of 0.0082 (0.0126) and a maximum redshift of 0.0876. The RBGS supersedes the previous two-part IRAS Bright Galaxy Samples, which were compiled before the final ("Pass 3") calibration of the IRAS Level 1 Archive in May 1990. The RBGS also makes use of more accurate and consistent automated methods to measure the flux of objects with extended emission. Basic properties of the RBGS sources are summarized, including estimated total infrared luminosities, as well as updates to cross-identifications with sources from optical galaxy catalogs established using the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). In addition...

  19. automated local bright: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  20. artificial sky brightness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  1. average brightness thomson: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  2. area telescope bright: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  3. albeit ultraviolet bright: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the penumbral features. The bright points are not uniformly distributed over the umbra but preferentially located around the penumbral boundary and in the fast decaying...

  4. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  5. Dim Matter in the Disks of Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Fuchs

    2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made to set constraints on the otherwise ambiguous decomposition of the rotation curves of low surface brightness galaxies into contributions due to the various components of the galaxies. For this purpose galaxies are selected which show clear spiral structure. Arguments of density wave theory of galactic spiral arms are then used to estimate the masses of the galactic disks. These estimates seem to indicate that the disks of low surface brightness galaxies might be much more massive than currently thought. This unexpected result contradicts stellar population synthesis models. This would also mean that low surface brightness galaxies are not dominated by dark matter in their inner parts.

  6. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, Max; Commins, Eugene D.; Heifets, Sam; Sannibale,Fernando

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsedelectron source, which has the potential for many useful applications inelectron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electronscattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of theproposed scheme is presented.

  7. Infrared Brightness Temperature of Mars, 1983-2103

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Wright

    2007-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The predicted infrared brightness temperature of Mars using the 1976 model of Wright is tabulated here for the period 1983 to 2103. This model was developed for far-infrared calibration, and is still being used for JCMT calibration.

  8. On the relationship between brightness temperature and thunderstorm evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, Anita Denise

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE AND THUNDERSTORM EVOLUTION A Senior Honors Thesis By ANITA DENISE RAPP Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs 4 Academic Scholarslnps Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment... of the requirements of the UNIVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS April 2000 Group: Physical Sciences ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN BRIGHTNESS TEMPERATURE AND THUNDERSTORM EVOLUTION A Senior Honors Thesis By ANITA DENlSE RAPP Submitted to the OIIice...

  9. Bright X-ray galaxies in SDSS filaments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tugay, A V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen bright X-ray emitting galaxies were found in nearby filaments within SDSS region. Basic X-ray spectral parameters were estimated for these galaxies using power law model with photoelectric absorption. A close pair of X-ray galaxies was found.

  10. Bright Spots in the South Carolina the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Bright Spots in the South Carolina the Economy 2012 African American Economic Summit Doug Woodward Professor of Economics #12;Overview · Why we should worry. ­ Global economy and financial contagion. ­ U.S. economy and political uncertainty. · Why we should be happy. ­ South Carolina economy healing. · Robust

  11. Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Heifets, S.; Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /SLAC

    2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of the proposed scheme is presented.

  12. SC-RISE LECTURE SERIES BRIGHT HORIZONS IN SOLAR ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SC-RISE LECTURE SERIES BRIGHT HORIZONS IN SOLAR ENERGY Sustainable Energy Opportunities, Options are being developed including biomass, geothermal, hydropower, ocean thermal energy conversion, solar electric, solar thermal, and wind. However, such aspects as low energy density, siting, and temporal

  13. Microwave generated electrodeless lamp for producing bright output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Ch. H.; Ury, M. G.

    1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave generated electrodeless light source for producing a bright output comprising a lamp structure including a microwave chamber and a plasma medium-containing lamp envelope having a maximum dimension which is substantially less than a wavelength disposed therein. To provide the desired radiation output the interior of the chamber is coated with a UV-reflective material and the chamber has an opening for allowing UV radiation to exit, which is covered with a metallic mesh. The chamber is arranged to be near-resonant at a single wavelength, and the lamp envelope has a fill including mercury at an operating pressure of 1-2 atmospheres, while a power density of at least 250-300 (watts/cm/sup 3/) is coupled to the envelope to result in a relatively high deep UV output at a relatively high brightness.

  14. Ultra-bright pulsed electron beam with low longitudinal emittance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography has been described. The source makes use of Cs atoms in an atomic beam. The source is cycled beginning with a laser pulse that excites a single Cs atom on average to a band of high-lying Rydberg nP states. The resulting valence electron Rydberg wave packet evolves in a nearly classical Kepler orbit. When the electron reaches apogee, an electric field pulse is applied that ionizes the atom and accelerates the electron away from its parent ion. The collection of electron wave packets thus generated in a series of cycles can occupy a phase volume near the quantum limit and it can possess very high brightness. Each wave packet can exhibit a considerable degree of coherence.

  15. Extremely High Current, High-Brightness Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. Ben-Zvi; D.S. Barton; D.B. Beavis; M. Blaskiewicz; J.M. Brennan; A. Burrill; R. Calaga; P. Cameron; X.Y. Chang; R. Connolly; D.M. Gassner; J.G. Grimes; H. Hahn; A. Hershcovitch; H.-C. Hseuh; P.D.J. Johnson; D. Kayran; J. Kewisch; R.F. Lambiase; V. Litvinenko; G.T. McIntyre; W. Meng; T.C.N. Nehring; T. Nicoletti; B. Oerter; D. Pate; J. Rank; T. Rao; T. Roser; T. Russo; J. Scaduto; Z. Segalov; K. Smith; N.W.W. Williams; K.-C. Wu; V. Yakimenko; K. Yip; A. Zaltsman; Y. Zhao; H. Bluem; A. Burger; M.D. Cole; A.J. Favale; D. Holmes; J. Rathke; T. Schultheiss; A.M.M. Todd; J.R. Delayen; L. W. Funk; P. Kneisel; H.L. Phillips; J.P. Preble

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Next generation ERL light-sources, high-energy electron coolers, high-power Free-Electron Lasers, powerful Compton X-ray sources and many other accelerators were made possible by the emerging technology of high-power, high-brightness electron beams. In order to get the anticipated performance level of ampere-class currents, many technological barriers are yet to be broken. BNL's Collider-Accelerator Department is pursuing some of these technologies for its electron cooling of RHIC application, as well as a possible future electron-hadron collider. We will describe work on CW, high-current and high-brightness electron beams. This will include a description of a superconducting, laser-photocathode RF gun and an accelerator cavity capable of producing low emittance (about 1 micron rms normalized) one nano-Coulomb bunches at currents of the order of one ampere average.

  16. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  17. A statistical study of bright spot reflection parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godwin, David Lee

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cal Study of Bright Spot Reflection Parameters. (December 1981) David Lee Godwin, B. S. , Pepperdine University Chairman of Adv1sory Committee: Dr. T. W. Spencer A data set consisting of two seismic lines served as the basis of study... obtained from each of the seismic lines were compared to deter- mine if the presence of commercial quantities of gas could be identified. The measurement process revealed that the interval travel time measurements between the marker horizons...

  18. High-brightness switchable multiwavelength remote laser in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zeng Bin; Li Guihua; Chu Wei; Ni Jielei; Zhang Haisu [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Xu Huailiang [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a harmonic-seeded switchable multiwavelength laser in air driven by intense midinfrared femtosecond laser pulses, in which population inversion occurs at an ultrafast time scale (i.e., less than {approx}200 fs) owing to direct formation of excited molecular nitrogen ions by strong-field ionization of inner-valence electrons. The bright multiwavelength laser in air opens the perspective for remote detection of multiple pollutants based on nonlinear optical spectroscopy.

  19. Structure of Bright 2MASS Galaxies: 2D Fits to the Ks-band Surface Brightness Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel H. McIntosh; Ari H. Maller; Neal Katz; Martin D. Weinberg

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unprecedented sky coverage and photometric uniformity of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) provides a rich resource for obtaining a detailed understanding of the galaxies populating our local (z<0.1) Universe. A full characterization of the physical structure of nearby galaxies is essential for theoretical and observational studies of galaxy evolution and structure formation. We have begun a quantified description of the internal structure and morphology of 10,000 bright (10brightness profiles using GIM2D. From our initial Monte Carlo tests on 77 galaxies drawn at random from the RC3, we find that the model derived structural parameter errors due to sky uncertainies are typically less than 10%.

  20. The redshifts of bright sub-mm sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key goals in observational cosmology over the next few years will be to establish the redshift distribution of the recently-discovered sub-mm source population. In this brief review I discuss and summarize the redshift information which has been gleaned to date for the ~ 50 bright sub-mm sources which have been uncovered via the six main classes of survey performed with SCUBA on the JCMT over the last 2-3 years. Despite the biases inherent in some of these surveys, and the crudeness of the redshift information available in others, I conclude that all current information suggests that only 10-15 % of luminous sub-mm sources lie at z < 2, and that the median redshift of this population is z ~ 3. I suggest that such a high median redshift is arguably not unexpected given current theories designed to explain the correlation between black-hole mass and spheroid mass found at low redshift. In such scenarios, peak AGN emission is expected to correspond to, or even to cause termination of major star-formation activity in the host spheroid. In contrast, maximum dust emission is expected to occur roughly half-way through the star-formation process. Given that optical emission from bright quasars peaks at z = 2.5, dust-emission from massive ellipticals might be reasonably expected to peak at some point in the preceding ~ 1 Gyr, at z ~ 3. Confirmation or refutation of this picture requires significantly-improved redshift information on bright samples of SCUBA sources.

  1. On the Origin of Low-Surface-Brightness Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Antonuccio-Delogu

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the problem of the origin of Low-Surface-Brightness (LSB) galaxies within the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) cosmological model ($\\Omega =1, h=0.5$). Taking into account the effect of substructure on the collapse times of low overdensity peaks, we show that the abundance of these peaks is larger than previously expected because of the dragging caused by dynamical friction induced by the presence of small-scale substructure. The number density of these shallow, low-density peaks turns out to be in good agreement with the observed overdensity of the blue LSB galaxies found during recent surveys.

  2. Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Future of CSP: ChallengesEnergy For PersonsBright Lights and

  3. NanoBright Technologies Pte Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean EnergyEnergyNance County,WasteNanoBright

  4. Comparative Analysis of a Transition Region Bright Point with a Blinker and Coronal Bright Point Using Multiple EIS Emission Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orange, N Brice; Chesny, David L; Patel, Maulik; Hesterly, Katie; Preuss, Lauren; Neira, Chantale; Turner, Niescja E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since their discovery twenty year ago, transition region bright points (TRBPs) have never been observed spectroscopically. Bright point properties have not been compared with similar transition region and coronal structures. In this work we have investigated three transient quiet Sun brightenings including a TRBP, a coronal BP (CBP) and a blinker. We use time-series observations of the extreme ultraviolet emission lines of a wide range of temperature T (log T = 5.3 - 6.4) from the EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS) onboard the Hinode satellite. We present the EIS temperature maps and Doppler maps, which are compared with magnetograms from the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) onboard the SOHO satellite. Doppler velocities of the TR BP and blinker are <,25 km s$^{-1}$, which is typical of transient TR phenomena. The Dopper velocities of the CBP were found to be < 20 km s^{-1} with exception of those measured at log T = 6.2 where a distinct bi-directional jet is observed. From an EM loci analysis we find evidenc...

  5. Michael Liebreich (Energy All Stars Presentation) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), OctoberMayEnergyInstitute of Standards andMichael

  6. High Brightness Plasmon-Enhanced Nanostructured Gold Photoemitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Yu; Joly, Alan G.; Kong, Lingmei; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmonic nanohole arrays are fabricated in gold thin films by focused ion beam (FIB) lithography. Subsequent heat treatment creates sub 100 nm nanometric structures including tips, rods and flakes, all localized in the nanohole array region. The combined nanohole array and nanostructured surface comprise an efficient photoemitter. High brightness photoemission is observed from this construct using photoemission electron microscopy (PEEM), following 780 nm femtosecond (fs) laser irradiation. By comparing our observables to results of finite difference time domain (FDTD) calculations, we demonstrate that photoemission from the sub-100 nm structures is enhanced in the region of propagating surface plasmons launched from the nanohole arrays. Additionally, by tuning hole diameter and separation in the nanohole array, the photoemission intensity of nanostructured photoemitters can be controlled. We observe a photoemission enhancement of over 108, relative to photoemission from the flat region of the gold substrate at laser intensities well below the ablation threshold.

  7. Bright Stars in the Galactic Globular M5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Brocato; V. Castellani; V. Ripepi

    1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a CCD investigation of the galactic globular M5 aimed to increase the statistical relevance of the available sample of evolving bright stars. Previous investigations, limited to the outer cluster region, have been extended toward the cluster center, more than doubling the number of observed luminous stars. On this basis, we discuss a statistically relevant sample, rich of 415 HB stars. The occurrence of a gap in the blue side of the HB is suggested. Comparison to the current evolutionary scenario discloses a good agreement concerning both the C-M diagram location and the relative abundance of stars in the advanced evolutionary phases, supporting our present knowledge of the evolution of low mass stars. Determination of the amount of the original helium content through the ratio R N(HB)/N(RGB) gives $Y = 0.22 \\pm 0.02$.

  8. How Many CASTLE Bulbs Would You Need To Match the Brightness of the Sun?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    How Many CASTLE Bulbs Would You Need To Match the Brightness of the Sun? = ? Please do all million miles), so if we were to try to build the Sun out of light bulbs, we'd need a bunch! But, how many objects: the Sun, and a CASTLE light bulb. What do we mean by "brightness?" The electromagnetic (EM

  9. Exploring Infrared Properties of Giant Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nurur Rahman; Justin H. Howell; George Helou; Joseph M. Mazzarella; Brent Buckalew

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Abridged: We present analysis of Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the three low surface brightness (LSB) optical giant galaxies Malin 1, UGC 6614 and UGC 9024. Mid- and far-infrared morphology, spectral energy distributions, and integrated colors are used to derive the dust mass, dust-to-gas mass ratio, total infrared luminosity, and star formation rate (SFR). The 8 micron images indicate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules are present in the central regions of all three metal-poor LSB galaxies. The diffuse optical disks of Malin 1 and UGC 9024 remain undetected at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The dustiest of the three LSB galaxies, UGC 6614, has infrared morphology that varies significantly with wavelength. The 8 and 24 micron emission is co-spatial with H\\alpha emission previously observed in the outer ring of UGC 6614. The estimated dust-to-gas ratios, from less than 10^{-3} to 10^{-2}, support previous indications that the LSB galaxies are relatively dust poor compared to the HSB galaxies. The total infrared luminosities are approximately 1/3 to 1/2 the blue band luminosities, suggesting that old stellar populations are the primary source of dust heating in these LSB objects. The SFR estimated from the infrared data ranges ~0.01-0.88 M_sun yr^{-1}, consistent with results from optical studies.

  10. Low Cost Lithography Tool for High Brightness LED Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hawryluk; Emily True

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this activity was to address the need for improved manufacturing tools for LEDs. Improvements include lower cost (both capital equipment cost reductions and cost-ofownership reductions), better automation and better yields. To meet the DOE objective of $1- 2/kilolumen, it will be necessary to develop these highly automated manufacturing tools. Lithography is used extensively in the fabrication of high-brightness LEDs, but the tools used to date are not scalable to high-volume manufacturing. This activity addressed the LED lithography process. During R&D and low volume manufacturing, most LED companies use contact-printers. However, several industries have shown that these printers are incompatible with high volume manufacturing and the LED industry needs to evolve to projection steppers. The need for projection lithography tools for LED manufacturing is identified in the Solid State Lighting Manufacturing Roadmap Draft, June 2009. The Roadmap states that Projection tools are needed by 2011. This work will modify a stepper, originally designed for semiconductor manufacturing, for use in LED manufacturing. This work addresses improvements to yield, material handling, automation and throughput for LED manufacturing while reducing the capital equipment cost.

  11. Discovery of a Nearby Low-Surface-Brightness Spiral Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Burton; R. Braun; R. A. M. Walterbos; C. G. Hoopes

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of a search for compact, isolated gas clouds moving with anomalous velocities in or near our own Galaxy (Braun and Burton 1998 A&A, in press), we have discovered, in the data of the Leiden/Dwingeloo survey (Hartmann and Burton 1997, Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen, CUP) of Galactic hydrogen, the HI signature of a large galaxy, moving at a recession velocity of 282 km/s, with respect to our Galaxy. Deep multicolor and spectroscopic optical observations show the presence of star formation in scattered HII regions; radio HI synthesis interferometry confirms that the galaxy is rich in HI and has the rotation signature of a spiral galaxy; a submillimeter observation failed to detect the CO molecule. The radio and optical evidence combined suggest its classification as a low-surface-brightness spiral galaxy. It is located in close spatial and kinematic proximity to the galaxy NGC 6946. The newly-discovered galaxy, which we call Cepheus 1, is at a distance of about 6 Mpc. It is probably to be numbered amongst the nearest few LSB spirals.

  12. Emission Line Properties of the Large Bright Quasar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl Forster; Paul J. Green; Thomas L. Aldcroft; Marianne Vestergaard; Craig B. Foltz; Paul C. Hewett

    2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the optical/UV emission lines for a large homogeneous sample of 993 quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey. Our largely automated technique accounts for continuum breaks and galactic reddening, and we perform multicomponent fits to emission line profiles, including the effects of blended iron emission, and of absorption lines both galactic and intrinsic. Here we describe the fitting algorithm and present the results of line fits to the LBQS sample, including upper limits to line equivalent widths when warranted. The distribution of measured line parameters, principally equivalent width and FWHM, are detailed for a variety of lines, including upper limits. We thus initiate a large-scale investigation of correlations between the high energy continuum and emission lines in quasars, to be extended to complementary samples using similar techniques. High quality, reproducible measurements of emission lines for uniformly selected samples will advance our understanding of active galaxies, especially in a new era of large surveys selected by a variety of complementary methods.

  13. THE STABILITY OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS DISKS BASED ON MULTI-WAVELENGTH MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLachlan, J. M.

    To investigate the structure and composition of the dusty interstellar medium (ISM) of low surface brightness (LSB) disk galaxies, we have used multi-wavelength photometry to construct spectral energy distributions for ...

  14. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results for the 4.5 GeV LCLS beam. . . . . . . . . . .148 Simulation of a 13.65 GeV LCLS beam . . . . . . . . . .142 LCLS ultra-low charge, high brightness beam

  15. Visualizing individual microtubules by bright field microscopy Braulio Gutirrez-Medinaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Steven

    a microscope with conventional bright field optics in conjunction with a webcam-type camera and a light-emitting diode illuminator. The light scattered by microtubules is image-processed to remove the background

  16. Batse observations of gamma-ray burst spectra; 2, peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, L A; Matteson, J L; Briggs, M S; Pendleton, G N; Preece, R D; Paciesas, W S; Teegarden, B J; Palmer, D M; Schaefer, B E; Cline, T L; Fishman, G J; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C A; Wilson, R B; Lestrade, J P

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors. High resolution spectra are characterized by the energy of the peak of \

  17. Progress in bright ion beams for industry, medicine and fusion at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HI FAN 1160 LBNL-50492 Progress in Bright Ion BeamsMedicine and Fusion at LBNL Joe W. Kwan Lawrence BerkeleyAbstract Recent progresses at LBNL in developing ion beams

  18. Proceedings of the third ICFA mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roser, T.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The third mini-workshop on high intensity, high brightness hadron accelerators was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on May 7-9, 1997 and had about 30 participants. The workshop focussed on rf and longitudinal dynamics issues relevant to intense and/or bright hadron synchrotrons. A plenary session was followed by four sessions on particular topics. This document contains copies of the viewgraphs used as well as summaries written by the session chairs.

  19. Formation of multi-solitons and vortex bright solitons in Bose-condensed alkali-metal atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Salasnich

    2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of multi-solitons and vortex bright solitons in Bose-condensed alkali-metal atoms is analyzed by using the nonpolynomial Schordinger equation. A train of bright solitons is obtained from an axially homogeneous Bose-Einstein condensate by a sudden change of the scattering length from repulsive to attractive. We derive an analytical expression for the number of bright solitons generated by using this mechanism. The formula generalizes a previous formula obtained with the 1D Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In the second part we consider vortex bright solitons, namely cigar-shaped bright solitons with a nonzero angular quantum number $k$ along the axial direction. By using a variational approach we determine the shape of vortex bright solitons, showing that the critical number of atoms for the collapse of the vortex soliton increases with a larger $k$. Finally we calculate monopole and quadrupole collective oscillations of these vortex bright solitons.

  20. 2002 AUGUST 24 LIMB FLARE LOOP: DYNAMICS OF MICROWAVE BRIGHTNESS DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Ji, H. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Melnikov, V. F.; Gorbikov, S. P.; Pyatakov, N. P. [Radiophysical Research Institute (NIRFI), Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Myagkova, I. N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vreznikova@nirfi.sci-nnov.ru

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution radio observation of Nobeyama Radioheliograph at 17 and 34 GHz allowed studying the dynamics of microwave brightness distribution along the giant limb flaring loop in the event of 2002 August 24. It is found that on the rising phase of the radio burst the brightness distribution was highly asymmetric, with a strong maximum near the southern footpoint (SFP) and much weaker brightness enhancements near the loop top (LT) and northern footpoint. On the decay phase, the LT gradually became most bright. The similar dynamics of brightness distribution are shown to happen for all major temporal subpeaks of the burst. Results of our diagnostics show two important properties: (1) the number density of mildly relativistic electrons in the LT is much higher than near the footpoints (FPs) during rise, maximum and decay of each major peak; and (2) the ratio of the electron number densities in the LT and an FP increases from the maximum to decay phase. Model simulations with making use of the nonstationary Fokker-Planck equation have allowed us to find the model explaining the major properties of the microwave brightness distribution and dynamics. The model is characterized by a compact source of electrons located near the center of an asymmetric magnetic loop; the source is nonstationary, long lasting, and injecting high-energy electrons with the pitch-angle distribution mostly directed toward the SFP but also having a very weak isotropic component. This easily explains the observed brightness asymmetry. The observed dynamics comes due to two reasons: faster precipitation of electrons having their mirror points near the ends of the magnetic trap, and relatively faster decay of the lower energy electrons responsible for the gyrosynchrotron emission near the FPs with higher magnetic field.

  1. Asymmetric Surface Brightness Distribution of Altair Observed with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Ohishi; Tyler E. Nordgren; Donald J. Hutter

    2004-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the rapidly rotating A7IV-V star, Altair, has been measured by the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The observations were recorded simultaneously using a triangle of three long baselines of 30m, 37m, and 64m, on 19 spectral channels, covering the wavelength range of 520nm to 850nm. The outstanding characteristics of these observations are (a) high resolution with the minimum fringe spacing of 1.7mas, easily resolving the 3-milliarcsecond (mas) stellar disk, and (b) the measurement of closure phase which is a sensitive indicator to the asymmetry of the brightness distribution of the source. Uniform disk diameters fit to the measured squared visibility amplitudes confirms the Altair's oblate shape due to its rapid rotation. The measured observables of Altair showed two features which are inconsistent with both the uniform-disk and limb-darkened disk models, while the measured observable of the comparison star, Vega, are consistent with the limb-darkened disk model. The first feature is that measured squared visibility amplitudes at the first minimum do not reach 0.0 but rather remain at about 0.02, indicating the existence of a small bright region on the stellar disk. The other is that the measured closure phases show non-zero/180 degrees at all spectral channels, which requires an asymmetric surface brightness distribution. We fitted the measured observables to a model with a bright spot on a limb-darkened disk and found the observations are well reproduced by a bright spot, which has relative intensity of 4.7%, on a 3.38 mas limb-darkened stellar disk. Rapid rotation of Altair indicates that this bright region is a pole, which is brighter than other part of the star owing to gravity darkening.

  2. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF M31'S STELLAR HALO FROM THE SPLASH SURVEY. I. SURFACE BRIGHTNESS PROFILE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra [UCO/Lick Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beaton, Rachael L.; Majewski, Steven R.; Ostheimer, James C.; Patterson, Richard J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Bullock, James; Tollerud, Erik J. [Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Geha, Marla C. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Kalirai, Jason S. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kirby, Evan N. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tanaka, Mikito; Chiba, Masashi, E-mail: kgilbert@astro.washington.edu [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the surface brightness profile of M31's stellar halo out to a projected radius of 175 kpc. The surface brightness estimates are based on confirmed samples of M31 red giant branch stars derived from Keck/DEIMOS spectroscopic observations. A set of empirical spectroscopic and photometric M31 membership diagnostics is used to identify and reject foreground and background contaminants. This enables us to trace the stellar halo of M31 to larger projected distances and fainter surface brightnesses than previous photometric studies. The surface brightness profile of M31's halo follows a power law with index -2.2 {+-} 0.2 and extends to a projected distance of at least {approx}175 kpc ({approx}2/3 of M31's virial radius), with no evidence of a downward break at large radii. The best-fit elliptical isophotes have b/a = 0.94 with the major axis of the halo aligned along the minor axis of M31's disk, consistent with a prolate halo, although the data are also consistent with M31's halo having spherical symmetry. The fact that tidal debris features are kinematically cold is used to identify substructure in the spectroscopic fields out to projected radii of 90 kpc and investigate the effect of this substructure on the surface brightness profile. The scatter in the surface brightness profile is reduced when kinematically identified tidal debris features in M31 are statistically subtracted; the remaining profile indicates that a comparatively diffuse stellar component to M31's stellar halo exists to large distances. Beyond 90 kpc, kinematically cold tidal debris features cannot be identified due to small number statistics; nevertheless, the significant field-to-field variation in surface brightness beyond 90 kpc suggests that the outermost region of M31's halo is also comprised to a significant degree of stars stripped from accreted objects.

  3. Towards an Understanding of the Mid-Infrared Surface Brightness of Normal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Dale; George Helou; Nancy A. Silbermann; Alessandra Contursi; Sangeeta Malhotra; Robert H. Rubin

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a mid-infrared color and surface brightness analysis of IC 10, NGC 1313, and NGC 6946, three of the nearby galaxies studied under the Infrared Space Observatory Key Project on Normal Galaxies. Images with < 9 arcsecond (170 pc) resolution of these nearly face-on, late-type galaxies were obtained using the LW2 (6.75 mu) and LW3 (15 mu) ISOCAM filters. Though their global I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) flux ratios are similar and typical of normal galaxies, they show distinct trends of this color ratio with mid-infrared surface brightness. We find that I_nu(6.75 mu)/I_nu(15 mu) ~< 1 only occurs for regions of intense heating activity where the continuum rises at 15 micron and where PAH destruction can play an important role. The shape of the color-surface brightness trend also appears to depend, to the second-order, on the hardness of the ionizing radiation. We discuss these findings in the context of a two-component model for the phases of the interstellar medium and suggest that star formation intensity is largely responsible for the mid-infrared surface brightness and colors within normal galaxies, whereas differences in dust column density are the primary drivers of variations in the mid-infrared surface brightness between the disks of normal galaxies.

  4. The Deconvolution of Lunar Brightness Temperature based on Maximum Entropy Method using Chang'E-2 Microwave Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Shuguo; Feng, Jianqing; Li, Chunlai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive and multi-channel microwave sounder onboard Chang'E-2 orbiter has successfully performed microwave observation of the lunar surface and subsurface structure. Compared with Chang'E-1 orbiter, Chang'E-2 orbiter obtained more accurate and comprehensive microwave brightness temperature data which is helpful for further research. Since there is a close relationship between microwave brightness temperature data and some related properties of the lunar regolith, such as the thickness, temperature and dielectric constant, so precise and high resolution brightness temperature is necessary for such research. However, through the detection mechanism of the microwave sounder, the brightness temperature data acquired from the microwave sounder is weighted by the antenna radiation pattern, so the data is the convolution of the antenna radiation pattern and the lunar brightness temperature. In order to obtain the real lunar brightness temperature, a deconvolution method is needed. The aim of this paper is to solve...

  5. The artificial night sky brightness mapped from DMSP Operational Linescan System measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Cinzano; F. Falchi; C. D. Elvidge; K. E. Baugh

    2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method to map the artificial sky brightness across large territories in astronomical photometric bands with a resolution of approximately 1 km. This is useful to quantify the situation of night sky pollution, to recognize potential astronomical sites and to allow future monitoring of trends. The artificial sky brightness present in the chosen direction at a given position on the Earth's surface is obtained by the integration of the contributions produced by every surface area in the surrounding. Each contribution is computed based on detailed models for the propagation in the atmosphere of the upward light flux emitted by the area. The light flux is measured with top of atmosphere radiometric observations made by the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) Operational Linescan System. We applied the described method to Europe obtaining the maps of artificial sky brightness in V and B bands.

  6. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Tong-Pu, E-mail: tongpu@nudt.edu.cn; Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Luo, Wen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of South China, Hengyang 421001 (China); Pukhov, Alexander [Institut fr Theoretische Physik I, Heinrich-Heine-Universitt Dsseldorf, 40225 Dsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1?keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  7. A Characterization of the Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear Bursts From 4U 1636-536

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coleman Miller

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of nearly coherent brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from six neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries has opened up a new way to study the propagation of thermonuclear burning, and may ultimately lead to greater understanding of thermonuclear propagation in other astrophysical contexts, such as in Type Ia supernovae. Here we report detailed analyses of the ~580 Hz brightness oscillations during bursts from 4U 1636-536. We investigate the bursts as a whole and, in more detail, the initial portions of the bursts. We analyze the ~580 Hz oscillations in the initial 0.75 seconds of the five bursts that were used in a previous search for a brightness oscillation at the expected ~290 Hz spin frequency, and find that if the same frequency model describes all five bursts there is insufficient data to require more than a constant frequency or, possibly, a frequency plus a frequency derivative. Therefore, although it is appropriate to use an arbitrarily complicated model of the ~580 Hz oscillations to generate a candidate waveform for the ~290 Hz oscillations, models with more than two parameters are not required by the data. For the bursts as a whole we show that the characteristics of the brightness oscillations vary greatly from burst to burst. We find, however, that in at least one of the bursts, and possibly in three of the four that have strong brightness oscillations throughout the burst, the oscillation frequency reaches a maximum several seconds into the burst and then decreases. This behavior has not been reported previously for burst brightness oscillations, and it poses a challenge to the standard burning layer expansion explanation for the frequency changes.

  8. BRIGHT BROADBAND AFTERGLOWS OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM MERGERS OF BINARY NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao He; Ding Xuan; Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Dai Zigao, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    If double neutron star mergers leave behind a massive magnetar rather than a black hole, then a bright early afterglow can follow the gravitational wave burst (GWB) even if there is no short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-GWB association or if there is an association but the SGRB does not beam toward Earth. Besides directly dissipating the proto-magnetar wind, as suggested by Zhang, here we suggest that the magnetar wind could push the ejecta launched during the merger process and, under certain conditions, would reach a relativistic speed. Such a magnetar-powered ejecta, when interacting with the ambient medium, would develop a bright broadband afterglow due to synchrotron radiation. We study this physical scenario in detail and present the predicted X-ray, optical, and radio light curves for a range of magnetar and ejecta parameters. We show that the X-ray and optical light curves usually peak around the magnetar spin-down timescale ({approx}10{sup 3}-10{sup 5} s), reaching brightnesses readily detectable by wide-field X-ray and optical telescopes, and remain detectable for an extended period. The radio afterglow peaks later, but is much brighter than the case without a magnetar energy injection. Therefore, such bright broadband afterglows, if detected and combined with GWBs in the future, would be a probe of massive millisecond magnetars and stiff equations of state for nuclear matter.

  9. Cell Cycle Regulation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Tobacco Cultivar Bright Yellow-2 Cells1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Cell Cycle Regulation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Tobacco Cultivar Bright Yellow-2 Cells1 David different regulation during the cell cycle. CdkA mRNA and protein accumulate during G1 in cells re, although CdkA mRNA and protein levels are not significantly regulated. In contrast, CdkB1 transcripts

  10. KEEPING THE FUTURE BRIGHT 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Sector Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply 8 Electricity consumption 9 Supply and demand projections 9 Electricity exports and importsKEEPING THE FUTURE BRIGHT 2004 Canadian Electricity Human Resource Sector Study #12;This project Electricity Association The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA), founded in 1891, is the national forum

  11. Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) Antenna Brightness Temperature Data Record (TDR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Special Sensor Microwave Imager and Sounder (SSMIS) Antenna Brightness Temperature Data Record (TDR/NESDIS/Center for Satellite Applications and Research Contributors from: Banghua Yan (Lead), QSS/JCSDA Ninghai Sun, IMSG, Metoffice, UK Yong Han, STAR/JCSDA Mark Liu, QSS/JCSDA Distribution to: Ralph Ferrrao, STAR Tom Schott, OSD

  12. Improving the photostability of bright monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Improving the photostability of bright monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins Nathan C illumination. Although fluorescent proteins typically bleach at a substantially slower rate than many small-molecule dyes, in many cases the lack of sufficient photostability remains an important limiting factor

  13. The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    The Threat to the Planet* Dark & Bright Sides of Global Warming Jim Hansen 3 October 2007 presented provides most important information on global warming. Recorded human history occurs within the Holocene for these large climate change is perturbations of Earth's orbit. #12;Continental Drift Fig. 1 "Global Warming

  14. Bright red electroluminescent devices using novel second-ligand-contained europium complexes as emitting layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yanyi

    Bright red electroluminescent devices using novel second-ligand- contained europium complexes) and 1-ethyl-2-(2-pyridyl)benzimidazole (EPBM), two europium complexes, Eu(DBM)3HPBM and Eu(DBM)3EPBM/TPD/Eu(DBM)3EPBM/AlQ/Al emit red light originating from the europium complexes. The EL luminance of Eu(DBM)3

  15. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  16. AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4 Robert D in a series we present an atlas of infrared images and photometry from 1.2 to 180 lm for a sample of bright galaxies. Using the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have obtained 12 lm images and photometry at 60

  17. SWIFT PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 050525a A. J. Blustin,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Bing

    SWIFT PANCHROMATIC OBSERVATIONS OF THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 050525a A. J. Blustin,1 D. Band,2 ABSTRACT The bright gamma-ray burst GRB 050525a has been detected with the Swift observatory, providing. This jet break time combined with the total gamma-ray energy of the burst constrains the opening angle

  18. Bright Blue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials FindAdvanced MaterialsDepartment FOR IMMEDIATE

  19. Modeling Bright Gamma-ray and Radio Emission at Fast Cloud Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Raymond, John C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O; Ellison, Donald C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenari...

  20. Controlling a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector using tailored bright illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Lydersen; Mohsen K. Akhlaghi; A. Hamed Majedi; Johannes Skaar; Vadim Makarov

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate that a superconducting nanowire single-photon detector is deterministically controllable by bright illumination. We found that bright light can temporarily make a large fraction of the nanowire length normally-conductive, can extend deadtime after a normal photon detection, and can cause a hotspot formation during the deadtime with a highly nonlinear sensitivity. In result, although based on different physics, the superconducting detector turns out to be controllable by virtually the same techniques as avalanche photodiode detectors. As demonstrated earlier, when such detectors are used in a quantum key distribution system, this allows an eavesdropper to launch a detector control attack to capture the full secret key without being revealed by to many errors in the key.

  1. Head-on beam-beam tune shifts with high brightness beams in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; McPherson, A; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Schaumann, M; Suykerbuyk, R; Trad, G; Paret, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this experiment (fills 1765, 1766) we have collided bunches with highest brightness, i.e. small emittances and high intensities, to explore the achievable beam-beam tune shift for head-on collisions. Different parameters and filling schemes have been used for this experiment and tune shifts above 0.015 have been achieved in single collisions and above 0.030 for two collision points.

  2. OPTICS FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS AND HIGH CURRENT ERL PROJECT AT BNL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAYRAN, D.; BEN-ZVI, I.; CALAGA, R.; CHANG, X.Y.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy recovery linac (ERL), under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory [1,2], will push ERLs further towards high current and high brightness beams. This R&D ERL will operate in two modes: a high current mode and a high charge mode. In this paper we present a lattice of the machine and PARMELA simulations from the cathode to the beam dump. We discuss the design considerations and present main parameters for various modes of operation.

  3. Volume-scalable high-brightness three-dimensional visible light source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramania, Ganapathi; Fischer, Arthur J; Wang, George T; Li, Qiming

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A volume-scalable, high-brightness, electrically driven visible light source comprises a three-dimensional photonic crystal (3DPC) comprising one or more direct bandgap semiconductors. The improved light emission performance of the invention is achieved based on the enhancement of radiative emission of light emitters placed inside a 3DPC due to the strong modification of the photonic density-of-states engendered by the 3DPC.

  4. $?$--PhotoZ: Photometric Redshifts by Inverting the Tolman Surface Brightness Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. Kurtz; Margaret J. Geller; Daniel G. Fabricant; William F. Wyatt; Ian P. Dell'Antonio

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface brightness is a fundamental observational parameter of galaxies. We show, for the first time in detail, how it can be used to obtain photometric redshifts for galaxies, the $\\mu$-PhotoZ method. We demonstrate that the Tolman surface brightness relation, $\\mu \\propto (1+z)^{-4}$, is a powerful tool for determining galaxy redshifts from photometric data. We develop a model using $\\mu$ and a color percentile (ranking) measure to demonstrate the $\\mu$-PhotoZ method. We apply our method to a set of galaxies from the SHELS survey, and demonstrate that the photometric redshift accuracy achieved using the surface brightness method alone is comparable with the best color-based methods. We show that the $\\mu$-PhotoZ method is very effective in determining the redshift for red galaxies using only two photometric bands. We discuss the properties of the small, skewed, non-gaussian component of the error distribution. We calibrate $\\mu_r, (r-i)$ from the SDSS to redshift, and tabulate the result, providing a simple, but accurate look up table to estimate the redshift of distant red galaxies.

  5. Cloning Hubble Deep Fields II: Models for Evolution by Bright Galaxy Image Transformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rychard J. Bouwens; Tom Broadhurst; Joseph Silk

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a companion paper we outlined a methodology for generating parameter-free, model-independent ``no-evolution'' fields of faint galaxy images, demonstrating the need for significant evolution in the HDF at faint magnitudes. Here we incorporate evolution into our procedure, by transforming the input bright galaxy images with redshift, for comparison with the HDF at faint magnitudes. Pure luminosity evolution is explored assuming that galaxy surface brightness evolves uniformly, at a rate chosen to reproduce the I-band counts. This form of evolution exacerbates the size discrepancy identified by our no-evolution simulations, by increasing the area of a galaxy visible to a fixed isophote. Reasonable dwarf-augmented models are unable to generate the count excess invoking moderate rates of stellar evolution. A plausible fit to the counts and sizes is provided by `mass-conserving' density-evolution, consistent with small-scale hierarchical growth, where the product of disk area and space density is conserved with redshift. Here the increased surface brightness generated by stellar evolution is accomodated by the reduced average galaxy size, for a wide range of geometries. These models are useful for assessing the limitations of the HDF images, by calculating their rates of incompleteness and the degree of over-counting. Finally we demonstrate the potential for improvement in quantifying evolution at fainter magnitudes using the HST Advanced Camera, with its superior UV and optical performance.

  6. Virginia Tech Shines Light on Home Efficiency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Collegiate teams from around the world came to Madrid this month to present their solar-powered houses in the first biennial Solar Decathlon Europe, a competition modeled after the Energy Department's Solar Decathlon in Washington, D.C.

  7. Flying on Sun Shine: Sailing in Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhorn, Dean (NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center) [NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    On January 20th, 2011, NanoSail-D successfully deployed its sail in space. It was the first solar sail vehicle to orbit the earth and the second sail ever unfurled in space. The 10m2 sail, deployment mechanism and electronics were packed into a 3U CubeSat with a volume of about 3500cc. The NanoSail-D mission had two objectives: eject a nanosatellite from a minisatellite; deploy its sail from a highly compacted volume to validate large structure deployment and potential de-orbit technologies. NanoSail-D was jointly developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. The ManTech/NeXolve Corporation provided key sail design support. NanoSail-D is managed by Marshall and jointly sponsored by the Army Space and Missile Defense Command, the Space Test Program, the Von Braun Center for Science and Innovation and Dynetics Inc. The presentation will provide insights into sailcraft advances and potential missions enabled by this emerging in-space propulsion technology.

  8. The Dark Penguin Shines Light at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primulando, Reinard; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling -- given by the Dark Penguin -- in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the $8$ and $14$ TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the $100$ TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold fo...

  9. Lasers will shine in future warfare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power radio and microwave beams join cost-effective, solid-state lasers on US militarys horizon.

  10. UP SHINES AT 48TH SASPP CONGRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - deserved first recipient of this prestigious award. Johan van der Linde, a PhD student in the Department for the best presentation overall by a student, with Johan van der Linde (PhD student in Department hands. #12;Johan van der Linde, Mrs Petakin Mildenhall and Prof John Mildehall. Vicky Knight and Dr

  11. Collaboration Shines in Materials Project Success

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,CobaltCold Vacuum

  12. Sun Shine Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation, searchNewOpenSumpter,Sun CitySun River

  13. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. I. BRIGHT UV STARS IN THE BULGE OF M31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Johnson, L. Clifton; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Girardi, Leo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova-INAF, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bressan, Alessandro [SISSA, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Lang, Dustin [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Guhathakurta, Puragra; Dorman, Claire E. [UCO/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howley, Kirsten M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lauer, Tod R.; Olsen, Knut A. G. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Larsen, Soren S. [Astronomical Institute, University of Utrecht, Princetonplein 5, 3584 CC Utrecht (Netherlands); Rix, Hans-Walter [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); and others

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury multi-cycle program, we observed a 12' Multiplication-Sign 6.'5 area of the bulge of M31 with the WFC3/UVIS filters F275W and F336W. From these data we have assembled a sample of {approx}4000 UV-bright, old stars, vastly larger than previously available. We use updated Padova stellar evolutionary tracks to classify these hot stars into three classes: Post-AGB stars (P-AGB), Post-Early AGB (PE-AGB) stars, and AGB-manque stars. P-AGB stars are the end result of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase and are expected in a wide range of stellar populations, whereas PE-AGB and AGB-manque (together referred to as the hot post-horizontal branch; HP-HB) stars are the result of insufficient envelope masses to allow a full AGB phase, and are expected to be particularly prominent at high helium or {alpha} abundances when the mass loss on the red giant branch is high. Our data support previous claims that most UV-bright sources in the bulge are likely hot (extreme) horizontal branch (EHB) stars and their progeny. We construct the first radial profiles of these stellar populations and show that they are highly centrally concentrated, even more so than the integrated UV or optical light. However, we find that this UV-bright population does not dominate the total UV luminosity at any radius, as we are detecting only the progeny of the EHB stars that are the likely source of the UV excess. We calculate that only a few percent of main-sequence stars in the central bulge can have gone through the HP-HB phase and that this percentage decreases strongly with distance from the center. We also find that the surface density of hot UV-bright stars has the same radial variation as that of low-mass X-ray binaries. We discuss age, metallicity, and abundance variations as possible explanations for the observed radial variation in the UV-bright population.

  14. Careers Bachelor if Sciences in The future is bright for those pursuing an education in geology or a geoscience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Careers Bachelor if Sciences in Geology The future is bright for those pursuing an education in geology or a geoscience related field as demand and gas industry (median $125,350). Forbes recently ranked Geology #7 in its "15

  15. Correlation analysis of mean global radiation values with mean brightness values for one year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolczynski, Edward Franklin

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantities of global radiation, = kb. sin h i oi where i denotes the number of the month (1 to 12), Q. is the individual monthly quantity of global radiation, h . is the solar altitude relat- oi ed to noon of the middle day of the month, and k is the coei... which now exists in the data bank of this field. B. ~Db' t' The objective of the proposed research is to investigate a pos- sible relationship between global radiation, as measured from ground- based instruments, and mean brightness values...

  16. Computational and experimental characterization of high-brightness beams for femtosecond electron imaging and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Tao, Z.; Makino, K.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M.; Ruan, C.-Y. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a multilevel fast multipole method, coupled with the shadow imaging of femtosecond photoelectron pulses for validation, we quantitatively elucidate the photocathode, space charge, and virtual cathode physics, which fundamentally limit the spatiotemporal and spectroscopic resolution and throughput of ultrafast electron microscope (UEM) systems. We present a simple microscopic description to capture the nonlinear beam dynamics based on a two-fluid picture and elucidate an unexpected dominant role of image potential pinning in accelerating the emittance growth process. These calculations set theoretical limits on the performance of UEM systems and provide useful guides for photocathode design for high-brightness electron beam systems.

  17. Evolution of laser-produced Sn extreme ultraviolet source diameter for high-brightness source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Amitava, E-mail: roy@fzu.cz, E-mail: aroy@barc.gov.in [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Radnic 828, 25241 Doln B?eany (Czech Republic); Arai, Goki; Hara, Hiroyuki; Higashiguchi, Takeshi, E-mail: higashi@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Ohashi, Hayato [Graduate School of Science and Engineering for Research, University of Toyama, Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Li, Bowen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Miura, Taisuke; Mocek, Tomas; Endo, Akira [HiLASE Centre, Institute of Physics ASCR, v.v.i., Za Radnic 828, 25241 Doln B?eany (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the effect of irradiation of solid Sn targets with laser pulses of sub-ns duration and sub-mJ energy on the diameter of the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emitting region and source conversion efficiency. It was found that an in-band EUV source diameter as low as 18??m was produced due to the short scale length of a plasma produced by a sub-ns laser. Most of the EUV emission occurs in a narrow region with a plasma density close to the critical density value. Such EUV sources are suitable for high brightness and high repetition rate metrology applications.

  18. The Bright Lights in New York Could Be Solar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartmentTest for Pumping System EfficiencyRole(EAP)EnergyThe Bright

  19. The Dark Bursts population in a complete sample of bright Swift Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Melandri; B. Sbarufatti; P. D'Avanzo; R. Salvaterra; S. Campana; S. Covino; S. D. Vergani; L. Nava; G. Ghisellini; G. Ghirlanda; D. Fugazza; V. Mangano; M. Capalbi; G. Tagliaferri

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the properties of the population of optically dark events present in a carefully selected complete sample of bright Swift long gamma-ray bursts. The high level of completeness in redshift of our sample (52 objects out of 58) allow us to establish the existence of a genuine dark population and we are able to estimate the maximum fraction of dark burst events (~30%) expected for the whole class of long gamma-ray burst. The redshift distribution of this population of dark bursts is similar to the one of the whole sample. Interestingly, the rest-frame X-ray luminosity (and the de-absorbed X-ray flux) of the sub-class of dark bursts is slightly higher than the average luminosity of the non-dark events. At the same time the prompt properties do not differ and the optical flux of dark events is at the lower tail of the optical flux distribution, corrected for Galactic absorption. All these properties suggest that dark bursts events generate in much denser environments with respect to normal bright events. We can therefore exclude the high-z and the low-density scenarios and conclude that the major cause of the origin of optically dark events is the dust extinction.

  20. Asymmetric Surface Brightness Distribution of Altair Observed with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohishi, N; Hutter, D J; Ohishi, Naoko; Nordgren, Tyler E.; Hutter, Donald J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An asymmetric surface brightness distribution of the rapidly rotating A7IV-V star, Altair, has been measured by the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI). The observations were recorded simultaneously using a triangle of three long baselines of 30m, 37m, and 64m, on 19 spectral channels, covering the wavelength range of 520nm to 850nm. The outstanding characteristics of these observations are (a) high resolution with the minimum fringe spacing of 1.7mas, easily resolving the 3-milliarcsecond (mas) stellar disk, and (b) the measurement of closure phase which is a sensitive indicator to the asymmetry of the brightness distribution of the source. Uniform disk diameters fit to the measured squared visibility amplitudes confirms the Altair's oblate shape due to its rapid rotation. The measured observables of Altair showed two features which are inconsistent with both the uniform-disk and limb-darkened disk models, while the measured observable of the comparison star, Vega, are consistent with the limb-darke...

  1. Sliding Mode Pulsed Averaging IC Drivers for High Brightness Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Anatoly Shteynberg, PhD

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed new Light Emitting Diode (LED) driver ICs associated with specific (uniquely operated) switching power supplies that optimize performance for High Brightness LEDs (HB-LEDs). The drivers utilize a digital control core with a newly developed nonlinear, hysteretic/sliding mode controller with mixed-signal processing. The drivers are flexible enough to allow both traditional microprocessor interface as well as other options such as on the fly adjustment of color and brightness. Some other unique features of the newly developed drivers include AC Power Factor Correction; High power efficiency; Substantially fewer external components should be required, leading to substantial reduction of Bill of Materials (BOM). Thus, the LED drivers developed in this research : optimize LED performance by increasing power efficiency and power factor. Perhaps more remarkably, the LED drivers provide this improved performance at substantially reduced costs compared to the present LED power electronic driver circuits. Since one of the barriers to market penetration for HB-LEDs (in particular white light LEDs) is cost/lumen, this research makes important contributions in helping the advancement of SSL consumer acceptance and usage.

  2. SN1994D in NGC4526: a normally bright type Ia supernova

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Drenkhahn; Tom Richtler

    1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SN1994D of type Ia has been suspected not to fit into the relation between decline rate, colour, and brightness. However, an individual distance of its host galaxy, NGC4526, other than that of the Virgo cluster, has not yet been published. We determined the distance by the method of globular cluster luminosity functions on the basis of HST archive data. A maximum-likelihood fit returns apparent turn-over magnitudes of 23.16+-0.16mag in V and 21.96+-0.09mag in I. The corresponding distance modulus is 30.4+-0.3mag, where the error reflects our estimation of the absolute distance scale. The absolute magnitudes (not corrected for decline rate and colour) are -18.67+-0.30mag, -18.62+-0.30mag, and -18.40+-0.30mag for B, V, and I, respectively. The corrected magnitudes are -18.69+-0.31mag, -18.69+-0.31mag, and -18.44+-0.31mag. Compared with other supernovae with reliably determined distances, SN1994D fits within the errors. It is therefore not a counter-example against a uniform decline-rate-colour-brightness relation.

  3. Much Ado about Microbunching: Coherent Bunching in High Brightness Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratner, Daniel; /Stanford U. /SLAC

    2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The push to provide ever brighter coherent radiation sources has led to the creation of correspondingly bright electron beams. With billions of electrons packed into normalized emittances (phase space) below one micron, collective effects may dominate both the preservation and use of such ultra-bright beams. An important class of collective effects is due to density modulations within the bunch, or microbunching. Microbunching may be deleterious, as in the case of the Microbunching Instability (MBI), or it may drive radiation sources of unprecedented intensity, as in the case of Free Electron Lasers (FELs). In this work we begin by describing models of microbunching due to inherent beam shot noise, which sparks both the MBI as well as SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, the world's first hard X-ray laser. We first use this model to propose a mechanism for reducing the inherent beam shot noise as well as for predicting MBI effects. We then describe experimental measurements of the resulting microbunching at LCLS, including optical radiation from the MBI, as well as the first gain length and harmonic measurements from a hard X-ray FEL. In the final chapters, we describe schemes that use external laser modulations to microbunch light sources of the future. In these sections we describe coherent light source schemes for both both linacs and storage rings.

  4. High brightness--multiple beamlets source for patterned X-ray production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Ji, Qing (Albany, CA); Barletta, William A. (Oakland, CA); Jiang, Ximan (El Cerrito, CA); Ji, Lili (Albany, CA)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for controllably directing beamlets to a target substrate are disclosed. The beamlets may be either positive ions or electrons. It has been shown that beamlets may be produced with a diameter of 1 .mu.m, with inter-aperture spacings of 12 .mu.m. An array of such beamlets, may be used for maskless lithography. By step-wise movement of the beamlets relative to the target substrate, individual devices may be directly e-beam written. Ion beams may be directly written as well. Due to the high brightness of the beamlets from extraction from a multicusp source, exposure times for lithographic exposure are thought to be minimized. Alternatively, the beamlets may be electrons striking a high Z material for X-ray production, thereafter collimated to provide patterned X-ray exposures such as those used in CAT scans. Such a device may be used for remote detection of explosives.

  5. Homogeneous spectroscopic parameters for bright planet host stars from the northern hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sousa, S G; Mortier, A; Tsantaki, M; Adibekyan, V; Mena, E Delgado; Israelian, G; Rojas-Ayala, B; Neves, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. In this work we derive new precise and homogeneous parameters for 37 stars with planets. For this purpose, we analyze high resolution spectra obtained by the NARVAL spectrograph for a sample composed of bright planet host stars in the northern hemisphere. The new parameters are included in the SWEET-Cat online catalogue. Methods. To ensure that the catalogue is homogeneous, we use our standard spectroscopic analysis procedure, ARES+MOOG, to derive effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities. These spectroscopic stellar parameters are then used as input to compute the stellar mass and radius, which are fundamental for the derivation of the planetary mass and radius. Results. We show that the spectroscopic parameters, masses, and radii are generally in good agreement with the values available in online databases of exoplanets. There are some exceptions, especially for the evolved stars. These are analyzed in detail focusing on the effect of the stellar mass on the derived planetary mass. ...

  6. Hipparcos calibration of the peak brightness of four SNe Ia and the value of Ho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Lanoix

    1997-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hipparcos geometrical parallaxes allowed us to calibrate the Cepheid Period-Luminosity relation and to compute the true distance moduli of 17 galaxies. Among these 17 galaxies, we selected those which generated type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia). We found NGC 5253, parent galaxy of 1895B and 1972E, IC 4182 and NGC 4536 parents of 1937C and 1981B, respectively. We used the available B-band photometry to determine the peak brightness of these four SNe Ia. We obtained = -19.65 \\pm 0.09. Then, we built a sample of 57 SNe Ia in order to plot the Hubble diagram and determine its zero-point. Our result (ZP_{B} = -3.16 \\pm 0.10) is in agreement with other determinations and allows us to derive the following Hubble constant : Ho = 50 \\pm 3 (internal) km.s^-1.Mpc^-1.

  7. Bright and fast voltage reporters across the visible spectrum via electrochromic FRET (eFRET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Peng; Douglass, Adam D; Hochbaum, Daniel R; Brinks, Daan; Werley, Christopher A; Harrison, D Jed; Campbell, Robert E; Cohen, Adam E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a palette of brightly fluorescent genetically encoded voltage indicators (GEVIs) with excitation and emission peaks spanning the visible spectrum, sensitivities from 6 - 10% Delta F/F per 100 mV, and half-maximal response times from 1 - 7 ms. A fluorescent protein is fused to an Archaerhodopsin-derived voltage sensor. Voltage-induced shifts in the absorption spectrum of the rhodopsin lead to voltage-dependent nonradiative quenching of the appended fluorescent protein. Through a library screen, we identified linkers and fluorescent protein combinations which reported neuronal action potentials in cultured rat hippocampal neurons with a single-trial signal-to-noise ratio from 6.6 to 11.6 in a 1 kHz imaging bandwidth at modest illumination intensity. The freedom to choose a voltage indicator from an array of colors facilitates multicolor voltage imaging, as well as combination with other optical reporters and optogenetic actuators.

  8. Modeling solar coronal bright point oscillations with multiple nanoflare heated loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrashekhar, K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensity oscillations of coronal bright points (BPs) have been studied for past several years. It has been known for a while that these BPs are closed magnetic loop like structures. However, initiation of such intensity oscillations is still an enigma. There have been many suggestions to explain these oscillations, but modeling of such BPs have not been explored so far. Using a multithreaded nanoflare heated loop model we study the behavior of such BPs in this work. We compute typical loop lengths of BPs using potential field line extrapolation of available data (Chandrashekhar et al. 2013), and set this as the length of our simulated loops. We produce intensity like observables through forward modeling and analyze the intensity time series using wavelet analysis, as was done by previous observers. The result reveals similar intensity oscillation periods reported in past observations. It is suggested these oscillations are actually shock wave propagations along the loop. We also show that if one considers di...

  9. THE SLOAN BRIGHT ARCS SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF SEVEN NEW STRONGLY LENSED GALAXIES FROM z = 0.66-2.94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Allam, Sahar S.; Drabek, Emily; Lin, Huan; Tucker, Douglas; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H. Thomas; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Hao Jiangang; Kubik, Donna; Annis, James; Frieman, Joshua A. [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wiesner, Matthew [Department of Physics, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL 60115 (United States); West, Anderson [The Illinois Math and Science Academy, Aurora, IL 60506 (United States)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of seven new, very bright gravitational lens systems from our ongoing gravitational lens search, the Sloan Bright Arcs Survey (SBAS). Two of the systems are confirmed to have high source redshifts z = 2.19 and z = 2.94. Three other systems lie at intermediate redshift with z = 1.33, 1.82, 1.93 and two systems are at low redshift z = 0.66, 0.86. The lensed source galaxies in all of these systems are bright, with i-band magnitudes ranging from 19.73 to 22.06. We present the spectrum of each of the source galaxies in these systems along with estimates of the Einstein radius for each system. The foreground lens in most systems is identified by a red sequence based cluster finder as a galaxy group; one system is identified as a moderately rich cluster. In total, SBAS has now discovered 19 strong lens systems in the SDSS imaging data, 8 of which are among the highest surface brightness z {approx_equal} 2-3 galaxies known.

  10. Optical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi-Ho Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    and encoded with audio or data signal. Hence, an LED indicator lamp or traffic light can become an information for incandescent lamps [3,4]. This advancement has led to the production of large- area full-color LED displaysOptical Wireless based on High Brightness Visible LEDs Grantham Pang, Thomas Kwan, Hugh Liu, Chi

  11. All-Star Nanocrystals | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1USummerNewsDOE Office of

  12. STEM Women All-Stars Hit the Road | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDERSTATE ENERGY PROGRAMJuly 2012STEM Women

  13. Introducing the All-Star Geeks of SoSTEM 2014! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas » Methane Hydrate »Department of

  14. Introducing the All-Star Geeks of SoSTEM 2014! | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1, 1999 Inspection offorInternationalAugust 14, 2012

  15. Mineral hints at bright blue rocks deep in the Earth 12 March 2014 Last updated at 21:16 ET | By Simon Redfern Science writer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Mineral hints at bright blue rocks deep in the Earth 12 March 2014 Last updated at 21:16 ET | By Simon Redfern Science writer Minerals preserved in diamond have revealed hints of the bright blue and back, which it has." Blue planet Prof Joseph Smyth of the University of Colorado has spent many

  16. Discovery of a bright X-ray transient in the Galactic Center with XMM-Newton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Porquet; N. Grosso; V. Burwitz; I. L. Andronov; B. Aschenbach; P. Predehl; R. S. Warwick

    2004-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of a bright X-ray transient object, XMMU J174554.4-285456, observed in outburst with XMM-Newton on October 3, 2002,and located at 6.3' from SgrA*, the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center.This object exhibits a very large X-ray luminosity variability of a factor of about 1300 between two X-ray observations separated by four months. The X-ray spectrum is best fitted by a power-law with a photon index of 1.6+/-0.2 and absorption column density of 14.1 (+1.6,-1.4) x 10^22 cm^-2. This large absorption suggests this source is located at the distance of the Galactic center, i.e., 8 kpc. The 2-10 keV luminosity is about 1.0 x 10^35(d/8kpc)^2 erg/s. A pulsation period of about 172 s is hinted by the timing analysis. The X-ray properties strongly suggest a binary system with either a black hole or a neutron star for the compact object.

  17. Bright Lyman Break Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, M C; Weinberg, D H; Bentz, Misty C.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Weinberg, David H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of six compact, starburst galaxies with redshifts 2.3 < z < 2.8 and r-band magnitudes 19.8-20.5 in the Quasar Catalog of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey First Data Release (SDSS DR1). The SDSS spectra of these objects resemble the composite spectrum of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) at z \\approx 3, but the galaxies are 4-5 magnitudes brighter than an ``L*'' LBG and 2-3 magnitudes brighter than the most luminous objects in typical LBG spectroscopic surveys. Star formation rates inferred from the UV continuum luminosities are about 300-1000 M_sun yr^-1 with no correction for dust extinction. Such rates are similar to those inferred for ultraluminous infrared galaxies, but in these UV-bright objects the star formation is evidently not obscured by high dust column densities. The SDSS images show no evidence of multiple imaging or foreground lensing structures, but amplification by gravitational lensing (as in the case of MS 1512-cB58) cannot be ruled out with the present data. Assuming tha...

  18. Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Blacksburg, VA); Besler-Guran, Serpil (Flemington, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

  19. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF SIX BRIGHT, HARD-SPECTRUM FERMI-LAT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T.; Bouvier, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Dickherber, R. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Boettcher, M. [Astrophysical Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Dumm, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Falcone, A., E-mail: afurniss@ucsc.edu, E-mail: pafortin@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: deirdre@llr.in2p3.fr [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS Collaboration; and others

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on VERITAS very high energy (VHE; E {>=} 100 GeV) observations of six blazars selected from the Fermi Large Area Telescope First Source Catalog (1FGL). The gamma-ray emission from 1FGL sources was extrapolated up to the VHE band, taking gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic background light into account. This allowed the selection of six bright, hard-spectrum blazars that were good candidate TeV emitters. Spectroscopic redshift measurements were attempted with the Keck Telescope for the targets without Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic data. No VHE emission is detected during the observations of the six sources described here. Corresponding TeV upper limits are presented, along with contemporaneous Fermi observations and non-concurrent Swift UVOT and X-Ray Telescope data. The blazar broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are assembled and modeled with a single-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. The SED built for each of the six blazars shows a synchrotron peak bordering between the intermediate- and high-spectrum-peak classifications, with four of the six resulting in particle-dominated emission regions.

  20. Sub-GeV flashes in $?-$ray burst afterglows as probes of underlying bright UV flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yizhong Fan; Tsvi Piran

    2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright optical and X-ray flares have been observed in many Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) afterglows. These flares have been attributed to late activity of the central engine. In most cases the peak energy is not known and it is possible and even likely that there is a significant far-ultraviolet component. These far-ultraviolet photons escape our detection because they are absorbed by the neutral hydrogen before reaching Earth. However, these photons cross the blast wave produced by the ejecta that have powered the initial GRB. They can be inverse Compton upscattered by hot electrons within this blast wave. This process will produce a strong sub-GeV flare that follows the high energy (soft X-ray) tail of the far-UV flare but lasts much longer and can be detected by the upcoming {\\em Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope} (GLAST) satellite. This signature can be used to probe the spectrum of the underlying far-ultraviolet flare. The extra cooling produced by this inverse Compton process can lower the X-ray emissivity of the forward shock and explain the unexpected low early X-ray flux seen in many GRBs.

  1. Advanced X-Band Test Accelerator for High Brightness Electron and Gamma Ray Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, Roark; /LLNL, Livermore; Anderson, Scott; /LLNL, Livermore; Barty, Christopher; /LLNL, Livermore; Chu, Tak Sum; /LLNL, Livermore; Ebbers, Chris; /LLNL, Livermore; Gibson, David; /LLNL, Livermore; Hartemann, Fred; /LLNL, Livermore; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC; Jongewaard, Erik; /SLAC; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Vlieks, Arnold; /SLAC; Wang, Juwen; /SLAC

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  2. ADVANCED X-BAND TEST ACCELERATOR FOR HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON AND GAMMA RAY BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Barty, C P; Chu, T S; Ebbers, C A; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F V; Adolphsen, C; Jongewaard, E N; Raubenheimer, T; Tantawi, S G; Vlieks, A E; Wang, J W

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of Compton scattering gamma-ray source efforts at LLNL, a multi-bunch test stand is being developed to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades. This test stand will enable work to explore the science and technology paths required to boost the current 10 Hz monoenergetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology to an effective repetition rate exceeding 1 kHz, potentially increasing the average gamma-ray brightness by two orders of magnitude. Multiple bunches must be of exceedingly high quality to produce narrow-bandwidth gamma-rays. Modeling efforts will be presented, along with plans for a multi-bunch test stand at LLNL. The test stand will consist of a 5.5 cell X-band rf photoinjector, single accelerator section, and beam diagnostics. The photoinjector will be a high gradient standing wave structure, featuring a dual feed racetrack coupler. The accelerator will increase the electron energy so that the emittance can be measured using quadrupole scanning techniques. Multi-bunch diagnostics will be developed so that the beam quality can be measured and compared with theory. Design will be presented with modeling simulations, and layout plans.

  3. Bright Fireballs Associated with the Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2007LQ19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madiedo, Jose M; Ortiz, Jose L; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J; Cabrera-Cao, Jesus

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze here two very bright fireballs produced by the ablation in the atmosphere of two large meteoroids in 2009 and 2010. These slow-moving and deep-penetrating events were observed over Spain in the framework of our Spanish Fireball Network continuous meteor monitoring campaign. The analysis of the emission spectrum imaged for one of these fireballs has provided the first clues about the chemical nature of the progenitor meteoroids. The orbital parameters of these particles suggests a likely association with the recently identified July rho-Herculid meteoroid stream. In addition, considerations about the likely parent body of this stream are also made on the basis of orbital dissimilarity criteria. This orbital analysis reveals that both meteoroids and PHA 2007LQ19 exhibit a similar evolution during a time period of almost 8,000 years, which suggests that either this NEO is the potential parent of these particles or that this NEO and both meteoroids had a common progenitor in the past.

  4. Fourier-phase analysis of the orbiting bright-spot model for AGN variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Karas

    1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier power spectra and phases of a signal from a large number of radiating sources orbiting around a black hole are investigated. It is assumed that the individual sources (bright spots) are located in an accretion disc and their lifetime exceeds the corresponding orbital period. This model is relevant for the short-time X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei. Previous works on this subject were mostly concentrated on temporal characteristics and power spectra of observed light curves. In our present contribution, Fourier phases are brought into consideration and studied systematically for a broad range of input parameters. In particular, conditions for the phase coherence are discussed. It is shown that one can discriminate between the two classes of models which are currently under consideration--orbital motion of a large number of sources versus short-lived independent flares--although parameters of the model are not completely arbitrary. It is also shown that predicted power spectra depend rather strongly on the spot distribution across the disk surface. We conclude that the orbital motion of the spots cannot be the only reason for the source fluctuations, but it certainly influences observational properties of the source intrinsic variability.

  5. The Mid-Infrared Spectral Energy Distribution, Surface Brightness and Color Profiles in Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquale Temi; Fabrizio Brighenti; William G. Mathews

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe photometry at mid-infrared passbands (1.2 - 24 microns) for a sample of 18 elliptical galaxies. All surface brightness distributions resemble de Vaucouleurs profiles, indicating that most of the emission arises from the photospheres or circumstellar regions of red giant stars. The spectral energy distribution peaks near 1.6 microns, but the half-light or effective radius has a pronounced minimum near the K band (2.15 microns). Apart from the 24 micron passband, all sample-averaged radial color profiles have measurable slopes within about twice the (K band) effective radius. Evidently this variation arises because of an increase in stellar metallicity toward the galactic cores. For example, the sampled-averaged color profile (K - 5.8 microns) has a positive slope although no obvious absorption feature is observed in spectra of elliptical galaxies near 5.8 microns. This, and the minimum in the effective radius, suggests that the K band may be anomalously luminous in metal-rich stars in galaxy cores. Unusual radial color profiles involving the 24 micron passband may suggest that some 24 micron emission comes from interstellar not circumstellar dust grains.

  6. The HI Companions of HII Galaxies and Low Surface Brightness Dwarf Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher L. Taylor

    1996-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I study the VLA HI survey of HII galaxies by Taylor et al. (1995, ApJS, 99, 427; 1996, ApJS, 102, 189) and the VLA HI survey of low surface brightness (LSB) dwarf galaxies by Taylor et al. (1996, ApJS, in press) to investigate the role of galaxy interactions in triggering the bursts of massive star formation seen in HII galaxies. I find that the companion rate for HII galaxies is more than twice that of LSB dwarfs (p[HII] = 0.57 p[LSB] = 0.24). I examine the completeness of the companion samples detected by the two surveys, finding that because they were observed in identical fashions, there are no relative biases to cause one sample or the other to have more companions. Thus I conclude that the difference in the number of HI rich companions is genuine, and signifies a difference in the local, small scale environments between the two types of galaxy. I search through published galaxy catalogs to study the large scale environments of the two samples, finding that at large separations, the two samples exist in very similar environments on average. The difference in companion rates between HII galaxies and LSB dwarfs supports the idea that the bursts of star formation are triggered by galaxy interactions.

  7. V and I Photometry of Bright Giants in the Central Regions of NGC 147

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1994-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep V and I CCD images with sub-arcsec spatial resolution are used to investigate the stellar content of the central regions of the Local Group dwarf elliptical galaxy NGC147. Red giant branch (RGB) stars are resolved over the entire field, and the RGB-tip occurs at I ~ 20.5, suggesting that the distance modulus is 24.3. A comparison with globular cluster sequences indicates that the center of NGC147 is moderately metal-poor, with [Fe/H] ~ -1. This is not significantly different from what was found in the outer regions of the galaxy by Mould, Kristian & Da Costa (1983, ApJ, 270, 471). Moreover, the width of the V-I color distribution at I = 21.0 indicates that a spread in metallicity is present, with sigma[Fe/H] ~ +/- 0.3. There is no evidence of a component more metal-poor than [Fe/H] ~ -1.3. A small population of moderately bright asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars has also been detected, and the AGB-tip occurs near M{bol} ~ -5.0, indicating that an intermediate-age population is present. It is estimated that the intermediate-age population contributes ~ 2-3% of the V light from NGC147.

  8. AN INVESTIGATION ON THE MORPHOLOGICAL EVOLUTION OF BRIGHT-RIMMED CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Jingqi [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); White, Glenn J. [Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Thompson, M. A. [School of Physics Astronomy and Maths, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Nelson, Richard P. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: J.Miao@kent.ac.uk

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A new radiative driven implosion (RDI) model based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics technique is developed and applied to investigate the morphological evolutions of molecular clouds under the effect of ionizing radiation. This model self-consistently includes the self-gravity of the cloud in the hydrodynamical evolution, the UV radiation component in the radiation transferring equations, the relevant heating and cooling mechanisms in the energy evolution, and a comprehensive chemical network. The simulation results reveal that under the effect of ionizing radiation, a molecular cloud may evolve through different evolutionary sequences. Depending on its initial gravitational state, the evolution of a molecular cloud does not necessarily follow a complete morphological evolution sequence from type A{yields}B{yields}C, as described by previous RDI models. When confronted with observations, the simulation results provide satisfactory physical explanations for a series of puzzles derived from bright-rimmed clouds observations. The consistency of the modeling results with observations shows that the self-gravity of a molecular cloud should not be neglected in any investigation on the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds when they are exposed to ionizing radiation.

  9. Evidence Against BALS in the X-ray Bright QSO PG1416-129

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul J. Green; Thomas L. Aldcroft; Smita Mathur; Norbert Schartel

    1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results from the ROSAT All Sky Survey, and from deep ROSAT pointings reveal that broad absorption line quasars (BALQSOs) are weak in the soft X-ray bandpass (with optical-to-X-ray spectral slope alpha_{ox}>1.8) in comparison to QSOs with normal OUV spectra (mean alpha_{ox}=1.4). One glaring exception appeared to be the nearby BALQSO PG1416-129, which is a bright ROSAT source showing no evidence for intrinsic soft X-ray absorption. We present here our new HST FOS spectrum of PG1416-129, in which we find no evidence for BALs. We show that the features resulting in the original BAL classification, based on IUE spectra, were probably spurious. On the basis of UV, X-ray and optical evidence, we conclude that PG1416-129, is not now, and has never been a BALQSO. Our result suggests that weak soft X-ray emission is a defining characteristic of true BALQSOs. If BALQSOs indeed harbor normal intrinsic spectral energy distributions, their observed soft X-ray weakness is most likely the result of absorption. The ubiquitous occurrence of weak soft X-ray emission with UV absorption (BALs) thus suggests absorbers in each energy regime that are physically associated, if not identical.

  10. Milagro Observations of TeV Emission from Galactic Sources in the Fermi Bright Source List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Chen, C; Christopher, G E; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Huentemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Morgan, T; Mincer, A I; Nmethy, P; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of a search of Milagro sky map for spatial correlations with sources from a subset of the recent Fermi Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL consists of the 205 most significant sources detected above 100 MeV by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We select sources based on their categorization in the BSL, taking all confirmed or possible Galactic sources in the field of view of Milagro. Of the 34 Fermi sources selected, 14 are observed by Milagro at a significance of 3 standard deviations or more. We conduct this search with a new analysis which employs newly-optimized gamma-hadron separation and utilizes the full 8-year Milagro dataset. Milagro is sensitive to gamma rays above 1 TeV and these results extend the observation of these sources far above the Fermi energy band. With the new analysis and additional data, TeV emission is definitively observed associated with the Fermi pulsar J2229.0+6114, in the the Boomerang Pulsar Wind Nebula (PWN). Furthermore, an extended region of TeV emission is...

  11. Atmospheric Imaging Assembly Response Functions: Solving the Fe VIII Problems with Hinode EIS Bright Point Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmelz, Joan T; Kimble, Jason A; 10.1007/s11207-012-0208-1

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory is a state-of-the-art imager with the potential to do unprecedented time-dependent multi-thermal analysis at every pixel on scales short compared to the radiative and conductive cooling times. Recent results, however, have identified missing spectral lines in the CHIANTI atomic physics data base, which is used to construct the instrument response functions. We have done differential emission measure analysis using simultaneous AIA and Hinode/EIS observations of six X-ray bright points. Our results not only support the conclusion that CHIANTI is incomplete near 131 angstroms, but more importantly, suggest that the peak temperature of the Fe VIII emissivity/response is likely to be closer to log T = 5.8 than to the current value of log T = 5.7. Using a revised emissivity/response calculation for Fe VIII, we find that the observed AIA 131-angstrom flux can be underestimated by about 1.25, which is smaller than previous comparisons.

  12. An Investigation on the Morphological Evolution of Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Miao; G. J. White; M. A. Thompson; R. P. Nelson

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new Radiative Driven Implosion (RDI) model based on Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) technique is developed and applied to investigate the morphological evolutions of molecular clouds under the effect of ionising radiation. This model self-consistently includes the self-gravity of the cloud in the hydrodynamical evolution, the UV radiation component in the radiation transfer equations, the relevant heating and cooling mechanisms in the energy evolution and a comprehensive chemical network. The simulation results reveal that under the effect of ionising radiation, a molecular cloud may evolve through different evolutionary sequences. Dependent on its initial gravitational state, the evolution of a molecular cloud does not necessarily follow a complete morphological evolution sequence from type A to B to C, as described by previous RDI models. When confronted with observations, the simulation results provide satisfactory physical explanations for a series of puzzles derived from Bright-Rimmed Clouds (BRCs) observations. The consistency of the modelling results with observations shows that the self-gravity of a molecular cloud should not be neglected in any investigation on the dynamical evolution of molecular clouds when they are exposed to ionising radiation.

  13. The angular size of the Cepheid L Car: a comparison of the interferometric and surface brightness techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kervella; P. Fouque; J. Storm; W. P. Gieren; D. Bersier; D. Mourard; N. Nardetto; V. Coude du Foresto

    2004-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent interferometric observations of the brightest and angularly largest classical Cepheid, L Carinae, with ESO's VLT Interferometer (VLTI) have resolved with high precision the variation of its angular diameter with phase. We compare the measured angular diameter curve to the one we derive by an application of the Baade-Wesselink type infrared surface brightness technique, and find a near-perfect agreement between the two curves. The mean angular diameters of L Car from the two techniques agree very well within their total error bars (1.5 %), as do the derived distances (4 %). This result is an indication that the calibration of the surface brightness relations used in the distance determination of far away Cepheids is not affected by large biases.

  14. High Spatial Resolution KAO Far-Infrared Observations of the Central Regions of Infrared-Bright Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beverly J. Smith; P. M. Harvey

    1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new high spatial resolution Kuiper Airborne Observatory 50 micron and/or 100 micron data for 11 infrared-bright galaxies. We also tabulate previously published KAO data for 11 other galaxies, along with the IRAS data for the bulges of M 31 and M 81. We find that L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) correlate with CO (1 - 0) intensity and tau(100). Galaxies with optical or near-infrared signatures of OB stars in their central regions have higher values of I(CO) and tau(100), as well as higher far-infrared surface brightnesses and L(FIR)/L(B) and L(FIR)/L(H) ratios. L(FIR)/L(H(alpha)) does not correlate strongly with CO and tau(100). These results support a scenario in which OB stars dominate dust heating in the more active galaxies and older stars are important in quiescent bulges.

  15. Ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard x-ray driven by laser-produced energetic electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Yin; Shen, Baifei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Lingang; Xu, Jiancai; Yu, Yahong; Zhao, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Yi, Longqing; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method of obtaining a compact ultra-bright, ultra-broadband hard X-ray source. This X-ray source has a high peak brightness in the order of 10{sup 22} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2} 0.1\\%BW), an ultrashort duration (10 fs), and a broadband spectrum (flat distribution from 0.1 MeV to 4 MeV), and thus has wide-ranging potential applications, such as in ultrafast Laue diffraction experiments. In our scheme, laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) provide driven electron beams. A foil target is placed oblique to the beam direction so that the target normal sheath field (TNSF) is used to provide a bending force. Using this TNSF-kick scheme, we can fully utilize the advantages of current LPAs, including their high charge, high energy, and low emittance.

  16. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TYPE M MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF IC59: A NEW MODEL FOR BRIGHT RIM CLOUDS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao Jingqi [Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); Sugitani, Koji [Institute of Natural Sciences, Nagoya City University, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8501 (Japan); White, Glenn J. [Centre for Earth, Planetary, Space and Astronomical Research, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Nelson, Richard P., E-mail: J.Miao@kent.ac.u [School of Mathematical Sciences, Queen Mary College, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results from a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation designed to model recent observational data on the nebula and Bright Rim Cloud IC59. We further examine, in the context of radiative-driven implosion (RDI) models, the possible formation mechanisms of the morphological structure of IC59. The results of the simulation reveal the existence of a new, fourth morphological state for Bright Rim Clouds (BRCs)-which we propose to call a Type M BRC morphology. We discuss the necessary conditions for the appearance of Type M BRCs, based on analytical and numerical simulations. The simulated physical properties from our model are consistent with the available observations of IC59. We further show that the prospect of RDI triggered star formation in all Type M BRCs is not supported by the simulations.

  17. Untangling the contributions of image charge and laser profile for optimal photoemission of high-brightness electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Portman, J.; Zhang, H.; Makino, K.; Ruan, C. Y.; Berz, M.; Duxbury, P. M. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using our model for the simulation of photoemission of high brightness electron beams, we investigate the virtual cathode physics and the limits to spatio-temporal and spectroscopic resolution originating from the image charge on the surface and from the profile of the exciting laser pulse. By contrasting the effect of varying surface properties (leading to expanding or pinned image charge), laser profiles (Gaussian, uniform, and elliptical), and aspect ratios (pancake- and cigar-like) under different extraction field strengths and numbers of generated electrons, we quantify the effect of these experimental parameters on macroscopic pulse properties such as emittance, brightness (4D and 6D), coherence length, and energy spread. Based on our results, we outline optimal conditions of pulse generation for ultrafast electron microscope systems that take into account constraints on the number of generated electrons and on the required time resolution.

  18. High-brightness electron beam evolution following laser-based cleaning of a photocathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhou, F.; Brachmann, A.; Decker, F-J.; Emma, P.; Gilevich, S.; Iverson, R.; Stefan, P.; Turner, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-based techniques have been widely used for cleaning metal photocathodes to increase quantum efficiency (QE). However, the impact of laser cleaning on cathode uniformity and thereby on electron beam quality are less understood. We are evaluating whether this technique can be applied to revive photocathodes used for high-brightness electron sources in advanced x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) facilities, such as the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The laser-based cleaning was applied to two separate areas of the current LCLS photocathode on July 4 and July 26, 2011, respectively. The QE was increased by 810 times upon the laser cleaning. Since the cleaning, routine operation has exhibited a slow evolution of the QE improvement and comparatively rapid improvement of transverse emittance, with a factor of 3 QE enhancement over five months, and a significant emittance improvement over the initial 23 weeks following the cleaning. Currently, the QE of the LCLS photocathode is holding constant at about 1.210?4 , with a normalized injector emittance of about 0.3???m for a 150-pC bunch charge. With the proper procedures, the laser-cleaning technique appears to be a viable tool to revive the LCLS photocathode. We present observations and analyses for the QE and emittance evolution in time following the laser-based cleaning of the LCLS photocathode, and comparison to the previous studies, the measured thermal emittance versus the QE and comparison to the theoretical model.

  19. THE WAVE PROPERTIES OF CORONAL BRIGHT FRONTS OBSERVED USING SDO/AIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, David M.; DeLuca, Edward E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gallagher, Peter T., E-mail: longda@tcd.ie [Astrophysics Research Group, School of Physics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal bright fronts (CBFs) are large-scale wavefronts that propagate through the solar corona at hundreds of kilometers per second. While their kinematics have been studied in detail, many questions remain regarding the temporal evolution of their amplitude and pulse width. Here, contemporaneous high cadence, multi-thermal observations of the solar corona from the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) and Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft are used to determine the kinematics and expansion rate of a CBF wavefront observed on 2010 August 14. The CBF was found to have a lower initial velocity with weaker deceleration in STEREO observations compared to SDO observations ({approx}340 km s{sup -1} and -72 m s{sup -2} as opposed to {approx}410 km s{sup -1} and -279 m s{sup -2}). The CBF kinematics from SDO were found to be highly passband-dependent, with an initial velocity ranging from 379 {+-} 12 km s{sup -1} to 460 {+-} 28 km s{sup -1} and acceleration ranging from -128 {+-} 28 m s{sup -2} to -431 {+-} 86 m s{sup -2} in the 335 A and 304 A passbands, respectively. These kinematics were used to estimate a quiet coronal magnetic field strength range of {approx}1-2 G. Significant pulse broadening was also observed, with expansion rates of {approx}130 km s{sup -1} (STEREO) and {approx}220 km s{sup -1} (SDO). By treating the CBF as a linear superposition of sinusoidal waves within a Gaussian envelope, the resulting dispersion rate of the pulse was found to be {approx}8-13 Mm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. These results are indicative of a fast-mode magnetoacoustic wave pulse propagating through an inhomogeneous medium.

  20. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rgnier, S.; Alexander, C. E.; Walsh, R. W. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Winebarger, A. R.; Cirtain, J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Golub, L.; Korreck, K. E.; Weber, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mitchell, N.; Platt, S. [School of Computing, Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); De Pontieu, B.; Title, A. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Kobayashi, K. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, 320 Sparkman Dr, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kuzin, S. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskii pr. 53, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observing the Sun at high time and spatial scales is a step toward understanding the finest and fundamental scales of heating events in the solar corona. The high-resolution coronal (Hi-C) instrument has provided the highest spatial and temporal resolution images of the solar corona in the EUV wavelength range to date. Hi-C observed an active region on 2012 July 11 that exhibits several interesting features in the EUV line at 193 . One of them is the existence of short, small brightenings 'sparkling' at the edge of the active region; we call these EUV bright dots (EBDs). Individual EBDs have a characteristic duration of 25 s with a characteristic length of 680 km. These brightenings are not fully resolved by the SDO/AIA instrument at the same wavelength; however, they can be identified with respect to the Hi-C location of the EBDs. In addition, EBDs are seen in other chromospheric/coronal channels of SDO/AIA, which suggests a temperature between 0.5 and 1.5 MK. Based on their frequency in the Hi-C time series, we define four different categories of EBDs: single peak, double peak, long duration, and bursty. Based on a potential field extrapolation from an SDO/HMI magnetogram, the EBDs appear at the footpoints of large-scale, trans-equatorial coronal loops. The Hi-C observations provide the first evidence of small-scale EUV heating events at the base of these coronal loops, which have a free magnetic energy of the order of 10{sup 26} erg.

  1. Experimental investigation of bright spots in broadband, gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrios, M. A.; Suter, L. J.; Glenn, S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Collins, G. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Scott, H.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-199 (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright spots in the hot spot intensity profile of gated x-ray images of ignition-scale implosions at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Opt. Eng. 443, (2004)] are observed. X-ray images of cryogenically layered deuterium-tritium (DT) and tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) ice capsules, and gas filled plastic shell capsules (Symcap) were recorded along the hohlraum symmetry axis. Heterogeneous mixing of ablator material and fuel into the hot spot (i.e., hot-spot mix) by hydrodynamic instabilities causes the bright spots. Hot-spot mix increases the radiative cooling of the hot spot. Fourier analysis of the x-ray images is used to quantify the evolution of bright spots in both x- and k-space. Bright spot images were azimuthally binned to characterize bright spot location relative to known isolated defects on the capsule surface. A strong correlation is observed between bright spot location and the fill tube for both Symcap and cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets, indicating the fill tube is a significant seed for the ablation front instability causing hot-spot mix. The fill tube is the predominant seed for Symcaps, while other capsule non-uniformities are dominant seeds for the cryogenically layered DT and THD ice targets. A comparison of the bright spot power observed for Si- and Ge-doped ablator targets shows heterogeneous mix in Symcap targets is mostly material from the doped ablator layer.

  2. Raman-free, noble-gas-filled PCF source for ultrafast, very bright twin-beam squeezed vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finger, Martin A; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagom\\'e-style photonic-crystal fibre. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ~2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (~50 THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes.

  3. V and R-band Galaxy Luminosity Functions and Low Surface Brightness Galaxies in the Century Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren R. Brown; Margaret J. Geller; Daniel G. Fabricant; Michael J. Kurtz

    2001-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 64 square degrees of deep V and R CCD images to measure the local V and R band luminosity function of galaxies. The V_0<16.7 and R_0<16.2 redshift samples contain 1250 galaxies and are 98% complete. We apply k-corrections before the magnitude selection so that the completeness is to the same depth for all spectral types. The V and R faint end slopes are surprisingly identical: alpha = -1.07+-0.09. Representative Schechter function parameters for H_0=100 are: M^*_R = -20.88+-0.09, phi^*_R = 0.016+-0.003 Mpc^-3 and M^*_V = -20.23+-0.09, phi^*_V = 0.020+-0.003 Mpc^-3. The V and R local luminosity densities, j_R = (1.9+-0.6)x10^8 and j_V = (2.2+-0.7)x10^8 L_sun, are in essential agreement with the recent 2dF and SDSS determinations. All low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies fall in the large scale structure delineated by high surface brightness galaxies. The properties and surface number density of our LSB galaxies are consistent with the LSB galaxy catalog of O'Neil, Bothun & Cornell, suggesting that our samples are complete for LSB galaxies to the magnitude limits. We measure colors, surface brightnesses, and luminosities for our samples, and find strong correlations among these galaxy properties.

  4. A closer look at the fluctuations in the brightness of SN 2009IP during its late 2012 eruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, J. C. [Barber Observatory, University of Illinois Springfield, Springfield, IL 62704 (United States); Hambsch, F.-J. [Remote Observatory, Atacama Desert, Chile Vereniging Voor Sterrenkunde (VVS), Oude Bleken 12, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Margutti, R.; Soderberg, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02318 (United States); Tan, T. G. [Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth (Australia); Curtis, I., E-mail: jmart5@uis.edu [Adelaide (Australia)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supernova (SN) impostor SN 2009ip has re-brightened several times since its initial discovery in 2009 August. During its last outburst in late 2012 September, it reached a peak brightness of m{sub v} ?13.5 (M{sub v} brighter than ?18), causing some to speculate that it had undergone a terminal core-collapse SN. Relatively high-cadence multi-wavelength photometry of the post-peak decline revealed bumps in brightness infrequently observed in other SNe IIn. These bumps occurred synchronously in all ultraviolet (UV) and optical bands with amplitudes of 0.10.4 mag at intervals of 1030 days. Episodic continuum brightening and dimming in the UV and optical with these characteristics is not easily explained within the context of models that have been proposed for the late September 2012 outburst of SN 2009ip. We also present evidence that the post-peak fluctuations in brightness occur at regular intervals and raise more questions about their origin.

  5. BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pyo, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Woong-Seob [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Matsumoto, Toshio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Matsuura, Shuji, E-mail: jhpyo@kasi.re.kr [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 {mu}m, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 {mu}m) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 {mu}m), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 {+-} 0.23 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 {mu}m and at least 0.47 {+-} 0.14 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.02% at 18 {mu}m. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2{sigma} error into account.

  6. The Near-Infrared Photometric Properties of Bright Giants in the Central Regions of the Galactic Bulge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Davidge

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Images recorded through broad (J, H, K), and narrow (CO, and 2.2micron continuum) band filters are used to investigate the photometric properties of bright (K < 13.5) stars in a 6 x 6 arcmin field centered on the SgrA complex. The giant branch ridgelines in the (K, J-K) and (K, H-K) color-magnitude diagrams are well matched by the Baade's Window (BW) M giant sequence if the mean extinction is A_K ~ 2.8 mag. Extinction measurements for individual stars are estimated using the M_K versus infrared color relations defined by M giants in BW, and the majority of stars have A_K between 2.0 and 3.5 mag. The extinction is locally high in the SgrA complex, where A_K ~ 3.1 mag. Reddening-corrected CO indices, CO_o, are derived for over 1300 stars with J, H, and K brightnesses, and over 5300 stars with H and K brightnesses. The distribution of CO_o values for stars with K_o between 11.25 and 7.25 can be reproduced using the M_K versus CO_o relation defined by M giants in BW. The data thus suggest that the most metal-rich giants in the central regions of the bulge and in BW have similar photometric properties and 2.3micron CO strengths. Hence, it appears that the central region of the bulge does not contain a population of stars that are significantly more metal-rich than what is seen in BW.

  7. A Chandra Snapshot Survey of IR-bright LINERs: A Possible Link Between Star Formation, AGN Fueling, and Mass Accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Dudik; S. Satyapal; M. Gliozzi; R. M. Sambruna

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a high resolution X-ray imaging study of nearby LINERs observed by Chandra. This study complements and extends previous X-ray studies of LINERs, focusing on the under-explored population of nearby dust-enshrouded infrared-bright LINERs. The sample consists of 15 IR-bright LINERs (L_FIR/L_B > 3), with distances that range from 11 to 26 Mpc. Combining our sample with previous Chandra studies we find that ~ 51% (28/55) of the LINERs display compact hard X-ray cores. The nuclear 2-10 keV luminosities of the galaxies in this expanded sample range from ~ 2 X 10^38 ergs s^-1 to ~ 2 X 10^44 ergs s^-1. We find an intriguing trend in the Eddington ratio vs. L_FIR and L_FIR/L_B for the AGN-LINERs in the expanded sample that extends over seven orders of magnitude in L/L_Edd. This correlation may imply a link between black hole growth, as measured by the Eddington ratio, and the star formation rate (SFR), as measured by the far-IR luminosity and IR-brightness ratio. If the far-IR luminosity is an indicator of the molecular gas content in our sample of LINERs, our results may further indicate that the mass accretion rate scales with the host galaxy's fuel supply. We discuss the potential implications of our results in the framework of black hole growth and AGN fueling in low luminosity AGN. (Abridged)

  8. First results from the high-brightness x-ray spectroscopy beamline 9. 3.1 at ALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, W.; Jones, G.; Perera, R.C.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beamline 9.3.1 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a windowless beamline, covering the 1-6 keV photon-energy range. This beamline is designed to achieve the goal of high brightness at the sample for use in the X-ray Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy (XAMS) science, surface and interface science, biology, and x-ray optical development programs at ALS. X-ray absorption and time of flight photoemission measurements in 2 - 5 keV photon energy along with the flux, resolution, spot size and stability of the beamline will be discussed. Prospects for future XAMS measurements will also be presented.

  9. A COMPLETE SAMPLE OF BRIGHT SWIFT LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS. I. SAMPLE PRESENTATION, LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvaterra, R. [INAF, IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Fugazza, D.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Sbarufatti, B.; Tagliaferri, G. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via E. Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Saint Lucia) (Italy); Nava, L. [SISSA, via Bonomea 265, I-34136 Trieste (Italy); Flores, H. [Laboratoire GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS-UMR8111, Univ. Paris-Diderot 5 place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon (France); Piranomonte, S., E-mail: ruben@lambrate.inaf.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, 00040 Monte Porzio Catone, Rome (Italy)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a carefully selected sub-sample of Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that is complete in redshift. The sample is constructed by considering only bursts with favorable observing conditions for ground-based follow-up searches, which are bright in the 15-150 keV Swift/BAT band, i.e., with 1-s peak photon fluxes in excess to 2.6 photons s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The sample is composed of 58 bursts, 52 of them with redshift for a completeness level of 90%, while another two have a redshift constraint, reaching a completeness level of 95%. For only three bursts we have no constraint on the redshift. The high level of redshift completeness allows us for the first time to constrain the GRB luminosity function and its evolution with cosmic times in an unbiased way. We find that strong evolution in luminosity ({delta}{sub l} = 2.3 {+-} 0.6) or in density ({delta}{sub d} = 1.7 {+-} 0.5) is required in order to account for the observations. The derived redshift distributions in the two scenarios are consistent with each other, in spite of their different intrinsic redshift distributions. This calls for other indicators to distinguish among different evolution models. Complete samples are at the base of any population studies. In future works we will use this unique sample of Swift bright GRBs to study the properties of the population of long GRBs.

  10. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF UV-BRIGHT WHITE DWARFS FROM THE SANDAGE TWO-COLOR SURVEY OF THE GALACTIC PLANE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, Division of Physical Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States); Bergeron, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Lanning, Howard H., E-mail: lepine@amnh.org [National Optical Astronomical Observatories, 940 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic observations confirming the identification of hot white dwarfs among UV-bright sources from the Sandage Two-color Survey of the Galactic Plane and listed in the Lanning (Lan) catalog of such sources. A subsample of 213 UV-bright Lan sources have been identified as candidate white dwarfs based on the detection of a significant proper motion. Spectroscopic observations of 46 candidates with the KPNO 2.1 m telescope confirm 30 sources to be hydrogen white dwarfs with subtypes in the DA1-DA6 range, and with one of the stars (Lan 161) having an unresolved M dwarf as a companion. Five more sources are confirmed to be helium white dwarfs, with subtypes from DB3 to DB6. One source (Lan 364) is identified as a DZ 3 white dwarf, with strong lines of calcium. Three more stars are found to have featureless spectra (to within detection limits) and are thus classified as DC white dwarfs. In addition, three sources are found to be hot subdwarfs: Lan 20 and Lan 480 are classified as sdOB, and Lan 432 is classified sdB. The remaining four objects are found to be field F star interlopers. Physical parameters of the DA and DB white dwarfs are derived from model fits.

  11. Environment of the submillimeter-bright massive starburst HFLS3 at $z$$\\sim$6.34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laporte, N; Calanog, J A; Cooray, A; Wardlow, J L; Bock, J; Bridge, C; Burgarella, D; Bussmann, R S; Cabrera-Lavers, A; Casey, C M; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Farrah, D; Fu, H; Gavazzi, R; Gonzlez-Solares, E A; Ivison, R J; Faro, B Lo; Ma, B; Magdis, G; Marques-Chaves, R; Martnez-Navajas, P; Oliver, S J; Osage, W A; Riechers, D; Rigopoulou, D; Scott, D; Streblyanska, A; Vieira, J D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the search for Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) near the sub-millimeter bright starburst galaxy HFLS3 at $z$$=$6.34 and a study on the environment of this massive galaxy during the end of reionization. We performed two independent selections of LBGs on images obtained with the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) by combining non-detections in bands blueward of the Lyman-break and color selection. A total of 10 objects fulfilling the LBG selection criteria at $z$$>$5.5 were selected over the 4.54 and 55.5 arcmin$^2$ covered by our HST and GTC images, respectively. The photometric redshift, UV luminosity, and the star-formation rate of these sources were estimated with models of their spectral energy distribution. These $z$$\\sim$6 candidates have physical properties and number densities in agreement with previous results. The UV luminosity function of this field at $z$$\\sim$6 shows no strong evidence for an overdensity of relatively bright objects (m$_{F105W}$$<$25.9) a...

  12. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Y; Preece, R; Dingus, B L; Briggs, M S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another...

  13. BRIGHT POINTS AND JETS IN POLAR CORONAL HOLES OBSERVED BY THE EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doschek, G. A.; Landi, E.; Warren, H. P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Harra, L. K., E-mail: george.doschek@nrl.navy.mi [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of polar coronal hole bright points (BPs) made with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft. The data consist of raster images of BPs in multiple spectral lines from mostly coronal ions, e.g., Fe X-Fe XV. The BPs are observed for short intervals and thus the data are snapshots of the BPs obtained during their evolution. The images reveal a complex unresolved temperature structure (EIS resolution is about 2''), with the highest temperature being about 2 x 10{sup 6} K. Some BPs appear as small loops with temperatures that are highest near the top. But others are more point-like with surrounding structures. However, the thermal time evolution of the BPs is an important factor in their appearance. A BP may appear quite different at different times. We discuss one BP with an associated jet that is bright enough to allow statistically meaningful measurements. The jet Doppler speed along the line of sight is about 15-20 km s{sup -1}. Electron densities of the BPs and the jet are typically near 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3}, which implies path lengths along the line of sight on the order of a few arcsec. We also construct differential emission measure curves for two of the best observed BPs. High spatial resolution (significantly better than 1'') is required to fully resolve the BP structures.

  14. GRB 090926A AND BRIGHT LATE-TIME FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, C. A.; Roming, P. W. A.; Vetere, L.; Kennea, J. A. [Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Maxham, A.; Zhang, B. B.; Zhang, B. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Box 454002, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Schady, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany); Holland, S. T. [Universities Space Research Association, 10227 Wincopin Circle, Suite 500, Columbia, MD 21044 (United States); Kuin, N. P. M.; Oates, S. R.; De Pasquale, M. [The UCL Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Page, K. L., E-mail: cswenson@astro.psu.ed [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 090926A was detected by both the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Swift follow-up observations began {approx}13 hr after the initial trigger. The optical afterglow was detected for nearly 23 days post trigger, placing it in the long-lived category. The afterglow is of particular interest due to its brightness at late times, as well as the presence of optical flares at T0+10{sup 5} s and later, which may indicate late-time central engine activity. The LAT has detected a total of 16 gamma-ray bursts; nine of these bursts, including GRB 090926A, also have been observed by Swift. Of the nine Swift-observed LAT bursts, six were detected by UVOT, with five of the bursts having bright, long-lived optical afterglows. In comparison, Swift has been operating for five years and has detected nearly 500 bursts, but has only seen {approx}30% of bursts with optical afterglows that live longer than 10{sup 5} s. We have calculated the predicted gamma-ray fluence, as would have been seen by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board Swift, of the LAT bursts to determine whether this high percentage of long-lived optical afterglows is unique, when compared to BAT-triggered bursts. We find that, with the exception of the short burst GRB 090510A, the predicted BAT fluences indicate that the LAT bursts are more energetic than 88% of all Swift bursts and also have brighter than average X-ray and optical afterglows.

  15. HAT-P-7b: An Extremely Hot Massive Planet Transiting a Bright Star in the Kepler Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pal; G. A. Bakos; G. Torres; R. W. Noyes; D. W. Latham; Geza Kovacs; G. W. Marcy; D. A. Fischer; R. P. Butler; D. D. Sasselov; B. Sipocz; G. A. Esquerdo; Gabor Kovacs; R. Stefanik; J. Lazar; I. Papp; P. Sari

    2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the latest discovery of the HATNet project; a very hot giant planet orbiting a bright (V = 10.5) star with a small semi-major axis of a = 0.0377 +/- 0.0005 AU. Ephemeris for the system is P = 2.2047299 +/- 0.0000040 days, mid-transit time E = 2,453,790.2593 +/- 0.0010 (BJD). Based on the available spectroscopic data on the host star and photometry of the system, the planet has a mass of Mp = 1.78+/-^{0.08}_{0.05} MJup and radius of Rp = 1.36+/-^{0.20}_{0.09} RJup. The parent star is a slightly evolved F6 star with M = 1.47+/-^{0.08}_{-0.05} Msun,R = 1.84+/-^{0.23}_{0.11} Rsun, Teff = 6350 +/- 80 K, and metallicity [Fe/H] = +0.26 +/- 0.08. The relatively hot and large host star, combined with the close orbit of the planet, yield a very high planetary irradiance of (4.71+/-^{1.44}_{0.05}) 10^9 erg cm^{-2}s^{-1}, which places the planet near the top of the pM class of irradiated planets as defined by Fortney et al. (2007). If as predicted by Fortney et al. (2007) the planet re-radiates its absorbed energy before distributing it to the night side, the day-side temperature should be about (2730+/-^{150}_{100}) K. Because the host star is quite bright, measurement of the secondary eclipse should be feasible for ground-based telescopes, providing a good opportunity to compare the predictions of current hot Jupiter atmospheric models with the observations. Moreover, the host star falls in the field of the upcoming Kepler mission; hence extensive space-borne follow-up, including not only primary transit and secondary eclipse observations but also asteroseismology, will be possible.

  16. Broadband Spectral Properties of Bright High-Energy Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with BATSE and EGRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Kaneko; M. M. Gonzalez; R. Preece; B. L. Dingus; M. S. Briggs

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the spectral analysis of duration-integrated broadband spectra (in $\\sim30 $keV$-200 $MeV) of 15 bright BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Some GRB spectra are very hard, with their spectral peak energies being above the BATSE LAD passband limit of $\\sim$2 MeV. In such cases, their high-energy spectral parameters (peak energy and high-energy power-law indices) cannot be adequately constrained by BATSE LAD data alone. A few dozen bright BATSE GRBs were also observed with EGRET's calorimeter, TASC, in multi-MeV energy band, with a large effective area and fine energy resolution. Combining the BATSE and TASC data, therefore, affords spectra that span four decades of energy ($30 $keV$-200 $MeV), allowing for a broadband spectral analysis with good statistics. Studying such broadband high-energy spectra of GRB prompt emission is crucial, as they provide key clues to understanding its gamma-ray emission mechanism. Among the 15 GRB spectra, we found two cases with a significant high-energy excess, and another case with a extremely high peak energy (\\epeak $\\gtrsim$ 170 MeV). There have been very limited number of GRBs observed at MeV energies and above, and only a few instruments have been capable of observing GRBs in this energy band with such high sensitivity. Thus, our analysis results presented here should also help predict GRB observations with current and future high-energy instruments such as AGILE and GLAST, as well as with ground-based very-high-energy telescopes.

  17. Galaxies that Shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disk galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy disks of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photo-ionisation heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multi-scattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photo-heating smooths and thickens the disks and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of ("thermal dump") supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but ...

  18. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    times science has used high-brilliance x-rays to look so closely at these reactions. Lead author Dr. David Mueller at the ALS using x-rays to characterize working fuel cells....

  19. Making (and Saving) Money While the Sun Shines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given by Tydings and Rosenberg during the DOE SunShot Grand Challenge: Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  20. Why Does the Sun Shine? Is the Sun on Fire?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Frederick M.

    protons + 6 neutrons) MO = 16 x mp (8 protons + 8 neutrons mp = 1.6 x 10-24 gm (mass of the proton) MCO2 = (12 + 32) * mp N = M / MCO2 = 2.6 X 1055 (number of reactions possible) #12;Is the Sun on Fire? Fire

  1. NREL: News Feature - Rain or Shine, Students Keep Their Race...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the uniform tunics from the 1960s show-Teegan's in red and Kira's in blue. The model electric car they're racing in the 25th Annual Junior Solar Sprint and Lithium Ion Battery...

  2. 1366 Technologies Shines a Light on American Innovation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in North Lexington, Massachusetts to get an inside look at their innovative approach to solar manufacturing and document how a 4 million grant from the Advanced Research...

  3. Shining On: A primer on solar radiation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunlap, M.A.; Cook, G. [eds.; Marion, B.; Riordan, C.; Renne, D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a primer on solar radiation data. General uses of solar energy are presented. The manner in which solar radiation data is used to aid engineers in optimizing the use of solar thermal conversion and photovoltaic conversion is discussed. Methods for acquiring and assimilating the solar radiation data are illustrated. This would include the design and use of pyranometers and pyrheliometers. Seasonal and geographical variations in solar flux reaching the earth are evaluated. Other uses of compiled data include the determination of meteorological impacts of atmospheric disturbances such as volcano eruptions.

  4. Relativistic Jets Shine through Shocks or Magnetic Reconnection?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sironi, Lorenzo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of gamma-ray-bursts and jets from active galactic nuclei reveal that the jet flow is characterized by a high radiative efficiency and that the dissipative mechanism must be a powerful accelerator of non-thermal particles. Shocks and magnetic reconnection have long been considered as possible candidates for powering the jet emission. Recent progress via fully-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations allows us to revisit this issue on firm physical grounds. We show that shock models are unlikely to account for the jet emission. In fact, when shocks are efficient at dissipating energy, they typically do not accelerate particles far beyond the thermal energy, and vice versa. In contrast, we show that magnetic reconnection can deposit more than 50% of the dissipated energy into non-thermal leptons as long as the energy density of the magnetic field in the bulk flow is larger than the rest mass energy density. The emitting region, i.e., the reconnection downstream, is characterized by a rough energy equipa...

  5. Cosmos incognito : Vera Rubin shines light on dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeager, Ashley

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis, a profile of astronomer Vera Rubin, highlights her scientific achievements, most notably the irrefutable evidence she gathered to persuade the astronomical community that galaxies spin at a faster speed than ...

  6. EM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Team's Holiday Spirit Shines | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory Board Contributions EMEM Recovery Act PressEMTacklesTapsof

  7. Rain or Shine: We Cycle for Science | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency |DepartmentEvent |Rafael

  8. Shining Light on Catalysis | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund scholarshipsShedding Light

  9. A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy ThisThis guideQuarterly2002, theEighth11 AA

  10. A Shining Example of Dr. King's legacy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA Liquid Layer Solution for theDecorativeAA

  11. Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's Nuclear EnergySmart Meters and| Department of:

  12. LANL Instrument to Shine Light on Mars Habitability | National Nuclear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointedKyungmin Ham, Ph.D. Title:

  13. Crayola's True Color Shines Through: Green | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAsAmanda McAlpin SopAmericaWhatUraniumHomemadeThe

  14. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALS WorkshopALS

  15. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALS WorkshopALSALS

  16. ALS X-Rays Shine a New Light on Catalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartmentNeutrino-Induced1ALSALS RevealsALS WorkshopALSALSALS

  17. Fifteen years of XMM-Newton and Chandra monitoring of Sgr A*: Evidence for a recent increase in the bright flaring rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponti, G; Morris, M R; Merloni, A; Munoz-Darias, T; Clavel, M; Haggard, D; Zhang, S; Nandra, K; Gillessen, S; Mori, K; Neilsen, J; Rea, N; Degenaar, N; Terrier, R; Goldwurm, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the X-ray flaring activity of Sgr A* during all the 150 XMM-Newton and Chandra observations pointed at the Milky Way center over the last 15 years. This includes the latest XMM-Newton and Chandra campaigns devoted to monitoring the closest approach of the very red Br-Gamma emitting object called G2. The entire dataset analysed extends from September 1999 through November 2014. We employed a Bayesian block analysis to investigate any possible variations in the characteristics (frequency, energetics, peak intensity, duration) of the flaring events that Sgr A* has exhibited since their discovery in 2001. We observe that the total bright-or-very bright flare luminosity of Sgr A* increased between 2013-2014 by a factor of 2-3 (~3.5 sigma significance). We also observe an increase (~99.9% significance) from 0.27+-0.04 to 2.5+-1.0 day^-1 of the bright-or-very bright flaring rate of Sgr A*, starting in late summer 2014, which happens to be about six months after G2's peri-center passage. This mi...

  18. THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fynbo, Johan

    THE BRIGHT GAMMA-RAY BURST OF 2000 FEBRUARY 10: A CASE STUDY OF AN OPTICALLY DARK GAMMA-RAY BURST L Received 2002 January 16; accepted 2002 June 8 ABSTRACT The gamma-ray burst GRB 000210 had the highest: observations -- gamma-rays: bursts 1. INTRODUCTION It is observationally well established that about half

  19. Quinn for New York campaign Come and intern with the Quinn for New York campaign. The campaign is looking for bright, energetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Aniruddh D.

    Quinn for New York campaign Come and intern with the Quinn for New York campaign. The campaign is looking for bright, energetic individuals who want to learn the nuts and bolts of how a campaign works, and help elect the next Mayor of New York City. Hours are completely flexible with a small requirement

  20. The Sloan Bright Arcs Survey : Discovery of Seven New Strongly Lensed Galaxies from $\\rm{z}=0.66-2.94$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubo, Jeffrey M.; Allam, Sahar S.; Annis, James; Buckley-Geer, Elizabeth J.; Diehl, H.Thomas; Drabek, Emily; Frieman, Joshua A.; Hao, Jiangang; Kubik, Donna; Lin, Huan; Soares-Santos, Marcelle

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of seven new, very bright gravitational lens systems from our ongoing gravitational lens search, the Sloan Bright Arcs Survey (SBAS). Two of the systems are confirmed to have high source redshifts z = 2.19 and z = 2.94. Three other systems lie at intermediate redshift with z = 1.33, 1.82, 1.93 and two systems are at low redshift z = 0.66, 0.86. The lensed source galaxies in all of these systems are bright, with i-band magnitudes ranging from 19.73-22.06. We present the spectrum of each of the source galaxies in these systems along with estimates of the Einstein radius for each system. The foreground lens in most systems is identified by a red sequence based cluster finder as a galaxy group; one system is identified as a moderately rich cluster. In total the SBAS has now discovered nineteen strong lens systems in the SDSS imaging data, eight of which are among the highest surface brightness z {approx_equal} 2-3 galaxies known.

  1. AS102 -Day Laboratory Exercise #2: Luminosity and Brightness _ Page 1 Introduction -How do we determine the value of the Sun's luminosity or the luminosity of other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opher, Merav

    : light bulbs, meter sticks, calculators, wax blocks, aluminum foil Methods: Mask light from a bulb consists of two wax blocks and a piece of aluminum foil located between the wax blocks. When viewed from the edge, this photometer will allow you to judge when the two wax blocks are equally bright. Then, if we

  2. Fabrication of a High-Brightness Blue-Light-Emitting Diode Using a ZnO-Nanowire Array Grown on p-GaN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    Fabrication of a High-Brightness Blue-Light-Emitting Diode Using a ZnO-Nanowire Array Grown on p-GaN of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), gallium nitride (GaN) has become the most important GaN nanowires (NWs) have also been fabricated, and nanoLEDs are an active field of research.[5

  3. IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 17, NO. 4, JULY/AUGUST 2011 971 Highly Efficient and Bright LEDs Overgrown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficient and Bright LEDs Overgrown on GaN Nanopillar Substrates Ching-Hsueh Chiu, Po-Min Tu, Chien emitting diodes (LEDs) using a GaN nanopillars (NPs) structure grown on sapphire substrate by integrating. However, lack of a suitable, inexpensive substrate restrains the improve- ment of GaN-based devices. Even

  4. Sub-GeV flashes in $\\gamma-$ray burst afterglows as probes of underlying bright UV flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Y; Fan, Yizhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bright optical and X-ray flares have been observed in many Gamma-ray Burst (GRB) afterglows. These flares have been attributed to late activity of the central engine. In most cases the peak energy is not known and it is possible and even likely that there is a significant far-ultraviolet component. These far-UV photons escape our detection because they are absorbed by the neutral hydrogen before reaching Earth. However, these photons cross the blast wave produced by the ejecta that have powered the initial GRB. They can be inverse Compton upscattered by hot electrons within this blast wave. This process will produce a strong sub-GeV flare that can be detected by the upcoming {\\em Gamma-Ray Large Area Telescope} (GLAST) satellite. This signature can be used to probe the spectrum of the underlying far-ultraviolet flare. The extra cooling produced by this inverse Compton process can lower the X-ray emissivity of the forward shock and explain the unexpected low early X-ray flux seen in many GRBs.

  5. On the Frequency Evolution of X-ray Brightness Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Evidence for Coherent Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tod E. Strohmayer; Craig B. Markwardt

    1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the time dependence of the frequency of X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear bursts from several neutron star low mass X-ray binaries. We find that the oscillation frequencies in the cooling tails of X-ray bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34 are well described by an exponential "chirp" model. With this model we demonstrate that the pulse trains in the cooling tails of many bursts are highly phase coherent, having oscillation quality factors as high as Q ~ 4000. We use this model of the frequency evolution to search sensitively for significant power at the harmonics and first sub-harmonic of the 330 and 363 Hz signals in bursts from 4U 1702-429 and 4U 1728-34, respectively, but find not evidence for significant power at any harmonic or the sub-harmonic. We argue that the high coherence favors stellar rotation as the source of the oscillations. We briefly discuss the frequency evolution in terms of rotational motion of an angular momentum conserving thermonuclear shell. we discuss how the limits on harmonic content can be used to infer properties of the neutron star.

  6. The SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey II. 450 micron data - evidence for cold dust in bright IRAS Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loretta Dunne; Stephen Eales

    2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second in a series of papers presenting results from the SCUBA Local Universe Galaxy Survey. In our first paper we provided 850 micron flux densities for 104 galaxies selected from the IRAS Bright Galaxy Sample and we found that the 60, 100 micron (IRAS) and 850 micron (SCUBA) fluxes could be adequately fitted by emission from dust at a single temperature. In this paper we present 450 micron data for the galaxies. With the new data, the spectral energy distributions of the galaxies can no longer be fitted with an isothermal dust model - two temperature components are now required. Using our 450 micron data and fluxes from the literature, we find that the 450/850 micron flux ratio for the galaxies is remarkably constant and this holds from objects in which the star formation rate is similar to our own Galaxy, to ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGS) such as Arp 220. The only possible explanation for this is if the dust emissivity index for all of the galaxies is ~2 and the cold dust component has a similar temperature in all galaxies (20-21 K). The dust masses estimated using the new temperatures are higher by a factor ~2 than those determined previously using a single temperature. This brings the gas-to-dust ratios of the IRAS galaxies into agreement with those of the Milky Way and other spiral galaxies which have been intensively studied in the submm.

  7. MILAGRO OBSERVATIONS OF MULTI-TeV EMISSION FROM GALACTIC SOURCES IN THE FERMI BRIGHT SOURCE LIST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, A. A.; Linnemann, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 3245 BioMedical Physical Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Allen, B. T.; Chen, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Aune, T. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Berley, D.; Goodman, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Christopher, G. E.; Kolterman, B. E.; Mincer, A. I.; Nemethy, P. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); DeYoung, T. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Dingus, B. L.; Hoffman, C. M. [Group P-23, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ellsworth, R. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Gonzalez, M. M. [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Huentemeyer, P. H. [Department of Physics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Morgan, T. [Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Morse Hall, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of a search of the Milagro sky map for spatial correlations with sources from a subset of the recent Fermi Bright Source List (BSL). The BSL consists of the 205 most significant sources detected above 100 MeV by the Fermi Large Area Telescope. We select sources based on their categorization in the BSL, taking all confirmed or possible Galactic sources in the field of view of Milagro. Of the 34 Fermi sources selected, 14 are observed by Milagro at a significance of 3 standard deviations or more. We conduct this search with a new analysis which employs newly optimized gamma-hadron separation and utilizes the full eight-year Milagro data set. Milagro is sensitive to gamma rays with energy from 1 to 100 TeV with a peak sensitivity from 10 to 50 TeV depending on the source spectrum and declination. These results extend the observation of these sources far above the Fermi energy band. With the new analysis and additional data, multi-TeV emission is definitively observed associated with the Fermi pulsar, J2229.0+6114, in the Boomerang pulsar wind nebula (PWN). Furthermore, an extended region of multi-TeV emission is associated with the Fermi pulsar, J0634.0+1745, the Geminga pulsar.

  8. Resolved Massive Star Clusters in the Milky Way and its Satellites: Brightness Profiles and a Catalogue of Fundamental Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin; Roeland P. van der Marel

    2006-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abridged]: We present a database of structural and dynamical properties for 153 spatially resolved star clusters (50 "young massive clusters" and 103 old globulars) in the Milky Way, the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, and the Fornax dwarf spheroidal. This database complements and extends others in the literature, such as those of Harris, and Mackey & Gilmore. By fitting a number of models to the clusters' density profiles, we derive various characteristic surface brightnesses and radii; central potentials, velocity dispersions, and escape velocities; total luminosities, masses, and binding energies; phase-space densities and relaxation timescales; and ``kappa-space'' parameters. Population-synthesis models are used to predict intrinsic (B-V) colors, reddenings, and V-band mass-to-light ratios for the same 153 clusters plus another 63 globulars in the Milky Way, and we compare these predictions to the observed quantities where available. These results are intended to serve as the basis for future investigations of structural correlations and the fundamental plane of massive star clusters, including especially comparisons between the systemic properties of young and old clusters. We also address the question of what structural model fits each cluster best, and argue that the extended halos known to characterize many Magellanic Cloud clusters may be examples of the generic envelope structure of self-gravitating star clusters, not just transient features associated strictly with young age.

  9. Bright X-ray flares in XRF 050406 and GRB 050502B provide evidence for extended central engine activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, D N; Falcone, A; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Moretti, A; O'Brien, P T; Goad, M R; Campana, S; Page, K L; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S D; Beardmore, A P; Capalbi, M; Chincarini, G; Cummings, J; Cusumano, G; Fox, D; Giommi, P; Hill, J E; Kennea, J A; Krimm, H; Mangano, V; Marshall, F; Mszros, P; Morris, D C; Nousek, J A; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Perri, M; Tagliaferri, G; Wells, A A; Woosley, S; Gehrels, N

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful explosions since the Big Bang, with typical energies around 10**51 ergs. Long GRBs (duration > 2 s) are thought to signal the creation of black holes, most likely by collapse of massive stars. The detected signals from the resulting highly relativistic fireball consist of prompt gamma-ray emission (from internal shocks in the fireball) lasting for several seconds to minutes, followed by afterglow emission (from external shocks as the fireball encounters surrounding material) covering a broad range of frequencies from radio through X-rays. Because of the time needed to determine the GRB position, most afterglow measurements have been made hours after the burst, and little is known about the characteristics of afterglows in the minutes following a burst, when the afterglow emission is actively responding to inhomogeneities in both the fireball and the circumburst environment. Here we report our discovery of two bright X-ray flares peaking a few minutes after the bur...

  10. The behaviour of dark matter associated with 4 bright cluster galaxies in the 10kpc core of Abell 3827

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Massey; Liliya Williams; Renske Smit; Mark Swinbank; Thomas Kitching; David Harvey; Mathilde Jauzac; Holger Israel; Douglas Clowe; Alastair Edge; Matt Hilton; Eric Jullo; Adrienne Leonard; Jori Liesenborgs; Julian Merten; Irshad Mohammed; Daisuke Nagai; Johan Richard; Andrew Robertson; Prasenjit Saha; Rebecca Santana; John Stott; Eric Tittley

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy cluster Abell 3827 hosts the stellar remnants of four almost equally bright elliptical galaxies within a core of radius 10kpc. Such corrugation of the stellar distribution is very rare, and suggests recent formation by several simultaneous mergers. We map the distribution of associated dark matter, using new Hubble Space Telescope imaging and VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy of a gravitationally lensed system threaded through the cluster core. We find that each of the central galaxies retains a dark matter halo, but that (at least) one of these is spatially offset from its stars. The best-constrained offset is 1.62+/-0.48kpc, where the 68% confidence limit includes both statistical error and systematic biases in mass modelling. Such offsets are not seen in field galaxies, but are predicted during the long infall to a cluster, if dark matter self-interactions generate an extra drag force. With such a small physical separation, it is difficult to definitively rule out astrophysical effects operating exclusively in dense cluster core environments - but if interpreted solely as evidence for self-interacting dark matter, this offset implies a cross-section sigma/m=(1.7+/-0.7)x10^{-4}cm^2/g x (t/10^9yrs)^{-2}, where t is the infall duration.

  11. Bright Lights, Black Leather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaSalle, R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?" The older man paused, smoothing his fingers over his mustache. "Mike Orgell," he said simply. Sonny froze at the mention of that name. Mike Orgell. Five months had passed since the last time he'd heard it spoken; hearing it again now was like reopening...'re lovers." "Yeah? So?" Sonny demanded. "Whats that got to do with Mike Orgell?" "You made your feelings known about Orgell, and Evan Freed... their sexual orientations." Martin held the detective's stare. "Your reaction to Henderson, to what he said...

  12. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  13. Mechanisms of brightness perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Alan Edward

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    percepts produced by luminance modulation. Vision Research,a square with the same luminance on a dark background (Fig.than point-for-point luminance. While this would predict

  14. BRIGHT 22 ?m EXCESS CANDIDATES FROM THE WISE ALL-SKY CATALOG AND THE HIPPARCOS MAIN CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Chao-Jian; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I; Yang, Ming; Gao, Liang [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Wen, Xiao-Qing [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Shuo [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Tong-Jie [Department of Astronomy, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a catalog that includes 141 bright candidates (?10.27 mag, V band) showing an excess of infrared (IR) at 22 ?m. Of these 141 candidates, 38 stars are known IR-excess stars or disks, 23 stars are double or multiple stars, and 4 are Be stars while the remaining more than 70 stars are identified as 22 ?m excess candidates in our work. The criterion for selecting candidates is K{sub s} [22]{sub ?m}. All these candidates are selected from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky data cross-correlated with the Hipparcos main catalog and the likelihood-ratio technique is employed. Considering the effect of background, we introduce the IRAS 100 ?m level to exclude the high background. We also estimate the coincidence probability of these sources. In addition, we present the optical to mid-IR spectral energy distributions and optical images for all the candidates, and give the observed optical spectra of six stars with the National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences' 2.16 m telescope. To measure for the amount of dust around each star, the fractional luminosity is also provided. We also test whether our method of selecting IR-excess stars can be used to search for extra-solar planets; we cross-match our catalog with known IR-excess stars with planets but found no matches. Finally, we give the fraction of stars showing excess IR for different spectral types of main-sequence stars.

  15. The Intra-Night Optical Variability of the bright BL Lac object S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Montagni; A. Maselli; E. Massaro; R. Nesci; S. Sclavi; M. Maesano

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the topic of the Intra-Night Optical Variability of the BL Lac object S5 0716+714. To this purpose a long term observational campaign was performed, from 1996 to 2003, which allowed the collection of a very large data set, containing 10,675 photometric measurements obtained in 102 nights. The source brightness varied in a range of about 2 mag, although the majority of observations were performed when it was in the range 13.0 < R < 13.75. Variability time scales were estimated from the rates of magnitude variation, which were found to have a distribution function well fitted by an exponential law with a mean value of 0.027 mag/h, corresponding to an e-folding time scale of the flux tau_F = 37.6 h. The highest rates of magnitude variation were around 0.10--0.12 mag/h and lasted less than 2 h. These rates were observed only when the source had an R magnitude < 13.4, but this finding cannot be considered significant because of the low statistical occurrence. The distribution of tau_F has a well defined modal value at 19 h. Assuming the recent estimate of the beaming factor delta about 20, we derived a typical size of the emitting region of about 5 times 10^{16}/(1 + z) cm. The possibility to search for a possible correlation between the mean magnitude variation rate and the long term changes of the velocity of superluminal components in the jet is discussed.

  16. Detection of solar-like oscillations in the bright red giant stars $\\gamma$ Psc and $\\theta^1$ Tau from a 190-day high-precision spectroscopic multisite campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, P G; Hillen, M; Corsaro, E; Van Winckel, H; Moravveji, E; De Ridder, J; Bloemen, S; Saesen, S; Mathias, P; Degroote, P; Kallinger, T; Verhoelst, T; Ando, H; Carrier, F; Acke, B; Oreiro, R; Miglio, A; Eggenberger, P; Sato, B; Zwintz, K; Ppics, P I; Marcos-Arenal, P; Fuentes, S A Sans; Schmid, V S; Waelkens, C; stensen, R; Matthews, J M; Yoshida, M; Izumiura, H; Koyano, H; Nagayama, S; Shimizu, Y; Okada, N; Okita, K; Sakamoto, A; Yamamuro, T; Aerts, C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red giants are evolved stars which exhibit solar-like oscillations. Although a multitude of stars have been observed with space telescopes, only a handful of red-giant stars were targets of spectroscopic asteroseismic observing projects. We search for solar-like oscillations in the two bright red-giant stars $\\gamma$ Psc and $\\theta^1$ Tau from time series of ground-based spectroscopy and determine the frequency of the excess of oscillation power $\

  17. BRIGHT 'MERGER-NOVA' FROM THE REMNANT OF A NEUTRON STAR BINARY MERGER: A SIGNATURE OF A NEWLY BORN, MASSIVE, MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Zhang, Bing; Gao, He, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A massive millisecond magnetar may survive the merger of a neutron star (NS) binary, which would continuously power the merger ejecta. We develop a generic dynamic model for the merger ejecta with energy injection from the central magnetar. The ejecta emission (the {sup m}erger-nova{sup )} powered by the magnetar peaks in the UV band and the peak of the light curve, progressively shifts to an earlier epoch with increasing frequency. A magnetar-powered merger-nova could have an optical peak brightness comparable to a supernova, which is a few tens or hundreds times brighter than the radioactive-powered merger-novae (the so-called macro-nova or kilo-nova). On the other hand, such a merger-nova would peak earlier and have a significantly shorter duration than that of a supernova. An early collapse of the magnetar could suppress the brightness of the optical emission and shorten its duration. Such millisecond-magnetar-powered merger-novae may be detected from NS-NS merger events without an observed short gamma-ray burst, and could be a bright electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers. If detected, it suggests that the merger leaves behind a massive NS, which has important implications for the equation-of-state of nuclear matter.

  18. GALAXY HALO TRUNCATION AND GIANT ARC SURFACE BRIGHTNESS RECONSTRUCTION IN THE CLUSTER MACSJ1206.2-0847

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichner, Thomas; Seitz, Stella; Monna, Anna [Universitaets-Sternwarte Muenchen, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Suyu, Sherry H. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Halkola, Aleksi [Institute of Medical Engineering, University of Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160 23562 Luebeck (Germany); Umetsu, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Zitrin, Adi [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, ZAH, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Coe, Dan; Postman, Marc; Koekemoer, Anton; Bradley, Larry [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21208 (United States); Rosati, Piero [ESO-European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Grillo, Claudio; Host, Ole [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Balestra, Italo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zheng, Wei; Lemze, Doron [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Broadhurst, Tom [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of the Basque Country, P.O. Box 644, E-48080 Bilbao (Spain); Moustakas, Leonidas [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-327, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Molino, Alberto [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), C/Camino Bajo de Huetor 24, Granada E-18008 (Spain); and others

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we analyze the mass distribution of MACSJ1206.2-0847, particularly focusing on the halo properties of its cluster members. The cluster appears relaxed in its X-ray emission, but has a significant amount of intracluster light that is not centrally concentrated, suggesting that galaxy-scale interactions are still ongoing despite the overall relaxed state. The cluster lenses 12 background galaxies into multiple images and one galaxy at z = 1.033 into a giant arc and its counterimage. The multiple image positions and the surface brightness (SFB) distribution of the arc, which is bent around several cluster members, are sensitive to the cluster galaxy halo properties. We model the cluster mass distribution with a Navarro-Frenk-White profile and the galaxy halos with two parameters for the mass normalization and the extent of a reference halo assuming scalings with their observed near-infrared light. We match the multiple image positions at an rms level of 0.''85 and can reconstruct the SFB distribution of the arc in several filters to a remarkable accuracy based on this cluster model. The length scale where the enclosed galaxy halo mass is best constrained is about 5 effective radii-a scale in between those accessible to dynamical and field strong-lensing mass estimates on the one hand and galaxy-galaxy weak-lensing results on the other hand. The velocity dispersion and halo size of a galaxy with m{sub 160W,AB} = 19.2 and M{sub B,Vega} = -20.7 are {sigma} = 150 km s{sup -1} and r Almost-Equal-To 26 {+-} 6 kpc, respectively, indicating that the halos of the cluster galaxies are tidally stripped. We also reconstruct the unlensed source, which is smaller by a factor of {approx}5.8 in area, demonstrating the increase in morphological information due to lensing. We conclude that this galaxy likely has star-forming spiral arms with a red (older) central component.

  19. HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b: FOUR TRANSITING PLANETS MORE MASSIVE THAN JUPITER ORBITING MODERATELY BRIGHT STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakos, G. A.; Hartman, J. D.; Csubry, Z.; Penev, K. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Torres, G.; Beky, B.; Latham, D. W.; Bieryla, A.; Quinn, S.; Szklenar, T.; Esquerdo, G. A.; Noyes, R. W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Buchhave, L. A. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100, Denmark, and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, DK-1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Kovacs, G. [Konkoly Observatory, Budapest (Hungary); Shporer, A. [LCOGT, 6740 Cortona Drive, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Fischer, D. A. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Johnson, J. A. [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA (United States); Howard, A. W.; Marcy, G. W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sato, B., E-mail: gbakos@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); and others

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of four transiting extrasolar planets (HAT-P-34b-HAT-P-37b) with masses ranging from 1.05 to 3.33 M{sub J} and periods from 1.33 to 5.45 days. These planets orbit relatively bright F and G dwarf stars (from V = 10.16 to V = 13.2). Of particular interest is HAT-P-34b which is moderately massive (3.33 M{sub J}), has a high eccentricity of e = 0.441 {+-} 0.032 at a period of P = 5.452654 {+-} 0.000016 days, and shows hints of an outer component. The other three planets have properties that are typical of hot Jupiters.

  20. Analysis and Identification of Biomarkers and Origin of Color in a Bright Blue Crude Oil Juyal, P.; McKenna, A. M.; Yen, A.; Rodgers, R. P.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Andrews, A. B.;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    School, Woods Hole A key step in crude oil production is injection of monoethyene glycol (MEG) to preventAnalysis and Identification of Biomarkers and Origin of Color in a Bright Blue Crude Oil Juyal, P. Strikingly blue crude oil from a Gulf of Mexico drillingg y , p of Mexico platform, the recovery of MEG from

  1. Low surface brightness galaxies rotation curves in the low energy limit of $R^n$ gravity : no need for dark matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Capozziello; V. F. Cardone; A. - Troisi

    2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility that the observed flatness of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies is not an evidence for the existence of dark matter haloes, but rather a signal of the breakdown of General Relativity. To this aim, we consider power - law fourth order theories of gravity obtained by replacing the scalar curvature $R$ with $f(R) = f_0 R^n$ in the gravity Lagrangian. We show that, in the low energy limit, the gravitational potential generated by a pointlike source may be written as $\\Phi(r) \\propto r^{-1} \\left [ 1 + (r/r_c)^{\\beta} \\right ]$ with $\\beta$ a function of the slope $n$ of the gravity Lagrangian and $r_c$ a scalelength depending on the gravitating system properties. In order to apply the model to realistic systems, we compute the modified potential and the rotation curve for spherically symmetric and for thin disk mass distributions. It turns out that the potential is still asymptotically decreasing, but the corrected rotation curve, although not flat, is higher than the Newtonian one thus offering the possibility to fit rotation curves without dark matter. To test the viability of the model, we consider a sample of 15 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with combined HI and H$\\alpha$ measurements of the rotation curve extending in the putative dark matter dominated region. We find a very good agreement between the theoretical rotation curve and the data using only stellar disk and interstellar gas.

  2. KEPLER-21b: A 1.6 R{sub Earth} PLANET TRANSITING THE BRIGHT OSCILLATING F SUBGIANT STAR HD 179070

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Bryson, Stephen T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Quinn, Samuel N. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chaplin, William J.; Elsworth, Yvonne [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Metcalfe, Travis S. [High Altitude Observatory and Scientific Computing Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Monteiro, Mario J. P. F. G. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Appourchaux, Thierry [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite Paris XI-CNRS (UMR8617), Batiment 121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Creevey, Orlagh L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gilliland, Ronald L. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Quirion, Pierre-Olivier [Canadian Space Agency, 6767 Boulevard de l'Aeroport, Saint-Hubert, QC, J3Y 8Y9 (Canada); Stello, Denis [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Kjeldsen, Hans; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Garcia, Rafael A. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot-IRFU/SAp, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Kepler observations of the bright (V = 8.3), oscillating star HD 179070. The observations show transit-like events which reveal that the star is orbited every 2.8 days by a small, 1.6 R{sub Earth} object. Seismic studies of HD 179070 using short cadence Kepler observations show that HD 179070 has a frequency-power spectrum consistent with solar-like oscillations that are acoustic p-modes. Asteroseismic analysis provides robust values for the mass and radius of HD 179070, 1.34 {+-} 0.06 M{sub Sun} and 1.86 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Sun }, respectively, as well as yielding an age of 2.84 {+-} 0.34 Gyr for this F5 subgiant. Together with ground-based follow-up observations, analysis of the Kepler light curves and image data, and blend scenario models, we conservatively show at the >99.7% confidence level (3{sigma}) that the transit event is caused by a 1.64 {+-} 0.04 R{sub Earth} exoplanet in a 2.785755 {+-} 0.000032 day orbit. The exoplanet is only 0.04 AU away from the star and our spectroscopic observations provide an upper limit to its mass of {approx}10 M{sub Earth} (2{sigma}). HD 179070 is the brightest exoplanet host star yet discovered by Kepler.

  3. XMM-Newton Data Processing for Faint Diffuse Emission: Proton Flares, Exposure Maps and Report on EPIC MOS1 Bright CCDs Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pradas; J. Kerp

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the in-flight performance of the XMM-Newton EPIC MOS and pn detectors, with focus on the influence of proton flares and vignetting on the data. The very wide range in the conditions of our sample of observations, in terms of exposure length and background intensities, allows the detection of a wide range in the spectra of the proton flares, in contrast to the hard-spectrum flares proposed by Lumb et al.(2002) or Read et al.(2003) We also find an up to now unreported contamination in the low energy regime (Econtamination yields in "bright CCDs" in the observations. Its effect must be taken into account for the study of sources detected in the affected CCDs. With respect to vignetting, we present in-flight exposure maps and we propose a method to repeat this calculation for user-definable energy bands. All the results presented here, have the goal to enable the study of very faint extended sources with XMM-Newton, like nearby galactic X-ray halos or the soft X-ray background.

  4. CARMA SURVEY TOWARD INFRARED-BRIGHT NEARBY GALAXIES (STING). III. THE DEPENDENCE OF ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR GAS SURFACE DENSITIES ON GALAXY PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Tony; Xue, Rui [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Fisher, David B.; Vogel, Stuart N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Blitz, Leo [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Bigiel, Frank [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Institut fr theoretische Astrophysik, Zentrum fr Astronomie der Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ott, Jrgen [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Rahman, Nurur [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa)] [Department of Physics, C1 Lab 140, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park, Johannesburg 2006 (South Africa); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fr Astronomie, Konigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the correlation between CO and H I emission in 18 nearby galaxies from the CARMA Survey Toward IR-Bright Nearby Galaxies (STING) at sub-kpc and kpc scales. Our sample, spanning a wide range in stellar mass and metallicity, reveals evidence for a metallicity dependence of the H I column density measured in regions exhibiting CO emission. Such a dependence is predicted by the equilibrium model of McKee and Krumholz, which balances H{sub 2} formation and dissociation. The observed H I column density is often smaller than predicted by the model, an effect we attribute to unresolved clumping, although values close to the model prediction are also seen. We do not observe H I column densities much larger than predicted, as might be expected were there a diffuse H I component that did not contribute to H{sub 2} shielding. We also find that the H{sub 2} column density inferred from CO correlates strongly with the stellar surface density, suggesting that the local supply of molecular gas is tightly regulated by the stellar disk.

  5. The Young and Bright Type Ia Supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, Early-Time Observations, First-Light Time, Distance to NGC 4666, and Progenitor Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shappee, B J; Holoien, T W -S; Prieto, J L; Contreras, C; Itagaki, K; Burns, C R; Kochanek, C S; Stanek, K Z; Alper, E; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Conseil, E; Danilet, A B; Dong, Subo; Falco, E; Grupe, D; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Morrell, N; Nicolas, J; Phillips, M M; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G; Stritzinger, M; Szczygie?, D M; Thompson, T A; Thorstensen, J; Wagner, M; Wo?niak, P R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 2014 Dec. 9.61, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just $\\sim2$ days after first light using a global array of 14-cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova ($V = 11.94$ mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ($\\Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.796 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$), a $B$-band maximum at $2457015.823 \\pm 0.030_{\\textrm{stat}}$, a rise time of $16.94^{+ 0.11 }_{- 0.11 }$ days, and moderate host--galaxy extinction ($E(B-V)_{\\textrm{host}} = 0.329 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$). Using ASASSN-14lp we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\\mu = 30.834 \\pm 0.003_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 0.16_{\\textrm{syst}}$ corresponding to a distance of $14.68 \\pm 0.02_{\\...

  6. Detection of an ultra-bright submillimeter galaxy in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC/ASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikarashi, S; Aguirre, J E; Aretxaga, I; Arumugam, V; Austermann, J E; Bock, J J; Bradford, C M; Cirasuolo, M; Earle, L; Ezawa, H; Furusawa, H; Furusawa, J; Glenn, J; Hatsukade, B; Hughes, D H; Iono, D; Ivison, R J; Johnson, S; Kamenetzky, J; Kawabe, R; Lupu, R; Maloney, P; Matsuhara, H; Mauskopf, P D; Motohara, K; Murphy, E J; Nakajima, K; Nakanishi, K; Naylor, B J; Nguyen, H T; Perera, T A; Scott, K S; Takagi, T; Takata, T; Tamura, Y; Tanaka, K; Tsukagoshi, T; Wilner, D J; Wilson, G W; Yun, M S; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of an extremely bright ($\\sim$34 mJy at 1100 $\\mu$m and $\\sim$73 mJy at 880 $\\mu$m) submillimeter galaxy (SMG), AzTEC-ASTE-SXDF1100.001 (hereafter referred to as SXDF1100.001), discovered in 1100 $\\mu$m observations of the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Field using AzTEC on ASTE. Subsequent CARMA 1300 $\\mu$m and SMA 880 $\\mu$m observations successfully pinpoint the location of SXDF1100.001 and suggest that it has two components, extended (FWHM of $\\sim$4^{\\prime\\prime}) and compact (unresolved) ones. Z-Spec on CSO has also been used to obtain a wide band spectrum from 190 to 308 GHz, although no significant emission/absorption lines are found. The derived upper limit to the line-to-continuum flux ratio is 0.1--0.3 (2 $\\sigma$) across the Z-Spec band. Based on the analysis of the derived spectral energy distribution from optical to radio wavelengths of possible counterparts near the SMA/CARMA peak position, we suggest that SXDF1100.001 is a lensed, optically dark SMG lying at $z \\sim 3.4$ behin...

  7. Presidential Inaugural Address M. Duane Nellis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    , Texas Tech University. This university was founded with a western pioneer spirit, indeed a West Texas found this university and community to be a beacon that shines bright across West Texas, the state Plains alone). All these successes are noteworthy. But in the spirit of West Texas and the dream

  8. spring 2013research scholarship, Collaboration, and Outreach at northwestern University Centerpiece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    Office for Research, 633 Clark Street Evanston, Illinois 60208 This publication is available online atVolume 12, Number 2 CONTENTS 2 Connecting the Dots Between Art and Science 20 Solar: Shingle Style 6 Science-field infrared view of an "emission" nebula that shines by its own light. The bright orange nebula is situated

  9. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten Nitrate Salt for Solar Energy Storage. Retrieved frommore-efficiently Solar Energy Industries Association (2012-year-review Solar Energy Industries Association (

  10. Bright Future for CPV (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrator photovoltaics may play significant role in growth of solar electricity because of scalability. Need to take a bird?s eye view for the design and a worm?s eye view for diagnosis.

  11. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten Nitrate Salt for Solar Energy Storage. Retrieved fromNew Ways to Store Solar Energy. Retrieved from http://new-ways-to-store-solar-energy-16407404 Lenert, Andrej,

  12. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    www.popularmechanics.com/science/energy/solar-wind/3-clever-Molten Nitrate Salt for Solar Energy Storage. Retrieved fromKrisch, J. (2014). 3 Clever New Ways to Store Solar Energy.

  13. Bright Ideas in Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melville, Jo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    like fossil fuels or hydrogen, storage is impractical justenergy as hydrogen gas (a common energy storage mechanism,rich hydrogen provides a good solution to energy storage

  14. Sensor Switch's Bright Manufacturing Future

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The switch helps with cost effective energy savings by turning off the lights when an occupancy sensor says the room is empty.

  15. COMET C/2011 W3 (LOVEJOY): ORBIT DETERMINATION, OUTBURSTS, DISINTEGRATION OF NUCLEUS, DUST-TAIL MORPHOLOGY, AND RELATIONSHIP TO NEW CLUSTER OF BRIGHT SUNGRAZERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W., E-mail: Zdenek.Sekanina@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: Paul.W.Chodas@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for {approx}3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at {approx}10{sup 12} g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail-the product of the terminal fragmentation-was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s{sup -1}. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698 {+-} 2 yr for the osculating orbital period, showing that C/2011 W3 is the first member of the expected new, 21st-century cluster of bright Kreutz-system sungrazers, whose existence was predicted by these authors in 2007. From the spine tail's evolution, we determine that its measured tip, populated by dust particles 1-2 mm in diameter, receded antisunward from the computed position of the missing nucleus. The bizarre appearance of the comet's dust tail in images taken only hours after perihelion with the coronagraphs on board the SOHO and STEREO spacecraft is readily understood. The disconnection of the comet's head from the tail released before perihelion and an apparent activity attenuation near perihelion have a common cause-sublimation of all dust at heliocentric distances smaller than about 1.8 solar radii. The tail's brightness is strongly affected by forward scattering of sunlight by dust. From an initially broad range of particle sizes, the grains that were imaged the longest had a radiation-pressure parameter {beta} {approx_equal} 0.6, diagnostic of submicron-sized silicate grains and consistent with the existence of the dust-free zone around the Sun. The role and place of C/2011 W3 in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system and its genealogy via a 14th-century parent suggest that it is indirectly related to the celebrated sungrazer X/1106 C1, which, just as the first-generation parent of C/2011 W3, split from a common predecessor during the previous return to perihelion.

  16. The Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey II: Clustering of Bright Lyman Break Galaxies - Strong Luminosity Dependent Bias at z=4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul D. Allen; Leonidas A. Moustakas; Gavin Dalton; Emily MacDonald; Chris Blake; Lee Clewley; Catherine Heymans; Gary Wegner

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the clustering properties of bright ($L>L_{*}$) z$\\sim$4 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey (ODT). We describe techniques used to select and evaluate our candidates and calculate the angular correlation function which we find best fitted by a power law, $\\omega(\\theta)=A_{w}\\theta^{-\\beta}$ with $A_{w}=15.4$ (with $\\theta$ in arcseconds), using a constrained slope of $\\beta=0.8$. Using a redshift distribution consistent with photometric models, we deproject this correlation function and find a comoving $r_{0}=11.4_{-1.9}^{+1.7}$ h$_{100}^{-1}$ Mpc in a $\\Omega_m=0.3$ flat $\\Lambda$ cosmology for $i_{AB}\\leq24.5$. This corresponds to a linear bias value of $b=8.1_{-2.6}^{+2.0}$ (assuming $\\sigma_{8}=0.9$). These data show a significantly larger $r_{0}$ and $b$ than previous studies at $z\\sim4$. We interpret this as evidence that the brightest LBGs have a larger bias than fainter ones, indicating a strong luminosity dependence for the measured bias of an LBG sample. Comparing this against recent results in the literature at fainter (sub-$L_{*}$) limiting magnitudes, and with simple models describing the relationship between LBGs and dark matter haloes, we discuss the implications on the implied environments and nature of LBGs. It seems that the brightest LBGs (in contrast with the majority sub-$L_{*}$ population), have clustering properties, and host dark matter halo masses, that are consistent with them being progenitors of the most massive galaxies today.

  17. VARIABILITY AND SPECTRAL MODELING OF THE HARD X-RAY EMISSION OF GX 339-4 IN A BRIGHT LOW/HARD STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droulans, R.; Belmont, R.; Malzac, J.; Jourdain, E. [CESR, Universite de Toulouse, UPS, 9 avenue du Colonel Roche, F-31028 Toulouse (France)

    2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the high-energy emission of the Galactic black hole candidate GX 339-4 using INTEGRAL/SPI and simultaneous RXTE/PCA data. By the end of 2007 January, when it reached its peak luminosity in hard X-rays, the source was in a bright hard state. The SPectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) data from this period show a good signal-to-noise ratio, allowing a detailed study of the spectral energy distribution up to several hundred keV. As a main result, we report on the detection of a variable hard spectral feature ({>=}150 keV) which represents a significant excess with respect to the cutoff power-law shape of the spectrum. The SPI data suggest that the intensity of this feature is positively correlated with the 25-50 keV luminosity of the source and the associated variability timescale is shorter than 7 hr. The simultaneous Proportional Counter Array data, however, show no significant change in the spectral shape, indicating that the source is not undergoing a canonical state transition. We analyzed the broadband spectra in the lights of several physical models, assuming different heating mechanisms and properties of the Comptonizing plasma. For the first time, we performed quantitative model fitting with the new versatile Comptonization code BELM, accounting self-consistently for the presence of a magnetic field. We show that a magnetized medium subject to pure non-thermal electron acceleration provides a framework for a physically consistent interpretation of the observed 4-500 keV emission. Moreover, we find that the spectral variability might be triggered by the variations of only one physical parameter, namely the magnetic field strength. Therefore, it appears that the magnetic field is likely to be a key parameter in the production of the Comptonized hard X-ray emission.

  18. Nostratic Dictionary - Third Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgopolsky, Aharon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ka4r, Tc B pa2kri {Ad.} 'clear, obvious', {Wn.} 'ouvertement, publiquement', Tc B {Ad.} pa2kre '? in the open' EI 352-3, 513 (*b?eh- 'shine'), F II 982-4, Wn. I 35O-1 (all of them do not distinguish this ? from *b?e2- 'shine, be bright'), Ad. 364... . The controversial IE cns. cluster is still to be investigated. In one root ( [{EI} ] 'earth') it may result from metathesis (IE {EI} > ). In another case ( / ? 'yesterday') is likely to go back to N (cf. entry 6O3a 'late, evening'). 1O. According to AD LZL 364...

  19. Nostratic Dictionary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgopolsky, Aharon

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    .} 'clear, obvious', {Wn.} 'ouvertement, publiquement', Tc B {Ad.} pa2kre '? in the open' WP II 122-3, P 1O4-5, see EI 352-3, 5 1 3 (*b?eh- 'shine'), F II 982-4, Wn. 35O-1 (all of them do not distinguish this ? from *b?e2- 'shine, be bright'), Ad. 364... be open to discussion and doubt, and it is on the basis of a significant number of proposed roots and of their descendent counterparts that the matter must be judged. That sufficient sample is presented in the pages that follow. The matter might relate...

  20. Letting the Sun Shine on Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation of Photovoltaic Cost Trends in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.; Cappers, P.; Margolis, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a comprehensive analysis of grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) cost trends in California, which is by far the largest PV market in the United States. The findings of this work may help stakeholders to understand important trends in the California PV market, and policymakers to design more effective solar incentive programs--a particularly important objective given the recent announcement from the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) to establish an 11-year, $3.2 billion incentive program for customer-sited solar. The study statistically analyzes the installed cost of grid-connected PV systems funded by the state's two largest solar rebate programs, overseen by the California Energy Commission (CEC) [operating since 1998] and the CPUC [operating since 2001].

  1. Letting The Sun Shine On Solar Costs: An Empirical Investigation Of Photovoltaic Cost Trends In California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Cappers, Peter; Margolis, Robert

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implications for solar suppliers and customers, and forover 11-years for customer-sited solar installations. Thiscost of customer-sited, grid-connected solar photovoltaic (

  2. Axion mechanism of Sun luminosity and TSI variations: light shining through the solar radiation zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusov, V D; Sharf, I V; Eingorn, M V; Smolyar, V P; Vlasenko, D S; Zelentsova, T N; Linnik, E P; Beglaryan, M E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the hypothesis of the axion mechanism of Sun luminosity suggesting that the solar axion-like particles are born in the core of the Sun and may be efficiently converted back into $\\gamma$-quanta in the magnetic field of the solar overshoot tachocline is physically relevant. As a result, it is also shown that the intensity variations of the $\\gamma$-quanta of axion origin, induced by the magnetic field variations in the tachocline, directly cause the Sun luminosity and total solar irradiance (TSI) variations and eventually characterize the active and quiet states of the Sun. Within the framework of this mechanism estimations of the strength of the axion coupling to a photon ($g_{a \\gamma} = 7.2 \\cdot 10^{-11} GeV^{-1}$) and the axion-like particle mass ($m_a \\sim 10^{-5} eV$) have been obtained. It is also shown that the claimed axion parameters do not contradict any known experimental and theoretical model-independent limitations.

  3. FPL's solar stars shine at new 500-acre array By SUSAN SALISBURY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    in November. It's the world's first solar plant directly connected to an existing combined- cycle natural gas," Gnecco said. The plant joins FPL's 25-megawatt solar plant in DeSoto County and 10-megawatt plant at the Kennedy Space Center. Although solar takes more land than other types of power plants, it was workable

  4. Why Disks Shine: the Transport of Angular Momentum in Hot, Thin Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. T. Vishniac

    1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I review recent work on the radial transport of angular momentum in ionized, Keplerian accretion disks. Proposed mechanisms include hydrodynamic and MHD local instabilities and long range effects mediated by wave transport. The most promising models incorporate the Velikhov-Chandrasekhar instability, caused by an instability of the magnetic field embedded in a differentially rotating disk. This has the important feature that the induced turbulent motions necessarily transport angular momentum outward. By contrast, convective modes may transport angular momentum in either direction. Combining the magnetic field instability with an $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo driven by internal waves leads to a model in which the dimensionless viscosity scales as $(H/r)^{4/3}$. However, this model has a phenomenology which is quite different from the $\\alpha$ disk model. For example, an active disk implies some source of excitation for the internal waves. In binary systems with a mass ratio of order unity the most likely exciting mechanism is a parametric instability due to tidal forces. This implies that in systems where the accretion stream is intermittent, like MV Lyrae or TT Ari, epochs when the mass flow is absent or very small will be epochs in which the disk shrinks and becomes relatively inactive and dark. This model also implies that forced vertical mixing is important, even in convectively stable disks. I discuss various observational tests of this model and the focus of current theoretical work.

  5. Formulation and Analysis of Compliant Grouted Waste Forms for SHINE Waste Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, William; Pereira, Candido; Heltemes, Thad A.; Youker, Amanda; Makarashvili, Vakhtang; Vandegrift, George F.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optional grouted waste forms were formulated for waste streams generated during the production of 99Mo to be compliant with low-level radioactive waste regulations. The amounts and dose rates of the various waste form materials that would be generated annually were estimated and used to determine the effects of various waste processing options, such as the of number irradiation cycles between uranium recovery operations, different combinations of waste streams, and removal of Pu, Cs, and Sr from waste streams for separate disposition (which is not evaluated in this report). These calculations indicate that Class C-compliant grouted waste forms can be produced for all waste streams. More frequent uranium recovery results in the generation of more chemical waste, but this is balanced by the fact that waste forms for those waste streams can accommodate higher waste loadings, such that similar amounts of grouted waste forms are required regardless of the recovery schedule. Similar amounts of grouted waste form are likewise needed for the individual and combined waste streams. Removing Pu, Cs, and Sr from waste streams lowers the waste form dose significantly at times beyond about 1 year after irradiation, which may benefit handling and transport. Although these calculations should be revised after experimentally optimizing the grout formulations and waste loadings, they provide initial guidance for process development.

  6. EECBG Success Story: Shining Energy-Saving LEDs on Utah Starry...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LEDs across 14 rural communities. About 2,500 streetlights will be replaced and could save the town 20% to 50% on electricity bills. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles A...

  7. Shining New Light on Protein Structure and Function thru Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism (SRCD) Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace,B.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy has been employed for more than 50 years for the study of the structure and dynamics of proteins. It is now a workhorse of structural biology, finding applications in the determination of protein secondary structures, monitoring and deciphering protein folding, examining macromolecular interactions, and defining and quantitating protein-ligand binding. For the most part, CD studies have used laboratory-based instruments to measure electronic transitions in the far (190-250 nm), near ultraviolet (UV) (250-300 nm) and visible (> 400 nm) wavelength ranges, which have enabled studies of polypeptide backbones, aromatic amino acids and colored chromophores, respectively. Additional transitions exist at lower wavelengths in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region (<190 nm); however, these transitions tend to be inaccessible to conventional CD instruments, due to the low intensity of their Xenon arc lamp light sources at wavelengths below190 nm. In 1980, the first synchrotron-based CD instruments were constructed, which took advantage of the high photon flux available from synchrotron light sources at these wavelengths. However, the technique of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) did not really take off until enabling studies had been done to show that additional data were obtainable for proteins in the VUV region, that these data were readily accessible with modern beamlines, and most importantly, that new applications of these data existed in structural molecular biology.

  8. Photo of the Week: Rain or Shine, Preparing for the 2013 Hurricane Season |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5Parabolic TroughPhoto Gallery: EnergyEnergyPi + NASA

  9. Desert Sunlight is Shining Example of How DOE Loan Guarantees Helped Launch

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4 VolumeAguaDepartment

  10. EECBG Success Story: Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River SiteDepartment of Energy MembersDepartment

  11. EECBG Success Story: Shining Energy-Saving LEDs on Utah Starry Nights |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah River SiteDepartmentDepartment ofEnergy

  12. SMart iNKS: SHiNiNG a LiGHt ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    . At the heart of his research is semiconductor photocatalysis. `In simple terms, we're talking about materials standards now in photocatalysis because there is such a wide range of commercial products. These standards

  13. Fuel Cells Shine a Light on the Last Endeavour Space Shuttle Launch |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: Congestion Study CommentsStolar, OlenaSurrogate2015August

  14. Shining Some Light on the World Cup's Efficiency Efforts | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartmentShawn Wang About Us ShawnEnergy

  15. Shining Stars of Solar: Meet Three SunShot Postdoctoral Award Recipients

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartmentShawn Wang About Us

  16. Shining Energy-saving LEDs on Utah Starry Nights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus GroupSherrell R. Greene About Us SherrellC

  17. Fewer lights, Brighter Shine in New Hampshire County | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721Energy 3_adv_battery.pdfFerrin Moore Title: Senior Aviation

  18. Rain or Shine, Students Keep Their Race Cars Going - News Feature | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations:RadiologicalRadorrletryreportsRain

  19. Shining Light on the Fleeting Interactions of Single Molecules | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules, Forms, andOffice of Science

  20. Spins and Heat in Nanoscale Electronic Systems (SHINES) | U.S. DOE Office

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules, Forms, andOfficeof Science

  1. Argonne Researchers Shine "Light" on Origins of Wind Turbine Bearing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1Powerof

  2. Shining Some Light on the World Cup's Efficiency Efforts | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWork Force Retention WorkStephen Graff Former

  3. THE LBT BOOeTES FIELD SURVEY. I. THE REST-FRAME ULTRAVIOLET AND NEAR-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND CLUSTERING OF BRIGHT LYMAN BREAK GALAXIES AT Z {approx} 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bian Fuyan; Fan Xiaohui; Jiang Linhua; McGreer, Ian; Dave, Romeel [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Green, Richard F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maiolino, Roberto [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Ave., Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lee, Kyoung-Soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906 (United States)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a deep LBT/LBC U{sub spec}-band imaging survey (9 deg{sup 2}) covering the NOAO Booetes field. A total of 14,485 Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 3 are selected, which are used to measure the rest-frame UV luminosity function (LF). The large sample size and survey area reduce the LF uncertainties due to Poisson statistics and cosmic variance by {>=}3 compared to previous studies. At the bright end, the LF shows excess power compared to the best-fit Schechter function, which can be attributed to the contribution of z {approx} 3 quasars. We compute the rest-frame near-infrared LF and stellar mass function (SMF) of z {approx} 3 LBGs based on the R-band and [4.5 {mu}m]-band flux relation. We investigate the evolution of the UV LFs and SMFs between z {approx} 7 and z {approx} 3, which supports a rising star formation history in the LBGs. We study the spatial correlation function of two bright LBG samples and estimate their average host halo mass. We find a tight relation between the host halo mass and the galaxy star formation rate (SFR), which follows the trend predicted by the baryonic accretion rate onto the halo, suggesting that the star formation in LBGs is fueled by baryonic accretion through the cosmic web. By comparing the SFRs with the total baryonic accretion rates, we find that cosmic star formation efficiency is about 5%-20% and it does not evolve significantly with redshift, halo mass, or galaxy luminosity.

  4. The XMM-Newton X-ray Spectra of the Most X-ray Luminous Radio-quiet ROSAT Bright Survey-QSOs: A Reference Sample for the Interpretation of High-redshift QSO Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krumpe, Mirko; Markowitz, Alex; Corral, Amalia; 10.1088/0004-637X/725/1/1

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L_X >= 10^{45} erg/s in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K-alpha fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K-alpha centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E=6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at...

  5. The Future Looks Bright for Teraflop Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farber, Rob

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wouldnt it be great to have a teraflop of computing power sitting in your lab, desktop workstation, or remote instrument server? Talk about simplifying workflows, eliminating competition for HPC resources, and allowing more scientists and technicians to get more work done! Well, the computer industry is marketing that capability now in the form of high-end video cards and for a bargain price with more and better technology on the market horizon. As the industry evolves to become more oriented toward multi-core and multi-threaded hardware; video card manufacturers are attempting to transition from a niche to multi-purpose market. One of the products currently getting attention is the Nvidia Tesla family of products based on the Tesla GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit). This card contains 128 processor computing core engines advertised as having the ability to deliver an aggregate 518 billion single-precision floating operations per second (518 Gflop), which is being introduced at a $1499 MSRP price-point. Nvidia also offers other commodity graphics cards, such as the GeForce 8800, which appear on paper to have roughly the same performance for roughly half the price although with half the memory (768M vs the Tesla 1.5 GB). This highlights how the Tesla GPGPUs are essentially redesigned graphics cards (with no video capability, increased memory, and clock changes) that fit into PCI-Express slots in your motherboard. If you believe Nvidias claims, two Tesla cards will - for the right applications - turn your lab workstation into a teraflop capable supercomputer. Double-precision versions are projected for a late 2007 introduction with expected 2008 delivery. The Nvidia Tesla GPGPU is one step forward in the many-core revolution that is happening in the computer industry. Instead of making two or four processing cores available to the user, many-core processors offer tens or hundreds of processing cores. Many-core processors promise to provide very high performance-per-dollar and performance-per-watt for many computational workloads. Intel is working on their version of many-core processors but delivery dates appear to be several years in the future. Last year Intel made a large splash with their proof-of-concept teraflop 80-core chip, which they announced might be available sometime in 2011. Intel is also working on something similar to the Nvidia Tesla codename Larrabee which will perform in the teraflop range and has a release date of sometime around 2009 or 2010. Larrabee is supposed to have 16 24 cores and several nice features. Bottom line: A teraflop lab computer is feasible today as the programmable Nvidia GeForce 8 and Quadro family of graphics cards are available now, Tesla cards will be shipping, and exciting many-core architectures are on the horizon from a number of vendors. Definitely, the potential for parallel processing systems is huge, and GPGPUs certainly provide parallel processing, but are there enough applications out there to take them mainstream and make it more appealing to businesses other than just research firms? Only time will tell as more applications are developed to utilize this computational capability. Right now, programming is required. Recently Google purchased PeakStream, a firm that engaged in abstracting the task of running multiple threads to software with specific GPGPU applicability. However, Google is a visionary software company. Instrument vendors and much of the software industry are still in the early stages of the transition to multi-threaded many-core data processing. Applications that exploit the full potential of parallel processing systems, and GPGPUs in particular, really dont exist in todays market. The development of Matlab plug-ins is a very positive sign for the future of GPGPUs and is indicative of Nvidias sense of where the market is headed.

  6. PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 Bright minds and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    that minimizes fuel consumption and emissions and encourages energy diversity. More info: www on environmental conservation and the reduction of human poverty. He will examine the relationship be- tween coral

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: high-brightness LED

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Solid state lighting (SSL), which uses light-emitting diodes (LEDs), has the potential to be 10 times more energy...

  8. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  9. average brightness of moonlight as a function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peletier, Reynier

    figures from Roach & Gordon: `The Light of the Night Sky' (1973) #12;many different reactions contribute to nightglow: tables from Roach & Gordon: `The Light of the Night Sky' (1973) nightglow lines can be very upper atmosphere emissions (Roach & Gordon 1973) aurora is transient emission driven by high

  10. PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 Bright minds and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    @uvic.ca CLEAN ENERGY FutureGrid forum outlines BC's energy options Climate change is expected to boost PHoTo SERVICES cLEAN ENERGY PARtNERS wIth chINA p. 7 By Valerie Shore The University of Victoria and nuclear physics. On June 22, BC Premier Gordon Camp- bell announced a $30.7-million provincial investment

  11. High Brightness Beam Applications: Energy Recovered Linacs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Krafft

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first part of the paper some general statements are made regarding applications suitable for utilizing energy recovered linacs (ERLs) by contrasting their potential performance to that of single pass linacs and storage rings. As a result of their potential for extremely good beam quality in combination with high average beam current, ERLs have been used and considered as drivers of both free electron laser and partially coherent photon sources, from THz through X-rays; as a suitable technology for high energy electron cooling; and as a continuous or semi-continuous electron beam source for high energy colliders. At present, beam requirements tend to be highly matched to end use requirements. By reviewing some of the many examples which have either been reduced to practice, or are being explored presently, one can develop an appreciation for the wide range of parameters being considered in ERL applications.

  12. Technical Assistance Application Bright Schools Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the energy cost and detailed usage information for each facility listed in Item 4 (above). Any past energy construction only: Schematic drawings (if available) 3. Project Description Type of assistance needed: Energy for proposed energy project New construction evaluation of new facility Other Discuss your proposed project

  13. Sustainable > DI BrightGreen January 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for companies' environmental management. The publication is printed on FSC certified paper. The international Energy 25 Energy Efficiency 27 Solutions from Companies 97 R & D Profiles 107 DI Profiles 115 Climate Cells and Hydrogen > Geothermal Energy > Hydropower > Photovoltaics > Solar Thermal Energy > Waste

  14. Photoswitchable Nanoprobes Offer Unlimited Brightness in Frequency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from none frequencydependent interference or noise using photoswitchingenabled Fourier transformation (PFT). As a result, the light-modulated probes can be made super...

  15. BrightSource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and Innovative Energy Technologies | OpenBrigham

  16. Bright Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name2 Jump

  17. ARM - Measurement - Longwave narrowband brightness temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow,icegovMeasurementsLightningnarrowband

  18. ARM - Measurement - Longwave spectral brightness temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse

  19. ARM - Measurement - Microwave narrowband brightness temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwelling irradiance ARM Data

  20. Blight-to-Bright | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher HomesLyonsBirch

  1. Bright three-band white light generated from CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode with high color rendering index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Ho Seong; Kwon, Byoung-Hwa; Jeon, Duk Young [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Heesun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, 72-1, Sangsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, bright three-band white light was generated from the CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot (QD)-assisted Sr{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}:Ce{sup 3+},Li{sup +}-based white light-emitting diode (WLED). The CdSe/ZnSe core/shell structure was confirmed by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CdSe/ZnSe QDs showed high quantum efficiency (79%) and contributed to the high luminous efficiency ({eta}{sub L}) of the fabricated WLED. The WLED showed bright natural white with excellent color rendering property ({eta}{sub L}=26.8 lm/W, color temperature=6140 K, and color rendering index=85) and high stability against the increase in forward bias currents from 20 to 70 mA.

  2. THE XMM-NEWTON X-RAY SPECTRA OF THE MOST X-RAY LUMINOUS RADIO-QUIET ROSAT BRIGHT SURVEY-QSOs: A REFERENCE SAMPLE FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QSO SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krumpe, M.; Markowitz, A. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Lamer, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Corral, A., E-mail: mkrumpe@ucsd.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, 20121 Milan (Italy)

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K{alpha} fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K{alpha} centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E = 6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at very high luminosities. Taking into account our individual EW measurements, we show that the X-ray Baldwin effect flattens above L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} (2-10 keV band) where an almost constant (EW) of {approx}100 eV is found. We confirm the assumption of having very similar X-ray active galactic nucleus properties when interpreting stacked X-ray spectra. Our stacked spectrum serves as a superb reference for the interpretation of low S/N spectra of radio-quiet QSOs with similar luminosities at higher redshifts routinely detected by XMM-Newton and Chandra surveys.

  3. Searching for life where the sun don't shine : explorations to the seafloors of Earth and Europa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Garret R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal vents on Earth's seafloor host entire ecosystems that live off energy from chemosynthesis rather than photosynthesis. This energy process uses chemical reactions between metals and hot gases from inside Earth's ...

  4. Light Pollution in the Shining Star of the Caribbean: Recovering the nightscape for future generations in island of Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    generations in island of Puerto Rico Main Author and contact information: Olga M. Ramos-Gonzlez GIS Rico Conservation Trust, University of Puerto Rico (Marine Science and Engineering Departments), Puerto Rico Sea Grant Program, US DOI Fish and Wildlife Service, Puerto Rico Power Authority, Puerto Rico

  5. Growing Cutting-edge X-ray Optics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ray Conley

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ever imagined that an Xbox controller could help open a window into a world spanning just one billionth of a meter? Brookhaven Lab's Ray Conley grows cutting-edge optics called multilayer Laue lenses (MLL) one atomic layer at a time to focus high-energy x-rays to within a single nanometer. To achieve this focusing feat, Ray uses a massive, custom-built atomic deposition device, an array of computers, and a trusty Xbox controller. These lenses will be deployed at the Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II, due to begin shining super-bright light on pressing scientific puzzles in 2015

  6. A BRIGHT IMPULSIVE SOLAR BURST DETECTED AT 30 THz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, P.; Fernandes, L. O. T.; Kudaka, A. S.; De Souza, R. V.; Valio, A.; Raulin, J.-P. [Center of Radio Astronomy and Astrophysics, Engineering School, Mackenzie Presbyterian University, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); White, S. M. [Air Force Research Laboratories, Space Vehicles Directorate, Albuquerque, NM 87117 (United States); Freeland, S. L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Marcon, R. [''Gleb Wataghin'' Physics Institute, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Aballay, J. L.; Fernandez, G.; Godoy, R.; Marun, A.; Gimenez de Castro, C. G. [El Leoncito Astronomical Complex, CONICET, San Juan (Argentina)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground- and space-based observations of solar flares from radio wavelengths to gamma-rays have produced considerable insights but raised several unsolved controversies. The last unexplored wavelength frontier for solar flares is in the range of submillimeter and infrared wavelengths. Here we report the detection of an intense impulsive burst at 30 THz using a new imaging system. The 30 THz emission exhibited remarkable time coincidence with peaks observed at microwave, mm/submm, visible, EUV, and hard X-ray wavelengths. The emission location coincides with a very weak white-light feature, and is consistent with heating below the temperature minimum in the atmosphere. However, there are problems in attributing the heating to accelerated electrons. The peak 30 THz flux is several times larger than the usual microwave peak near 9 GHz, attributed to non-thermal electrons in the corona. The 30 THz emission could be consistent with an optically thick spectrum increasing from low to high frequencies. It might be part of the same spectral component found at sub-THz frequencies whose nature remains mysterious. Further observations at these wavelengths will provide a new window for flare studies.

  7. Photo of the Week: Bright Ideas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    two of history's most important energy-related engineers: Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla. Edison and Tesla's developments in electric power generation and distribution made...

  8. Bright Water- hydrosols, water conservation and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitz, Russell

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since air-water and water-air interfaces are equally refractive, cloud droplets and microbubbles dispersed in bodies of water reflect sunlight in much the same way. The lifetime of sunlight-reflecting microbubbles, and hence the scale on which they may be applied, depends on Stokes Law and the influence of ambient or added surfactants. Small bubbles backscatter light more efficiently than large ones, opening the possibility of using highly dilute micron-radius hydrosols to substantially brighten surface waters. Such microbubbles can noticeably increase water surface reflectivity, even at volume fractions of parts per million and such loadings can be created at an energy cost as low as J m-2 to initiate and milliwatts m-2 to sustain. Increasing water albedo in this way can reduce solar energy absorption by as much as 100 W m-2, potentially reducing equilibrium temperatures of standing water bodies by several Kelvins. While aerosols injected into the stratosphere tend to alter climate globally, hydrosols can be...

  9. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LCLSprobe experiments at the lcls. Opt. Express, 18(17):17620probe experiments at the LCLS. Optics express, 18(17):17620

  10. The Effect of Acute Bright Light Exposure on Social Affiliation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botanov, Yevgeny

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    applied to patients with Parkinsons disease, demonstrating a positive effect on sleep, mood, and motor function (for review, see Rutten et al., 2012). Excessive daytime sleepiness is also improved (Videnovic et al., 2014), and such symptom changes can...

  11. PROGRESS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS IN BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON BEAM SOURCES...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be used to produce femto- seconds coherent IR radiation, or femto-seconds X-ray by laser Compton scattering. Photoelectron beam can also be used to drive FEL. 5 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT...

  12. INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [University of Maryland, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550W 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Lubin, P. M. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mirel, P. [Wyle Informations Systems, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Singal, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A., E-mail: Michael.D.Seiffert@jpl.nasa.gov [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Caixa Postal 515, 12245-970-Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

  13. The Problem Conventional office lighting typically consists of bright fluo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by delamping--result in lower power consump- tion. The PLS, which features light-emitting diode (LED lighting is reduced and three light-emitting diode (LED) task lights (two desk lamps and one undercabinet

  14. Cree Sets New Benchmarks for LED Efficacy and Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cree has successfully created a cool white LED prototype that delivers 107 lm/W at 350mA. This achievement builds on the Cree EZBright LED chip platform, developed in part with prior funding support from DOE. Cree made the prototype LED under their DOE project focused on developing LED chips incorporating photonic crystal elements for improved light extraction and novel package technology for higher down-conversion efficiency compared to conventional LEDs. Based on a 1 millimeter-square chip, the new prototype LED produces white light with a CCT of 5500K and a CRI of 73. Integration of four of these prototype LEDs can produce luminous flux of more than 450 lumens.

  15. Bright-White Beetle Scales Optimise Multiple Scattering of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burresi, Matteo; Cortese, Lorenzo; Pattelli, Lorenzo; Kolle, Mathias; Vukusic, Peter; Wiersma, Diederik S.; Steiner, Ullrich; Vignolini, Silvia

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    function of the cuticle volume fraction f (see below) and thus also R is f-dependent. The use of diffusion theory for the beetle scales needs some further discussion due to the scale network morphology. Indeed, the dif- fusion equation for light... waves in random media. Phys. Rev. B 49, 38003810 (1994). 35. Sapienza, R. et al. Observation of resonant behavior in the energy velocity of diffused light. Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 233902 (2007). www.nature.com/scientificreports SCIENTIFIC REPORTS | 4...

  16. High-brightness beam diagnostics for the APS linac.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, A. H.

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) injector includes an S-band linac with the capability to accelerate beams to 650 MeV. The linac has recently been upgraded with the installation of an rf thermionic gun in addition to the standard DC thermionic gun. The rf gun is predicted to have lower emittance (5{pi}mm mrad) and may be used to support the APS self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) experiments. The critical characterization of this gun's beam has begun with a beam diagnostics station at the end of the linac that can address beam transverse size, emittance, and bunch length (peak current). This station uses both an optical transition radiation (OTR) screen at 45{degree} to the beam direction and a Ce-doped YAG single crystal normal to the beam with a 45{degree} mirror behind it. The visible light images are detected by a Vicon CCD camera and a Hamamatsu C5680 synchroscan streak camera. Spatial resolution of about 30 {micro}m ({sigma}) and temporal resolution of 1 ps ({sigma}) have been demonstrated. Examples of rf gun beam characterization at 220 MeV are reported.

  17. Bright Light-Emitting Diodes based on Organometal Halide Perovskite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Zhi-Kuang; Moghaddam, Reza Saberi; Lai, May Ling; Docampo, Pablo; Higler, Ruben; Deschler, Felix; Price, Michael; Sadhanala, Aditya; Pazos, Luis M.; Credgington, Dan; Hanusch, Fabian; Bein, Thomas; Snaith, Henry J.; Friend, Richard H.

    2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    a Keithley 2400 Source Measure Unit (SMU). Photon flux was measured simultaneously using a calibrated silicon photodiode centered over the light-emitting pixel. Radiance in W sr-1 m-2 and luminance in cd m-2 10 were calculated based...

  18. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1989. [96] A. Yariv and P. Yeh. Optical Waves in Crystals:Mar 2008. [95] Amnon Yariv. Quantum electronics. Wiley,

  19. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hartmann, D. Rolles, A. Rudenko, C. Schmidt, L. Foucar, N.R. Hartmann, D. Rolles, A. Rudenko, L. Fou- car, N. Kimmel,

  20. NREL Success Stories - SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, Gary; Gee, Randy

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL Scientists and SkyFuel share a story about how their partnership has resulted in a revolutionary concentrating solar power technology ReflecTech Mirror Film.

  1. The Future is bright for Y-12 ? and diverse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the history of the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology and the Manufac- turing Skills Campus concludes, it seems good to take a glance into Y-12"s potential future...

  2. High brightness diode-pumped organic solid-state laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Zhuang; Nafa, Malik; Chnais, Sbastien; Forget, Sbastien

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-power, diffraction-limited organic solid-state laser operation has been achieved in a vertical external cavity surface-emitting organic laser (VECSOL), pumped by a low-cost compact blue laser diode. The diode-pumped VECSOLs were demonstrated with various dyes in a polymer matrix, leading to laser emissions from 540 nm to 660 nm. Optimization of both the pump pulse duration and output coupling leads to a pump slope efficiency of 11% for a DCM based VECSOLs. We report output pulse energy up to 280 nJ with 100 ns long pump pulses, leading to a peak power of 3.5 W in a circularly symmetric, diffraction-limited beam.

  3. Light Wars: The Bright Future of Laser Weapons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mistry, Hemma

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    currently the highest power solid-state laser in the world,funding the Joint High Power Solid-State Laser (JHPSSL)Solid-state lasers and chemical lasers have certain limitations on the power

  4. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hoegen, and D. von der Linde. Femtosecond X-ray measurementTh. Tschentscher, D. von der Linde, and J. B. Hastings.Tinten, P. Tsu, D. von der Linde, S. I. Anisimov, S. I.

  5. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field lines as the electromagnetic pulse travels into thepulses 117 Femtosecond probing of transient electromagneticlaser pulses and the evolution of electromagnetic fields in

  6. Wireless Power Transmission: An Obscure History, Possibly a Bright Future.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    of living. All of these trends point to an energy demand that will grow at even a larger rate. Wireless of its own. Figure 1. Projected yearly growth in world energy consumption. (3) 2 #12;History of Wireless the use of microwaves because of the economic and energy efficiency that can be leveraged by products

  7. Wireless Power Transmission An Obscure History and a Bright Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    to the distant rectenna site over a distance of 1.6 km. The dc output was 30 kW." [2] [5] #12;Solar Power transmission. Solar Power Satellite to Earth Terminal. Desert Solar Power Farm to Civilization. Earth Terminal solution to the coming power shortage . . . Solar Power Satellites (SPS) (4) #12;Solar Power Satellites (5

  8. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for material removal in ultra- fast pulsed laser ablation ofspecifically the ultra- fast laser-induced melting of gold.of an ultra- short, high intensity laser pulse pumping a

  9. Dust properties of UV bright galaxies at z ~ 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Noll; D. Pierini

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of the extinction curve in the rest-frame UV for a sample of 34 UV-luminous galaxies at 2 energy distribution is adopted; its sensitivity to properties of the stellar populations or of dust attenuation is established with the use of combined stellar population and radiative transfer models. The distribution of the z ~ 2 UV-luminous FDF galaxies in several diagnostic diagrams shows that their extinction curves range between those typical of the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds (SMC and LMC, respectively). For the majority of strongly reddened objects having a UV continuum slope beta > -0.4 a significant 2175 A absorption feature is inferred, indicating an LMC-like extinction curve. On the other hand, the UV continua of the least reddened objects are mostly consistent with SMC-like extinction curves, lacking a significant 2175 A bump, as for the Calzetti et al. sample of local starbursts. Furthermore, the most opaque (beta ~ 0) UV-luminous galaxies tend to be among the most metal rich, most massive, and largest systems at z ~ 2. The presence of the UV bump does not seem to depend on the total metallicity, as given by the equivalent width (EW) of the C IV doublet. Conversely, it seems to be associated with large EWs of prominent interstellar low-ionisation absorption lines, suggesting a link between the strength of the UV bump and the topology of the interstellar medium of the most evolved UV-luminous, massive galaxies at z ~ 2.

  10. Schmidt modes in the angular spectrum of bright squeezed vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polina R. Sharapova; Angela M. Perez; Olga V. Tikhonova; Maria V. Chekhova

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spatial properties of high-gain parametric down-conversion (PDC). From the Hamiltonian we find the Schmidt modes, apply the Bloch-Messiah reduction, and calculate analytically the measurable quantities, such as the angular distributions of photon numbers and photon-number correlations. Our approach shows that the Schmidt modes of PDC radiation can be considered the same as for the low-gain (biphoton) case while the Schmidt eigenvalues strongly depend on the parametric gain. Its validity is confirmed by comparison with several experimental results, obtained by us and by other groups.

  11. NRG Energy, Inc. (BrightSource) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    jobs. Impact When completed in late 2013, Ivanpah will nearly double the amount of solar thermal energy produced in the U.S. in previous years. By harnessing the Mojave Desert's...

  12. BaBrI:Eu2 + , a new bright scintillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a divalent europium 5d-4f transition. F igureto the divalent europium 5d-4f broadband

  13. Bright Skies Ahead for Moapa | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13,

  14. Posters Comparisons of Brightness Temperature Measurements and Calculations Obtained

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations719 Posters1

  15. BrightPath Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name2

  16. Bright Lights From Dark Places | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda AgendaDepartmentOregonApril 8,

  17. Bright Lights and Even Brighter Ideas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda AgendaDepartmentOregonApril 8,Kim Kisslinger, a

  18. PPPL: Great story, Bright Future | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11:Tel.:162Physics|stationPrinceton PlasmaPPPL:

  19. Department Announces Loan Guarantee for BrightSource Energy Inc. |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 ThisFinal Report |Denice Ross About Us

  20. Bright Lights From Dark Places | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplicationCommittee |FY14JuneforUtilizationEnergyBriefing:

  1. Solar Generation Has a Bright Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski - PolicyWork ForceSectorProcessDepartmentEfficient EnergyofGrowth

  2. BrightView Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotinsBostonBridger Valley Elec Assn, Inc

  3. Condition and brightness of structural blue-green: motmot tail-racket brightness is related to speed of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Troy G.

    to speed of feather growth in males, but not in females TROY G. MURPHY* and TIFFANY T. PHAM Trinity University, Department of Biology, One Trinity Place, San Antonio, TX 78212, USA Received 21 November 2011, whereas female traits are maintained by different selective*Corresponding author. E-mail: troy.murphy@trinity

  4. July 17-19, 2013 Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Applications Usage of Biofuel to Mitigate the Current Environmental Impact of Aviation Shine Jude Hamilton

  5. The Gaia Project - technique, performance and status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Jordan

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaia is a satellite mission of the ESA, aiming at absolute astrometric measurements of about one billion stars (all stars down to 20th magnitude, with unprecedented accuracy. Additionally, magnitudes and colors will be obtained for all these stars, while radial-velocities and spectral properties will be determined only for bright objects (V<17.5). At 15th magnitude Gaia aims at an angular accuracy of 20 microarcseconds (muas). This goal can only be reached if the geometry of the telescopes, the detectors, and the pointing of Gaia at each moment ("attitude") can be inferred from the Gaia measurements itself with muas accuracy.

  6. JGGB EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES | AUGUST 6, 2012 Attendance: Sanjay Kumar (Co-Chair), Shuvo Roy (Co-Chair), Sri Nagarajan, SarahJane Taylor, Amy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Kevin Edward

    students who shined through who could benefit from program · Have a group of ppl on admissions committee

  7. I.V. Ptashnik and K.P. Shine Vol. 16, No. 3 /March 2003/ Atmos. Oceanic Opt. 251 0235-6880/03/03 251-05 $02.00 2003 Institute of Atmospheric Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Academy of Science, Russia Received January 13, 2003 Line-by-line calculations in the spectral region 2 remains an important concern for global climate modeling. It was shown more then 10 years ago in Ref. 1 in the different models. This factor has become more important recently as significant changes have taken place

  8. Homogeneity of bright radio sources at 15 GHz on the sky and in the space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arshakian, T G; Zensus, J A; Lister, M L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A revised sample of the 2 cm Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) survey is studied to test the isotropic distribution of radio sources on the sky and their uniform distribution in space. The revised sample is complete to flux-density limits of 1.5 Jy for positive declinations and 2 Jy for declinations between 0 and -20 degrees. At present the active galactic nuclei sample comprises 122 members. Application of the two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test shows that there is no significant deviation from the homogenous distribution in the sky, while the V/Vmax test shows that the space distribution of active nuclei is not uniform at high confidence level (99.9%). This is indicative of a strong luminosity and/or density evolution implying that active nuclei (or jet activity phenomena) were more populous at high redshifts, z~2.

  9. Bright tripartite entanglement in triply concurrent parametric oscillation A. S. Bradley and M. K. Olsen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    , University of Virginia, 382 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4714, USA Received 17 May 2005 number s : 42.50.Dv, 03.65.Ud, 03.67.Mn, 42.65.Lm Entanglement is a central property of quantum mechanics

  10. Radio Observations of the AGN and Gas in Low Surface Brightness Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes; J. Palous; M. Das; N. Kantharia; S. N. Vogel; S. S. Mcgaugh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. LSB galaxies have low metallicities, diffuse stellar disks, and massive HI disks. We have detected molecular gas in two giant LSB galaxies, UGC 6614 and F568-6. A millimeter continuum source has been detected in UGC 6614 as well. At centimeter wavelengths we have detected and mapped the continuum emission from the giant LSB galaxy 1300+0144. The emission is extended about the nucleus and is most likely originating from the AGN in the galaxy. The HI gas distribution and velocity field in 1300+0144 was also mapped. The HI disk extends well beyond the optical disk and appears lopsided in the intensity maps.

  11. Correlation analysis of mean global radiation values with mean brightness values for one year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolczynski, Edward Franklin

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Table 1 shows how three different instruments in the same area (Toronto, Canada) can give quite different values for the same periods. Toronto gives a much lower reading than Toronto-Scarborough or Toronto Meteorological Research Station. Since all... of instrument 15 and the positioning of the instrument can affect the results obtained. Table 1. Variation statistics for three distinct ground-based instru- ments located in the same area. All instruments are in Toronto, Canada, and are less than 20 mi...

  12. Detecting Sound-Wave-Like Surface Brightness Ripples in Cluster Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Graham; A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the observational requirements for the detection of sound-wave-like features in galaxy cluster cores. We calculate the effect of projection on the observed wave amplitude, and find that the projection factor depends only weakly on the underlying cluster properties but strongly on the wavelength of the sound waves, with the observed amplitude being reduced by a factor ~5 for 5 kpc waves but only by a factor ~ 2 for 25 kpc waves. We go on to estimate the time needed to detect ripples similar to those previously detected in the Perseus cluster in other clusters. We find that the detection time scales most strongly with the flux of the cluster and the amplitude of the ripples. By connecting the ripple amplitude to the heating power in the system, we estimate detection times for a selection of local clusters and find that several may have ripples detected with ~1Ms Chandra time.

  13. New Family of Tiny Crystals Glow Bright in LED Lights | Advanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crystals that glow different colors may be the missing ingredient for white light-emitting diode (LED) lighting that illuminates homes and offices as effectively as natural...

  14. 106Rotation Velocity of a Galaxy Spiral galaxy M-101 showing its bright nucleus and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V(x)/dx = 0. 1 3 2 24 4 3 2 2 ( ) (350 )(3/ 4)(1 ) (2 ) 350(1 ) (1 ) dV x x x x x dx x - + - + = + so after=1 the physical distance is 10,000 light years. How many years does it take a star to complete one the physical distance is 10,000 light years. How many years does it take a star to complete one circular orbit

  15. Three-dimensional analysis of free-electron laser performance using brightness scaled variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gullans, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) design, ESASEon the LCLS, and the optimal gain for a ?xed emittance.The parameters for LCLS used here are a beam energy of 13.64

  16. High-brightness single photon source from a quantum dot in a directional-emission nanocavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitsuru Toishi; Dirk Englund; Andrei Faraon; Jelena Vuckovic

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a single photon source consisting of an InAs quantum dot coupled to a directional-emission photonic crystal (PC) cavity implemented in GaAs. On resonance, the dot's lifetime is reduced by more than 10 times, to 45ps. Compared to the standard three-hole defect cavity, the perturbed PC cavity design improves the collection efficiency into an objective lens (NA=0.75) by factor 6, and improves the coupling efficiency of the collected light into a single mode fiber by factor 1.9. The emission frequency is determined by the cavity mode, which is antibunched to g(2)=0.05. The cavity design also enables efficient coupling to a higher-order cavity mode for local optical excitation of cavity-coupled quantum dots.

  17. but variations of brightness with time allow astronomers to detect light echoes through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    star and eventually reaches the critical Chandrasekhar mass (1.4 solar masses), a thermonuclear explosion disrupts the star, releasing materials that are the product of the stellar nuclear fusion (mostly G-type companion star14 (a star just like our Sun) all suggested a thermonuclear supernova rather

  18. Characterization of TRIUMF dc H{sup -} ion sources for enhanced brightness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, Y.S.; Cojocaru, G.; Yuan, D.; McDonald, M.; Jayamanna, K.; Kim, G.H.; Dutto, G. [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    At TRIUMF, H{sup -} ion sources have been characterized on a teststand to improve the understanding of their performance. Measured beam characteristics such as current, emittance, and e/H{sup -} ratio were correlated with source conditions as a function of relevant plasma parameters. Plasma densities, temperatures, and plasma potentials were measured with a Langmuir probe and correlated with beam properties for different confining magnetic fields and different values of arc power and gas pressure. The mechanism of beam extraction was studied by correlating plasma potential profiles with the corresponding plasma electrode bias voltages obtained from optimizing ion source outputs. Experiments with collar biasing and noble gas mixing were unsuccessful because of undesirable plasma potential profiles.

  19. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chao, Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering. WorldWiedemann, Particle Accelerator Physics I: Basic PrinciplesDynamics. Particle Accelerator Physics, Springer, 1999. [33

  20. Horizon brightness revisited: measurements and a model of clear-sky radiances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Raymond L.

    from solar energy engineering2 ,3 to atmospheric optics4'5 have repeatedly measured and modeled. Second, before the advent of narrow field-of-view (FOV) radiometers8 and photographic analysis tech explanation of the phenomenon. High-Resolution Measurements of Clear-Sky Radiances We beginby electronically

  1. Veeco Develops a Tool to Reduce Epitaxy Costs and Increase LED Brightness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Veeco is working on reducing epitaxy costs and increasing LED efficiency by developing a physical vapor deposition (PVD) tool for depositing aluminum nitride buffer layers on LED substrates. PVD, also known as "sputtering," is an alternative to metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). PVD is a purely physical process that involves plasma sputter bombardment rather than a chemical reaction at the surface to be coated, as in MOCVD.

  2. 1RXSJ062518.2+733433: A bright, soft intermediate polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staude; A. D. Schwope; M. Krumpe; V. Hambaryan; R. Schwarz

    2003-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 50 hours time-resolved R-band photometry of the ROSAT all-sky survey source 1RXSJ062518.2+733433. The source was identified by Wei et al. (1999) as a cataclysmic variable. Our photometry, performed in 10 nights between February 11, 2003, and March 21, 2003, reveals two stable periodicities at 19.7874 and 283.118 min, which are identified as probable spin and orbital periods of the binary. We therefore classify 1RXSJ062518.2+733433 as an intermediate polar. Analysis of the RASS X-ray observations reveal a variability of 100% in the X-ray flux and a likely soft X-ray excess. The new IP thus joins the rare group of soft IPs with only four members so far.

  3. 1RXSJ062518.2+733433: A bright, soft intermediate polar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staude, A; Krumpe, M; Hambaryan, V; Schwarz, R

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of 50 hours time-resolved R-band photometry of the ROSAT all-sky survey source 1RXSJ062518.2+733433. The source was identified by Wei et al. (1999) as a cataclysmic variable. Our photometry, performed in 10 nights between February 11, 2003, and March 21, 2003, reveals two stable periodicities at 19.7874 and 283.118 min, which are identified as probable spin and orbital periods of the binary. We therefore classify 1RXSJ062518.2+733433 as an intermediate polar. Analysis of the RASS X-ray observations reveal a variability of 100% in the X-ray flux and a likely soft X-ray excess. The new IP thus joins the rare group of soft IPs with only four members so far.

  4. Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams -- prioritized

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Molvik, L. Prost, P. K. Roy, P. A. Seidl, G. Westenskow,A. Seidl, M. Leitner, P. K. Roy, W. Sharp, W. L. Waldron, Haber, M. L. Leitner, P. K. Roy, W. L. Waldron, J-L. Vay,

  5. Lecture 2. Instrumentation Is the Sun very bright so we can never be photon hungry?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a secondary flat, so images are not rotated. Coelostats #12;12 Turret Altazimuth mirror arrangement Kitt Peak;9 Consideration of telescope focal length Diameter of solar image in the focal plane: f : focal length A : Sun to generate effective focal length. Arfd /2 B) Long Primary Focus Instrument #12;10 Heliostat primary mirror

  6. australia telescope low-brightness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it to tracking imagers and the science instrument, set up the oscillating secondary mirror, and aggregate pointings into relocatable nods and dithers. Gross, Michael A K; Moore,...

  7. Looking on bright side of losing ITER Risa Kato and Tetsuro Yamada / Yomiuri Shimbun Staff Writers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to have a remote-controlled ITER experiment unit, and one for the development of super heat candidate to have a remote-control facility is of especially high significance, according to experts. The remote-control facility is envisaged as playing a key role in the ITER project, as it will be able

  8. Short-term variability of overcast brightness Raymond L. Lee, Jr. and Javier Hernndez-Andrs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Raymond L.

    overcast skies measured at 30-s intervals reveal unexpected temporal variability in horizontal illumi- nance E and zenith luminance L . Fourier analysis of these time series shows peak fluctuations overcast twilight E exceeds clear-sky E at the same Sun elevation. 2005 Optical Society of America OCIS

  9. Design, conditioning, and performance of a high voltage, high brightness dc photoelectron gun with variable gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxson, Jared; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Dobbins, John; Liu, Xianghong; Smolenski, Karl [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new high voltage photoemission gun has been constructed at Cornell University which features a segmented insulator and a movable anode, allowing the cathode-anode gap to be adjusted. In this work, we describe the gun's overall mechanical and high voltage design, the surface preparation of components, as well as the clean construction methods. We present high voltage conditioning data using a 50 mm cathode-anode gap, in which the conditioning voltage exceeds 500 kV, as well as at smaller gaps. Finally, we present simulated emittance results obtained from a genetic optimization scheme using voltage values based on the conditioning data. These results indicate that for charges up to 100 pC, a 30 mm gap at 400 kV has equal or smaller 100% emittance than a 50 mm gap at 450 kV, and also a smaller core emittance, when placed as the source for the Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector with bunch length constrained to be <3 ps rms. For 100 pC up to 0.5 nC charges, the 50 mm gap has larger core emittance than the 30 mm gap, but conversely smaller 100% emittance.

  10. Solid-State Lighting with High Brightness, High Efficiency, and Low Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    -based lamp for lighthouse application were discussed at the system level ("Implementation and test of a LED- based lamp for a lighthouse" by L. Mercatelli et al.). Such applications of LED in lighthouse have-emitting diode (LED) is the most popular technique due to its advantages of small volume, long lifetime, high

  11. UNVEILING FAR-INFRARED COUNTERPARTS OF BRIGHT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXIES USING PACS IMAGING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannerbauer, H.; Daddi, E.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Horeau, B.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Le Pennec, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Morrison, G. E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa, HI 96822 (United States); Altieri, B. [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, ESA, Villanueva de la Canada, 28691 Madrid (Spain); Andreani, P. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Berta, S.; Schreiber, N. Foerster; Genzel, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, 85741 Garching (Germany); Bongiovanni, A.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna (Spain); Cimatti, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Dominguez, H.; Gruppioni, C., E-mail: helmut.dannerbauer@cea.f [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for Herschel-PACS counterparts of dust-obscured, high-redshift objects previously selected at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey North field. We detect 22 of 56 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs, 39%) with a signal-to-noise ratio of {>=}3 at 100 {mu}m down to 3.0 mJy, and/or at 160 {mu}m down to 5.7 mJy. The fraction of SMGs seen at 160 {mu}m is higher than that at 100 {mu}m. About 50% of radio-identified SMGs are associated with PACS sources. We find a trend between the SCUBA/PACS flux ratio and redshift, suggesting that these flux ratios could be used as a coarse redshift indicator. PACS-undetected submillimeter/millimeter selected sources tend to lie at higher redshifts than the PACS-detected ones. A total of 12 sources (21% of our SMG sample) remain unidentified and the fact that they are blank fields at Herschel-PACS and the Very Large Array 20 cm wavelength may imply higher redshifts for them than for the average SMG population (e.g., z>3-4). The Herschel-PACS imaging of these dust-obscured starbursts at high redshifts suggests that their far-infrared spectral energy distributions have significantly different shapes than template libraries of local infrared galaxies.

  12. THE RAPIDLY FLARING AFTERGLOW OF THE VERY BRIGHT AND ENERGETIC GRB 070125 Adria C. Updike,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . Haislip,2 Melissa C. Nysewander,3 Andrew S. Fruchter,3 D. Alexander Kann,4 Sylvio Klose,4 Peter A. Milne,5 Adalberto Piccioni,26 Graziella Pizzichini,25 Federica Terra,23 Kuntal Misra,27,28 B. C. Bhatt,29 G. C

  13. The Rapidly Flaring Afterglow of the Very Bright and Energetic GRB 070125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Updike, Adria C; Nysewander, Melissa C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Kann, D Alexander; Klose, Sylvio; Milne, Peter A; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, Weikang; Hergenrother, Carl W; Prochaska, Jason X; Halpern, Jules P; Mirabal, Nestor; Thorstensen, John R; van der Horst, Alexander J; Starling, Rhaana L C; Racusin, Judith L; Burrows, David N; Kuin, N P M; Roming, Peter W A; Bellm, Eric; Hurley, Kevin; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V; Blake, Cullen; Starr, Dan; Falco, Emilio E; Brown, Warren R; Dai, Xinyu; Deng, Jinsong; Xin, Liping; Qiu, Yulei; Wei, Jianyan; Urata, Yuji; Nanni, Domenico; Maiorano, Elisabetta; Palazzi, Eliana; Greco, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto; Pizzichini, Graziella; Terra, Federica; Misra, Kuntal; Bhatt, B C; Anupama, G C; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Reichart, Dan E; Eid, Hala A; Bryngelson, Ginger; Puls, Jason; Goldthwaite, R C; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on multi-wavelength observations, ranging from the X-ray to radio wave bands, of the IPN-localized gamma-ray burst GRB 070125. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of absorption lines due to O I, Si II, and C IV, implying a likely redshift of z = 1.547. The well-sampled light curves, in particular from 0.5 to 4 days after the burst, suggest a jet break at 3.7 days, corresponding to a jet opening angle of ~7.0 degrees, and implying an intrinsic GRB energy in the 1 - 10,000 keV band of around E = (6.3 - 6.9)x 10^(51) erg (based on the fluences measured by the gamma-ray detectors of the IPN network). GRB 070125 is among the brightest afterglows observed to date. The spectral energy distribution implies a host extinction of Av < 0.9 mag. Two rebrightening episodes are observed, one with excellent time coverage, showing an increase in flux of 56% in ~8000 seconds. The evolution of the afterglow light curve is achromatic at all times. Late-time observations of the afterglow do not show eviden...

  14. The Rapidly Flaring Afterglow of the Very Bright and Energetic GRB 070125

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adria C. Updike; Joshua B. Haislip; Melissa C. Nysewander; Andrew S. Fruchter; D. Alexander Kann; Sylvio Klose; Peter A. Milne; G. Grant Williams; Weikang Zheng; Carl W. Hergenrother; Jason X. Prochaska; Jules P. Halpern; Nestor Mirabal; John R. Thorstensen; Alexander J. van der Horst; Rhaana L. C. Starling; Judith L. Racusin; David N. Burrows; N. P. M. Kuin; Peter W. A. Roming; Eric Bellm; Kevin Hurley; Weidong Li; Alexei V. Filippenko; Cullen Blake; Dan Starr; Emilio E. Falco; Warren R. Brown; Xinyu Dai; Jinsong Deng; Liping Xin; Yulei Qiu; Jianyan Wei; Yuji Urata; Domenico Nanni; Elisabetta Maiorano; Eliana Palazzi; Giuseppe Greco; Corrado Bartolini; Adriano Guarnieri; Adalberto Piccioni; Graziella Pizzichini; Federica Terra; Kuntal Misra; B. C. Bhatt; G. C. Anupama; X. Fan; L. Jiang; Ralph A. M. J. Wijers; Dan E. Reichart; Hala A. Eid; Ginger Bryngelson; Jason Puls; R. C. Goldthwaite; Dieter H. Hartmann

    2008-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on multi-wavelength observations, ranging from the X-ray to radio wave bands, of the IPN-localized gamma-ray burst GRB 070125. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of absorption lines due to O I, Si II, and C IV, implying a likely redshift of z = 1.547. The well-sampled light curves, in particular from 0.5 to 4 days after the burst, suggest a jet break at 3.7 days, corresponding to a jet opening angle of ~7.0 degrees, and implying an intrinsic GRB energy in the 1 - 10,000 keV band of around E = (6.3 - 6.9)x 10^(51) erg (based on the fluences measured by the gamma-ray detectors of the IPN network). GRB 070125 is among the brightest afterglows observed to date. The spectral energy distribution implies a host extinction of Av < 0.9 mag. Two rebrightening episodes are observed, one with excellent time coverage, showing an increase in flux of 56% in ~8000 seconds. The evolution of the afterglow light curve is achromatic at all times. Late-time observations of the afterglow do not show evidence for emission from an underlying host galaxy or supernova. Any host galaxy would be subluminous, consistent with current GRB host-galaxy samples. Evidence for strong Mg II absorption features is not found, which is perhaps surprising in view of the relatively high redshift of this burst and the high likelihood for such features along GRB-selected lines of sight.

  15. The X-ray spectrum of the Gamma Bright Quasar S5 0836+710

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Comastri; M. Cappi; M. Matsuoka

    1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an ASCA observation of the high redshift flat spectrum radio quasar S5 0836+710. The $\\sim 0.4-10$ keV X-ray spectrum is remarkably flat with $\\Gamma \\sim 1.4$ and substantial intrinsic absorption at low energy. The spectral slope was found to be in good agreement with the non--simultaneous ROSAT PSPC observations while no evidence of intrinsic absorption has been found in the PSPC spectrum. Our results suggest time variability of the absorbing material on timescales less than five months in the source rest--frame.

  16. High-brightness single photon source from a quantum dot in a directional-emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    , Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 2 Sony Corporation, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo, Japan, 141-0001 3, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305 a mitsuru.toishi@jp.sony.com, b englund@fas.harvard.edu, c jela

  17. November 16, 2006 Spectral properties of X-ray bright variable sources in the Taurus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Code 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027, USA 5 INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri of flares to derive the size of the flaring loops. Results. The light curves of the selected sources show to solar flares, or of slow modulation due e.g. to rotation (Feigelson & Montmerle 1999; Wolk et al. 2005

  18. Titan's bright spots: Multiband spectroscopic measurement of surface diversity and hazes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamkovics, Mate

    in a methane- based meteorological cycle that is similar to the Earth's hydrological cycle [Toon et al., 1988 initiates a series of chemical reactions that result in the formation of condensible hydrocarbons aerosols settle into the tropo- sphere, they can serve as condensation nuclei for Titan's methane

  19. By the mid-1900s, these brightly-colored, small par-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    electrical fires and, when wet, nests Monk Parakeet (Wikimedia) Focal Species: Monk Parakeet can cause short circuits, dam- age power equipment, and cause power outages, costing South Florida utilities over $500

  20. Theoretical ecology: a successful first year and a bright future for a new journal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Alan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 EDITORIAL Theoretical ecology: a successful first year andvolume 2 of Theoretical Ecology. Looking back, this has beenfocusing on theoretical ecology can play an expanding role

  1. Sleep, mood, and circadian responses to bright green light during sleep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandner, Michael Andrew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groups .96 Figure 9: ESS Baseline and EndEpworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS; Johns, 1991), The PittsburghEpworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS; Johns, 1991) is a commonly-

  2. BLAST05: POWER SPECTRA OF BRIGHT GALACTIC CIRRUS AT SUBMILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Arabindo; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, Calvin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, 5 The Parade, Cardiff, CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Bock, James J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gundersen, Joshua O. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Carol Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Hughes, David H. [Instituto Nacional de AstrofIsica Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Aptdo. Postal 51 y 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Miville-Deschenes, Marc-Antoine [Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, UMR8617, Universite Paris-Sud, F-91405, Orsay (France); Olmi, Luca [Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, P.O. Box 23343, UPR station, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Patanchon, Guillaume, E-mail: aroy@cita.utoronto.c [Laboratoire APC, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet 75205 Paris (France)

    2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report multi-wavelength power spectra of diffuse Galactic dust emission from Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope observations at 250, 350, and 500 mum in Galactic plane fields in Cygnus X and Aquila. These submillimeter power spectra statistically quantify the self-similar structure observable over a broad range of scales and can be used to assess the cirrus noise which limits the detection of faint point sources. The advent of submillimeter surveys with the Herschel Space Observatory makes the wavelength dependence a matter of interest. We show that the observed relative amplitudes of the power spectra can be related through a spectral energy distribution (SED). Fitting a simple modified black body to this SED, we find the dust temperature in Cygnus X to be 19.8 +- 1.5 K and in the Aquila region 16.8 +- 0.8 K. Our empirical estimates provide important new insight into the substantial cirrus noise that will be encountered in forthcoming observations.

  3. Development of a High-Brightness VHF Electron Source at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, Steven M.; Sannibale, Fernando; Staples, John W.; Virostek, Steve P.; Wells, Russell P.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VHF ELECTRON SOURCE AT LBNL* S. Lidia # , F. Sannibale, J.S. Virostek, R. Wells, LBNL, Berkeley, CA, USA Abstract

  4. Brightly photoluminescent phosphor materials based on silicon quantum dots with oxide shell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    .-J. Cheng, Y. Tian, M. S. Liu, J. Zhao, J. A. Bardecker, I. J.-L. Plante, D. S. Ginger, and A. K.-Y. Jen for display backlights," Adv. Mater. (Deerfield Beach Fla.) 22(28), 30763080 (2010). 9. Z. Ding, B. M. Quinn quantum dot-organic light-emitting diodes," Appl. Phys. Lett. 98(21), 213102 (2011). 11. K.-Y. Cheng, R

  5. Compact radiation sources for increased access to high brightness x-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Shea, Finn Henry

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are considering radiation, the electric fields detected areof synchrotron radiation from the General Electric syn-by the null in the electric dipole radiation pattern in the

  6. A bright idea? : the promise and peril of a memory drug

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowd, William (William Michael)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the MIT lab of neuropharmacologist Richard Wurtman, rodents that received a new Alzheimer's drug have shown a marked improvement in learning and memory. They are able to master elaborate mazes in half the time of their ...

  7. Evolution of Bright Points, X-ray jets, their physical parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Equatorial extensions of polar coronal hole. EIS: The EUV imaging spectrometer. EIT: Extreme happens between open and close magnetic field at coronal hole boundaries. Transient brightening events (i

  8. Generation, transport and focusing of high-brightness heavy ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henestroza, Enrique

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX) has been built at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory. NTX is the first successful integrated beam system experiment that explores various physical phenomena, and ...

  9. A bright thermonuclear X-ray burst simultaneously observed with Chandra and RXTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in t Zand, J. J. M.

    The prototypical accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4?3658 was observed simultaneously with Chandra-LETGS and RXTE-PCA near the peak of a transient outburst in November 2011. A single thermonuclear (type-I) ...

  10. Panel Discussion: The SunShot Initiative: The Future is Bright | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM5 Accretion-of-DutiesPROPERTY3-0127Paducah3 Theofof

  11. New family of tiny crystals glow bright in LED lights | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew User and DataNew companiesNewNew

  12. Synthetic properties of bright metal-poor variables. II. BL Her stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Di Criscienzo; F. Caputo; M. Marconi; S. Cassisi

    2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the properties of the so-called BL Her stars, i.e., Population II Cepheids with periods shorter than 8 days, using updated pulsation models and evolutionary tracks computed adopting a metal abundance in the range of Z=0.0001 to Z=0.004. We derive the predicted Period-Magnitude (PM) and Period-Wesenheit (PW) relations at the various photometric bands and we show that the slopes of these relations are in good agreement with the slopes determined by observed variables in Galactic globular clusters, independently of the adopted M_V(RR)-[Fe/H] relation to get the cluster RR Lyrae-based distance. Moreover, we show that also the distances provided by the predicted PM and PW relations for BL Her stars agree within the errors with the RR Lyrae based values. The use of the predicted relations with W Vir stars, which are Population II Cepheids with periods longer than 8 days, provides no clear evidence for or against a change in the PM and PW slopes around P~10 days.

  13. Concepts for Phosphorescent Organic LEDs at High Brightness | MIT-Harvard

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer SimulationsConcentrating Solar

  14. BrightPhase Energy Inc formerly Solar Focus | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainable and Innovative Energy Technologies | OpenBrigham City

  15. Cracking Molecular Structures with Bright Lights - and a Few Good Eggs |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPracticesWinter (Part 2) |

  16. DOE Finalizes $1.6 Billion Loan Guarantee for BrightSource Energy Inc. |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE F 1300.2 RecordFacility

  17. The Bright Lights in New York Could Be Solar | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idaho |EnergyTankless

  18. Bright Young Minds for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJune 17,Agenda AgendaDepartmentOregonApril 8,Kim Kisslinger,

  19. Plastic Solar Cells See Bright Future | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics

  20. 'DisrupTech' event to highlight bright ideas from Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship ProgramBiomassUniversity |DepartmentEnergyPhysics

  1. NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright Future for Solar Energy -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL Refines Method tofor Solar FS-6A42-62241

  2. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercial Cold Climate HeatEnergy

  3. NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL and SkyFuel Partnership Reflects Bright

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: Grid IntegrationReport Available forVoucher PilotFuture for

  4. ITP Glass: A Clear Vision for a Bright Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGENDDepartmentSeptember 20092009 | UC

  5. Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Loan | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department of Energy |Article 29 Employee Awardssiting featured by

  6. Ashland Electric Utility - Bright Way to Heat Water Rebate | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department of Energy |Article 29 Employee Awardssiting featured byEnergy

  7. Sparkling extreme-ultraviolet bright dots observed with Hi-C | OSTI, US

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology|Solar windMarchSpace-AgeSpacerSpark

  8. SunShot Grand Challenge Summit: Bright Outlook to Achieve SunShot Goal |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success Stories Touching The LivesSummer 2 012

  9. Supernovae of the Same Brightness, Cut From Vastly Different Cosmic Cloth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...Success Stories

  10. Building Technologies Office Load Control Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BTO researches and implements load control strategies, which support the Sustainable and Holistic IntegratioN of Energy storage and Solar PV (SHINES) FOA.

  11. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to solar, while the permitting laws... Eligibility: Construction Savings Category: Photovoltaics, Solar Water Heat City of Milwaukee- Milwaukee Shines Solar Financing Beginning...

  12. IT TalkJanuary / February 2011 Issue 1 Improved Security, Efficiency,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL), which is a British invention. IT Talk was designed to shine a light on all

  13. Energy Sciences Building | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Video Argonne's Energy Sciences Building Energy Sciences Building The Energy Sciences Building is a world-class scientific facility and a shining example of sustainable design....

  14. EECBG Success Story: Sundance, Skiing and Solar: Park City to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    skiing and annual Sundance Film Festival - is quickly becoming a shining example of environmental sustainability. Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Park City, UT has...

  15. Introduction........................................................................................................3 ON THE HORIZON: Promising Research Efforts Currently Underway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanostructures Pack It In...........................................................................11 SUCCESS.............................................................................................17 Faster, Cleaner, More Flexible Energy Storage ........................................18 Shining communications, the device detects stress on the gr

  16. Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Lynn Margaret

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    renewable energy sources such as the sun and wind aresum of energy we require whether or not the sun is shining

  17. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Environmental Sciences ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.;...

  18. Solar | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Award Program work on. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Shining Stars of Solar: Meet Three SunShot Postdoctoral Award Recipients...

  19. acute cold exposure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (direct dark matter searches exploiting microwave cavities), helioscopes (searches for solar ALPs or HPs), or light-shining-through-a-wall techniques -- can probe large parts of...

  20. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    integrate these solutions into PV power plants. SHINES projects can also focus on demand response and load management to achieve target metrics. These projects will...

  1. very high brightnesses and efficiencies. The successful synthe-sis of these complexes provides a new direction for electro-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    , the design of new alkenylpyridine ligands, and the application of these ligands in the synthesis of cyclo nitrogen for 12 h. After cooling to room temperature, 2-ethoxyetha- nol was distilled out. The residue and the residue was purified on a silica gel column using a mixture of CH2Cl2 and hexane as eluent giving

  2. A compact streak camera for 150 fs time resolved measurement of bright pulses in ultrafast electron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassier, G. H.; Haupt, K.; Erasmus, N.; Rohwer, E. G.; Bergmann, H. M. von; Schwoerer, H. [Laser Research Institute, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602 Matieland (South Africa); Coelho, S. M. M.; Auret, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a compact streak camera suitable for measuring the duration of highly charged subrelativistic femtosecond electron bunches with an energy bandwidth in the order of 0.1%, as frequently used in ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) experiments for the investigation of ultrafast structural dynamics. The device operates in accumulation mode with 50 fs shot-to-shot timing jitter, and at a 30 keV electron energy, the full width at half maximum temporal resolution is 150 fs. Measured durations of pulses from our UED gun agree well with the predictions from the detailed charged particle trajectory simulations.

  3. Oregon's Rocky Shore Species: Anemones Giant Green Anemones get their bright coloration from symbiotic, single-celled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    " (blobs on rocks that look like paint or tar) is a different stage in the life cycle of this red alga snails, and barnacles A common species, the finger limpet A small, colorful lined chiton A lemon

  4. tales from the high-rise P8 Universe found to be twice as bright P17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    of Canberra is the site of research investigating how extreme winds generate monster waves in the open ocean

  5. Nanoscale optical positioning of single quantum dots for bright, pure, and on-demand single-photon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapienza, Luca; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-assembled, epitaxially-grown InAs/GaAs quantum dots are promising semiconductor quantum emitters that can be integrated on a chip for a variety of photonic quantum information science applications. However, self-assembled growth results in an essentially random in-plane spatial distribution of quantum dots, presenting a challenge in creating devices that exploit the strong interaction of single quantum dots with highly confined optical modes. Here, we present a photoluminescence imaging approach for locating single quantum dots with respect to alignment features with an average (minimum) position uncertainty efficiency (48 % +/- 5 % into a 0.4 numerical aperture lens, close to the theoretically predicted value of 50 %), low multiphoton prob...

  6. Through a window, brightly : modulating daylight and solar radiation in commercial and institutional buildings through the use of architectural elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlereth, Hans-Joachim

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural lighting serves several important functions in buildings. The visual power of a shaft of sunlight penetrating a dark space or the visual beauty of a stained window has long been recognized by architects and designers. ...

  7. No excess of bright galaxies around the redshift 7.1 quasar ULAS J1120+0641

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Chris; Mortlock, Daniel; Warren, Stephen; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Hewett, Paul; McLure, Ross; McMahon, Richard; Venemans, Bram

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    to facilitate studies of the Universe in the first billion years after the big bang in two ways. First, since they are the most luminous non-transient objects, it is possible to measure the opacity of the intergalactic medium (IGM) along the line of sight due... Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Abazajian et al. 2009), augmented with deeper imaging from the Liverpool Telescope, its redshift was originally measured as z = 7.085 0.003 from the broad ultraviolet emission lines, later refined to z = 7.0842 from a detection...

  8. Vol. 9,No. 5/May 1992/J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 643 Why is snow so bright?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeCarlo, Doug

    skies the azimuth (compass direction) is largely irrelevant. For overcast skies the luminance November 22, 1991; accepted December 3, 1991 Snow seen against an overcast sky typically appears much well known is that snow also typically ap- pears much brighter than the sky that illuminates it, even

  9. The ultraviolet-bright, slowly declining transient PS1-11af as a partial tidal disruption event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Zauderer, B. A.; Kamble, A.; Soderberg, A. M.; Czekala, I.; Dittmann, J.; Drout, M.; Foley, R. J.; Fong, W.; Kirshner, R. P.; Lunnan, R.; Marion, G. H.; Narayan, G. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gezari, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Rest, A.; Riess, A. G. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chomiuk, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Huber, M. E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lawrence, A., E-mail: rchornock@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Pan-STARRS1 discovery of the long-lived and blue transient PS1-11af, which was also detected by Galaxy Evolution Explorer with coordinated observations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV) band. PS1-11af is associated with the nucleus of an early type galaxy at redshift z = 0.4046 that exhibits no evidence for star formation or active galactic nucleus activity. Four epochs of spectroscopy reveal a pair of transient broad absorption features in the UV on otherwise featureless spectra. Despite the superficial similarity of these features to P-Cygni absorptions of supernovae (SNe), we conclude that PS1-11af is not consistent with the properties of known types of SNe. Blackbody fits to the spectral energy distribution are inconsistent with the cooling, expanding ejecta of a SN, and the velocities of the absorption features are too high to represent material in homologous expansion near a SN photosphere. However, the constant blue colors and slow evolution of the luminosity are similar to previous optically selected tidal disruption events (TDEs). The shape of the optical light curve is consistent with models for TDEs, but the minimum accreted mass necessary to power the observed luminosity is only ?0.002 M {sub ?}, which points to a partial disruption model. A full disruption model predicts higher bolometric luminosities, which would require most of the radiation to be emitted in a separate component at high energies where we lack observations. In addition, the observed temperature is lower than that predicted by pure accretion disk models for TDEs and requires reprocessing to a constant, lower temperature. Three deep non-detections in the radio with the Very Large Array over the first two years after the event set strict limits on the production of any relativistic outflow comparable to Swift J1644+57, even if off-axis.

  10. Confirming HD 23478 as a new magnetic B star hosting an H$\\alpha$-bright centrifugal magnetosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikora, James; Bohlender, David; Neiner, Coralie; Oksala, Mary; Shultz, Matt; Cohen, David; ud-Doula, Asif; Grunhut, Jason; Monin, Dmitry; Owocki, Stan; Petit, Vronique; Rivinius, Thomas; Townsend, Richard

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report 23 magnetic field measurements of the B3IV star HD 23478: 12 obtained from high resolution Stokes $V$ spectra using the ESPaDOnS (CFHT) and Narval (TBL) spectropolarimeters, and 11 from medium resolution Stokes $V$ spectra obtained with the DimaPol spectropolarimeter (DAO). HD 23478 was one of two rapidly rotating stars identified as potential "centrifugal magnetosphere" hosts based on IR observations from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We derive basic physical properties of this star including its mass ($M=6.1^{+0.8}_{-0.7}\\,M_\\odot$), effective temperature ($T_{\\rm eff}=20\\pm2\\,$kK), radius ($R=2.7^{+1.6}_{-0.9}\\,R_\\odot$), and age ($\\tau_{\\rm age}=3^{+37}_{-1}\\,$Myr). We repeatedly detect weakly-variable Zeeman signatures in metal, He and H lines in all our observations corresponding to a longitudinal magnetic field of $\\langle B_z\\rangle\\approx-2.0\\,$kG. The rotational period is inferred from Hipparcos photometry ($P_{\\rm rot}=1.0498(4)\\,$d). Und...

  11. High-brightness X-ray free-electron laser with an optical undulator by pulse shaping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    codes: (140.2600) Free-electron lasers (FELs); (140.3300)The Development of X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers, IEEE J. Sel.and M.N. Rosenbluth, Free-Electron Lasers with Variable

  12. SPIE International Conference, Denver CO, July 1999 1 Relevance Of The Modified Model For The Microwave Brightness Temperature To The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

    seas, including locations where radiosonde or buoys cannot be afforded, relatively low power numerous advantages over ship and buoy data. Some of these advantages include the vast coverage of global

  13. Star-to-Star Abundance Variations among Bright Giants in the Mildly Metal-Poor Globular Cluster M4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inese I. Ivans; Christopher Sneden; Robert P. Kraft; Nicholas B. Suntzeff; Verne V. Smith; G. Edward Langer; Jon P. Fulbright; .

    1999-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a chemical composition analysis of 36 giants in the nearby mildy metal-poor ( = -1.18) "CN-bimodal" globular cluster M4. Confronted with a cluster that has large and variable interstellar extinction across the cluster face, we combined traditional spectroscopic abundance methods with modifications to line-depth ratio techniques to determine the atmospheric parameters of our stars. We derive a total-to-selective extinction ratio of 3.4 and an average reddening of 0.33 which is significantly lower than that estimated by using the dust maps made by Schlegel et al. (1998). Abundance ratios for Sc, Ti, V, Ni, & Eu are typical of halo field and cluster stars. However, Si, Al, Ba, & La are overabundant with respect to what is seen in other globular clusters of similar metallicity. Superimposed on the primordial abundance distribution is evidence for the existence of proton-capture synthesis. We recover some of the C, N, O, Na, Mg, & Al abundance swings and correlations found in other more metal-poor globular clusters but the range of variation is muted. The Al enhancements appear to be from the destruction of 25,26Mg, not 24Mg. The C+N+O abundance sum is constant to within the observational errors, and agrees with the C+N+O total that might be expected for M4 stars at birth. The M4 AGB stars have C,N,O abundances that show less evidence for proton- capture nucleosynthesis than is found in the less-evolved stars of the RGB. Deeply-mixed stars of the RGB, subsequent to the helium core flash, might take up residence on the blue end of the HB, and thus fail to evolve back to the AGB but reasons for skepticism concerning this scenario are noted.

  14. Blast-furnace ironmaking -- Existing capital and continued improvements are a winning formula for a bright future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oshnock, T.W.; Colinear, J.A. [U.S. Steel, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the years the blast-furnace process has been improved upon significantly. Increases to the hot-blast temperature, improvements to the physical, chemical, and metallurgical properties of coke and burden materials, the use of more fuel injectants, and improvements to the design of the furnace facilities have led to significant decreases in furnace coke rate, increases in productivity, and increases in furnace campaign life. As a result, many of the alternative cokeless reduction processes have not replaced blast-furnace hot-metal production in North America. In the future, these continued blast-furnace improvements will potentially result in coke rates decreasing to 400 pounds per net ton of hot metal (lb/NTHM) as more pulverized coal is injected. These improvements, coupled with the fact that existing blast furnaces and coke plants can be refurbished for approximately $110 per annual ton of hot metal [$100 per annual net ton of hot metal (NTHM)], will result in extending the life of the North American blast furnaces well into the twenty-first century.

  15. AC-driven, color-and brightness-tunable organic light-emitting diodes constructed from an electron only device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    a charge generation layer into an electron only device to form an n-i-p-i-n structure. It is shown that an electron only device (EOD), which can be considered as an n-i-n structure. The low injection barrier with a negative bias across the device while the holes are blocked at the other electrode. Therefore, the electron

  16. Search for gamma-rays from the unusually bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; BenZvi, S Y; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garca, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T O; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Ponce, E; Pretz, J; Prez-Prez, E G; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; lvarez, J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift $z\\lesssim0.5$, featuring the highest energy photon so far detected from a GRB and the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory is a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. It features two data acquisition (DAQ) systems - one designed to readout full air-shower events (main DAQ) and the other one counting the signals in each photomultiplier tube (scaler DAQ). The burst occurred at a zenith angle of $57^\\circ$, when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector and collecting data with the scaler DAQ only. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, 8 different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC de...

  17. A close-up of the Sun (shown in ultraviolet light) reveals a mottled surface, bright flares,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    . Near its surface, the Sun is like a pot of boiling water, with bubbles of hot, electrified gas the solar wind). Instead, it is the energy stored in the plasma and the magnetic fields associated area. Sunspots are dark splotches on the Sun caused by the appearance of cooler (3000 degrees Celsius

  18. HIGH CURRENT AND HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES , I. Bazarov, S. Belomestnykh, M. Billing, E. Chojnacki, Z. Conway,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    will review the technical requirements of such projects and the status of on-going research through- out and longitudinally shaped laser pulse, in RF cavities with very high electrical fields of up to 120 MV/m [1] to beam to a significant heating of the cavity surfaces due to resistive energy losses which causes thermal stress

  19. Posters Brightness Fields of Broken Clouds V. E. Zuev, G. A. Titov, E. I. Kasyanov, and D. A. Zimin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal observations71 Posters1

  20. Skynet.be Mijnblog Creer jeblog Fouteblog? Kies aardgas van Essent en bespaar tot November 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbester, Andrs

    ? Categorien Bicycle light LED diving flashlight led lamp led tube Archieven 2011-11 2011-10 2011-09 2011 Recente berichten Ultrasonic tap nozzle gives revolutionary... Cree shines the LED light on Camp Pendleton-08 2011-07 2011-06 2011-05 2011-04 2011-03 Alle archieven Populaire tags Cree shines the LED light

  1. Solar Policy Environment: Milwaukee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Milwaukees SAC Initiative, Milwaukee Shines, works to reduce informational, economic and procedural barriers to the widespread adoption of solar energy systems. While the City of Milwaukee and its partners have demonstrated commitment and experience in implementing solar technologies, Milwaukee Shines aims to enhance these efforts and make solar a viable alternative throughout the region.

  2. "A 4-H tradition that has been maintained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Virginia 4-H All Stars "A 4-H tradition that has been maintained for over 80 years." Becoming an All Star By being active in your home 4-H community and maintaining a high interest in "Making the Best Better," you can apply to become a 4- H All Star in Virginia. Applications must be filled out

  3. Analysis of International Policies In The Solar Electricity Sector: Lessons for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Ranjit

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its Brightness Rural Electrification and the Townshipthe result of Brightness Rural Electrification and Townshipits Brightness Rural Electrification Program (started in

  4. PRECISE HIGH-CADENCE TIME SERIES OBSERVATIONS OF FIVE VARIABLE YOUNG STARS IN AURIGA WITH MOST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cody, Ann Marie; Tayar, Jamie; Hillenbrand, Lynne A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Matthews, Jaymie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kallinger, Thomas, E-mail: amc@ipac.caltech.edu [Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wien, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore young star variability on a large range of timescales, we have used the MOST satellite to obtain 24 days of continuous, sub-minute cadence, high-precision optical photometry on a field of classical and weak-lined T Tauri stars (TTSs) in the Taurus-Auriga star formation complex. Observations of AB Aurigae, SU Aurigae, V396 Aurigae, V397 Aurigae, and HD 31305 reveal brightness fluctuations at the 1%-10% level on timescales of hours to weeks. We have further assessed the variability properties with Fourier, wavelet, and autocorrelation techniques, identifying one significant period per star. We present spot models in an attempt to fit the periodicities, but find that we cannot fully account for the observed variability. Rather, all stars exhibit a mixture of periodic and aperiodic behavior, with the latter dominating stochastically on timescales less than several days. After removal of the main periodicity, periodograms for each light curve display power-law trends consistent with those seen for other young accreting stars. Several of our targets exhibited unusual variability patterns not anticipated by prior studies, and we propose that this behavior originates with the circumstellar disks. The MOST observations underscore the need for investigation of TTS light variations on a wide range of timescales in order to elucidate the physical processes responsible; we provide guidelines for future time series observations.

  5. X-ray Properties of Low-Mass Pre-Main Sequence Stars in the Orion Trapezium Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulz, Norbert S; Guenther, Moritz; Testa, Paola; Canizares, Claude R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chandra High Energy Transmission Gratings (HETG) Orion Legacy Project (HOLP) is the first comprehensive set of observations of a very young massive stellar cluster which provides high resolution X-ray spectra of very young stars over a wide mass range (0.7 - 2.3 Msun). In this paper, we focus on the six brightest X-ray sources with T Tauri stellar counterparts which are well-characterized at optical and infra-red wavelengths. All stars show column densities which are substantially smaller than expected from optical extinction indicating that the sources are located on the near side of the cluster with respect to the observer as well as that these stars are embedded in more dusty environments. Stellar X-ray luminosities are well above $10^{31}$ erg/s, in some cases exceeding $10^{32}$ erg/s for a substantial amount of time. The stars during these observations show no flares but are persistently bright. The spectra can be well fit with two temperature plasma components of 10 MK and 40 MK, of which the latte...

  6. Development of an asynchronous solar-powered cooker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinwale, P. Femi (Pamela Femi)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One reason that solar cookers have not gained widespread acceptance is because their use has proved inconvenient and impractical. Users are restricted to cooking when, and where, the sun is shining. Furthermore, the cooking ...

  7. Last updated: 19 August 2013 Main Panel B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Professor Walter Henning US Department of Energy, Argonne National Laboratory Professor Raymond Jeanloz Kathryn Monk Natural Resouces Wales Mr Bob Sargent Hyder Consulting (UK) Ltd Professor Keith Shine Strategy Board Professor Matthew Rosseinsky University of Liverpool Professor Jeremy Sanders University

  8. Energy Department Announces $25 Million to Lower Cost of Concentrating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    thermal energy to a power block to generate electricity. CSP technology with thermal energy storage can store the sun's intense heat for use when the sun isn't shining. This...

  9. Energy 101: Solar PV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  10. SLIDESHOW: Learning Valuable Lessons About Energy with Scouts...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    meter. | Photo by Matty Greene. 9 of 13 A Boy Scout watches light shine on a solar panel, showing how photovoltaic panels work. | Photo by Matty Greene. 10 of 13 Scouts watch...

  11. Energy 101: Solar PV

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel converts the energy of the sun into renewable electricity to power homes and businesses.

  12. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    In this photo, a Boy Scout watches light shine on a solar panel that's powering a hydrogen fuel cell system, showing how photovoltaic panels work and energy systems can be...

  13. Energy 101: Solar PV | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar PV Energy 101: Solar PV Addthis Description Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems can generate clean, cost-effective power anywhere the sun shines. This video shows how a PV panel...

  14. We're dreaming of a green Christmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talbot, James P.

    , or customise them if they are starting to look tired. Choose edible versions When decorating the tree, you are looking for you could try recycled circuit boards, CDs and recycled glass to add a bit of shine to your

  15. Energy Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    can do to make your apartment or rental more comfortable and efficient. October 20, 2009 Solar Decathlon: Rain and Shine Friday marked the end of the Solar Decathlon competition....

  16. Neutrino Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operators in the Lagrangian (Majorana mass terms), or both. The ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches may be able to shine light on the matter. But the neutrino sector...

  17. 12_12_Nilsson

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shine Light on the Water Mystery Anders Nilsson a graduate of Uppsala University in Sweden. In 2000, he accepted a faculty position at Stanford University and the SLAC National...

  18. Comparison of radiological dose pathways for tank farm accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1996-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This calculation note documents an evaluation of the doses from submersion and ground shine due to a release of tank farm radioactive materials, and a comparison of these doses to the doses from inhalation of the materials. The submersion and ground shine doses are insignificant compared to the inhalation doses. The doses from resuspension are also shown to be negligible for the tank farm analysis conditions.

  19. Low surface brightness galaxies rotation curves in the low energy limit of $R^n$ gravity no need for dark matter?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capozziello, S; Troisi, A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the possibility that the observed flatness of the rotation curves of spiral galaxies is not an evidence for the existence of dark matter haloes, but rather a signal of the breakdown of General Relativity. To this aim, we consider power - law fourth order theories of gravity obtained by replacing the scalar curvature $R$ with $f(R) = f_0 R^n$ in the gravity Lagrangian. We show that, in the low energy limit, the gravitational potential generated by a pointlike source may be written as $\\Phi(r) \\propto r^{-1} \\left [ 1 + (r/r_c)^{\\beta} \\right ]$ with $\\beta$ a function of the slope $n$ of the gravity Lagrangian and $r_c$ a scalelength depending on the gravitating system properties. In order to apply the model to realistic systems, we compute the modified potential and the rotation curve for spherically symmetric and for thin disk mass distributions. It turns out that the potential is still asymptotically decreasing, but the corrected rotation curve, although not flat, is higher than the Newtonian...

  20. For Release: 9:20 a.m. PST, January 9, 2007 CHANDRA X-RAY TELESCOPE DISCOVERS COMPANION TO BRIGHT STAR IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    : Australia, Brazil, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, and Samoa. The companion star was discovered accidentally the highly supersonic stellar winds of hot, luminous stars produce x-rays, and we were surprised to see two that of the Sun, is very luminous (giving off about 34,000 times as much energy as our Sun every second

  1. Enhancing a More Balanced Understanding of a Dark and Bright Emotional Intelligence: Development and Preliminary Validation of the Interpersonal Emotional Manipulation Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O' Donnell, Michael

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Concealment, and Self-serving Elicitation (influencing the moods and feelings of others explicitly for one's self-interest). Numerous hierarchical multiple regressions unveiled the incremental validity of the new measure; above and beyond the power of age...

  2. The Bright Gamma-Ray Burst 991208 - Tight Constraints on Afterglow Models from Observations of the Early-Time Radio Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Galama; M. Bremer; F. Bertoldi; K. M. Menten; U. Lisenfeld; D. S. Shepherd; B. Mason; F. Walter; G. G. Pooley; D. A. Frail; R. Sari; S. R. Kulkarni; E. Berger; J. S. Bloom; A. J. Castro-Tirado; J. Granot

    2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The millimeter wavelength emission from GRB 991208 is the second brightest ever detected, yielding a unique data set. We present here well-sampled spectra and light curves over more than two decades in frequency for a two-week period. This data set has allowed us for the first time to trace the evolution of the characteristic synchrotron self-absorption frequency nu_a and peak frequency nu_m, and the peak flux density F_m: we obtain nu_a \\propto t^{-0.15 +- 0.12}, nu_m \\propto t^{-1.7 +- 0.4}, and $_m \\propto t^{-0.47 +- 0.11}. From the radio data we find that models of homogeneous or wind-generated ambient media with a spherically symmetric outflow can be ruled out. A model in which the relativistic outflow is collimated (a jet) can account for the observed evolution of the synchrotron parameters, the rapid decay at optical wavelengths, and the observed radio to optical spectral flux distributions that we present here, provided that the jet transition has not been fully completed in the first two weeks after the event. These observations provide additional evidence that rapidly decaying optical/X-ray afterglows are due to jets and that such transitions either develop very slowly or perhaps never reach the predicted asymptotic decay F(t) \\propto t^{-p}.

  3. THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY. I. CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM AND BRIGHT NORTHERN STARS IN THE BLUE-VIOLET AT R {approx} 2500

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sota, A.; Maiz Apellaniz, J.; Alfaro, E. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Walborn, N. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Barba, R. H. [Instituto de Ciencias Astronomicas, de la Tierra y del Espacio, Casilla 467, 5400 San Juan (Argentina); Morrell, N. I. [Las Campanas Observatory, Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, La Serena (Chile); Gamen, R. C. [Instituto de Astrofisica de La Plata (CCT La Plata-CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata), Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Arias, J. I., E-mail: jmaiz@iaa.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first installment of a massive spectroscopic survey of Galactic O stars, based on new, high signal-to-noise ratio, R {approx} 2500 digital observations from both hemispheres selected from the Galactic O-Star Catalog of MaIz Apellaniz et al. and Sota et al. The spectral classification system is rediscussed and a new atlas is presented, which supersedes previous versions. Extensive sequences of exceptional objects are given, including types Ofc, ON/OC, Onfp, Of?p, Oe, and double-lined spectroscopic binaries. The remaining normal spectra bring this first sample to 184 stars, which is close to complete to B = 8 and north of {delta} = -20{sup 0} and includes all of the northern objects in MaIz Apellaniz et al. that are still classified as O stars. The systematic and random accuracies of these classifications are substantially higher than previously attainable, because of the quality, quantity, and homogeneity of the data and analysis procedures. These results will enhance subsequent investigations in Galactic astronomy and stellar astrophysics. In the future, we will publish the rest of the survey, beginning with a second paper that will include most of the southern stars in MaIz Apellaniz et al.

  4. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  5. First Detection of CO in a Low Surface Brightness Galaxy 1 Arecibo Observatory, NAIC/Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Karen

    /Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612 P. Hofner Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931 and Arecibo Observatory, NAIC/Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612 E. Schinnerer California Institute of Technology

  6. Surface modification of indium tin oxide by plasma treatment: An effective method to improve the efficiency, brightness, and reliability of organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface modification of indium tin oxide by plasma treatment: An effective method to improve; accepted for publication 7 January 1997 We demonstrate the improvement of an indium tin oxide anode contact conductivity, and effi- ciency as a hole injector into organic materials, indium tin oxide ITO has been widely

  7. Astron. Nachr. / AN 329, No. 7, 1 7 (2008) / DOI 10.1002/asna.2008xxxxx High-resolution observations of extremely bright penumbral grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -located with the cluster is displaced from the middle penumbra closer towards the umbra and that the radial outflow it is well known that about three quarters of the penum- bral grains move towards the umbra whereas

  8. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J. [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  10. Published in: Journal of Geophysical ResearchVOL.100E10 21,119--21,234, October 25, 1995. Low brightness temperatures of Martian Polar caps : CO 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    to the condensation of CO 2 in the atmosphere. We have used a combination of data analysis and modeling to compare to the frost point of CO 2 gas, CO 2 condenses, and polar ice caps are formed. The surface temperature which have directly condensed on the ground could have an emissivity close to unity and in any case much

  11. Published in: Journal of Geophysical ResearchVOL.100-E10 21,11921,234, October 25, 1995. Low brightness temperatures of Martian Polar caps : CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    to the condensation of CO¢ in the atmosphere. We have used a combination of data analysis and modeling to compare to the frost point of CO¤ gas, CO¤ condenses, and polar ice caps are formed. The surface temperature which have directly condensed on the ground could have an emissivity close to unity and in any case much

  12. On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearch &CEATOmar The U.S.On theOn

  13. Notice of Intent to Issue Funding Opportunity for Integrated PV and Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As solar power plants proliferate, the variability and uncertainty of the solar resource poses challenges for integrating PV with electric power systems at both the distribution and bulk system levels. In response to these challenges, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has issued a notice of intent (NOI) to release the SunShot Sustainable and Holistic IntegratioN of Energy storage and Solar (SHINES) funding opportunity. SHINES will enable the holistic design, development, and widespread sustainable deployment of low-cost, flexible, and reliable energy storage solutions, and will strive to successfully integrate these solutions into PV power plants. SHINES projects can also focus on demand response and load management to achieve target metrics.

  14. EXPLORING THE CENTRAL SUB-PARSEC REGION OF THE {gamma}-RAY BRIGHT RADIO GALAXY 3C 84 WITH VLBA AT 43 GHz IN THE PERIOD OF 2002-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Kenta [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Nagai, Hiroshi; Kino, Motoki; Kobayashi, Hideyuki [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kataoka, Jun [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Asada, Keiichi; Inoue, Makoto [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Doi, Akihiro [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Yoshinodai 3-1-1, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Orienti, Monica; Giovannini, Gabriele; Giroletti, Marcello [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Laehteenmaeki, Anne; Tornikoski, Merja; Leon-Tavares, Jonathan [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, FIN-02540 Kylmaelae (Finland); Bach, Uwe [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Kameno, Seiji [Faculty of Science, Kagoshima University, 1-21-35 Korimoto, Kagoshima 890-0065 (Japan)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the discovery of a new radio component right before the GeV {gamma}-ray detection since 2008 August by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, we present a detailed study of the kinematics and light curve on the central sub-parsec scale of 3C 84 using the archival Very Long Baseline Array 43 GHz data covering the period between 2002 January and 2008 November. We find that the new component 'C3', previously reported by the observations with the Very Long Baseline Interferometer Exploration of Radio Astrometry, was already formed in 2003. The flux density of C3 increases moderately until 2008, and then it becomes brighter rapidly after 2008. The radio core, C1, also shows a similar trend. The apparent speed of C3 with reference to the core C1 shows moderate acceleration from 0.10c to 0.47c between 2003 November and 2008 November, but is still sub-relativistic. We further try to fit the observed broadband spectrum by the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model using the measured apparent speed of C3. The fit can reproduce the observed {gamma}-ray emission, but does not agree with the observed radio spectral index between 22 and 43 GHz.

  15. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of the high-brightness Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) red phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Chengchun [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Yin Xin [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Huang Fuqiang, E-mail: huangfq@mail.sic.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Hang Yin, E-mail: yhang@siom.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of red-emitting phosphors Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) have been successfully synthesized at 850 Degree-Sign C by solid state reaction. The excitation spectra of the two phosphors reveal two strong excitation bands at 396 nm and 466 nm, respectively, which match well with the two popular emissions from near-UV and blue light-emitting diode chips. The intensity of the emission from {sup 5}D{sub 0} to {sup 7}F{sub 2} of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} phosphors with the optimal compositions of x=0.85 for Li or x=0.70 for Na is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. The quantum efficiencies of the entitled phosphors excited under 396 nm and 466 nm are also investigated and compared with commercial phosphors Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+} and Y{sub 3}A{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}. The experimental results indicate that the Eu{sup 3+}-doped M{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors are promising red-emitting phosphors pumped by near-UV and blue light. - Graphical Abstract: The intensity of the red emission of M{sub 2}(Gd{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}){sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7} (M=Li, Na) phosphors with the optimal compositions is about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two novel Eu{sup 3+}-doped red phosphors (Na{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}, Li{sub 2}Gd{sub 4}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 7}) were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their emission intensities are about five times higher than that of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Their quantum efficiencies are higher than that of commercial red phosphor Sr{sub 2}Si{sub 5}N{sub 8}:Eu{sup 2+}.

  16. The future is bright for chemists trained in the fundamentals of their disciplines, but fully capable of contributing at the cutting edge of modern interdisciplinary science. Enormous and diverse challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    -sufficiency and a reduced dependence on hydrocarbon-based fuels. Chemistry will always be central in solving these complex and discovery-based methods geared toward the identification of proteins, metal speciation, oligosaccharides

  17. Calibrating cosmological radiative transfer simulations with Lyman alpha forest data: Evidence for large spatial UV background fluctuations at z ~ 5.6 - 5.8 due to rare bright sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chardin, Jonathan; Aubert, Dominique; Puchwein, Ewald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calibrate here cosmological radiative transfer simulation with ATON/RAMSES with a range of measurements of the Lyman alpha opacity from QSO absorption spectra. We find the Lyman alpha opacity to be very sensitive to the exact timing of hydrogen reionisation. Models reproducing the measured evolution of the mean photoionisation rate and average mean free path reach overlap at z ~ 7 and predict an accelerated evolution of the Lyman alpha opacity at z > 6 consistent with the rapidly evolving luminosity function of Lyman alpha emitters in this redshift range. Similar to "optically thin" simulations our full radiative transfer simulations fail, however, to reproduce the high-opacity tail of the Lyman alpha opacity PDF at z > 5. We argue that this is due to spatial UV fluctuations in the post-overlap phase of reionisation on substantially larger scales than predicted by our source model, where the ionising emissivity is dominated by large numbers of sub-L* galaxies. We further argue that this suggests a signific...

  18. Surface plasmon polaritons locally excited on the ridges of metallic gratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Surface plasmon polaritons locally excited on the ridges of metallic gratings B. Wang*, and P the surface plasmon polaritons that are locally excited on the ridges (between the indentations) of metallic by an intuitive microscopic model that shines new light on the role of surface plasmons in the transmission

  19. Center for Biotechnology Prof. Dr.-Ing. Gerhard Sagerer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Ralf

    developed innovative new courses of study which attract gifted students from all over the world. The CeBiTec not only shines in the international world of science; it also has important cooperation partners in many such as the application of biofuels, and for new microscope techniques, to name just a few. The CeBiTec has continually

  20. 2014 Summer Housing Summer Housing dates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahon, Bradford Z.

    2014 Summer Housing FACT SHEET Summer Housing dates: May 19, 2014 August 9, 2014 "Rochester Shines in the Summer Time" Please read all of the information thoroughly. Once signed, your housing contract is binding. *We will begin accepting Summer Housing contracts Monday, April 7, 2014 GENERAL

  1. OFFICE OF COMMUNICATIONS PRESS RELEASE -MONDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    objects and processes at unprecedented speed and scale, the LCLS has embarked on groundbreaking research interacts with atoms and molecules. The LCLS is unique, shining light that can resolve detail the size to this kind of light before," said LCLS Director Jo Sthr. "The realization of the LCLS isn't only a huge

  2. WIND TOMOGRAPHY IN BINARY SYSTEMS O.Knill, R.Dgani and M.Vogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    WIND TOMOGRAPHY IN BINARY SYSTEMS O.Knill, R.Dgani and M.Vogel ETH-Zurich, CH-8092, Switzerland method is particularly suitable for determining the velocity laws of stellar winds. 1. WIND TOMOGRAPHY AND ABEL'S INTEGRAL Binary systems in which a compact, point-like radiation source shines through the wind

  3. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  4. The Long Way Home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawn, M.; Bennett, J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '. They have a CB, I think." Ray opened his mouth and then closed it. "See you in about an hour, Benny." Ray reached for the flashlight kept under the stove and clicked it on. Shining the light, he saw the newspaper racks and grabbed a handful. They came...

  5. Volume 10, No. 1 Decade of the Brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolbow, John

    Winter 2014 Volume 10, No. 1 SHINING A LIGHT ON BRAIN INJURY Decade of the Brain #12;ALSO of traumatic brain injury in children 14 "Hypoxia in a box" may reveal hidden concussion damage 18 Diabetes Clark, MSN'11, builds hope and health in Uganda Decade of the BRAIN #12;From 1990 through 2000, the U

  6. THE DISCOVERY OF www.sciam.com Updated from the April 2000 issue 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backer, Don

    by the thermonuclear radiation from hydrogen fusion; once it begins, the star's size and luminosity stay constant. A star shines because of the thermonuclear reactions in its core, which release enormous amounts of energy by fusing hy- drogen into helium. For the fusion reactions to oc- cur, though, the temperature

  7. Storing Renewable Energy in Chemical Bonds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helm, Monte; Bullock, Morris

    2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    With nearly 7 billion people, the world's population is demanding more electricity every year. Improved technologies are bringing wind and solar power to our electrical grid. However, wind turbines and solar panels only work when the wind blows or the sun shines. PNNL scientists discuss catalysis approaches for storing and releasing energy on demand.

  8. Stellar structure and Sterrenstelsels & Kosmos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    ,Why does the Sun shine? 2 #12;Gravitational energy Can the Sun power itself just by releasing energy from long can this gravitational potential energy power the Sun? The Sun is losing energy from its surface source is gravitational potential energy 8 #12; This is 20 million years... ...but we know the Sun has

  9. argentina preliminary results: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    argentina preliminary results First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Delaware Will Shine...

  10. 4 Scienq &aFeature Released upon receipt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that moonlight i s favorable t o the occurrence of frosts, of the air, but the moon cannot shine unless the sky is clear, and a clear Sky at night permits rapid loss of heat from the earth by radiationo The chilled is that there are strong minds overhead, which may eventually blow at the earthrs surface. The common halo or luminous ring

  11. Volume 130, Number 16 tech.mit.edu Friday, April 2, 2010 Oldest and Largest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Hiroshi

    of the health reform bill have yet to be felt, the passage of the bill shined a hard light on health care who has worked extensively with Democrats on health care reform. "The U.S. government now takes health's conse- quences by conducting new research and looking for new ways to fix health care ineffi- ciencies

  12. Global warming and its implications for conservation. 3. How does it work? Part two: atmospheric science and the layer model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    that energy comes in from the sun and shines back out to space as IR. The main points are: 1. The outflow of IR energy from a planet must balance heating from the sun. 2. The planet accomplishes this balance warms the surface of the planet as it moves toward an equilibrium of energy fluxes in and out. The layer

  13. New High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    much of each gets made. Water to Burn RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES, SUCH AS WIND AND SOLAR POWER, have plenty going for them. They're abundant and carbon-free, and their prices are dropping. But they're part-timers. Even when the sun is shining and the wind is blowing, there is no good way to store excess electricity

  14. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 7, 39573968, 2007 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/7/3957/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information on many climate, chemical and dynamical processes. The accurate measurements of the water-by-line ra- diative transfer model and an inversion procedure based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM of ozone destruction, chlorine activation, denitrifica- tion and methane decomposition (Forster and Shine

  15. Published: September 13, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 1601 dx.doi.org/10.1021/tx200316x |Chem. Res. Toxicol. 2011, 24, 16011609

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    applica- tions including fire-fighting foam, additives in self-shine floor polishes, cement, lubricants, and oil repellants in food packages.1 Two classes of perfluor- oalkyl chemicals that are commonly measured effects, tumorigenesis, developmental toxicity, and immunotoxicity,4?6 there remains considerable interest

  16. Danny Byrd Controlling Lights with PWM and Motion Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kachroo, Pushkin

    been used to save power by turning off a light when no motion is detected for many decades now. Just a machine that will taper down the power consumption as time goes by, saving energy by the second to shine will slowly slowed, saving energy in the meantime. Though it will not be a huge save in energy

  17. Reversed Doppler Effect in Photonic Crystals Evan J. Reed,* Marin Soljacic, and John D. Joannopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soljai, Marin

    Reversed Doppler Effect in Photonic Crystals Evan J. Reed,* Marin Soljacic, and John D, 42.79.Hp, 42.79.Jq, 47.40.Nm In 1843, Johann Christian Doppler proposed an effect whereby of extrasolar planets. The Doppler effect predicts that light shined by an ob- server onto an object moving

  18. Magnetotransport in low dimensional semiconductor structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Gil-Ho

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    bias to the gate, one may capacitively induce carriers into the 2DEG. The carrier density in a GaAs-AIGaAs heterostructure, at low temper ature, can also be enhanced by shining an red light emitting diode (LED) onto the device. This has the effect...

  19. This is a typical amateur-astronomer's green laser pointer, shown with a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Joshua Edward

    arrested the preceding week after allegedly shining a green laser at a private jet on approach to a nearby airport and then at a police helicopter dispatched to search for the culprit. According to the criminal on the Use ... 8/19/10 9:32 AM http://www.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=S... 1 of 5 #12

  20. LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE The Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    is the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The LCLS's highly focused beam, which arrives in staccato bursts one-rays are scientists' best tool for probing matter on the atomic scale, and the LCLS is an x-ray source unlike any before. Shining a billion times brighter than previous X-ray sources, the LCLS probes matter in new ways