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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters, R. A. Feely, and R. M. Key (2006), Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity 35)2 + d (SST Ã? 20) + e (SST Ã? 20)2 fits surface total alkalinity (AT) data for each of five

2

A particulate non-specific alkaline phosphatase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dennis J. Opheim A previously undefined alkaline phosphatase in yeast, which is particulate, has been found. This latter form has no mobil- ity on polyacrylamide gels and can be sedimented after centri- fugation at 200, 000 x g for one hour. Over 90X... of the enzyme activity can be solubilized from the particulate fraction with 100 mM sodium cholate. In the solubilized state this enzyme has been found to migrate in the same position on polyacrylamide gels as the already known soluble repressible alkaline...

Mitchell, James Kent

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SAND CONSOLIDATION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE ALKALINE SOLUTION A Thesis by FIDEL ENRIQUE MORENO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2000 Malor Subject: Petroleum Engmeering EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF SAND CONSOLIDATION USING HIGH- TEMPERATURE ALKALINE SOLUTION A Thesis by FIDEL ENRIQUE MORENO ROMERO Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

2013-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Anodes for alkaline electrolysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Supplementary Information: Estimation of Pfs Specific Activity Materials. Mouse anti-polyhistidine and goat anti-mouse IgG conjugated to alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). This was done by connecting the cathode and anode (nickel chromium wire) using alligator clips to a DC power. Estimations of Pfs specific activity. Pfs-chitosan conjugate was prepared and electrodeposited onto different

Rubloff, Gary W.

7

The effect of alkaline agents on retention of EOR chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a literature survey on how alkaline agents reduce losses of surfactants and polymers in oil recovery by chemical injection. Data are reviewed for crude sulfonates, clean anionic surfactants, nonionic surfactants, and anionic and nonionic polymers. The role of mineral chemistry is briefly described. Specific effects of various alkaline anions are discussed. Investigations needed to improve the design of alkaline-surfactant-polymer floods are suggested. 62 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

Lorenz, P.B.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alkaline flooding injection strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Wide-band-gap, alkaline-earth-oxide semiconductor and devices utilizing same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to novel and comparatively inexpensive semiconductor devices utilizing semiconducting alkaline-earth-oxide crystals doped with alkali metal. The semiconducting crystals are produced by a simple and relatively inexpensive process. As a specific example, a high-purity lithium-doped MgO crystal is grown by conventional techniques. The crystal then is heated in an oxygen-containing atmosphere to form many [Li].degree. defects therein, and the resulting defect-rich hot crystal is promptly quenched to render the defects stable at room temperature and temperatures well above the same. Quenching can be effected conveniently by contacting the hot crystal with room-temperature air.

Abraham, Marvin M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chen, Yok (Oak Ridge, TN); Kernohan, Robert H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alkalinity tolerance of peach rootstocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 ABSTRACT Alkalinity Tolerance of Peach Rootstocks. (May 1992) Yan Shi, B. S. , Fujian Agricultural College Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David H. Byrne Peaches suffer from Fe chlorosis when grown in alkaline soils. A range of alkalinity... could be assessed by leaf visual-chlorosis rating and Sped-502 reading instead of extractable leaf-chlorophyll concentration or leaf Fe concentration. Some modifications were suggested for the future evaluation. Bicarbonate was a major factor which...

Shi, Yan

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Steady state temperature profiles in two simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature data from steady state tests in two parallel, simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications have been compared to determine the extent to which they agree. In general, good agreement was found in data at low flows and in bundle-center data at higher flows. Discrepancies in the data wre noted near the bundle edges at higher flows. An analysis of bundle thermal boundary conditions showed that the possible eccentric placement of one bundle within the housing could account for these discrepancies.

Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geosynthetic clay liners in alkaline environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) as secondary barrier layers in environmental applications such as landfills and other impoundment facilities is becoming increasingly more popular among the engineering community, particularly at project sites where earthen materials suitable for barrier layers may not be locally available. Design engineers for these environmental applications are becoming well versed at performing equivalency calculations comparing the performance of geosynthetic materials to their earthen counterparts. For barrier layers, these equivalency calculations would normally compare the mechanical and hydraulic properties of the GCL to a compacted clay liner. Of these properties, the ability of the hydraulic properties to withstand degradation due to permeation of contained leachates is of prominent concern. Such is the case in alkaline environments. The leachate may adversely affect the GCL by minimizing swelling, decreasing adsorption capacity and increasing the permeability of the material. If the effect on the material is significant, the usefulness of this product is diminished, possibly voiding any equivalency comparison to compacted clay liner performance. The design engineer must fully understand what effect, if any, specific leachates will have on the GCL being considered. Accordingly, appropriate performance testing with the leachate in question must be performed during the design phase and confirmed during construction through quality assurance testing. This paper will present the design considerations, required laboratory testing and conformance tests for a recent project that contained an alkaline leachate. Through appropriate testing, a contaminant resistant GCL was shown to possess desired hydraulic properties in the presence of the alkaline leachate.

McKelvey, J.A. III [Roy F. Weston, Inc., West Chester, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

Wilson, David B. (Ithaca, NY); Lao, Guifang (Bethesda, MD)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Development of alkaline fuel cells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Horan, James L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Caire, Benjamin R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Ziegler, Zachary C. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Herring, Andrew M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Yang, Yuan [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Robson, Michael H. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Artyushkova, Kateryna [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Patterson, Wendy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C4, supplment au n" 4, Tome 40, avril 1979, page C4-140 Low temperature specific heat of rocksalt thorium compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature specific heat of rocksalt thorium compounds V. Maurice, J. L. Boutard C) and D. Abbe ( n ) SESI with vacancy content in ThC,^x and is minimal for ThC06N04 compared to ThC and ThN. 1. Introduction. -- Thorium://dx.doi.org/10.1051/jphyscol:1979445 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE SPECIFIC HEAT OF ROCKSALT THORIUM COMPOUNDS C4-141 have

Boyer, Edmond

22

Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Photoluminescence Properties of Alkaline-Earth Oxide Nanoparticles. Abstract: Previous experiments have demonstrated that...

23

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

Singh, David Joseph

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Investigation of Temperature Dependent Optical Modes in GexAs35-xSe65 Thin Films: Structure Specific Raman, FIR and Optical Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present a comprehensive study of temperature and composition dependent Raman spectroscopy of GexAs35-xSe65 thin films to understand different structural units responsible for optical properties. Strikingly, our experimental results uncover the ratio of GeSe4/2 tetrahedral and AsSe3/2 pyramidal units in GexAs35-xSe65 thin films and their linear scaling relationship with temperature and x. An important notable outcome of our study is the formation of Se8 rings at lower temperatures. Our experimental results further provide interesting optical features, thermally and compositionally tunable optical absorption spectra. Detailed structure specific FIR data at room temperature also present direct information on the structural units in consistent with Raman data. We foresee that our studies are useful in determining the lightinduced response of these films and also for their potential applications in optics and optoelectronics.

Khan, Pritam; Joshy, Abin; Sathe, Vasant; Deshpande, Uday; Adarsh, K V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Study of the dependence of the specific output power of a copper chloride laser on the radial temperature profile of a gas plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a copper chloride laser is described, and the laser is optimised by studying the dependence of its output power on the buffer gas type. The voltage and current of the laser discharge at the optimum buffer gas pressure are measured. The influence of the diaphragm diameter on the specific output power is studied after optimisation of switch parameters. When an diaphragm producing the optimal temperature gradient in the laser gas-discharge tube, the record specific output power of 123 W L{sup -1} is obtained without any admixtures. (lasers)

Sadighi-Bonabi, R; Mohammadpour, R; Tavakoli, M [Physics Department, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltanmoradi, F [Bonab Research Center, Bonab, Azerbaijan province (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zand, M [Laser Research Center, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth atoms Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Noble metals 12;18 C.3. Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals 12;19 Elements: Ca, Sr, Ba (Be... . Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals bands...

30

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth metal Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Noble metals 12;18 C.3. Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals 12;19 Elements: Ca, Sr, Ba (Be... . Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline ... Source: del Barco,...

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth metal compounds Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Noble metals 12;18 C.3. Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals 12;19 Elements: Ca, Sr, Ba (Be... . Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline ... Source: del Barco,...

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth metals pt Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Noble metals 12;18 C.3. Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals 12;19 Elements: Ca, Sr, Ba (Be... . Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline ... Source: del Barco,...

33

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth metal ions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. Noble metals 12;18 C.3. Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline earth metals 12;19 Elements: Ca, Sr, Ba (Be... . Alkaline earth metalsC.3. Alkaline ... Source: del Barco,...

34

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and OverviewInnovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and Overview Innovation for Our Energy Future Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory AMFC Workshop May 8, 2011 Innovation...

37

alkaline ph alter: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in magnitude and are often opposite in direction. It was also found that during Clyde Marshall; Leslie; F. Nims 37 Subcellular localization of marine bacterial alkaline...

38

alkaline nuclear wastes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: -solid waste for CO2 mitigation and reduction of greenhouse effect gases into the atmosphere. ? 2008 ElsevierCarbonation of alkaline paper mill...

39

alkaline nuclear waste: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geosciences Websites Summary: -solid waste for CO2 mitigation and reduction of greenhouse effect gases into the atmosphere. ? 2008 ElsevierCarbonation of alkaline paper mill...

40

DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80?C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO{sub 2}, and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

Fox, E.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ORIGINAL PAPER Recognition of early Carboniferous alkaline granite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Recognition of early Carboniferous alkaline granite in the southern Altai orogen for the Bulgen alkaline granite yield crystallization ages of 358 ± 4 Ma (SHRIMP) and 354 ± 4 Ma (LA-orogenic granitoids (460­375 Ma) in this region. The Bulgen granite has high SiO2, total alkalis, rare earth elements

Siebel, Wolfgang

42

alkaline earth metals: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth metals First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Effects of Alkaline Earth Metal...

43

alkaline earth compound: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth compound First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantum computing with alkaline...

44

alkaline earth metallic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth metallic First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Effects of Alkaline Earth Metal...

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced alkaline water Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline water Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced alkaline water Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Net alkalinity and net acidity...

46

MODELING AN ION EXCHANGE PROCESS FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM ALKALINE RADIOACTIVE WASTE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The performance of spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde ion-exchange resin for the removal of cesium from alkaline radioactive waste solutions has been investigated through computer modeling. Cesium adsorption isotherms were obtained by fitting experimental data using a thermodynamic framework. Results show that ion-exchange is an efficient method for cesium removal from highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions. On average, two 1300 liter columns operating in series are able to treat 690,000 liters of waste with an initial cesium concentration of 0.09 mM in 11 days achieving a decontamination factor of over 50,000. The study also tested the sensitivity of ion-exchange column performance to variations in flow rate, temperature and column dimensions. Modeling results can be used to optimize design of the ion exchange system.

Smith, F; Luther Hamm, L; Sebastian Aleman, S; Johnston Michael, J

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

47

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplment au n" 8, Tome 39, aot 1978, page C6-982 PHONON SCATTERING AND THE LINEAR SPECIFIC HEAT TERM IN EPOXY-RESINS AT LOW TEMPERATURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCATTERING AND THE LINEAR SPECIFIC HEAT TERM IN EPOXY-RESINS AT LOW TEMPERATURES S. Kelham and H.M. Rosenberg. Abstract.- The specific heat and the thermal conductivity of an epoxy--resin has been measured from 0 on the thermal conductivity and speci- fic heat of an epoxy-resin in the range 0.1 to 80 K in which

Boyer, Edmond

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline massif kola Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ultramafic-alkaline complex in the Kola Alkaline Prov- ince, northwestern Russia. This work continues... supports a close affinity between CAPR and carbonatitic rocks...

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline pluton kola Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ultramafic-alkaline complex in the Kola Alkaline Prov- ince, northwestern Russia. This work continues... supports a close affinity between CAPR and carbonatitic rocks...

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth chlorides Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of the alkaline earth cations, magnesium, calcium, and barium on the dissolution kinetics of quartz PATRICIAM... and alkaline earth cations in near-neutralpH solutions. We...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth metal cations Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K. (2002): A novel group of alkaline earth metal amides: synthesis... ): Not just heavy "Grignards": Recent advances in the organometallic chemistry of the alkaline earth...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth cations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the cation (alkaline, rare earth... to the cation size. Knowing that the size of rare earth elements and alkaline cations decreases in the following... of results on tungstate...

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth isotopes Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that laser light could Summary: to alkaline elements, even isotopes of alkaline earth elements do not possess nuclear spin, and therefore do... temper- ature limits achievable by...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth lithium Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the cation (alkaline, rare earth... to the cation size. Knowing that the size of rare earth elements and alkaline cations decreases in the following... of results on tungstate...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline fluids released Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels 6 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: alkalinity. HCO3 is normally the dominant anion. Sr isotope ratios from...

57

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline hydrothermal reaction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 13 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: alkalinity. HCO3 is normally the dominant anion. Sr isotope ratios from...

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline intermediate level Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy 24 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal...

59

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

60

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

Hsu, C.L.W.

1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

Hsu, Chia-lin W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

alkaline massif se: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

64

alkaline hydrothermal vent: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

65

alkaline phosphatase activities: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

66

african alkaline fermentedfood: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

67

alkaline phosphatase activity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

68

alkaline phosphatase-conjugated oligonucleotide: Topics by E...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

69

alkaline complex south: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

70

alkaline province located: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline fusion process is used from waste phosphors. 1. Introduction The recycling of rare earths is of importance for helping for recycling Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ (BMA)...

71

Alkaline Leaching of Key, Non-Radioactive Components from Simulants and Hanford Tank Sludge 241-S-110: Results of FY01 Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study addressed three aspects in selected alkaline leaching: first, the use of oxidants persulfate, permanganate, and ferrate as selective chromium-leaching agents from washed Hanford Tank S-110 solids under varying conditions of hydroxide concentration, temperature, and time was investigated. Second, the selective dissolution of solids containing mercury(II) oxide under alkaline conditions was examined. Various compounds were studied for their effectiveness in dissolving mercury under varying conditions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration in the leachate. Three compounds were studied: cysteine, iodide, and diethyldithiophosphoric acid (DEDTPA). Finally, the possibility of whether an oxidant bound to an anion-exchange resin can be used to effectively oxidize chromium(III) in alkaline solutions was addressed. The experimental results remain ambiguous to date; further work is required to reach any definitive conclusions as to the effectiveness of this approach.

Rapko, Brian M.; Vienna, John D.; Sinkov, Serguei I.; Kim, Jinseong; Cisar, Alan J.

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO{sub 3}, quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite.

Kruger, A.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Advanced Cement-Based Materials] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Increase in the Export of Alkalinity from North America's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be fluvially exported. The fluvial export of terrestrial alkalinity is also the major source of oceanic bicarbonate or car- bonate through the weathering of the parent rock material, and the hydrologic cycle trans delivery can alter the export rates of elements with a weathering source (4). It has recently been shown

Berkowitz, Alan R.

76

alkaline earth compounds: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alkaline earth compounds First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Quantum computing with...

77

Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment Will Mayes1 & Jon · Circum-neutral pH, high Fe concentrations Treatment wetlands and post-industrial pollution Taff Merthyr The basis for treatment wetlands · `Volunteer' wetlands · pH 12 lime spoil leachate · pH 12 steel slag

Heal, Kate

78

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth metal complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speciation of REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... (HA) 3-5. By contrast, in alkaline waters with high ... Source: Ecole...

79

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth complexes Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

speciation of REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... (HA) 3-5. By contrast, in alkaline waters with high ... Source: Ecole...

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth elements studied Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline-earth elements studied Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Heavy Alkaline-earth Elements: Barium and Radium...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline hot springs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: investigated, source of river solutes and alkalinity. Active hot springs are...

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline siliceous hot Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: is the fraction of the total hot spring alkalinity derived from silicate...

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline single cell Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

aqueous-alkaline biocarbon fuel cell. In view of the fact... that aqueous-alkaline hydrogen fuel cells have been used to power an Austin car and a commercial Black Cab... in...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline melts beneath Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

et al. 2001), mac alkaline magmas... , it is not coincident that the mac rock at Bingham Canyon is alkaline (Waite et al. 1997) and the basaltic mac melt... specia- tion...

85

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL of this work was to investigate the mineralogy of smectites in the soils surrounding a representative alkaline

Ahmad, Sajjad

86

Low-to-moderate temperature geothermal resource assessment for Nevada, area specific studies. Final report, June 1, 1980-August 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hawthorne study area is located in Mineral County, Nevada and surrounds the municipality of the same name. It encompasses an area of approximately 310 sq. km (120 sq. mi), and most of the land belongs to the US Army Ammunition Plant. The energy needs of the military combined with those of the area population (over 5,000 residents) are substantial. The area is classified as having a high potential for direct applications using the evaluation scheme described in Texler and others (1979). A variety of scientific techniques was employed during area-wide resource assessment. General geologic studies demonstrate the lithologic diversity in the area; these studies also indicate possible sources for dissolved fluid constituents. Geophysical investigations include aero-magnetic and gravity surveys which aid in defining the nature of regional, and to a lesser extent, local variations in subsurface configurations. Surface and near-surface structural features are determined using various types of photo imagery including low sun-angle photography. An extensive shallow depth temperature probe survey indicates two zones of elevated temperature on opposite sides of the Walker Lake basin. Temperature-depth profiles from several wells in the study area indicate significant thermal fluid-bearing aquifers. Fluid chemical studies suggest a wide spatial distribution for the resource, and also suggest a meteoric recharge source in the Wassuk Range. Finally, a soil-mercury survey was not a useful technique in this study area. Two test holes were drilled to conclude the area resource assessment, and thermal fluids were encountered in both wells. The western well has measured temperatures as high as 90 C (194 F) within 150 meters (500 ft) of the surface. Temperature profiles in this well indicate a negative temperature gradient below 180 meters (590 ft). The eastern hole had a bottom hole temperature of 61 C (142 F) at a depth of only 120 meters (395 ft). A positive gradient is observed to a total depth in the well. Several conclusions are drawn from this study: the resource is distributed over a relatively large area; resource fluid temperatures can exceed 90 C (194 F), but are probably limited to a maximum of 125 C (257 F); recharge to the thermal system is meteoric, and flow of the fluids in the near surface (< 500 m) is not controlled by faults; heat supplied to the system may be related to a zone of partially melted crustal rocks in the area 25 km (15 mi) south of Hawthorne. Four papers and an introduction are included. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper. (MHR)

Trexler, D.T.; Koenig, B.A.; Flynn, T.; Bruce, J.L.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline phosphatase selective Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phosphatase activity is strongly... compounds. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: biosensor; algae; Chlorella; alkaline phosphatase; fluorescence; heavy metals... ; Rechnitz and Ho, 1990). This...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline phosphatase phok Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phosphatase activity is strongly... compounds. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: biosensor; algae; Chlorella; alkaline phosphatase; fluorescence; heavy metals... ; Rechnitz and Ho, 1990). This...

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline phosphatase produced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phosphatase activity is strongly... compounds. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: biosensor; algae; Chlorella; alkaline phosphatase; fluorescence; heavy metals... ; Rechnitz and Ho, 1990). This...

90

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline phosphatase Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phosphatase activity is strongly... compounds. KKeeyywwoorrddss:: biosensor; algae; Chlorella; alkaline phosphatase; fluorescence; heavy metals... ; Rechnitz and Ho, 1990). This...

91

Author's personal copy Performance of an alkaline-acid direct ethanol fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Performance of an alkaline-acid direct ethanol fuel cell L. An, T.S. Zhao ethanol fuel cell Alkaline-acid Species concentrations Membrane thickness Power density a b s t r a c t This paper reports on the performance of an alkaline-acid direct ethanol fuel cell (AA-DEFC) that is composed

Zhao, Tianshou

92

Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform Fikile R of hydrogen H2 and oxygen O2 . Operating fuel cells in alkaline media, as opposed to acidic media, has on an alkaline microfluidic fuel cell for catalyst and electrode characterization. Its constantly refreshing

Kenis, Paul J. A.

93

Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Baudry, Michelle (Le Pontaroux, FR)

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

95

Probing the Kondo Lattice Model with Alkaline Earth Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study transport properties of alkaline-earth atoms governed by the Kondo Lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

Michael Foss-Feig; Michael Hermele; Ana Maria Rey

2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Steady-state superradiance with alkaline earth atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth-alkaline-like atoms with ultra-narrow transitions open the door to a new regime of cavity quantum electrodynamics. That regime is characterized by a critical photon number that is many orders of magnitude smaller than what can be achieved in conventional systems. We show that it is possible to achieve superradiance in steady state with such systems. We discuss the basic underlying mechanisms as well as the key experimental requirements

D. Meiser; M. J. Holland

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Tuning the Curie temperature of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt thin films through site-specific substitution of Rh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In structurally ordered magnetic thin films, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic films depends on the exchange integral of the short range ordered neighboring atoms. The exchange integral may be adjusted by controlling the elemental substitutional concentration at the lattice site of interest. We show how to control the T{sub C} in high anisotropy L1{sub 0} Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} magnetic thin films by substituting Rh into the Pt site. Rh substitution in L1{sub 0} FePt modified the local atomic environment and the corresponding electronic properties, while retaining the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The analysis of extended x-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra shows that Rh uniformly substitutes for Pt in L1{sub 0} FePt. A model of antiferromagnetic defects caused by controlled Rh substitution of the Pt site, reducing the T{sub C,} is proposed to interpret this phenomenon and its validity is further examined by ab initio density functional calculations.

Xu, Dongbin, E-mail: dongbin.xu@seagate.com [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Sun, Cheng-Jun, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Heald, Steve M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, Gan Moog, E-mail: cjsun@aps.anl.gov, E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Zhou, Tie-Jun [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore); Bergman, Anders; Sanyal, Biplab [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub X} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub X} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the previous semi-annual technical progress report (April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001). During the current reporting period, additional balance of plant impact information was determined for one of the two tests. These additional balance-of-plant results are presented and discussed in this report. There was no other technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed.

Gary M. Blythe

2002-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

Gary M. Blythe

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline peroxide pretreated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grant Western Regional Center Summary: performed tests on Douglas fir and hybrid poplar biomass to identify the effect of pretreatment conditions... of alkaline elements and a...

102

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth dihalide molecules Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline-earth dihalide molecules Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Vibrational signatures of zwitterionic...

103

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline hypersaline mono Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eng KineretDataCenterProfileDC.asp) and its lake sediments are also alkaline (Stiller and ... Source: Yager, Patricia L. - Department of Marine Sciences, University of...

104

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline dust impact Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chem. Phys., 10, 39994012, 2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: in terms of accumulation of nitrate and sulfate, titration of dust alkalinity, and impact on...

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline secondary cell Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

batteries within AUVs Summary: that secondary lithium batteries offer the lowest energy cost. PEM fuel cells should produce energy at a lower... alkaline and several primary...

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline medium peliculas Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

rate: medium Texture: medium Foliage Leaf arrangement: alternate (Fig... requirement: tree grows in full sun Soil tolerances: clay; loam; sand; slightly alkaline; acidic;...

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth transition Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

various alkaline cations in order... to the cation size. Knowing that the size of rare earth elements and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection:...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali alkaline earth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Waterloo Collection: Chemistry 2 GEOL 305 Lecture 5 Felsic MaficIntermediate Summary: rare rhyolite Calc-alkaline and tholeiite basalts common, with less alkali basalt Mafic...

109

Design and development in the field of alkaline fuel cell technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis is about the research on alkaline fuel cell (AFC) technology to investigate the long term operation with air. The aim was to… (more)

Schudt, Steffen, (Thesis)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline thermal spring Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biotechnology 2 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: estimate that the springs provide 25 (15)% of the silicate-derived...

111

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth silicate Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 7 Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Summary: estimate that the springs provide 25 (15)% of the silicate-derived...

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline band formation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization ; Chemistry 51 Residual alkalinity as tracer to...

113

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline solution structure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

added alkaline ethanol solutions have been ... Source: Zhao, Tianshou - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Collection: Energy...

114

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline direct alcohol Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Oxford Collection: Mathematics ; Biology and Medicine 2 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell System Break-Out Session Summary: and reliability Advanced reformer (for alcohol...

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth hafnates bahfo3 Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

apply the ab initio... of hafnium silicates (see e.g. Ref. 17). Perov- skite alkaline metal ... Source: Curtarolo, Stefano - Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials...

116

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline nitrate solutions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2010 www.atmos-chem-phys.net1039992010 Summary: . The model in- cludes explicit transport of size-resolved mineral dust and its alkalinity, nitrate... in terms of...

117

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline soils Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the results were compared to alkalinity ... Source: Kirby, Carl S. - Department of Geology, Bucknell University Collection: Geosciences 49 Remediation of uranium...

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline oxidizing conditions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

highly alkaline conditions. This discovery ... Source: Bethke, Craig - Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

119

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly to be used in a Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell (SAFC) needs to (i) be insoluble in both aqueous solutions,10% > 320 °C). When used in a fuel cell as a binder in the membrane-electrodes assembly (MEA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell S 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell Pt reserved. 1. Introduction In terms of fuel, a direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) is more attractive than

Zhao, Tianshou

123

Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

124

Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing-electrolyte alkaline fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing- electrolyte alkaline fuel cell Fikile R 17 October 2011 Accepted 18 October 2011 Available online 12 November 2011 Keywords: Alkaline fuel cell Electrode characterization X-ray micro-computed tomography Microfluidic fuel cell Carbonates a b

Kenis, Paul J. A.

125

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions Romain Available online 8 March 2012 Keywords: A1. Mineral replacement rate A1. Serpentinization A1. TG analyses B1. Alkaline medium B2. Chrysotile nanotubes a b s t r a c t Olivine mineral replacement by serpentine is one

Montes-Hernandez, German

127

Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high1 alkaline conditions2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high1 alkaline conditions2 3.1016/j.jcrysgro.2012.02.040 #12;2 Abstract16 Olivine mineral replacement by serpentine is one major replaced by18 chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions. In our study, olivine replacement19

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

128

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding with weak alkalis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Project BE4B in FY90 was to develop cost-effective and efficient chemical flooding formulations using surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemical systems. Chemical systems were studied that mitigate the deleterious effects of divalent ions. The experiments were conducted with carbonate mixtures and carbonate/phosphate mixtures of pH 10.5, where most of the phosphate ions exist as the monohydrogen phosphate species. Orthophosphate did not further reduce the deleterious effect of divalent ions on interfacial tension behavior in carbonate solutions, where the deleterious effect of the divalent ions is already very low. When added to a carbonate mixture, orthophosphate did substantially reduce the adsorption of an atomic surfactant, which was an expected result; however, there was no correlation between the amount of reduction and the divalent ion levels. For acidic oils, a variety of surfactants are available commercially that have potential for use between pH 8.3 and pH 9.5. Several of these surfactants were tested with oil from Wilmington (CA) field and found to be suitable for use in that field. Two low-acid crude oils, with acid numbers of 0.01 and 0.27 mg KOH/g of oil, were studied. It was shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding does have merit for use with these low-acid crude oils. However, each low-acid oil tested was found to behave differently, and it was concluded that the applicability of the method must be experimentally determined for any given low-acid crude oil. 19 refs., 10 figs. 4 tabs.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Commissioning Specifications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Commissioning specifications outline basic requirements of the commissioning process and detail the roles and responsibilities of each party involved. System checklists, startup requirements, and...

130

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding in the swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to the naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of the injected solution bypasses the target pore space containing oil. The objective of this work is to investigate whether combining these two technologies could broaden the applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium--polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 9.2 to 12.9.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qui; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta III b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net alkalinity and net acidity 2: Practical considerations Carl S. Kirby a,*, Charles A. Cravotta of the sample. The Hot Acidity directly measures net acidity (=Ã?net alkalinity). Samples that had near-neutral p in their alkalinities and dissolved Fe, Mn, and Al concentrations. Hot Acidity was approximately equal to net acidity

Kirby, Carl S.

132

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Improvement of thermoelectric properties of alkaline-earth hexaborides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermoelectric (TE) and transport properties of alkaline-earth hexaborides were examined to investigate the possibility of improvement in their TE performance. As carrier concentration increased, electrical conductivity increased and the absolute value of the Seebeck coefficient decreased monotonically, while carrier mobility was almost unchanged. These results suggest that the electrical properties of the hexaboride depend largely on carrier concentration. Thermal conductivity of the hexaboride was higher than 10 W/m K even at 1073 K, which is relatively high among TE materials. Alloys of CaB{sub 6} and SrB{sub 6} were prepared in order to reduce lattice thermal conductivity. Whereas the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity of the alloys were intermediate between those of CaB{sub 6} and SrB{sub 6} single phases, the thermal conductivities of the alloys were lower than those of both single phases. The highest TE performance was obtained in the vicinity of Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}B{sub 6}, indicating that alloying is effective in improving the performance. - Graphical abstract: Thermoelectric figure-of-merit, ZT, for (Ca,Sr)B{sub 6} alloys. The highest ZT value of 0.35 at 1073 K was obtained due to effective reduction of thermal conductivity by alloying.

Takeda, Masatoshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@mech.nagaokaut.ac.jp; Terui, Manabu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Takahashi, Norihito [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan); Ueda, Noriyoshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Novel alkaline earth copper germanates with ferro and antiferromagnetic S=1/2 chains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new alkaline earth copper(II) germanates were hydrothermally synthesized: CaCuGeO4 center dot H2O (1) and BaCu2Ge3O9 center dot H2O (2), and their structures determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound (1) crystallizes in space group P2(1)/c with a=5.1320(2) angstrom, b=16.1637(5) angstrom, c=5.4818(2) angstrom, beta=102.609(2)degrees, V=443.76(3) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This copper germanate contains layers of composition [CuGeO4](infinity)(2-) comprising CuO4 square planes and GeO4 tetrahedra with calcium and water molecules in the inter-layer space. Compound (2) crystallizes in the Cmcm space group with a=5.5593(3) angstrom, b=10.8606(9) angstrom, c=13.5409(8) angstrom, V=817.56(9) angstrom(3) and Z=4. This structure contains GeO6 and CuO6 octahedra as well as GeO4 tetrahedra, forming a three-dimensional network of interconnecting six-membered ring channels. The magnetic susceptibility for both samples can be interpreted as S=1/2 chains, in agreement with the copper topology observed in the crystal structure. The susceptibility of (1) exhibits a Bonner-Fisher type behavior, resulting from antiferromagnetic intra-chain interactions without three-dimensional ordering down to 5 K-the lowest measured temperature. This observation, together with the absence of super-exchange paths between the copper chains, make this system particularly promising for the study of low dimensional magnetism. The magnetic properties of (2) show a very weak ferromagnetic near-neighbor interaction along the chain. In this compound a peak the chi T plot seems to indicate the onset of interchain antiferromagentic correlations. However, no ordering temperature is detected in the susceptibility data.

Brandao, Paula [University of Aveiro, Portugal; Reis, Mario S [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brasil; Gai, Zheng [ORNL; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline ph jump Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health Summary: total alkalinity, the pH is unstable, and therefore you would have dramatic jumps in pH from...

137

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkalinity bicarbonate rejection Sample...  

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By Elton Roberts Ripon, CA Summary: to bicarbonate in the water. Dropping the pH of the water leads to a decrease in the water alkalinity. The sole... is caused by the presence of...

138

Electrochemical reduction of nitrates and nitrites in alkaline media in the presence of hexavalent chromium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, SC, approximately 35 million gallons of highly ra- dioactive waste has be operated on a continuous basis. Keywords: alkaline media, electrochemical reduction, hexavalent chromium

Weidner, John W.

139

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline water treatment Sample Search...  

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and severity. Bogoria an alkaline saline, Rift Valley Lake at one time fresh water... rainwater was used in the dilution. Four treatments (100%vv lake water, 50%vv lake...

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline phosphatase predicts Sample Search...  

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results for: alkaline phosphatase predicts Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 In Silico Biology 5, 0034 (2005); 2005, Bioinformation Systems e.V. A new domain family in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline assisted thermal Sample Search...  

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. Adam Ray, Matt Van de Bogert, and Carl Johnson for technical assistance; and M. Stiller for providing... and alkalinity (HCO and CO ), calcite dissolution,2 3 3 and methane...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline cacl2 solutions Sample Search...  

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cacl2 solutions Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline cacl2 solutions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 pH Effects on the structure of...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline internal ph Sample Search Results  

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ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: Islam, M. R. Summary: enhanced oil recovery (EOR) schemes. Alkaline water flooding is an old recovery process in which pH... acidic oil...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline spring system Sample Search Results  

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flowers in the spring. It is also quite drought and alkaline soil tolerant... of soil pH. Care: Prune only in summer. Winter or spring pruning results in profuse bleeding. This...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earths Sample Search Results  

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REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth elements Sample Search Results  

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by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline earth elements Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 2001 Fall Meeting Eos Trans. AGU, 82(47), Fall Meet....

147

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth plasmas Sample Search Results  

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REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

148

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkali metal alkaline Sample Search Results  

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with alkali-metals 9, loi, alkaline earth metals l,18 and some of other rare-earth elements 19, 20 have... alkali metals were doped into C60 solids 9 and...

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth neptunatesiv Sample Search...  

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REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various...

150

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth lanthanide Sample Search...  

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bound to carbonates as a function of pH for various alkalinities: (a... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de...

151

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth halogenides Sample Search...  

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REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various...

152

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline earth zinc-aluminophosphate Sample...  

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REE with organic matter in alkaline organic rich-water. .H ZRUGV Rare earth... of rare earth elements (REE) to humic acid (HA) and carbonates was studied experimentally at various...

153

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline permanganate-an electrochemical...  

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for: alkaline permanganate-an electrochemical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Biocarbon Fuel Cell III Thermodynamics permits the carbon fuel cell, which is a battery that...

154

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline air pollution Sample Search Results  

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air pollution Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline air pollution Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Long-term and seasonal variations...

155

A NEW CONCEPT IN AN ELECTRICALLY RECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of a New Zinc-Air Battery Concept Using Flowingdiagram of the zinc-air battery single cell prototype usedRECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY Philip N. Ross

Ross, P.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth silicate phosphors Sample...  

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differ in the nature of the angle... ). Weidner and Hamaya (1983) observed that the transition-metal oxides and the alkaline-earth oxides fail... the shear elastic moduli and...

157

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline-earth metal oxides Sample Search...  

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differ in the nature of the angle... ). Weidner and Hamaya (1983) observed that the transition-metal oxides and the alkaline-earth oxides fail... ... Source: Price, G. David -...

158

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline black liquor Sample Search Results  

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by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline black liquor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Journal of Membrane Science, 33 (1987) 83-95 Elsevier Science...

159

Decomposition Studies of Triphenylboron, Diphenylborinic Acid and Phenylboric Acid in Aqueous Alkaline Solutions Containing Copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the copper-catalyzed chemical kinetics of triphenylboron, diphenylborinic acid and phenylboric acid (3PB, 2PB and PBA) in aqueous alkaline solution contained in carbon-steel vessels between 40 and 70 degrees C.

Crawford, C.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Peterson, R. A.

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pore water chemistry of an alkaline rift valley lake: Lake Turkana, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Turkana is the largest closed basin lake in the African rift system. It has evolved through the past 5000 years to become a moderately alkaline lake. Previous mass balance argument suggest that sulfate is removed from the lake by sulfate reduction in the sediments, and that the lake is accumulating in chloride, sodium, and alkalinity. Studies of pore water from 12 meter cores collected in November 1984 show that sulfate is reduced in the sediment column with a net production of alkalinity. Some sodium is lost from the lake and diffuses into the sediment to maintain charge balance. At several meters depth, organic matter is destroyed by methanogenic bacteria, as shown by the high delta /sup 13/C values for dissolved inorganic carbon. Magnesium and calcium molar ratios change with depth; chloride, sodium, and alkalinity also change with depth.

Cerling, T.E.; Johnson, T.C.; Halfman, J.D.; Lister, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline electrolyte fuel cells Sample...  

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fuel cells Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alkaline electrolyte fuel cells Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The Biocarbon Fuel Cell III...

162

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline treatment conditions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 589-598, May 1995 O 1995 American Society of Plant Physiologists The Activation of the Potato PR-lOa Gene Requires the Summary: . Treatment with alkaline phosphatase also...

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects alkaline phosphatase Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 589-598, May 1995 O 1995 American Society of Plant Physiologists The Activation of the Potato PR-lOa Gene Requires the Summary: is affected by alkaline phosphatase only in...

164

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2002 Major Subject: Poultry Science UTILIZATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM ALKALINE HYDROXIDE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE BROILER CARCASSES A Thesis by TRUITT PRESTON NIEMEYER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions of Silicate Ions with Zinc(II) and Aluminum(III) in Alkaline Aqueous Solution Michel R 16, 2005 We present 29 Si, 27 Al, and 67 Zn NMR evidence to show that silicate ions in alkaline, with aluminate (Al(OH)4 - ). Zincate reacts with monomeric silicate at pH 14-15 to form [(HO)O2Si-O-Zn(OH)3

Sahai, Nita

166

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Heat inactivation of alkaline phosphatase in human milk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cobalt; and the use of di sodium ethyl enedi amine tetraacetate I EDTA]. Fram ( 1957) further investigated the effect of temperature nd reported results which were essentially in agreement with other workers. Using skim milk, whole milk, 20K cream... was more readily destroyed in colostrum than in normal milk. Other work is proceeding in our laboratory on the heat destruction of bacterial cells in breast milk. 'When that work i s complete, the useful ness of pho sphata-e activity as a marker...

Odumodu, Chinyelu Uzoamaka

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

NOx uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported on ?-Al2O3. NOx uptake on alkaline earth oxides (BaO, MgO, CaO and SrO) supported on ?-Al2O3....

172

Synthesis and characterization of the Au-modified Pd cathode catalyst for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available online 3 August 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell Oxygen reduction Carbon in large quantities from agricultural products or biomass. Hence, direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) haveSynthesis and characterization of the Au-modified Pd cathode catalyst for alkaline direct ethanol

Zhao, Tianshou

173

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline shift effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels 18 FEATURE ARTICLE T.S. Zhao, Y.S. Li, S.Y. Shen Summary: for the EOR in alkaline media whereas it was Pd1Ag1C for the PdAgC catalysts. The promoting...

174

Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alteration High-carbonate alkalinity Magnesite Lizardite Crystal growth Hydrothermal systems The present and carbonation of olivine with relevance in Earth systems (e.g. functioning of hydrothermal fieldsSimultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from hydrothermal alteration of olivine under

Montes-Hernandez, German

175

The structure and energetics of $^3$He and $^4$He nanodroplets doped with alkaline earth atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present systematic results, based on density functional calculations, for the structure and energetics of $^3$He and $^4$He nanodroplets doped with alkaline earth atoms. We predict that alkaline earth atoms from Mg to Ba go to the center of $^3$He drops, whereas Ca, Sr, and Ba reside in a deep dimple at the surface of $^4$He drops, and Mg is at their center. For Ca and Sr, the structure of the dimples is shown to be very sensitive to the He-alkaline earth pair potentials used in the calculations. The $5s5p\\leftarrow5s^2$ transition of strontium atoms attached to helium nanodroplets of either isotope has been probed in absorption experiments. The spectra show that strontium is solvated inside $^3$He nanodroplets, supporting the calculations. In the light of our findings, we emphasize the relevance of the heavier alkaline earth atoms for analyzing mixed $^3$He-$^4$He nanodroplets, and in particular, we suggest their use to experimentally probe the $^3$He-$^4$He interface.

A. Hernando; R. Mayol; M. Pi; M. Barranco; F. Ancilotto; O. B{ü}nermann; F. Stienkemeier

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal fluxes of alkalinity in the Narayani river system of central Nepal Matthew J. Evans hot springs flow within the steeply incised gorges of the central Nepal Himalayan front. The spring of central Nepal, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 5, Q08011, doi:10.1029/2004GC000719. G 3 G 3Geochemistry

Derry, Louis A.

177

Author's personal copy An alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cell with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), rather than carbon di- oxide (CO2) [5]. Hence, the actual and maximum electron transfer numbers per), and the product of ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline media is pre- dominated by acetic acid (CH3COOH), respectively. Under this circumstance, the electron transfer rate (ETR) of the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR

Zhao, Tianshou

178

Oxidative Alkaline leaching of Americium from simulated high-level nuclear waste sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidative alkaline leaching has been proposed to pre-treat the high-level nuclear waste sludges to remove some of the problematic (e.g., Cr) and/or non-radioactive (e.g., Na, Al) constituents before vitrification. It is critical to understand the behavior of actinides, americium and plutonium in particular, in oxidative alkaline leaching. We have studied the leaching behavior of americium from four different sludge simulants (BiPO{sub 4}, BiPO{sub 4 modified}, Redox, PUREX) using potassium permanganate and potassium persulfate in alkaline solutions. Up to 60% of americium sorbed onto the simulants is leached from the sludges by alkaline persulfate and permanganate. The percentage of americium leached increases with [NaOH] (between 1.0 and 5.0 M). The initial rate of americium leaching by potassium persulfate increases in the order BiPO{sub 4} sludge < Redox sludge < PUREX sludge. The data are most consistent with oxidation of Am{sup 3+} in the sludge to either AmO{sub 2}{sup +} or AmO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in solution. Though neither of these species is expected to exhibit long-term stability in solution, the potential for mobilization of americium from sludge samples would have to be accommodated in the design of any oxidative leaching process for real sludge samples.

Reed, Wendy A.; Garnov, Alexander Yu.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Bond, Andrew H.

2004-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Poly (vinyl alcohol)/3-(trimethylammonium) propyl-functionalized silica hybrid membranes for alkaline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions. As a result, the overall cost of the fuel cell system can for alkaline direct ethanol fuel cells E.D. Wang, T.S. Zhao*, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering Accepted 29 December 2009 Available online 8 January 2010 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct ethanol fuel cell

Zhao, Tianshou

180

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere of anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere such as CO2, CH4, N2O and CFCs. The CO2 emissions to reflect, adsorb and emit the solar energy. However, the continuous emissions of CO2 into the atmosphere

Montes-Hernandez, German

182

Nepheline syenites and related magmatic fluids in the Ditr u Alkaline Massif, Transylvania, Romania Andrs Fall *, Robert J. Bodnar and Csaba Szab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nepheline syenites and related magmatic fluids in the Ditr u Alkaline Massif, Transylvania, Romania Carpathians, in Romania, and is a Mesozoic alkaline igneous complex formed during an extensional phase

Bodnar, Robert J.

183

Pressure &Pressure & TemperatureTemperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer toprobe to measure atmospheric pressure, and thermometer to measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature.measure air temperature

California at Santa Cruz, University of

184

Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Edwards, T.B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Mechanism of CO Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Media J. S. Spendelow, J. D. Goodpaster, P. J. A. Kenis, and A. Wieckowski*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the mechanism of CO oxidation on Pt surfaces would be useful in optimizing Pt-based catalysts for fuel cell fuel cells (DMFCs) and reformate- fed hydrogen fuel cells.1-11 Alkaline electrolytes have been shown carbonation in alkaline media complicates the use of alkaline electrolytes for fuel cells.16 Fuel cells

Kenis, Paul J. A.

186

Cylinder Test Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Specific features of the temperature dependence of the conduction electron concentration in the narrow-gap and zero-gap states of Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of studies of the conductivity {sigma} and the Hall coefficient R in the Cd{sub x}Hg{sub 1-x}Te crystals with x = 0.1, 0.12, 0.14, and 0.15 are analyzed in the temperature range T = 4.2-300 K and the magnetic field range B = 0.005-2.22 T. Using data on the R(B) in low and high magnetic fields and the data on {sigma}(T), electron and hole concentrations and mobilities are determined. It is shown that the electron concentration n in the studied samples is almost independent of T in the range 4.2-15 K, while as T increases, it increases according to the law n {proportional_to} T {sup r} (r > 3/2), where r = f(n, T, x). It is found that r varies from 1.7 at x = 0.1 to 3.1 at compositions with x = 0.14 and 0.15. The results for n(T) are compared with theory, taking into account nonparabolicity of the variance law for {epsilon}(T), and with the theory of impurity states in narrow-gap and zero-gap semiconductors. It is shown that the constancy of n(T) up to {approx}15 K and the strong dependence n(T) (r > 3/2) at higher temperatures are caused by the intense ionization of electrons localized at acceptor states.

Aliev, S. A.; Zulfigarov, E. I.; Selim-zade, R. I. [Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

Boatner, Lynn A [ORNL; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine [ORNL; Kolopus, James A [ORNL; Neal, John S [ORNL; Cherepy, Nerine [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Payne, Stephen A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Beck, P [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Burger, Arnold [Fisk University, Nashville; Rowe, E [Fisk University, Nashville; Bhattacharya, P. [Fisk University, Nashville

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ livingPattern : Room ­? behaviour; setTemp : Room ­? num; heatSwitchOn, heatSwitchOff, userReset : simple

Day, Nancy

192

Influence of Acidic and Alkaline Waste Solution Properties on Uranium Migration in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study shows that acidic and alkaline wastes co-disposed with uranium into subsurface sediments has significant impact on changes in uranium retardation, concentration, and mass during downward migration. For uranium co-disposal with acidic wastes, significant rapid (i.e., hours) carbonate and slow (i.e., 100s of hours) clay dissolution resulted, releasing significant sediment-associated uranium, but the extent of uranium release and mobility change was controlled by the acid mass added relative to the sediment proton adsorption capacity. Mineral dissolution in acidic solutions (pH 2) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in aqueous carbonate (with Ca2+, Mg2+) and phosphate and a slow (100s of hours) increase in silica, Al3+, and K+, likely from 2:1 clay dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong acid resulted in significant shallow uranium mineral dissolution and deeper uranium precipitation (likely as phosphates and carbonates) with downward uranium migration of three times greater mass at a faster velocity relative to uranium infiltration in pH neutral groundwater. In contrast, mineral dissolution in an alkaline environment (pH 13) resulted in a rapid (< 10 h) increase in carbonate, followed by a slow (10s to 100s of hours) increase in silica concentration, likely from montmorillonite, muscovite, and kaolinite dissolution. Infiltration of uranium with a strong base resulted in uranium-silicate precipitation (presumed Na-boltwoodite) but also desorption of natural uranium on the sediment due to the high ionic strength solution, or 60% greater mass with greater retardation compared with groundwater. Overall, these results show that acidic or alkaline co-contaminant disposal with uranium can result in complex depth- and time-dependent changes in uranium dissolution/precipitation reactions and uranium sorption, which alter the uranium migration mass, concentration, and velocity.

Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Wellman, Dawn M.; Resch, Charles T.; Zhong, Lirong

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

James Harvey; Michael Gula

1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

In situ atomic force microscopy imaging of electroprecipitated nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ atomic force microscopy images of nickel hydrous oxide films electrodeposited on the basal plane of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite in alkaline electrolytes have shown that a stepwise oxidation leads to irreversible formation of wide crevices throughout the material. Upon subsequent stepwise reduction, the gaps close leaving a hairline type crack which follows the profile of the crevice. These potential induced structural rearrangements have been attributed to stresses induced by differences in the densities of the nickel hydrous oxide in the two oxidation states. 9 refs., 5 figs.

Chen, R.; Mo, Y.; Scherson, D.A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Specific Gravity Urobilinogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin®(Bilirubin): Lot # Protein (Sulfosalicylic Acid): Lot # Specific Gravity - Saline 0.85 Specific Gravity - H20 RBC AND DATA ENTRY FORMS #12;Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone

Rodriguez, Carlos

199

Specific Gravity Urobilinogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Date Lot # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin®(Bilirubin): Lot # Protein (Sulfosalicylic Acid): Lot # Specific Gravity - Saline 0.85 Specific Gravity - H20 # Specific Gravity pH Leukocytes Nitrite Protein Glucose Ketone Urobilinogen Bilirubin Blood / Hemoglobin HCG

Rodriguez, Carlos

200

Investigations Into the Nature of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work accomplished in fiscal year (FY) 2013, exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Various aspects of FY 2013’s work were sponsored both by Washington River Protection Solutions and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection; because of this commonality, both sponsors’ work is summarized in this report. There were three tasks in this FY 2013 study. The first task involved examining the speciation of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ in alkaline solution by 99Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The second task involved the purchase and installation of a microcalorimeter suitable to study the binding affinity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ with various inorganic and organic compounds relevant to Hanford tank wastes, although the actual measure of such binding affinities is scheduled to occur in future FYs. The third task involved examining the chemical reactivity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ as relevant to the development of a [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ spectroelectrochemical sensor based on fluorescence spectroscopy.

Rapko, Brian M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Edwards, Matthew K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

Mark D. McKay

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modification of alkaline pulping to facilitate the isolation of aliphatic acids. Part 1. Sodium hydroxide pretreatment of pine wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pretreating pine chips (Pinus sylvestris) with sodium hydroxide prior to the alkaline delignification kraft, kraft-anthraquinone, and soda-anthraquinone) can facilitate the recovery of the carbohydrate degradation products from alkaline pulping liquors. Under suitable pretreatment conditions large amounts of carbohydrate degradation products (alipahtic acids) were formed relative to lignin. The lignin fraction was composed of comparatively low-molecular-weight fragments. Although the delignification was considerably retarded and the yield (based on wood) was decreased by 1-3%, the properties of the resulting pulp were essentially maintained despite pretreatment. Finally, data are given for the composition of aliphatic acids in liquors resulting from pretreatments.

Alen, R.; Niemelae, K.; Sjoestroem, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Specific Learning Difficulties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dyslexia and other Specific Learning Difficulties (SpLDs) A guide for tutors Enabling Services Supporting you to succeed #12;2 Contents Dyslexia Support ............................................................................................................ 3 Recognising students with dyslexia or other specific learning difficulties................. 4

Anderson, Jim

205

Review and assessment of technologies for the separation of strontium from alkaline and acidic media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey has been conducted to identify and evaluate methods for the separation of strontium from acidic and alkaline media as applied to Hanford tank waste. The most promising methods of solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange are described. The following criteria were used for evaluating the separation methods: Appreciable strontium removal must be demonstrated; Strontium selectivity over bulk components must be demonstrated; The method must show promise for evolving into a practical and fairly simple process; The process should be safe to operate; The method must be robust (i.e., capable of separating strontium from various waste types); Secondary waste generation must be minimized; and The method must show resistance to radiation damage. The methods discussed did not necessarily satisfy all of the above criteria; thus, key areas requiring further development are also given for each method. Less promising solvent extraction, precipitation, and ion exchange methods were also identified; areas for potential development are included in this report.

Orth, R.J.; Kurath, D.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Parity violating radiative emission of neutrino pair in heavy alkaline earth atoms of even isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metastable excited states ${}^3P_2, {}^3P_0$ of heavy alkaline earth atoms of even isotopes are studied for parity violating (PV) effects in radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP). PV terms arise from interference between two diagrams containing neutrino pair emission of valence spin current and nuclear electroweak charge density proportional to the number of neutrons in nucleus. This mechanism gives large PV effects, since it does not suffer from the suppression of 1/(electron mass) usually present for non-relativistic atomic electrons. A controllable magnetic field is crucial to identify RENP process by measuring PV observables. Results of PV asymmetries under the magnetic field reversal and the photon circular polarization reversal are presented for an example of Yb atom.

M. Yoshimura; N. Sasao; S. Uetake

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Oscillatory Increases in Alkalinity Anticipate Growth and May Regulate Actin Dynamics in Pollen Tubes of Lily W OA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with a low concentration of the pH-sensitive dye bis-carboxyethyl carboxyfluorescein dextran, show of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 b Integrative Cell Biology Laboratory, Durham University, Durham DH1 alkalinity and cell extension. A target for pH may be the actin cytoskeleton, because the apical cortical

Kunkel, Joseph G.

208

An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao the performance of anion exchange membrane (AEM) direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) is that state-of-the-art AEMs exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM- DEFCs) have received ever-increasing attention, mainly

Zhao, Tianshou

209

Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from1 hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from1 hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity2 3 Romain Lafaya, b , German Montes-Hernandeza, *, Emilie Janotsb experiments in order to investigate the simultaneous25 serpentinization and carbonation of olivine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

210

Bull. Soc. gol. Fr., 2008, no The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey): a Late  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bull. Soc. géol. Fr., 2008, no 4 The alkaline intraplate volcanism of the Antalya nappes (Turkey-words. ­ Alkali basalt, Intraplate volcanism, Triassic (Upper), Neotethys, Turkey, Geochemistry. Abstract. ­ Late belonging to the Kara Dere ­ Sayrun unit of the Middle Antalya nappes, southwestern Turkey. New

Demouchy, Sylvie

211

Historical and Short-Term Controls on Sulfate Reduction and Alkalinity Generation in Three Aquatic Ecosystems of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation, pyrite, sediments #12;Introduction First described as acid rain in 1852 by Scottish chemist Angus.19 to 13.47 mEq m-2 y-1 in freshwater sediments. Keywords: Sulfate reduction, alkalinity, acid Smith, all forms of atmospheric acid deposition continue to be an environmental problem faced

Vallino, Joseph J.

212

Beamline Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground8.0.1 PrintTemperatures Energy: 3.0000 GeV

213

Specific Heat of Disordered 3He  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous aerogel is a source of elastic scattering in superfluid 3He and modifies the properties of the superfluid, suppressing the transition temperature and order parameter. The specific heat jumps for the B-phase of superfluid 3He in aerogel have been measured as a function of pressure and interpreted using the homogeneous and inhomogeneous isotropic scattering models. The specific heat jumps for others p-wave states are estimated for comparison.

Choi, H.; Davis, J. P.; Pollanen, J.; Halperin, W. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Mulders, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

214

Ultrasonic hydrometer. [Specific gravity of electrolyte  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time t between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance d between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time t, the sonic velocity V is calculated with the equation V = 2d/t. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0 and 40/sup 0/C and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation.

Swoboda, C.A.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

216

Comparative Analysis of the Effect of Different Alkaline Catalysts on Biodiesel Yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: A major challenge in the biodiesel industry is the comparatively high cost of raw materials for production. A cost build-up analysis of biodiesel production from J. curcas oil shows that catalyst alone contributes about 50.9 % of the total production cost. This paper aims at highlighting the effects of two different commonly used catalysts on the yield of biodiesel. Samples of biodiesel were produced by three different methods namely single stage transesterification (SST), double stage transesterification (DST) and foolproof (FP) processes in which sodium hydroxide (NaOH) and potassium hydroxide (KOH) were used. The effects of each catalyst on the production yield were analyzed and compared. NaOH gave production yields of 79%, 81% and 84 % for the SST, DST and FP processes respectively. KOH produced comparatively lower yields of 68%, 71 % and 75 % for SST, DST and fool proof processes respectively. Although the use of KOH slightly raises the cost of biodiesel production as compared to NaOH, the local production of KOH from cocoa husks could minimize the production cost. Abbreviations: BDF = Biodiesel fuel; PDF = Petroleum diesel fuel; DF = Diesel fuel Key words: Transesterification Alkaline catalysts Biodiesel yield Biodiesel KOH NaOH

Cynthia Ofori-boateng; Ebenezer M. Kwofie; Moses Y. Mensah

217

Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

219

Specific light in sculpture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

Powell, John William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Redesigning specificity in miniproteins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work focuses on designing specific miniprotein interactions using computational models and then testing these designs with experiments. Miniproteins are small, autonomously-folding proteins that are excellent for ...

Taylor, Christina Marie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Harmonization of Biodiesel Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide biodiesel production has grown dramatically over the last several years. Biodiesel standards vary across countries and regions, and there is a call for harmonization. For harmonization to become a reality, standards have to be adapted to cover all feedstocks. Additionally, all feedstocks cannot meet all specifications, so harmonization will require standards to either tighten or relax. For harmonization to succeed, the biodiesel market must be expanded with the alignment of test methods and specification limits, not contracted.

Alleman, T. L.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design Specification | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Design Specification Design Specification PARS II Extraction Utility Design Spec v8020130510.pdf More Documents & Publications Design Specifications for the PARS II Extraction...

224

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

225

Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

Humbert, Matthew S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques,(2) to quantify the effect of chemical slug volume injection on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) to determine the economic ramifications of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) to forecast the results of injecting an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) to provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil, reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report document the initial geological and reservoir engineering data gathering. In addition, some of the initial laboratory results are discussed. Some evaluation of the West Kiehl has been published.

Pitts, M.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212" F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

Kleinfeld, David

230

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MULTI-USE STEINEL VARIABLE TEMPERATURE ELECTRONICALLY CONTROLLED HEAT GUNTEMPERATURE RANGE 212 at the outlet nozzle will bum flesh. Do not tum on Heat Gun with hand in front of nozzle. DO NOT USE NEAR equipment Specifications Temperature Variable from 212° F to 1100° F Watts 1500W Weight 1.5 lbs. Supply

Kleinfeld, David

231

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Americium/Lanthanide Separations in Alkaline Solutions for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project goals: Can used nuclear fuel be partitioned by dissolution in alkaline aqueous solution to give a solution of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium and a filterable solid containing nearly all of the lanthanide fission products and certain other fission products? What is the chemistry of Am/Cm/Ln in oxidative carbonate solutions? Can higher oxidation states of Am be stabilized and exploited? Conclusions: Am(VI) is kinetically stable in 0.5-2.0 M carbonate solutions for hours. Aliquat 336 in toluene has been successfully shown to extract U(VI) and Pu(VI) from carbonate solutions. (Stepanov et al 2011). Higher carbonate concentration gives lower D, SF{sub U/Eu} for = 4 in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Experiments with Am(VI) were unsuccessful due to reduction by the organics. Multiple sources of reducing organics...more optimization. Reduction experiments of Am(VI) in dodecane/octanol/Aliquat 336 show that after 5 minutes of contact, only 30-40% of the Am(VI) has been reduced. Long enough to perform an extraction. Shorter contact times, lower T, and lower Aliquat 336 concentration still did not result in any significant extraction of Am. Anion exchange experiments using a strong base anion exchanger show uptake of U(VI) with minimal uptake of Nd(III). Experiments with Am(VI) indicate Am sorption with a Kd of 9 (10 minute contact) but sorption mechanism is not yet understood. SF{sub U/Nd} for = 7 and SF{sub U/Eu} for = 19 after 24 hours in 1 M K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

Goff, George S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Long, Kristy Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reilly, Sean D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jarvinen, Gordon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runde, Wolfgang H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Deltaic sedimentation in saline, alkaline Lake Bogoria, Kenya: Response to environmental change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Bogoria is a meromictic, saline (90 g/l TDS), alkaline (pH: 10.3) lake with Na-CO[sub 3]-Cl waters, located in a narrow half-graben in the central Kenya Rift. It is fed by hot springs, direct precipitation, and a series of ephemeral streams that discharge into the lake via small deltas and fan-deltas. Examination of the exposed deltas and >50 short cores from the lake floor, have revealed a wide range of deltaic and prodeltaic sediments, including turbidites and subaqueous debris-flow deposits. Studies of 3 long cores and the exposed delta stratigraphy have shown how the style of deltaic sedimentation has responded to environmental changes during the last 30,000 years. During humid periods when lake level is high the lake waters are fresher and less dense. Theoretically, high sediment yield and more constant discharge may promote underflow (hyperpycnal flow), generating low-density turbidity currents. In contrast, during low stages with dense brine, the less dense, inflowing waters carry fine sediment plumes toward the center of the lake where they settle from suspension (hypopycnal flow). Although applicable as a general model, the sediment record shows that reality is more complex. Variations in meromixis and level of the chemocline, together with local and temporal differences in sediment yield and discharge, may permit density flows even when the lake is under a predominant hypopycnal regime. During periods of aridity when sodium carbonate evaporites were forming, exposed delta plains were subject to desiccation with local development of calcrete and zeolitic paleosols.

Renaut, R.W. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences); Tiercelin, J.J. (Univ. Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France). Domaines Oceaniques)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Improvements in Shallow (Two-Meter) Temperature Measurements...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to study influences on shallow temperature measurements related to geological and solar radiation factors specifically, slope orientation, ground composition and albedo. In...

236

IDC System Specification Document.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the system specifications derived to satisfy the system requirements found in the IDC System Requirements Document for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. Revisions Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

Clifford, David J.

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Understanding Operational Amplifier Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are utilized to the extent TI deems necessary to support this warranty. Specific testing of all parameters are the property of their respective owners. #12;CONTACT INFORMATION INTERNET www.ti.com Register with TI INFORMATION CENTERS US TMS320 Hotline (281) 274-2320 Fax (281) 274-2324 BBS (281) 274-2323 email dsph

Jones, R. Victor

238

Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by the Company and ITER. The Fabrication Specifications may reflect some national requirements and regulations that are not fully provided here. This document presents the ITER CSI specifications.

Martovetsky, Nicolai N [ORNL; Smirnov, Alexandre [ORNL

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Specific heat in two-dimensional melting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the specific heat $c_N$ around the melting transition(s) of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles confined in two dimensions, calculated from fluctuations of positions and internal energy, and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. Since colloidal systems provide single particle resolution, they offer the unique possibility to compare the experimental temperatures of peak position of $c_N(T)$ and symmetry breaking, respectively. While order parameter correlation functions confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young melting scenario where translational and orientational order symmetries are broken at different temperatures with an intermediate so called hexatic phase, we observe a single peak of the specific heat within the hexatic phase, with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation. Thus, the peak is not associated with broken symmetries but can be explained with the total defect density, which correlates with the maximum increase of isolated dislocations. The absence of a latent heat strongly supports the continuous character of both transitions.

Sven Deutschländer; Antonio M. Puertas; Georg Maret; Peter Keim

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

240

Changing fuel specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will describe the goals, methods, and results of a program designed to expand fuel specifications. The ability to expand fuel specs can provide many advantages to a power company. These would include increased fuel flexibility, better performance and lower fuel cost. The expansion of transportation modes also may enhance the scenario. Although brief, this paper should provide a good understanding of the types of problems that can be encountered, and the cooperative effort necessary to resolve them.

Hatt, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

Gallegos, María V., E-mail: plapimu@yahoo.com.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Falco, Lorena R., E-mail: mlfalco@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Peluso, Miguel A., E-mail: apelu@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sambeth, Jorge E., E-mail: sambeth@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Ciencias Aplicadas, “Dr. J. Ronco” CINDECA (CONICET CCT La Plata), 47 N°257, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thomas, Horacio J. [Pla.Pi.Mu-Planta Piloto Multipropósito, (CICPBA-UNLP) Cno. Centenario y 505, M.B. Gonnet, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Corrigan, Dennis (Troy, MI); Venkatesan, Srini (Southfield, MI); Young, Rosa (Troy, MI); Fierro, Christian (Troy, MI); Fetcenko, Michael A. (Rochester Hills, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Oak Ridge Site Specific  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge, TennesseeSite Specific

245

Decomposition of NH3 on Ir(100): A Temperature Programmed Desorption Study A. K. Santra, B. K. Min, C. W. Yi, Kai Luo, T. V. Choudhary, and D. W. Goodman*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-temperature fuel cells are of great interest, yet require COx-free hydrogen for optimum operation. For example, proton exchange membrane fuel cells can tolerate only ppm levels of CO in the hydrogen fuel, whereas alkaline fuel cells require COx-free hydrogen. Conventional hydrogen production technologies such as steam

Goodman, Wayne

246

Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and its application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual report for the period January 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. {open_quotes}Detailed Evaluation of the West Kiehl Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Field Project and Its Application to Mature Minnelusa Waterfloods{close_quotes} objective is to evaluate both the field performance of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer enhanced oil recovery technology as well as its potential application to other Minnelusa oil fields.

Pitts, M.J.; Surkalo, H.; Mundorf, W.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

248

Investigation on the co-precipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly alkaline radioactive waste solutions originating from production of plutonium for military purposes are stored in underground tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The purification of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium is important in the treatment and disposal of these wastes. This report describes scoping tests with sodium hydroxide solutions, where precipitation techniques were investigated to perform the separation. Hydroxides of iron (III), manganese (II), cobalt (II, III), and chromium (III); manganese (IV) oxide, and sodium uranate were investigated as carriers. The report describes the optimum conditions that were identified to precipitate these carriers homogeneously throughout the solution by reductive, hydrolytic, or catalytic decomposition of alkali-soluble precursor compounds by a technique called the Method of Appearing Reagents. The coprecipitation of pentavalent and hexavalent neptunium and plutonium was investigated for the candidate agents under optimum conditions and is described in this report along with the following results. Plutonium coprecipitated well with all tested materials except manganese (IV) oxide. Neptunium only coprecipitated well with uranate. The report presents a hypothesis to explain these behaviors. Further tests with more complex solution matrices must be performed.

Krot, N.; Shilov, V.; Bessonov, A.; Budantseva, N.; Charushnikova, I.; Perminov, V.; Astafurova, L. [Russian Academy of Science (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Finite Temperature Closed Superstring Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find that the gas of IIA strings undergoes a phase transition into a gas of IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. A gas of free heterotic strings undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless duality transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat but vanishing internal energy at criticality. We examine the consequences of requiring a tachyon-free thermal string spectrum. We show that in the absence of Ramond-Ramond fluxes the IIA and IIB string ensembles are thermodynamically ill-defined. The 10D heterotic superstrings have nonabelian gauge fields and in the presence of a temperature dependent Wilson line background are found to share a stable and tachyon-free ground state at all temperatures starting from zero with gauge group SO(16)xSO(16). The internal energy of the heterotic string is a monotonically increasing function of temperature with a stable and supersymmetric zero temperature limit. Our results point to the necessity of gauge fields in a viable weakly coupled superstring theory. Note Added (Sep 2005).

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

251

Construction of an Ultralow Temperature Cryostat and Transverse Acoustic Spectroscopy in Superfluid Helium-3 in Compressed Aerogels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An ultra low temperature cryostat is designed and implemented in this work to perform experiments at sub-millikelvin temperatures, specifically aimed at understanding the superfluid phases… (more)

Bhupathi, Pradeep

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Alkaline phosphatase, a biochemical marker of cellular differentiation of BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NaCl-treated (control). In contrast, the ALP specific activity of TM from Caco-2 cells which differentiated spontaneously did not show an increase with butyrate treatment. We separated TM into a light membrane (LM) fraction (I 7/40%) and a heavy...

Lu, Wei

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solubility Behavior and Phase Stability of Transition Metal Oxides in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solubility behavior of transition metal oxides in high temperature water is interpreted by recognizing three types of chemical reaction equilibria: metal oxide hydration/dehydration, metal oxide dissolution and metal ion hydroxocomplex formation. The equilibria are quantified using thermodynamic concepts and the thermochemical properties of the metal oxides/ions representative of the most common constituents of construction metal alloys, i.e., element shaving atomic numbers between Z = 22 (Ti) and Z = 30 (Zn), are summarized on the basis of metal oxide solubility studies conducted in the laboratory. Particular attention is devoted to the uncharged metal ion hydrocomplex, M{sup Z}(OH){sub Z}(aq), since its thermochemical properties define minimum solubilities of the metal oxide at a given temperature. Experimentally-extracted values of standard partial molal entropy (S{sup 0}) for the transition metal ion neutral hydroxocomplex are shown to be influenced by ligand field stabilization energies and complex symmetry.

S.E. Ziemniak

2000-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

254

Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles for Protection and Delayed Release of Enzymes in Alkaline pH and at Elevated Temperature during Hydraulic Fracturing of Oil Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Polyethylenimine-dextran sulfate polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) were used to entrap two enzymes used to degrade polymer gels following hydraulic fracturing of oil wells in order to obtain delayed release and to protect ...

Barati Ghahfarokhi, Reza; Johnson, Stephen J.; McCool, Stan; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul; Liang, Jenn-Tai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Vehicle Performance Specifications for the UPRM AUV Vehicle Specifications Vehicle Characteristics Specification Maximum Depth 700m with 1.5 safety factor Vehicle power 2kWHr Li Ion Rechargeable Transducer 700m rated Paroscientific Depth Sensor will be integrated into the vehicle navigation stream

Gilbes, Fernando

256

Generic refinements for behavioral specifications   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the properties of generic refinements of behavioral specifications. At the base of this investigation stands the view from algebraic specification that abstract data types can be modeled as ...

Petria, Marius

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The effect of stress cracked and broken corn kernels on alkaline processing losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used and the final product desirecL Then the cooked corn and water mixture is, &equently, pumped to a soaking tank for a 8-15 br steep, Other commercial operations utilize large cooking tanks which, after cooking, serve as steeping tanks. After...-samples of Pioneer 3780 (P3780) were also preparezL The first sub- sample was dried in a continuous elevator drying system at 46' C and steeped in a bin for 6 hr, then cooled with ambient temperature air. The second Pioneer 3780 sub- sample was bin (batch) dried...

Jackson, David Scott

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Calc-alkaline mafic rocks of the Black Dyke Formation: Remnants of the final activity of a submerged Permian volcano  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Permian Black Dyke Fm., which occurs as large tectonic slices within the Luning allochthon in the Excelsior Mountains, NV, forms an E-W trending anticline at Black Dyke Mountain. The 800-m thick stratigraphic succession consists of volcanic and pyroclastic rocks overlain conformably by volcaniclastic sediments. Along the northern limb of the anticline, the rocks consist of mafic porphyritic lavas, breccias, and graded and ungraded pyroclastic beds. The sedimentary unit consists of thick volcaniclastic turbidites overlain by conglomerates, sandstones, and mudstones. Along the southern limb of the anticline, the sequence is replaced by reworked breccia, tuffs, and sandstones. Mafic plutonic rocks occur as xenoliths in the lavas and breccias, and as coeval plugs intruding the section. Gabbros show cumulate or porphyritic textures and are composed of amph, cpx, and zoned plag. Their Ti/V (14.5--15) and Nb/Y (0.25--0.3) ratios fall in the range commonly found in calc-alkaline rocks. Diorite porphyry shows high Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], ZrO[sub 2], and REE abundances indicating that this rock is more fractionated. Basalts and andesites are plag-cpx-opx phyric. They often include glomeroporphyritic clots of cpx with amph coronas. Some rocks exhibit fluidal textures. Both volcanic and plutonic rocks show homogeneous geochemical features and similar crystallization sequences: Fe-Ti oxides---->plag---->opx + cpx----> brown zoned hbl, suggesting that they are cogenetic. Thus, the lower part of the Black Dyke Fm. likely represents the final products formed in a calc-alkaline magma chamber because pyroclastic rocks prevail over lava flows and abundant early crystal cumulates occur as plugs or as inclusions in the lavas and breccias.

Blein, O.; Lapierre, H.; Pecher, A. (URA-CNRS, Grenoble (France)); Schweickert, R.A. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Dept. of Geological Science)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Strings at finite temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We obtain a semiclassical evaluation of the temperature for which the free energy of the strings of spontaneously broken scalar electrodynamics vanishes. We argue that, above this temperature, these objects should play a significant physical role.

Arago C. de; Bazeia, D.; Eboli, O.J.P.; Marques, G.C.

1985-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

Otto, Neil C. (Chicago, IL); Warner, Barry T. (South Holland, IL); Smaga, John A. (Lemont, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Insulating and sheathing materials of electric and optical cables - Common test methods - Part 5-1: Methods specific to filling compounds - Drop-point - Separation of oil - Lower temperature brittleness - Total acid number - Absence of corrosive components - Permittivity at 23 °C - DC resistivity at 23 °C and 100 °C  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specifies the test methods for filling compounds of electric cables used with telecommunication equipment. Gives the methods for drop-point, separation of oil, lower temperature brittleness, total acid number, absence of corrosive components, permittivity at 23 °C, d.c. resistivity at 23°C and 100°C.

International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

6, 13011320, 2006 Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban, South Africa H and Physics Discussions Temperature climatology and trend estimates in the UTLS region as observed over Commons License. 1301 #12;ACPD 6, 1301­1320, 2006 Temperature climatology and trend estimates over Durban

Boyer, Edmond

264

A Carbon-Supported Copper Complex of 3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole as a Cathode Catalyst for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Applications Fikile R. Brushett, Matthew S. Thorum, Nicholas S. Lioutas, Matthew S. Naughton-tri/C) is investigated as a cathode material using an alkaline microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell. The absolute Cu be realized by optimizing catalyst and electrode preparation procedures. Fuel cell-based systems hold promise

Kenis, Paul J. A.

265

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications Solar Photovoltaic Specification, Checklist and Guide,...

266

Temperature dependence of magnetic properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3SrTiO3 thin films on silicon substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by a 20-nm-thick SrTiO3 001 buffer layer. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies. INTRODUCTION Perovskite manganites RE 1-x AE xMnO3, where RE =rare earth and AE=alkaline earth formTemperature dependence of magnetic properties of La0.7Sr0.3MnO3Ã?SrTiO3 thin films on silicon

Boyer, Edmond

267

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

Mosher, D.M.

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Temperature compensated photovoltaic array  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

1997-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

EFFECT OF ANATOMICAL FRACTIONATION ON THE ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF ACID AND ALKALINE PRETREATED CORN STOVER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to concerns with biomass collection systems and soil sustainability there are opportunities to investigate the optimal plant fractions to collect for conversion. An ideal feedstock would require low severity pretreatment to release a maximum amount of sugar during enzymatic hydrolysis. Corn stover fractions were separated by hand and analyzed for glucan, xylan, acid soluble lignin, acid insoluble lignin, and ash composition. The stover fractions were also pretreated with either 0, 0.4, or 0.8% NaOH for 2 hours at room temperature, washed, autoclaved and saccharified. In addition, acid pretreated samples underwent simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) to ethanol. In general, the two pretreatments produced similar trends with cobs, husks, and leaves responding best to the pretreatments, the tops of stalks responding slightly less, and the bottom of the stalks responding the least. For example, corn husks pretreated with 0.8% NaOH released over 90% (standard error of 3.8%) of the available glucan, while only 45% (standard error of 1.1%) of the glucan was produced from identically treated stalk bottoms. Estimates of the theoretical ethanol yield using acid pretreatment followed by SSF were 65% (standard error of 15.9%) for husks and 29% (standard error of 1.8%) for stalk bottoms. This suggests that integration of biomass collection systems to remove sustainable feedstocks could be integrated with the processes within a biorefinery to minimize overall ethanol production costs.

K. B. Duguid; M. D. Montross; C. W. Radtke; C. L. Crofcheck; L. M. Wendt; S. A. Shearer

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOCUMENTATION SPECIFIC TASK TRAINING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOCUMENTATION APPENDIX SPECIFIC TASK TRAINING PROGRAM Conducted by the ILLINOIS CENTER ............................................................. Coordination of Contract Documents Art.105.05 Appendix Page 14

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

272

Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Hanford Site environmental management specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

Grygiel, M.L.

1998-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

Temperature and RH Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

275

Finite Temperature Gases of Fermionic Strings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that in the absence of a Ramond-Ramond sector both the type IIA and type IIB free string gases have a thermal instability due to low temperature tachyon modes. The gas of free IIA strings undergoes a thermal duality transition into a gas of free IIB strings at the self-dual temperature. The free heterotic string gas is a tachyon-free ensemble with gauge symmetry SO(16)$\\times$SO(16) in the presence of a timelike Wilson line background. It exhibits a holographic duality relation undergoing a self-dual phase transition with positive free energy and positive specific heat. The type IB open and closed string ensemble is related by thermal duality to the type I' string ensemble. We identify the order parameter for the Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition from a low temperature gas of short open strings to a high temperature long string phase at or below T_C. Note Added (Sep 2005).

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fiber optic temperature sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

Rabold, D.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

“Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

Edelman, Alan [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Persson, Per-Olof [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sutton, Brian D. [Department of Mathematics, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Anodically electrodeposited Co+Ni mixed oxide electrode: preparation and electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution in alkaline media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co+Ni mixed oxides on Ni substrate were prepared through anodic electrodeposition from Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} aqueous solutions with five different Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratios beside only Co{sup 2+}. By the electrochemical measurements, the optimum performance in electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction in alkaline media was obtained on the Co+Ni mixed oxide deposited from the solution containing Co{sup 2+}/Ni{sup 2+} ratio of 1:1. The mixed oxide is corresponding to about 68at% Co contents with spinel-type NiCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase and porosity surface structure. The electrochemical kinetic parameters including exchange current density, Tafel slopes, reaction order with respect to [OH{sup -}] and standard electrochemical enthalpy of activation were analyzed also. A possible mechanism involving the formation of a physisorbed hydrogen peroxide intermediate in a slow electrochemical step was presented, which accounts for the values of the experimental results.

Wu Gang [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: wugang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Li Ning [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou Derui [Department of Applied Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Mitsuo, Kurachi [Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8283 (Japan); Xu Boqing [Innovative Catalysis Program, Key Lab of Organic Optoelectronics and Molecular Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

High temperature probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature probe for sampling, for example, smokestack fumes, and is able to withstand temperatures of 3000.degree. F. The probe is constructed so as to prevent leakage via the seal by placing the seal inside the water jacket whereby the seal is not exposed to high temperature, which destroys the seal. The sample inlet of the probe is also provided with cooling fins about the area of the seal to provide additional cooling to prevent the seal from being destroyed. Also, a heated jacket is provided for maintaining the temperature of the gas being tested as it passes through the probe. The probe includes pressure sensing means for determining the flow velocity of an efficient being sampled. In addition, thermocouples are located in various places on the probe to monitor the temperature of the gas passing there through.

Swan, Raymond A. (Fremont, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Evaluation of an alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from SRS tank waste using laboratory-scale centrifugal contactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An alkaline-side solvent extraction process for cesium removal from Savannah River Site (SRS) tank waste was evaluated experimentally using a laboratory-scale centrifugal contactor. Single-stage and multistage tests were conducted with this contactor to determine hydraulic performance, stage efficiency, and general operability of the process flowsheet. The results and conclusions of these tests are reported along with those from various supporting tests. Also discussed is the ability to scale-up from laboratory- to plant-scale operation when centrifugal contractors are used to carry out the solvent extraction process. While some problems were encountered, a promising solution for each problem has been identified. Overall, this alkaline-side cesium extraction process appears to be an excellent candidate for removing cesium from SRS tank waste.

Leonard, R. A.; Conner, C.; Liberatore, M. W.; Sedlet, J.; Aase, S. B.; Vandegrift, G. F.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electric motor model repair specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These model repair specifications list the minimum requirements for repair and overhaul of polyphase AC squireel cage induction motors. All power ranges, voltages, and speeds of squirrel cage motors are covered.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

MEASUREMENT OF SPECIFIC HEAT CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone grout mixtures. The heat capacity of the Saltstone waste form is one of the important properties of Saltstone mixes that was last measured at SRNL in 1997. It is therefore important to develop a core competency for rapid and accurate analysis of the specific heat capacity of the Saltstone mixes in order to quantify the impact of compositional and operational variations on this property as part of the variability study. The heat capacity, coupled with the heat of hydration data obtained from isothermal calorimetry for a given Saltstone mix, can be used to predict the maximum temperature increase in the cells within the vaults of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The temperature increase controls the processing rate and the pour schedule. The maximum temperature is also important to the performance properties of the Saltstone. For example, in mass pours of concrete or grout of which Saltstone is an example, the maximum temperature increase and the maximum temperature difference (between the surface and the hottest location) are controlled to ensure durability of the product and prevent or limit the cracking caused by the thermal gradients produced during curing. This report details the development and implementation of a method for the measurement of the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes as well as the heat capacities of the cementitious materials of the premix and the simulated salt solutions used to batch the mixes. The developed method utilizes the TAM Air isothermal calorimeter and takes advantage of the sophisticated heat flow measurement capabilities of the instrument. Standards and reference materials were identified and used to validate the procedure and ensure accuracy of testing. Heat capacities of Saltstone mixes were {approx} 55% higher than the previous measurement of specific heat capacity on a reference Saltstone mix in 1997. Values of mixes prepared using Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment (DDA), Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) and Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) simulants and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio were {approx} 1.95 J/g/{sup o}C and were equivalent within experimental error. The simple law of mixtures was used to predict the heat capacities of the Saltstone and the results were in excellent agreement with experimental data. This simple law of mixtures can therefore be used to predict the heat capacities of Saltstone mixes in those cases where measurements have not been made. The time dependence of the heat capacity is important as an input to the modeling of temperature increase in Saltstone vaults. The heat capacity of a mix of MCU and premix at 0.60 w/cm ratio was measured immediately after initial mixing and then periodically up to times greater than 100 days. Within experimental error, the heat capacity did not change with time. Therefore, the modeling is not complicated by requiring a time dependent function for specific heat capacity. The water to cementitious material (w/cm) ratio plays a key role in determining the value of the heat capacity. Both experimental and predictive values for SWPF mixes as function of the w/cm ratio were obtained and presented in this report. Predictions of the maximum temperatures of the Saltstone mixes were made using the heat of hydration data from previous isothermal measurements and the newly measured heat capacities for DDA, MCU and SWPF mixes. The maximum temperature increase ranged from 37 to 48 C for these mixes. The presence of aluminate at 0.33 M produced a temperature increase of 68 C which is close to the adiabatic temperature rise of 74 C observed by Steimke and Fowler in 1997 for a mix containing 0.35 M aluminate. Aluminum dissolution of the sludge will increase the aluminate in the DSS which in turn will result in a larger temperature increase in the Saltstone vaults during the curing p

Harbour, J; Vickie Williams, V

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Heavy-Duty Low-Temperature and Diesel Combustion & Heavy-Duty...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in the following eleven slides Current Specific Objectives: (SNL) Understand the spatial and temporal evolution of soot formation in low-temperature diesel combustion...

284

Neutrons and X-rays reveal structure of high-temperature liquid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

first determination of the complete set of pair distribution functions for a high temperature oxide melt, which gives element-specific information on the probability of finding...

285

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

286

RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL WEATHERIZATION SPECIFICATIONS August 30, 2011 Index to Sections Section Page I. GENERAL............................................................................................35 #12;1 I. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS 1. These specifications apply to existing residential (retro

287

Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States))

1992-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Low temperature cryoprobe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

Sungaila, Z.F.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

High-Temperature Superconductivity  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

Peter Johnson

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

290

Elevated temperature crack propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a summary of two NASA contracts on high temperature fatigue crack propagation in metals. The first evaluated the ability of fairly simple nonlinear fracture parameters to correlate crack propagation. Hastelloy-X specimens were tested under isothermal and thermomechanical cycling at temperatures up to 980 degrees C (1800 degrees F). The most successful correlating parameter was the crack tip opening displacement derived from the J-integral. The second evaluated the ability of several path-independent integrals to correlate crack propagation behavior. Inconel 718 specimens were tested under isothermal, thermomechanical, temperature gradient, and creep conditions at temperatures up to 650 degrees C (1200 degrees F). The integrals formulated by Blackburn and by Kishimoto correlated the data reasonably well under all test conditions.

Orange, T.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Penrose Well Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

Christopherson, Karen

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

High temperature pressure gauge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

2002-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Alkaline-Side Extraction of Cesium from Savannah River Tank Waste Using a Calixarene-Crown Ether Extractant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented supporting the viability of the alkaline-side CSEX process as a potential replacement for the In-Tank Precipitation process for removal of cesium from aqueous high-level waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Under funding from the USDOE Efficient Separations and Crosscutting program, a flowsheet was suggested in early June of 1998, and in the following four months, this flowsheet underwent extensive testing, both in batch tests at ORNL and ANL and in two centrifugal-contactor tests at ANL. To carry out these tests, the initial ESP funding was augmented by direct funds from Westinghouse Savannah River Corporation. The flowsheet employed a solvent containing a calixarene-crown hybrid compound called BoBCalixC6 that was invented at ORNL and can now be obtained commercially for government use from IBC Advanced Technologies. This special extractant is so powerful and selective that it can be used at only 0.01 M, compensating for its expense, but a modifier is required for use in an aliphatic diluent, primarily to increase the cesium distribution ratio D{sub Cs} in extraction. The modifier selected is a relatively economical fluorinated alcohol called Cs3, invented at ORNL and so far available. only from ORNL. For the flowsheet, the modifier is used at 0.2 M in the branched aliphatic kerosene Isopar{reg_sign} L. Testing at ORNL and ANL involved simulants of the SRS HLW. After extraction of the Cs from the waste simulant, the solvent is scrubbed with 0.05 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with a solution comprised of 0.0005 M HNO{sub 3} and 0.0001 M CsNO{sub 3}. The selection of these conditions is justified in this report, both on the basis of experimental data and underlying theory.

Bonnesen, P.V.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Moyer, B.A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass Recalcitrance Factors Using Reference Substrates. Investigating Commercial Cellulase Performances Toward Specific Biomass...

299

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Temperature initiated passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

Forsberg, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

303

Temperature Data Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater temperature is sensitive to the competing processes of heat flow from below the advective transport of heat by groundwater flow. Because groundwater temperature is sensitive to conductive and advective processes, groundwater temperature may be utilized as a tracer to further constrain the uncertainty of predictions of advective radionuclide transport models constructed for the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Since heat transport, geochemical, and hydrologic models for a given area must all be consistent, uncertainty can be reduced by devaluing the weight of those models that do not match estimated heat flow. The objective of this study was to identify the quantity and quality of available heat flow data at the NTS. One-hundred-forty-five temperature logs from 63 boreholes were examined. Thirteen were found to have temperature profiles suitable for the determination of heat flow values from one or more intervals within the boreholes. If sufficient spatially distributed heat flow values are obtained, a heat transport model coupled to a hydrologic model may be used to reduce the uncertainty of a nonisothermal hydrologic model of the NTS.

Gillespie, David

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ProductSpecifications Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t GOLDD+ XRF Analyzer The Thermo Scientific Niton XL3t x-ray tube-based x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer with GOLDD+ technology is purpose versatile x-ray tubes ever used in a handheld XRF instrument. When this power is harnessed to our

Short, Daniel

305

Gas Slow Control System Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMS-02 TRD Gas Slow Control System Specifications v 4.2 26-06-2006 A. Bartoloni, B. Borgia, F. Bucci, F. R. Spada INFN Sezione di Roma 1- Roma, Italy #12;2/45 #12;3/45 1. ABSTRACT 5 2. GAS SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION 5 3. GAS CONTROL SYSTEM 8 4. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS 12 a. Universal Control System

Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

306

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

307

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Research Establishment, Ris^, Denmark, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heinrich; Petrology and Mineralogy of the Mt. Rosa Area, ElDana 1958 A textbook of mineralogy with an extended treatiseon crystallography and physical mineralogy, Dana, E.S. , and

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Thorium by Gamma-Ray Spectrometry, Exemplified byabundance by gamma-ray spectrometry and, on the basis ofand thorium by gamma-ray spectrometry; exemplified by

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

^ (0H) , also with rare-earth elements. Commonly altered andthe radio- and rare-earth elements. However, there iscontain the radio- and rare-earth elements. In general then,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Press, Canberra, Australia, 224 p. Gerasimovsky,University Press, Canberra, Australia, 369 p. Gerasimovsky,

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Alkaline Membrane Electrolysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas:Austin, T X S ummaryDirector,

313

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland," in Uranium Exploration Geology, Int. AtomicOklahoma," 1977 Nure Geology Uranium Symposium, Igneous HostMcNeil, M. , 1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method And Apparatus For Evaluatin Of High Temperature Superconductors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for evaluation of high-T.sub.c superconducting films and single crystals is based on measurement of temperature dependence of differential optical reflectivity of high-T.sub.c materials. In the claimed method, specific parameters of the superconducting transition such as the critical temperature, anisotropy of the differential optical reflectivity response, and the part of the optical losses related to sample quality are measured. The apparatus for performing this technique includes pump and probe sources, cooling means for sweeping sample temperature across the critical temperature and polarization controller for controlling a state of polarization of a probe light beam.

Fishman, Ilya M. (Palo Alto, CA); Kino, Gordon S. (Stanford, CA)

1996-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery, Phase III. Final report, 26 October 1981-18 September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project effort was concentrated primarily on technical advancement of the alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery to meet goals of scale-up and demonstration of solid-reactant storage with 1000-cm/sup 2/ full-scale cells; development of a conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar-photovoltaic storage system; demonstration of solar acceptance random cycling; and determination of cycle life of cells operating at 70- and 200-mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity. These goals were met in the design, fabrication, and cyclic testing of a 1000-cm/sup 2/ cell having a flow aspect ratio of 2:1. After some design optimization, energy efficiency in 2N NaOH at 43/sup 0/C is 74 to 78 percent. Testing has been in conjunction with a crystallizer/reservoir designed with a capacity of 300 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ that delivers solids-free electrolyte to the cell. A conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar storage-battery system has been formulated with mass and thermal balances computed. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests are in progress at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ with 2N NaOH electrolyte with Nafion N-125 separator at 40/sup 0/C. Over 800 cycles at 70 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 +- 2.1 percent have been logged. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 83.3 +- 1.8 percent and 92.0 +- 1.8 percent, respectively. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests run under similar conditions at 249 +- 45 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ have logged over 220 cycles with mean energy efficiency of 75.3 +- 5.1 percent. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 84.7 +- 2.0 and 89.0 +- 6.0, respectively.

Adams, G.B.; Hollandsworth, R.P.; Webber, B.D.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Temperature differential detection device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

Girling, P.M.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Low Temperature Performance Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0.0036 0.0038 0.004 0.0042 Inverse Temperature, 1K Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww) (BID 1935), 4.1V, 3 Sep. Gen2 Electrodes and 1.2M LiPF6 in EC:EMC (3:7 ww)...

319

Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

Moyzis, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

Dai, Steven Xunhu

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Diagnosis of Acid Placement from Downhole Temperature Measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-dependent function for estimating injection temperature D depth D(t) time function in the wormhole model Dtotal total depth of the wellbore section d observed data vector e residual vector ek specific kinetic energy ep specific potential energy e...R specific internal energy of rock es specific internal energy of acid solution E energy viii Ereaction energy released by reaction in the control volume f objective function f(t) time-dependent function in Ramey’s equation G sensitivity matrix...

Tan, Xuehao

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

322

Processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production: Dissolution of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} targets by alkaline hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-enriched uranium silicide targets designed to recover fission product {sup 99}Mo were dissolved in alkaline hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plus NaOH) at about 90C. Sintering of matrix aluminum powder during irradiation and heat treatment retarded aluminum dissolution and prevented silicide particle dispersion. Gas evolved during dissolution is suspected to adhere to particles and block hydroxide ion contact with aluminum. Reduction of base concentrations from 5M to O.lM NaOH yielded similar silicide dissolution and peroxide destruction rates, simplifying later processing. Future work in particle dispersion enhancement, {sup 99}Mo separation, and waste disposal is also discussed.

Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

324

Engine Cylinder Temperature Control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for controlling a temperature in a combustion cylinder in an internal combustion engine. The cylinder is fluidly connected to an intake manifold and an exhaust manifold. The method and apparatus includes increasing a back pressure associated with the exhaust manifold to a level sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of residual exhaust gas in the cylinder, and varying operation of an intake valve located between the intake manifold and the cylinder to an open duration sufficient to maintain a desired quantity of fresh air from the intake manifold to the cylinder, wherein controlling the quantities of residual exhaust gas and fresh air are performed to maintain the temperature in the cylinder at a desired level.

Kilkenny, Jonathan Patrick (Peoria, IL); Duffy, Kevin Patrick (Metamora, IL)

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

Manufacturing High Temperature Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergyAll ManufacturingFoodOctoberto DOE

326

Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan Bonneville Power Administration Program Specific Recovery Plan Microsoft Word - PSRP May 15 2009 BPA Final.docx...

327

Purification of alkaline solutions and wastes from actinides and technetium by coprecipitation with some carriers using the method of appearing reagents: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coprecipitation of transuranium elements (TRU) and technetium from alkaline solutions and from simulants of Hanford Site tank wastes has been studied in reducing and oxidizing conditions on uranium(IV,VI) hydroxocompounds, tetraalkylammonium perrhenate and perchlorate, and on hydroxides of Fe(III), Co(III), Mn(II), and Cr(III) using the method of appearing reagents (MAR). Coprecipitations in alkaline solution have been shown to give high decontamination factors (DF) at low content of carrier and in the presence of high salt concentrations. Uranium(IV) hydroxide in concentrations higher than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} M coprecipitates Pu and Cm in any oxidation state from 0.2 to 4 M NaOH with DFs of 110 to 1000 and Np and Tc with DFs of 51 to 176. Technetium (VII) coprecipitates with (5 to 8) {times} 10{sup {minus}4} M tetrabutylammonium (TBA) perrhenate in 0.01 to 0.02 M TBA hydroxide from 0.5 to 1.5 M NaOH to give DFs of 150 to 200. Coprecipitations of Np and Pu with Co(OH){sub 3}, Fe(OH){sub 3}, Cr(OH){sub 3}, and Mn(OH){sub 2} obtained by the MAR from precursors in the range from pH 10.5 to 0.4 M NaOH give DFs from 80 to 400.

Peretrukhin, V.F.; Silin, V.I.; Kareta, A.V.; Gelis, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; German, K.E.; Firsova, E.V.; Maslennikov, A.G.; Trushina, V.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Specific test and evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

Rana B. Gupta

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Thermionic converter temperature controller  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thermionic Converter Temperature Controller  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

Shaner,B. J.; Wolf, Joseph H.; Johnson, Robert G. R.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Drexel University Temperature Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Element-specific study of the temperature dependent magnetization of Co-Mn-Sb thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and ? ai its total atomic absorption cross section. Thisi and on the to- tal atomic absorption cross section ? ai .

Schmalhorst, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Temperature modeling in a total knee joint replacement using patient-specific kinematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For the standard condition, which assumes an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) tibial component coefficient was explored. The model is extremely sensitive to the thermal properties of the femoral component in diluted bovine serum, which acts as a lubricant and mimics joint synovial fluid. Denaturing of proteins

Sawyer, Wallace

335

Rate of decrease of the specific surface area of dry snow: Isothermal and temperature gradient conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

crystals. These effects drive sublimation/condensation cycles that modify the sizes and shapes of snow through sublimation/condensation and adsorption/desorption cycles. Adsorbed gases can diffuse inside snow variations must be described in models of snow physics and chemistry [Flin et al., 2003; Legagneux and Domine

Domine, Florent

336

Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

Overeem, A.

337

Temperature-dependent ion beam mixing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work on enhanced interdiffusion rates during ion-beam mixing at elevated temperatures is reviewed. As discussed previously, expected increase in ion-beam mixing rates due to `radiation-enhanced diffusion` (RED), i.e. the free migration of isolated vacancy and interstitial defects, is well documented in single-crystal specimens in the range of 0.4 to 0.6 of absolute melting temperature. In contrast, the increase often observed at somewhat lower temperatures during ion-beam mixing of polycrystalline specimens is not well understood. However, sufficient evidence is available to show that this increase reflects intracascade enhancement of a thermally-activated process that also occurs without irradiation. Recent evidence is presented which suggests that this process is Diffusion-induced Grain-Boundary Migration (DIGM). An important complementary conclusion is that because ion-beam mixing in single-crystal specimens exhibits no significant temperature dependence below that of RED, models that invoke only irradiation-specific phenomena, e.g., cascade-overlap, thermal-spikes, or liquid-diffusion, and hence which predict no difference in mixing behavior between single- or poly-crystalline specimens, cannot account for the existing results.

Rehn, L.E.; Alexander, D.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

Callender, Craig

342

The Greenhouse Effect Temperature Equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Greenhouse Effect #12;Temperature Equilibrium The Earth is in equilibrium with the Sun temperature is about 14C, or 287K. The 40K difference is due to the greenhouse effect. Essentially all

Walter, Frederick M.

343

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is LSCF < PSCF < SSCF < YSCF < LSM. The button cell results agree with this ordering indicating that this is an important tool for use in developing our understanding of electrode behavior in fuel cells.

Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

Lane, Michael

347

Perspectives on Temperature in the Pacific Northwest's Fresh Waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a perspective on environmental water temperatures in the Pacific Northwest as they relate to the establishment of water temperature standards by the state and their review by the US Environmental Protection Agency. It is a companion to other detailed reviews of the literature on thermal effects on organisms important to the region. Many factors, both natural and anthropogenic, affect water temperatures in the region. Different environmental zones have characteristic temperatures and mechanisms that affect them. There are specific biotic adaptations to environmental temperatures. Life-cycle strategies of salmonids, in particular, are attuned to annual temperature patterns. Physiological and behavioral requirements on key species form the basis of present water temperature criteria, but may need to be augmented with more concern for environmental settings. There are many issues in the setting of standards, and these are discussed. There are also issues in compliance. Alternative temperature-regulating mechanisms are discussed, as are examples of actions to control water temperatures in the environment. Standards-setting is a social process for which this report should provide background and outline options, alternatives, limitations, and other points for discussion by those in the region.

Coutant, C.C.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Complete genome sequence of the halophilic bacterium Spirochaeta africana type strain (Z-7692T) from the alkaline Lake Magadi in the East African Rift  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spirochaeta africana Zhilina et al. 1996 is an anaerobic, aerotolerant, spiral-shaped bacte- rium that is motile via periplasmic flagella. The type strain of the species, Z-7692T, was iso- lated in 1993 or earlier from a bacterial bloom in the brine under the trona layer in a shallow lagoon of the alkaline equatorial Lake Magadi in Kenya. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence, and annotation. Considering the pending reclassification of S. caldaria to the genus Treponema, S. africana is only the second 'true' member of the genus Spirochaeta with a genome-sequenced type strain to be pub- lished. The 3,285,855 bp long genome of strain Z-7692T with its 2,817 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Abt, Birte [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Scheuner, Carmen [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Held, Brittany [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Deshpande, Shweta [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Huntemann, Marcel [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Tindall, Brian [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

Robertson, Eric P

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

351

Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications are to ensure that the design team applies commissioning concepts to the design and prepares commissioning specifications and a commission plan for inclusion in the bid construction documents.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Runtime verification of object lifetime specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reports on the implementation of a runtime verification system for object lifetime specifications. This system is used to explore and evaluate the expressiveness object lifetime specifications. Object lifetime ...

Benjamin, Zev (Zev A.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

Xia Zhengqiang [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Chen Sanping, E-mail: sanpingchen@126.com [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Wei Qing, E-mail: weiqq@126.com [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069 (China); Qiao Chengfang [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710069 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Low temperature magnetic transitions of single crystal HoBi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present resistivity, specific heat and magnetization measurements in high quality single crystals of HoBi, with a residual resistivity ratio of 126. We find, from the temperature and field dependence of the magnetization, an antiferromagnetic transition at 5.7 K, which evolves, under magnetic fields, into a series of up to five metamagnetic phases.

Fente, A. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid; Suderow, H. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid; Vieira, S. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid; Nemes, N. M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid; Garcia-Hernandez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid; Budko, Sergei L. [Ames Laboratory; Canfield, Paul C. [Ames Laboratory

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

355

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Alliance Equipment Performance Specifications - 2013 BTO Peer Review Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

356

High temperature interfacial superconductivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_D1.

Hänggi, Peter; Talkner, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T?specific heat varies with temperature as T{sup n}, where n?=?1 for graphene, n?=?1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n?=?1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

Nika, Denis L. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States); Cocemasov, Alexandr I. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Balandin, Alexander A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I. [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Research Institute for Optical and Physical Measurements (VNIIOFI), 46 Ozernaya St., Moscow 119361 (Russian Federation)

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

360

High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effects of Radiation and Temperature on Iodide Sorption by Surfactant-Modified Bentonite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and ?-irradiation (60Co) resulted in significantly (~2–10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Min Kyung; Yang, Jungseok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Ergonomic Chair Specifications These specifications are intended to address most employees. Employees that have  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ergonomic Chair Specifications These specifications are intended to address most employees should consult Environmental Health & Safety if they require a special ergonomic chair. a. Any chair must

de Lijser, Peter

363

Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Humidity, Temperature, and Voltage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An update is given on the work of the PV Quality Assurance Task Force; Group 3: studying the effects of humidity, temperature, and voltage bias.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High Temperature Processing Symposium 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

} High temperature recycling operations } Materials sustainability } New furnace technology (including solar) We look forward to seeing you in February 2014. Dr M Akbar Rhamdhani (Chairman HTPS 2014) Prof

Liley, David

366

Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

367

Low temperature material bonding technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

E-Print Network 3.0 - adiabatic temperature change Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adiabatic process changes the temperature of the gas without heating it. 12;DC A steam engine and a Ferrari... a phase change. Specific heat c of a substance is the energy...

369

Experiment Hazard Class 3 - High Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operation * APS Base Low Temperatures * Cryogenic Systems High Temperatures * Electric Furnace * Optical Furnace * Other High Temperature Lasers * Laser, Class 2 * Laser,...

370

Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project entitled, ''Innovative Instrumentation and Analysis of the Temperature Measurement for High Temperature Gasification'', was successfully completed by the Principal Investigator, Dr. S. Lee and his research team in the Center for Advanced Energy Systems and Environmental Control Technologies at Morgan State University. The major results and outcomes were presented in semi-annual progress reports and annual project review meetings/presentations. Specifically, the literature survey including the gasifier temperature measurement, the ultrasonic application in cleaning application, and spray coating process and the gasifier simulator (cold model) testing has been successfully conducted during the first year. The results show that four factors (blower voltage, ultrasonic application, injection time intervals, particle weight) were considered as significant factors that affect the temperature measurement. Then the gasifier simulator (hot model) design and the fabrication as well as the systematic tests on hot model were completed to test the significant factors on temperature measurement in the second year. The advanced Industrial analytic methods such as statistics-based experimental design, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression methods were applied in the hot model tests. The results show that operational parameters (i.e. air flow rate, water flow rate, fine dust particle amount, ammonia addition) presented significant impact on the temperature measurement inside the gasifier simulator. The experimental design and ANOVA are very efficient way to design and analyze the experiments. The results show that the air flow rate and fine dust particle amount are statistically significant to the temperature measurement. The regression model provided the functional relation between the temperature and these factors with substantial accuracy. In the last year of the project period, the ultrasonic and subsonic cleaning methods and coating materials were tested/applied on the thermocouple cleaning according to the proposed approach. Different frequency, application time and power of the ultrasonic/subsonic output were tested. The results show that the ultrasonic approach is one of the best methods to clean the thermocouple tips during the routine operation of the gasifier. In addition, the real time data acquisition system was also designed and applied in the experiments. This advanced instrumentation provided the efficient and accurate data acquisition for this project. In summary, the accomplishment of the project provided useful information of the ultrasonic cleaning method applied in thermocouple tip cleaning. The temperature measurement could be much improved both in accuracy and duration provided that the proposed approach is widely used in the gasification facilities.

Seong W. Lee

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury- Jet Target Experiment August 2005 #12;Draft Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R0 8/10/05 Draft Draftii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM

McDonald, Kirk

372

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury-Jet Target Experiment August 24Nov 1, 2005 #12;Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a ii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM FOR THE HIGH POWER MERCURY

McDonald, Kirk

373

Low temperature irradiation tests on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

McDonald, Kirk

374

Methods for chromosome-specific staining  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogeneous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include ways for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes. 3 figs.

Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microbial impacts on geothermometry temperature predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional geothermometry approaches assume that the composition of a collected water sample originating in a deep geothermal reservoir still reflects chemical equilibration of the water with the deep reservoir rocks. However, for geothermal prospecting samples whose temperatures have dropped to <120°C, temperature predictions may be skewed by the activity of microorganisms; microbial metabolism can drastically and rapidly change the water’s chemistry. We hypothesize that knowledge of microbial impacts on exploration sample geochemistry can be used to constrain input into geothermometry models and thereby improve the reliability of reservoir temperature predictions. To evaluate this hypothesis we have chosen to focus on sulfur cycling, because of the significant changes in redox state and pH associated with sulfur chemistry. Redox and pH are critical factors in defining the mineral-fluid equilibria that form the basis of solute geothermometry approaches. Initially we are developing assays to detect the process of sulfate reduction, using knowledge of genes specific to sulfate reducing microorganisms. The assays rely on a common molecular biological technique known as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which allows estimation of the number of target organisms in a particular sample by enumerating genes specific to the organisms rather than actually retrieving and characterizing the organisms themselves. For quantitation of sulfate reducing genes using qPCR, we constructed a plasmid (a piece of DNA) containing portions of two genes (known as dsrA and dsrB) that are directly involved with sulfate reduction and unique to sulfate reducing microorganisms. Using the plasmid as well as DNA from other microorganisms known to be sulfate reducers or non-sulfate reducers, we developed qPCR protocols and showed the assay’s specificity to sulfate reducers and that a qPCR standard curve using the plasmid was linear over >5 orders of magnitude. As a first test with actual field samples, the assay was applied to DNA extracted from water collected at springs located in and around the town of Soda Springs, Idaho. Soda Springs is located in the fold and thrust belt on the eastern boundary of the track of the Yellowstone Hotspot, where a deep carbon dioxide source believed to originate from Mississippian limestone contacts acidic hydrothermal fluids at depth. Both sulfate and sulfide have been measured in samples collected previously at Soda Springs. Preliminary results indicate that sulfate reducing genes were present in each of the samples tested. Our work supports evaluation of the potential for microbial processes to have altered water chemistry in geothermal exploration samples.

Yoshiko Fujita; David W. Reed; Kaitlyn R. Nowak; Vicki S. Thompson; Travis L. McLing; Robert W. Smith

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Agency...

377

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Static Consistency Checking for Distributed Specifications Christian Nentwich, Wolfgang Emmerich, UK {c.nentwich,w.emmerich,a.finkelstein}@cs.ucl.ac.uk Abstract Software engineers building a complex

Finkelstein, Anthony

378

Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires Webcast  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This November 15, 2011 webcast presented information about the Model Specification for LED Roadway Luminaires developed by DOE's Municipal Solid-State Street Lighting Consortium. During the webcast...

379

Municipal Consortium Releases Updated Model Specification for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

to reflect changes in technologies and associated standards, and to incorporate feedback from users, the model specification enables cities, utilities, and other local...

380

Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gibbs and Boltzmann definitions of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite sized `small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant to biophysics and nanotechnology.

Dixit, Purushottam D

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

383

Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract—The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

unknown authors

384

Summary of beryllium specifications, current and historical  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes beryllium properties included in producer, Department of Energy, and government specifications. The specifications are divided into two major categories: current and historical. Within each category the data are arranged primarily according to increasing purity and secondarily by increasing tensile properties. Qualitative comments on formability and weldability are included. Also, short summaries of powder production and consolidation techniques are provided.

Abeln, S.P.; Kyed, P.

1990-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Working Copy Specification E-I-474  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Copy Specification E-I-474 Revision Number 0 Revision Date 07/30/07 ECO Number 11818.7 Packaging and Shipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3.8 Final #12;Working Copy E-I-474, Rev. 0 SPECIFICATION E-X-XXX RECORD OF REVISION ECO/REV NUMBER DATE PAGES

386

Chemical Equilibration at the Hagedorn Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One important question in relativistic heavy ion collisions is if hadrons, specifically anti-hyperons, are in equilibrium before thermal freezeout because strangeness enhancement has long been pointed to as a signature for Quark Gluon Plasma. Because anti-baryons have long equilibration times in the hadron gas phase it has been suggested that they are "born" into equilibrium. However, Hagedorn states, massive resonances, which are thought to appear near the critical temperature, contribute to fast chemical equilibration times for a hadron gas by providing extra degrees of freedom. Here we use master equations to describe the interplay between Hagedorn resonances, pions, and baryon anti-baryon pairs as they equilibrate over time and observe if the baryons and anti-baryons are fully equilibrated within the fireball.

J. Noronha-Hostler; C. Greiner; I. A. Shovkovy

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Shock temperature measurements in ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our first shock temperature measurements on a cryogenic target are reported for NH/sub 3/. A new fast optical pyrometer and a cryogenic specimen holder for liquid NH/sub 3/ were developed to measure shock temperatures of 4400 and 3600 K at pressures of 61 and 48 GPa. These conditions correspond to those in the ice layers in Uranus and Neptune. The shock temperature data are in reasonable agreement with an equation of state based on an intermolecular potential derived from NH/sub 3/ Hugoniot data.

Radousky, H.B.; Mitchell, A.C.; Nellis, W.J.; Ross, M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Dynamical Approach to Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dynamical approach for measuring the temperature of a Hamiltonian dynamical system in the micro canonical ensemble of thermodynamics. We show that under the hypothesis of ergodicity the temperature can be computed as a time-average of the functional, div(grad H/|grad H|^2), on the energy-surface. Our method not only yields an efficient computational approach for determining the temperature it also provides an intrinsic link between dynamical systems theory and the statistical mechanics of Hamiltonian systems.

Hans Henrik Rugh

1997-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method for measuring surface temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

391

Subcritical temperature in Bose-Einstein condensates of chiral molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bose-Einstein condensation of a sample of non-interacting chiral molecules leads to a non zero optical activity of the condensate and also to a subcritical temperature in the heat capacity. This is due to the internal structure of the molecule which, in our model, is considered as a simple two-state system, characterized by tunneling and parity violation. The predicted singular behavior found for the specific heat, below the condensation temperature, sheds some light on the existence of the so far elusive parity violation energy difference between enantiomers.

Pedro Bargueno; Ricardo Perez de Tudela; Salvador Miret-Artes; Isabel Gonzalo

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

392

Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

Baudouy, B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Unimolecular and hydrolysis channels for the detachment of water from microsolvated alkaline earth dication (Mg2+, Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+) clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine theoretically the three channels that are associated with the detachment of a single water molecule from the aqueous clusters of the alkaline earth dications, [M(H2O)n]2+, M = Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, n ? 6. These are the unimolecular water loss (M2+(H2O)n-1 + H2O) and the two hydrolysis channels resulting to the loss of hydronium ([MOH(H2O)n-2]+ + H3O+) and Zundel ([MOH(H2O)n-3]+ + H3O+(H2O)) cations. The Potential Energy Curves (PECs) corresponding to those three channels were constructed at the Møller-Plesset second order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with basis sets of double- and triple-? quality. We furthermore investigated the water and hydronium loss channels from the mono-hydroxide water clusters with up to four water molecules, [MOH(H2O)n]+, 1 ? n ? 4. Our results indicate the preference of the hydronium loss and possibly the Zundel cation loss channels for the smallest size clusters, whereas the unimolecular water loss channel is preferred for the larger ones as well as the mono-hydroxide clusters. Although the charge separation (hydronium and Zundel cation loss) channels produce more stable products when compared to the ones for the unimolecular water loss, they also require the surmounting of high energy barriers, a fact that makes the experimental observation of fragments related to these hydrolysis channels difficult.

Miliordos, Evangelos; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

394

Study of electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten as hydrogen electrodes in alkaline water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrodeposited nickel-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten, cobalt-molybdenum, and cobalt-tungsten were characterized for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in the electrolysis of 30 w/o KOH alkaline water at 25 C. The rate-determining step (rds) of the HER was suggested based on the Tafel slope of polarization and the capacitance of electrode-solution interface determined by ac impedance measurement. The HER on the nickel- and cobalt-based codeposits was enhanced significantly compared with that o the electrolytic nickel and cobalt with comparable deposit loadings. The decrease in the HER overpotential was more pronounced on the molybdenum-containing codeposits, particularly on cobalt-molybdenum which also showed a high stability. The enhancement of the HER was attributed to both the synergetic composition and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of te electrodes and the effect of their and the increased active surface of the codeposits. The real electrocatalytic activity of the electrodes and the effect of their surface increase were distinguished quantitatively. The linear relations between HER overpotential and surface roughness factor of the electrodes on a Y-log(X) plot were obtained experimentally and interpreted based on the Tafel law.

Fan, C.; Piron, D.L.; Sleb, A.; Paradis, P. (Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of foreign metal ions in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspects of the structural and electronic properties of hydrous oxide films of composite (9:1) Ni/Co and (9:1) Ni/Fe, prepared by electrodeposition, have been examined in alkaline electrolytes using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). An analysis of the X-ray absorption near the edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for the Co and Fe K-edges of these composite hydrous oxides revealed that, regardless of the oxidation state of nickel sites in the films, the guest metal ions are present as Co[sup 3+] and Fe[sup 3+] and that the cobalt-oxygen distance d(Co-O) = 1.9 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom] and d(Fe-O) = 1.92 [+-] 0.02 [angstrom]. The latter values are in excellent agreement with d(Me-O) (Me = Co or Fe) in CoOOH and [beta]- and [gamma]-FeOOH, respectively, determined by conventional X-ray diffraction. Two clearly defined Me-Ni first coordination shells could be observed in the Fourier transforms (FT) of the K-edge EXAFS of the guest metal recorded at a potential at which both Ni[sup 2+] and Ni[sup 3+] sites are expected to be present. 28 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, D.A.; Scherson, D. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)); Antonio, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Carr, R. (Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab., CA (United States))

1994-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Ohmic contacts for high-temperature GaP devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMOVAL 10 13 24 24 26 50 50 52 78 80 83 98 98 99 100 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) APPENDIX D ? 6 LIFT-OFF PREMETAL PREPARATION APPENDIX D ? 7 METAL LIFTOFF Page 100 100 vi LIST OP TABLES Table I Relative High Temperature... with a variety of III-V compound semi- conductors and contact metals. By using a ruby or a COe laser with Au-Sn or Ag-Sn contact metals, specific contact resistances as low as 8. 6 x 19 " 0-cm were reported. (The specific contact resistance...

Van der Hoeven, Willem Bernard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

398

Conducting polymer actuators : temperature effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to utilize conducting polymer actuators as a viable engineering solution, it is necessary to produce usable levels of force with a reasonable bandwidth. Polypyrrole actuated at temperatures as high as 100 °C ...

Del Zio, Michael R. (Michael Robert), 1982-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, W.Y.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, Wayne Y. (Munster, IN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

Loewe, W.E.

2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Curie temperature of multiphase nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Curie temperature and the local spontaneous magnetization of ferromagnetic nanocomposites are investigated. The macroscopic character of the critical fluctuations responsible for the onset of ferromagnetic order means that there is only one Curie temperature, independent of the number of magnetic phases present. The Curie temperature increases with the grain size and is, in general, larger than predicted from the volume averages of the exchange constants. However, the Curie-temperature enhancement is accompanied by a relative reduction of the spontaneous magnetization. Due to the quadratic dependence of the permanent-magnet energy product on the spontaneous magnetization, this amounts to a deterioration of the magnets performance. The length scale on which an effective intergranular exchange coupling is realized (coupling length) depends on the Curie-temperature difference between the phases and on the spacial distribution of the local interatomic exchange. As a rule, it is of the order of a few interatomic distances; for much bigger grain sizes the structures mimic an interaction-free ensemble of different ferromagnetic materials. This must be compared to the magnetic-anisotropy coupling length, which is of the order of 10 nm. The difference is explained by the nonrelativistic character of the Curie-temperature problem. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

Skomski, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States); Sellmyer, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Materials Research and Analysis, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The synthesis and crystal structures of the first rare-earth alkaline-earth selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca and Sr)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two new alkaline-earth Nd selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca, Sr) were obtained using crystal growth from alkaline-earth chloride melts in quartz tubes. These new compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic system in space group C cca (no. 68). The compounds were studied by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction. It was shown that both compounds adopt the same structure type, constructed by complex [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs separated by chloride anion layers perpendicular to the longest cell parameter. The SeO{sub 3} groups show a pyramidal shape and may be described as SeO{sub 3}E tetrahedra. Such SeO{sub 3} groups decorate the Nd-O skeletons forming the [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs. - Graphical abstract: Two new alkaline-earth Nd selenite chlorides MNd{sub 10}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}Cl{sub 8} (M=Ca, Sr) were synthesized. These structures are constructed by [M{sub 11}(SeO{sub 3}){sub 12}]{sup 8+} slabs separated by chloride anion layers.

Berdonosov, P.S. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: psberd@inorg.chem.msu.ru; Olenev, A.V.; Dolgikh, V.A. [Department of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Lightfoot, P. [EaStChem, School of Chemistry, St. Andrews University, St. Andrews, KY16 9ST (United Kingdom)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Oceanic CO{sub 2} measurements for the WOCE hydrological survey in the Pacific Ocean; Shipboard alkalinity analyses during 1991 and 1992. Final technical report, February 1, 1992--July 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research group contributed titration alkalinity analyses to transects of the WOCE Hydrological Survey during 1991 and 1992. The results have been transmitted to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC) of the Department of Energy in a technical data report having two parts: Oceanic CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey of the Pacific Ocean, 1990--1991: Shipboard Analyses During 1991 and 1992, Part 1. Alkalinity Measurements on TUNES, Leg 3, 1991. Oceanic CO{sub 2} Measurements for the WOCE Hydrographic Survey of the Pacific Ocean, 1990--1991: Shipboard Analyses During 1991 and 1992, Part 2. Alkalinity Measurements on CGC92, Legs 1 and 2, 1992. This report contains a paper entitled, ``Total dissolved inorganic carbon measurements made on WOCE leg P13`` by Andrew G. Dickson. A brief description of how these measurements were made and calibrated has been provided along with a statement of the quality of the measurements. The data themselves have been sent to ORNL CDIAC for archival and distribution.

Keeling, C.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21Jul1999 Project Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21­Jul­1999 Project Specification Project Name: ATLAS ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21­Jul­1999 Table of Contents 1. SCOPE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.1. ATLAS BINARY FRONT END READOUT ARCHITECTURE

California at Santa Cruz, University of

409

ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999 Project Specification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999 Project Specification Project Name: ATLAS Binary Chip (ABC) Version: 5.01 Revision History Revision Change Description, Pages Revised and formatting. M. French 21-Jul-99 #12;Page 2 ATLAS Binary Readout IC (ABC) Specification V5.01 21-Jul-1999

California at Santa Cruz, University of

410

Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

Lamberd, D.L.

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

411

UPC Language Specifications V1.2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UPC is an explicitly parallel extension to the ISO C 99Standard. UPC follows the partitioned global address space programming model. This document is the formal specification for the UPC language syntax and semantics.

UPC Consortium

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Double Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

SUSIENE, W.T.

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

413

Stepwise Development from Ideal Specifications Graeme Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stepwise Development from Ideal Specifications Graeme Smith Software Verification Research Centre University of Queensland, Australia smith@svrc.uq.edu.au Abstract The stepwise development of a program using

Smith, Graeme

414

BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Getting Started: Simulations in BRASIL 4 2.1 The State-Effect Design Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Supporting the State-Effect Pattern in BRASIL

415

THE TEMPERATURES OF RED SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a re-appraisal of the temperatures of red supergiants (RSGs) using their optical and near-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We have obtained data of a sample of RSGs in the Magellanic Clouds using VLT+XSHOOTER, and we fit MARCS model atmospheres to different regions of the spectra, deriving effective temperatures for each star from (1) the TiO bands, (2) line-free continuum regions of the SEDs, and (3) the integrated fluxes. We show that the temperatures derived from fits to the TiO bands are systematically lower than the other two methods by several hundred kelvin. The TiO fits also dramatically overpredict the flux in the near-IR, and imply extinctions which are anomalously low compared to neighboring stars. In contrast, the SED temperatures provide good fits to the fluxes at all wavelengths other than the TiO bands, are in agreement with the temperatures from the flux integration method, and imply extinctions consistent with nearby stars. After considering a number of ways to reconcile this discrepancy, we conclude that three-dimensional effects (i.e., granulation) are the most likely cause, as they affect the temperature structure in the upper layers where the TiO lines form. The continuum, however, which forms at much deeper layers, is apparently more robust to such effects. We therefore conclude that RSG temperatures are much warmer than previously thought. We discuss the implications of this result for stellar evolution and supernova progenitors, and provide relations to determine the bolometric luminosities of RSGs from single-band photometry.

Davies, Ben [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Gazak, Zach [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Plez, Bertrand [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France)] [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Trager, Scott [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands)] [Kapteyn Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700-AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lancon, Ariane [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France)] [Observatoire Astronomique and CNRS UMR 7550, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bergemann, Maria [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Evans, Chris [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)] [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chiavassa, Andrea [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)] [CNRS Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

Site-specific strategies for cotton management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SITE-SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COTTON MANAGEMENT A Thesis by MARCELO DE CASTRO CHAVES STABILE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 2005 Major Subject: Agronomy SITE-SPECIFIC STRATEGIES FOR COTTON MANAGEMENT A Thesis by MARCELO DE CASTRO CHAVES STABILE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Stabile, Marcelo de Castro Chaves

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Building America Climate-Specific Guidance | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Building America Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance Building America Climate-Specific Guidance 2014 Housing Innovation...

418

Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

419

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

Militzer, Burkhard

420

Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and res

Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mechanical instability at finite temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many physical systems including lattices near structural phase transitions, glasses, jammed solids, and bio-polymer gels have coordination numbers that place them at the edge of mechanical instability. Their properties are determined by an interplay between soft mechanical modes and thermal fluctuations. In this paper we investigate a simple square-lattice model with a $\\phi^4$ potential between next-nearest-neighbor sites whose quadratic coefficient $\\kappa$ can be tuned from positive negative. We show that its zero-temperature ground state for $\\kappa power-law behavior of the shear modulus as a function of temperature. We expect our study to provide a general framework for the study of finite-temperature mechanical and phase behavior of other systems with a large number of floppy modes.

Xiaoming Mao; Anton Souslov; Carlos I. Mendoza; T. C. Lubensky

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential property measurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectric materials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectric measurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tritt, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Uher, C. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

High temperature Seebeck coefficient metrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of the challenges and practices of thermoelectric metrology on bulk materials at high temperature (300 to 1300 K). The Seebeck coefficient, when combined with thermal and electrical conductivity, is an essential propertymeasurement for evaluating the potential performance of novel thermoelectricmaterials. However, there is some question as to which measurement technique(s) provides the most accurate determination of the Seebeck coefficient at high temperature. This has led to the implementation of nonideal practices that have further complicated the confirmation of reported high ZT materials. To ensure meaningful interlaboratory comparison of data, thermoelectricmeasurements must be reliable, accurate, and consistent. This article will summarize and compare the relevant measurement techniques and apparatus designs required to effectively manage uncertainty, while also providing a reference resource of previous advances in high temperature thermoelectric metrology.

Martin, J.; Tritt, T.; Uher, Ctirad

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

2005-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

In situ x-ray absorption fine structure and optical reflectance studies of electrodeposited nickel hydrous oxide films in alkaline electrolytes.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and optical reflectance spectroscopy (RS) have been used to examine in situ electronic and structural aspects of nickel hydrous oxide, a-Ni(OH)2(hyd), electrodes supported on gold in alkaline electrolytes as a function of their state of charge. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes in the uncharged (UC, or discharged) and overcharged (OC, or fully charged) states yielded, in each case, a single set of two distinct nearest-neighbor shells, with distances, d(Ni-O)1 = 2.05 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 3.11 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for UC, and d(Ni-O)1 = 1.87 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} and d(Ni-Ni)1 = 2.83 {+-} 0.02 {angstrom} for OC. The in situ EXAFS of films allowed to self-discharge following overcharge could be fit with contributions from both sets of shells, suggesting that only two types of nickel sites are sufficient to account for the redox chemistry of this material. These data, in addition to information derived both from quantitative X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and optical RS in the visible range, indicate that the excess anodic charge, i.e., beyond the one-electron oxidation of Ni2+ sites, observed during the first oxidation of freshly prepared a-Ni(OH)2(hyd) electrodes may not be related to oxidation state changes involving nickel sites in the lattice, and, therefore, do not support the existence of nickel sites with a formal oxidation state higher than three for charged or overcharged electrodes in this media.

Hu, Y.; Bae, I. T.; Mo, Y.; Antonio, M. R.; Scherson, D. A.; Chemistry; Case Western Reserve Univ.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Temperature Resistant Optimal Ratchet Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stable periodic structures containing optimal ratchet transport, recently found in the parameter space dissipation versus ratchet parameter [PRL 106, 234101 (2011)], are shown to be resistant to reasonable temperatures, reinforcing the expectation that they are essential to explain the optimal ratchet transport in nature. Critical temperatures for their destruction, valid from the overdamping to close to the conservative limits, are obtained numerically and shown to be connected to the current efficiency, given here analytically. Results are demonstrated for a discrete ratchet model and generalized to the Langevin equation with an additional external oscillating force.

Cesar Manchein; Alan Celestino; Marcus W Beims

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Crystal face temperature determination means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

High temperature superconductor current leads  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrical lead is disclosed having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths. 9 figs.

Hull, J.R.; Poeppel, R.B.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

432

Possible Routes to Frictionless Transport of Electronic Fluids in High-Temperature Superconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric-field-driven transport of electronic fluids in metallic glasses as well as three-dimensional amorphous superconductors are investigated by using the verified approach which has been successfully adopted to study the critical transport of glassy solid helium in very low temperature environment. The critical temperatures related to the nearly frictionless transport of electronic fluids were found to be directly relevant to the superconducting temperature of amorphous superconductors after selecting specific activation energies. Our results imply that optimal shear-thinning is an effective way to reach high-temperature charged superfluidity or superconductivity.

Zotin K-H Chu

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reliability of temperature determination from curve-fitting in multi-wavelength pyrometery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract This paper examines the reliability of a widely used method for temperature determination by multi-wavelength pyrometry. In recent WDM experiments with ion-beam heated metal foils, we found that the statistical quality of the fit to the measured data is not necessarily a measure of the accuracy of the inferred temperature. We found a specific example where a second-best fit leads to a more realistic temperature value. The physics issue is the wavelength-dependent emissivity of the hot surface. We discuss improvements of the multi-frequency pyrometry technique, which will give a more reliable determination of the temperature from emission data.

Ni, P.A.; More, R.M.; Bieniosek, F.M.

2013-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

434

THERMODYNAMIC CONSIDERATIONS FOR THERMAL WATER SPLITTING PROCESSES AND HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A general thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production based on thermal water splitting processes is presented. Results of the analysis show that the overall efficiency of any thermal water splitting process operating between two temperature limits is proportional to the Carnot efficiency. Implications of thermodynamic efficiency limits and the impacts of loss mechanisms and operating conditions are discussed as they pertain specifically to hydrogen production based on high-temperature electrolysis. Overall system performance predictions are also presented for high-temperature electrolysis plants powered by three different advanced nuclear reactor types, over their respective operating temperature ranges.

J. E. O'Brien

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

Bhattacharyya, Rahul

438

Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_Dheat based on the thermodynamic prescription becomes negative. This anomaly is rooted in an ill-defined density of states of the damped free particle which assumes unphysical negative values when gamma/omega_D>1.

Peter Hänggi; Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Peter Talkner

2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

AWS breaks new ground with soldering specification.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Joining technologies continue to advance with new materials, process innovations, and inspection techniques. An increasing number of high-valued, high-reliability applications -- from boilers and ship hulls to rocket motors and medical devices -- have required the development of industry standards and specifications in order to ensure that the best design and manufacturing practices are being used to produce safe, durable products and assemblies. Standards writing has always had an important role at the American Welding Society (AWS). The AWS standards and specifications cover such topics as filler materials, joining processes, inspection techniques, and qualification methods that are used in welding and brazing technologies. These AWS standards and specifications, all of which are approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), have also provided the basis for many similar documents used in Europe and in Pacific Rim countries.

Vianco, Paul Thomas

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

442

Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

443

Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste Heat Recovery Nanostructured High Temperature Bulk Thermoelectric Energy Conversion for Efficient Waste...

444

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

445

Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

446

Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

Barclay, J.A.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

447

3, 771789, 2007 temperatures and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling and the onset of North American glaciation P. Huybers1 and P. Molnar2 1 Department of Earth that gradual cooling in the eastern tropical Pacific led to cooling of North America and the initiation affects North American temperature and ice-ablation. Assuming that the modern relationship holds5 over

Boyer, Edmond

448

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

High temperature synthetic cement retarder  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A synthetic cement retarder which provides excellent retardation and compressive strength development has been synthesized. The response properties and temperature ranges of the synthetic retarder far exceed those of commonly used retarders such as lignosulfonates. The chemical nature of the new retarder is discussed and compared to another synthetic retarder.

Eoff, L.S.; Buster, D.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Enhanced Specific Heat of Silica Donghyun Shin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, molten salt, lithium carbonate, potassium carbonate, solar energy, thermal en- ergy storage, phase change the operational efficiencies and reliability of solar thermal energy conversion systems. The materials material 1 Introduction Thermal energy storage TES systems at high temperatures are required to improve

Banerjee, Debjyoti

454

Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Gupta, Amita

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process for removal of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the K Basins has been divided into major sub-systems. The Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) removes fuel from the existing storage canisters, cleans it, and places it into baskets. The multi-canister overpack (MCO) loading system places the baskets into an MCO that has been pre-loaded in a cask. The cask, containing a loaded MCO, is then transferred to the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility. After drying at the CVD Facility, the cask, and MCO, are transferred to the Canister Storage Building (CSB), where the MCO is removed from the cask, staged, inspected, sealed (by welding), and stored until a suitable permanent disposal option is implemented. The purpose of this document is to specify the process related characteristics of an MCO at the interface between major process systems. The characteristics are derived from the primary technical documents that form the basis for safety analysis and design calculations. This document translates the calculation assumptions into implementation requirements and describes the method of verifying that the requirement is achieved. These requirements are used to define validation test requirements and describe requirements that influence multiple sub-project safety analysis reports. This product specification establishes limits and controls for each significant process parameter at interfaces between major sub-systems that potentially affect the overall safety and/or quality of the SNF packaged for processing, transport, and interim dry storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in MCOs to be transported throughout the SNF Project. The description of the product specifications are organized in the document as follows: Section 2.0--Summary listing of product specifications at each major sub-system interface. Section 3.0--Summary description providing guidance as to how specifications are complied with by equipment design or processing within a major sub-system. Section 4.0--Specific technical basis description for each product specification. The scope of this product specification does not include data collection requirements to support accountability or environmental compliance activities.

PAJUNEN, A.L.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

Engineered waste-package-system design specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity.

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Alkaline Electrolysis Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, GE developed electrolyzer stack technologies to meet DOE’s goals for low cost electrolysis hydrogen. The main barrier to meeting the targets for electrolyzer cost was in stack assembly and construction. GE’s invention of a single piece or “monolithic” plastic electrolyzer stack reduces these costs considerably. In addition, GE developed low cost cell electrodes using a novel application of metal spray coating technology. Bench scale stack testing and cost modeling indicates that the DOE targets for stack capital cost and efficiency can be met by full-scale production of industrial electrolyzers incorporating GE’s stack technology innovations.

RIchard Bourgeois; Steven Sanborn; Eliot Assimakopoulos

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

Hans Gougar

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Field dependences of magnetization and specific-heat coefficient in a nearly magnetic system: Liquid /sup 3/He and strong Pauli paramagnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analytically derive the first-order magnetic-field dependences of the magnetization M and of the coefficient ..gamma.. of the specific heat, in a nearly magnetic paramagnet, at low temperature.

Beal-Monod, M.T.; Daniel, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Modeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on-Chip design process. Many existing approaches employ a bottom-up approach to pipeline validation, where description language (ADL) constructs, and thus allows a powerful top-down approach to pipeline validationModeling and Validation of Pipeline Specifications PRABHAT MISHRA and NIKIL DUTT University

Mishra, Prabhat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Product Specification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the limits and controls for the significant parameters that could potentially affect the safety and/or quality of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) packaged for processing, transport, and storage. The product specifications in this document cover the SNF packaged in Multi-Canister Overpacks to be transported throughout the SNF Project.

PAJUNEN, A.L.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

462

SAVCBS 2003 Specification and Verification of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://www.cs.iastate.edu/SAVCBS/ September 1-2, 2003 Helsinki, Finland Workshop at ESEC/FSE 2003 9th European Software Engineering ConferenceSAVCBS 2003 Specification and Verification of Component-Based Systems ESEC/FSE 2003 9th European Software Engineering Conference and 11th ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering

Leavens, Gary T.

463

Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications Alan M. Frisch1 , Brahim Hnich2 , Ian choose model transformations to reduce greatly the amount of effort that is required to solve a problem by systematic search. It is a consid- erable challenge to automate such transformations. A problem may be viewed

Walsh, Toby

464

Mining malware specifications through static reachability analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mining malware specifications through static reachability analysis Hugo Daniel Macedo1 and Tayssir be used to model the stack operations occurring during the binary code execution), use reachability the file under analysis is malicious. Experimental data shows that our approach can be used to learn

Boyer, Edmond

465

Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Affinity Purification of Plasmid DNA by Temperature-Triggered Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. coli cell lysates to a better purity than that prepared by a standard alkaline purification candidate for large-scale purification of plasmid DNA for sensitive applications such as nonviral gene and Doly, 1979) and CsCl-dye buoyant density-gradient ultra- centrifugation (Sambrook and Russell, 2001

Chen, Wilfred

467

NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

426 AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS SEP 2 1196: vuUiJo HIM. . SPECIAL and Wildlife, Daniel H. Janzen, Director AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER FOR FISHERY BIOLOGISTS -temperature meter 11 Maintenance and trouble -shooting 12 #12;AN ELECTRICAL OXYGEN-TEMPERATURE METER

470

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

Militzer, Burkhard

471

High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Battery system with temperature sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

473

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

High temperature turbine engine structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical Approach Page 1 Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Security Policy Specification Using a Graphical Approach Page 1 Security Policy Specification Using of California, Davis {hoagland,pandey,levitt}@cs.ucdavis.edu Technical Report CSE-98-3 A security policy states for organizations to declare their security policies, even informal state- ments would be better than the current

California at Davis, University of

477

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

478

NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

Jager, Yetta [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkalinity temperature specific" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Drug delivery by organ-specific immunoliposomes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monoclonal antibodies highly specific to the mouse pulmonary endothelial cells were conjugated to liposomes. The resulting immunoliposomes showed high levels of lung accumulation when injected intravenously into mice. Optimal target binding and retention were achieved if the lipid composition included ganglioside GM{sub 1} to reduce the uptake of immunoliposomes by the reticuloendothelial system. Details of the construction and optimization of these organ-specific immunoliposomes are reviewed. The drug delivery potential of this novel liposome system was demonstrated in an experimental pulmonary metastasis model. Immunoliposomes containing a lipophilic prodrug of deoxyfluorouridine effectively prolonged the survival time of the tumor-bearing mice. This and other therapeutic applications of the immunoliposomes are discussed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

Maruyama, Kazuo; Mori, Atsuhide; Hunag, Leaf (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA). Dept. of Biochemistry); Kennel, S.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Product specification Supersedes data of September 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specification NPN switching transistors 2N2222; 2N2222A FEATURES · High current (max. 800 mA) · Low voltage (max collector current (DC) - 800 mA Ptot total power dissipation Tamb 25 °C - 500 mW hFE DC current gain IC = 10 mA; VCE = 10 V 75 - fT transition frequency IC = 20 mA; VCE = 20 V; f = 100 MHz 2N2222 250 - MHz 2

Ravikumar, B.

483

The Reaction Specificity of Nanoparticles in Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-based metallic and oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have enhanced reactivity towards a variety of chemical species, including chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible oxyanions, which frequently contaminate ground water at DOE and other government and industrial sites. Possibly of greater importance is the ability of these nanoparticles to select specific reaction pathways, potentially facilitating the formation of the most environmentally acceptable reaction products.

Baer, Donald R.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Composition Semantics of the Rosetta Specification Language  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using Coalgebras . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 6.2.1 Process Calculi . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 6.2.2 Coalgebras in Java Semantics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 6.2.3 Previous Work on Rosetta.... Components may have inputs and outputs that allow them to be parameterized and to communicate with other specification constructs. The terms within a component may either be Boolean expressions written in Rosetta’s expression language or may instantiate other...

Peck, Megan Elizabeth

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

Burch, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

487

Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped boresilicate glass, accurate to .+-.0.5.degree. C. over an operating temperature range of about -196.degree. C. to 400.degree. C.; and a mixture of D.sub.2 O and H.sub.2 O, accurate to .+-.0.1.degree. C. over an operating range of about 5.degree. C. to 90.degree. C.

O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

University of Illinois Temperature Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Low temperature embrittlement of RPV support structure steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years concerns have arisen regarding low temperature irradiation damage processes following the observation of an apparent tenfold increase in embrittlement in the HFIR reactor surveillance program at Oak Ridge compared with accelerated material irradiation`s in MTR`s. The possible importance of this phenomenon to the integrity of LWR Support Structures was recognized by USNRC and it was formally designated Generic Safety Issue 15. This topic has also become an important UK regulatory issue in the context of the Sizewell PWR. Here the concern was that the high copper material used in the RPV Supports, when taken in light of the HFIR results of that time, highlighted the possibility that irradiation induced copper precipitation could occur at the low temperatures (50--60 C) and peak end-of-life dose of 2mdpa, {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 18} n.cm{sup {minus}2} (E > 1 MeV), encountered in RPV Supports, which contain significant levels (> 0.20%) of copper. This paper describes the results of an experiment set up to establish whether copper precipitation could occur at low temperatures in the Sizewell B RPV Support Structure steel. Mechanical properties measured by conventional hardness and Charpy test were performed. The series of model steels previously studied after irradiation at 288 C in the IAEA CRP-3 showed no clear evidence of copper precipitation under the low temperature irradiation conditions employed. Post irradiation annealing studies demonstrated that the irradiation embrittlement in the A588 support structure steel at low temperatures is due to matrix damage. The copper content is believed to be unimportant. There is, therefore, no reason to believe that the relatively high copper specification of A588 support structure steel will be detrimental to the steels toughness after low temperature/high dose irradiation as expected in the Sizewell B support structure.

Boydon, F.M.D. [Health and Safety Executive, Bootle (United Kingdom). Nuclear Safety Div.; Elroy, R.J.; Gage, G.; Phythian, W.J. [AEA Technology, Didcot (United Kingdom). Harwell Lab.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

High Temperature Integrated Thermoelectric Ststem and Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final goal of this project is to produce, by the end of Phase II, an all ceramic high temperature thermoelectric module. Such a module design integrates oxide ceramic n-type, oxide ceramic p-type materials as thermoelectric legs and oxide ceramic conductive material as metalizing connection between n-type and p-type legs. The benefits of this all ceramic module are that it can function at higher temperatures (> 700 C), it is mechanically and functionally more reliable and it can be scaled up to production at lower cost. With this all ceramic module, millions of dollars in savings or in new opportunities recovering waste heat from high temperature processes could be made available. A very attractive application will be to convert exhaust heat from a vehicle to reusable electric energy by a thermoelectric generator (TEG). Phase I activities were focused on evaluating potential n-type and p-type oxide compositions as the thermoelectric legs. More than 40 oxide ceramic powder compositions were made and studied in the laboratory. The compositions were divided into 6 groups representing different material systems. Basic ceramic properties and thermoelectric properties of discs sintered from these powders were measured. Powders with different particles sizes were made to evaluate the effects of particle size reduction on thermoelectric properties. Several powders were submitted to a leading thermoelectric company for complete thermoelectric evaluation. Initial evaluation showed that when samples were sintered by conventional method, they had reasonable values of Seebeck coefficient but very low values of electrical conductivity. Therefore, their power factors (PF) and figure of merits (ZT) were too low to be useful for high temperature thermoelectric applications. An unconventional sintering method, Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was determined to produce better thermoelectric properties. Particle size reduction of powders also was found to have some positive benefits. Two composition systems, specifically 1.0 SrO - 0.8 x 1.03 TiO2 - 0.2 x 1.03 NbO2.5 and 0.97 TiO2 - 0.03 NbO2.5, have been identified as good base line compositions for n-type thermoelectric compositions in future module design. Tests of these materials at an outside company were promising using that company's processing and material expertise. There was no unique p-type thermoelectric compositions identified in phase I work other than several current cobaltite materials. Ca3Co4O9 will be the primary p-type material for the future module design until alternative materials are developed. BaTiO3 and rare earth titanate based dielectric compositions show both p-type and n-type behavior even though their electrical conductivities were very low. Further research and development of these materials for thermoelectric applications is planned in the future. A preliminary modeling and optimization of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) that uses the n-type 1.0 SrO - 1.03 x 0.8 TiO2 - 1.03 x 0.2 NbO2.5 was performed. Future work will combine development of ceramic powders and manufacturing expertise at TAM, development of SPS at TAM or a partner organization, and thermoelectric material/module testing, modeling, optimization, production at several partner organizations.

Mike S. H. Chu

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

491

Face Recognition Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders Are Both Domain Specific and Process Specific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although many studies have reported face identity recognition deficits in autism spectrum disorders (ASD), two fundamental question remains: 1) Is this deficit “process specific” for face memory in particular, or does it ...

Weigelt, Sarah

492

Magnetic insulation at finite temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A finite-temperature non-neutral plasma (FTNNP) theory of magnetically insulated (MI) electron flows in crossed-field vacuum devices is developed and applied in planar geometry. It is shown that, in contrast to the single type of MI flow predicted by traditional cold-plasma treatments, the nonlinear FTNNP equations admit five types of steady flow, of which three types are MI flows, including flows in which the electric field and/or the tangential velocity at the cathode may be zero or nonzero. It is also shown that finite-temperature Vlasov-Poisson treatments yield solutions for electron number densities and electrostatic potentials that are a subset of the FTNNP solutions. The algorithms that are used to solve the FTNNP equations numerically are discussed, and the numerical results are presented for several examples of the three types of MI flow. Results include prediction of the existence, boundaries, number density profiles, and other properties of sheaths of electrons in the anode-cathode gap.

Goedecke, G. H.; Davis, Brian T.; Chen, Chiping [Physics Department, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States); Intense Beam Theoretical Research Group, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 and Raytheon Missile Systems, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, Arizona 85706 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

494

Heat pump augmented radiator for low-temperature space applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Closed-cycle, space-based heat rejection systems depend solely on radiation to achieve their heat dissipation function. Since the payload heat rejection temperature is typically 50 K above that of the radiation sink in near earth orbit, the size and mass of these systems can be appreciable. Size (and potentially mass) reductions are achievable by increasing the rejection temperature via a heat pump. Two heat pump concept were examined to determine if radiator area reductions could be realized without increasing the mass of the heat rejection system. The first was a conventional, electrically-driven vapor compression system. The second is an innovative concept using a solid-vapor adsorption system driven by reject heat from the prime power system. The mass and radiator area of the heat pumpradiator systems were compared to that of a radiator only system to determine the merit of the heat pump concepts. Results for the compressor system indicated that the mass minimum occured at a temperature lift of about 50 K and radiator area reductions of 35% were realized. With a radiator specific mass of 10 kgm/sup 2/, the heat pump system is 15% higher than the radiator only baseline system. The complex compound chemisorption systems showed more promising results. Using water vapor as the working fluid in a single stage heat amplifier resulted in optimal temperature lifts exceeding 150 K. This resulted in a radiator area reduction of 83% with a mass reduction of 64%. 7 refs., 9 figs.

Olszewski, M.; Rockenfeller, U.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

Project specific selection of decommissioning techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three decommissioning projects with quite different contamination characteristics were terminated with the requested result of freely released rooms for dismantled buildings under supervision of the responsible authorities. The examples show that control areas with different kinds of contamination and different equipment can be decommissioned with reasonable effort. The specific selection of decontamination methods and measurement techniques optimizes the performance of the project and lowers the amount of primary and secondary active waste. The careful planning of radiation protection measures ensures the safe work within the foreseen time schedule.

Christ, B.G.; Wehner, E.L. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany). Nuclear Technology Div.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

497

End Points Specification Methods | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirementsDraftEmerson: ENERGY STAR Referral (CR289E)Shared PathSpecification

498

Standard technical specifications: Combustion engineering plants. Volume 1, Revision 1: Specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the combined effort of the NRC and the industry to produce improved Standard Technical Specifications (STS), Revision 1 for Comb