National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for alkalinity temperature specific

  1. Novel Refractory Materials for High-Temperature, High-Alkaline...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Can be used in high-temperature, high-alkaline furnaces and process vessels found in aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, and steel industries....

  2. Experimental investigation of sand consolidation using high-temperature alkaline solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Romero, Fidel Enrique

    2000-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to better understand the sand consolidation process under high-temperature alkaline solution. Wilmington Tar sand samples were successfully consolidated in the laboratory using high-temperature (250-260?C...

  3. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, W., E-mail: guowei1982cry@163.com [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma, H.A.; Jia, X. [National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  4. Relaxation calorimetry technique for measuring low temperature specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei, Eva Y.

    Relaxation calorimetry technique for measuring low temperature specific heat R. W. Newsome, Jr the temperature dependence of the specific heat of a 10 thick 0.62 mg copolymer film of vinylidene fluoride. INTRODUCTION Design improvements over recent years enable some calorimeters to precisely measure the specific

  5. Specific heat of apple at different moisture contents and temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viacheslav Mykhailyk; Nikolai Lebovka

    2013-05-11

    This work discusses results of experimental investigations of the specific heat, $C$, of apple in a wide interval of moisture contents ($W=0-0.9$) and temperatures ($T = 283-363$ K). The obtained data reveal the important role of the bound water in determination of $C(W,T)$ behaviour. The additive model for description of $C(W)$ dependence in the moisture range of $0.1apple was considered as a mixture of water and hydrated apple material (water plasticised apple) with specific heat $C_h$. The difference between $C_h$ and specific heat of dry apple, $\\Delta Cb=C_h-C_d$, was proposed as a measure of the excess contribution of bound water to the specific heat. The estimated amounts of bound water $W_b$ were comparable with the monolayer moisture content in apple. The analytical equation was proposed for approximation of $C(W,T)$ dependencies in the studied intervals of moisture content and temperature.

  6. The critical temperature of superconductor and its electronic specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2010-08-09

    It is shown that the critical temperature of the superconductor is related to the Sommerfeld constant, i.e. it is determined by the Fermi energy for I-type superconductors. The estimation of properties of II-type superconductors reveals a somewhat different relation of critical temperature and Fermi energy. Among the high-temperature superconducting ceramics there are the both - I and II - types superconductors.

  7. Low-temperature specific heat measurement of a ferroelectric copolymer film of vinylidene fluoride and trifluoroethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei, Eva Y.

    Low-temperature specific heat measurement of a ferroelectric copolymer film of vinylidene fluoride; published 13 February 2004 The specific heat of a highly crystallized ferroelectric copolymer film to the pyroelectric coefficient in this temperature range. The specific heat data also show a rapid transition from

  8. The specific heat of superfluids near the transition temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Schultka; E. Manousakis

    1995-02-15

    The specific heat of the $x-y$ model is studied on cubic lattices of sizes $L \\times L \\times L$ and on lattices $L \\times L \\times H$ with $L \\gg H$ (i.e. on lattices representing a film geometry) using the Cluster Monte Carlo method. Periodic boundary conditions were applied in all directions. In the cubic case we obtained the ratio of the critical exponents $\\alpha/\

  9. The boson peak in structural and orientational glasses of simple alcohols: Specific heat at low temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel A. Ramos; Cesar Talon; Sebastian Vieira

    2002-01-30

    We review in this work specific-heat experiments, that we have conducted on different hydrogen-bonded glasses during last years. Specifically, we have measured the low-temperature specific heat Cp for a set of glassy alcohols: normal and fully-deuterated ethanol, 1- and 2- propanol, and glycerol. Ethanol exhibits a very interesting polymorphism presenting three different solid phases at low temperature: a fully-ordered (monoclinic) crystal, an orientationally-disordered (cubic) crystal or 'orientational glass', and the ordinary structural glass. By measuring and comparing the low-temperature specific heat of the three phases, in the 'boson peak' range 2-10 K as well as in the tunneling-states range below 1K, we are able to provide a quantitative confirmation that ''glassy behavior'' is not an exclusive property of amorphous solids. On the other hand, propanol is the simplest monoalcohol with two different stereoisomers (1- and 2-propanol), what allows us to study directly the influence of the spatial rearrangement of atoms on the universal properties of glasses. We have measured the specific heat of both isomers, finding a noteworthy quantitative difference between them. Finally, low-temperature specific-heat data of glassy glycerol have also been obtained. Here we propose a simple method based upon the soft-potential model to analyze low-temperature specific-heat measurements, and we use this method for a quantitative comparison of all these data of glassy alcohols and as a stringent test of several universal correlations and scaling laws suggested in the literature. In particular, we find that the interstitialcy model for the boson peak [A. V. Granato, Phys. Rev. Lett. 68 (1992) 974] gives a very good account of the temperature at which the maximum in Cp/T^3 occurs.

  10. Alkalinity tolerance of peach rootstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yan

    1992-01-01

    be substituted for chlorophyll analyses in the alkalinity tolerance evaluation in sorghum, soybeans and citrus (DeCianzio et al. , 1979; Mckenzie et al. , 1984; Sudahono, 1991). Active Fe, a form of Fe effective in chlorophyll formation, is proportional... 1992 ABSTRACT Alkalinity Tolerance of Peach Rootstocks. (May 1992) Yan Shi, B. S. , Fujian Agricultural College Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David H. Byrne Peaches suffer from Fe chlorosis when grown in alkaline soils. A range of alkalinity...

  11. Bekenstein-Spectrum, Hawking-Temperature and Specific Heat of Schwarzschild Black Holes from Microscopic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Krause

    2005-10-28

    We study the thermodynamic consequences of a recently proposed description for a Schwarzschild black hole based on Euclidean (D3,D3)+(\\bar{D3},\\bar{D3}) brane pairs described in terms of chain-like excitations. A discrete mass-spectrum of Bekenstein-type is inferred and upon identification of the black hole mass with the chain's energy the leading corrections to both Hawking-temperature and specific heat of the black hole are obtained. The results indicate that for small black holes the evaporation process will be considerably altered.

  12. LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, G.

    2012-03-06

    The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

  13. Excess Specific Heat of Ptfe and Pctfe at Low Temperatures: Approximation Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogdanova, Nina B

    2008-01-01

    Approximation of the previously estimated excess specific heat C^{excess}/T^{5} of two fluoropolymers, PTFE and PCTFE, is presented using Orthonormal Polynomial Expansion Method (OPEM). The new type of weighting functions in OPEM involves the experimental errors in every point of the studied thermal characteristic. The investigated temperature dependence of the function C^{excess}/T^{5} is described in the whole temperature ranges 0.4\\div8 K and 2.5\\div7 K respectively for PTFE and PCTFE as well as in two subintervals (0.4\\div2) K, (2.5\\div8) K for PTFE. Numerical results of the deviations between the given C^{excess}/T^{5} data and their approximating values are given. The usual polynomial coefficients obtained by orthonormal ones in our OPEM approach and the calculated in every point absolute, relative and specific sensitivities of the studied thermal characteristic are proposed too. The approximation parameters of this type thermal characteristic are shown in Figures and Tables.

  14. The Pseudo Specific Heat in SU(2) Gauge Theory : Finite Size Dependence and Finite Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Engels; T. Scheideler

    1996-10-15

    We investigate the pseudo specific heat of SU(2) gauge theory near the crossover point on $4^4$ to $16^4$ lattices. Several different methods are used to determine the specific heat. The curious finite size dependence of the peak maximum is explained from the interplay of the crossover phenomenon with the deconfinement transition occurring due to the finite extension of the lattice. We find, that for lattices of size $8^4$ and larger the crossover peak is independent of lattice size at $\\beta_{co}=2.23(2)$ and has a peak height of $C_{V,co}=1.685(10)$. We conclude therefore that the crossover peak is not the result of an ordinary phase transition. Further, the contributions to $C_V$ from different plaquette correlations are calculated. We find, that at the peak and far outside the peak the ratio of contributions from orthogonal and parallel plaquette correlations is different. To estimate the finite temperature influence on symmetric lattices far off the deconfinement transition point we calculate the modulus of the lattice average of the Polyakov loop on these lattices and compare it to predictions from a random walk model.

  15. The Pseudo Specific Heat in SU(2) Gauge Theory Finite Size Dependence and Finite Temperature Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engels, J

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the pseudo specific heat of SU(2) gauge theory near the crossover point on $4^4$ to $16^4$ lattices. Several different methods are used to determine the specific heat. The curious finite size dependence of the peak maximum is explained from the interplay of the crossover phenomenon with the deconfinement transition occurring due to the finite extension of the lattice. We find, that for lattices of size $8^4$ and larger the crossover peak is independent of lattice size at $\\beta_{co}=2.23(2)$ and has a peak height of $C_{V,co}=1.685(10)$. We conclude therefore that the crossover peak is not the result of an ordinary phase transition. Further, the contributions to $C_V$ from different plaquette correlations are calculated. We find, that at the peak and far outside the peak the ratio of contributions from orthogonal and parallel plaquette correlations is different. To estimate the finite temperature influence on symmetric lattices far off the deconfinement transition point we calculate the modulus...

  16. Microscale investigation of the corrosion performances of low-carbon and stainless steels in highly alkaline concretes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itty, Pierre-Adrien

    2012-01-01

    Corrosion Behaviour of New Stainless Steels Reinforcing BarsSpecification for Stainless Steel Bars and Shapes. ” ASTMFilms of Different Stainless Steels Developed on Alkaline

  17. Species-specific phenological responses to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazer, SJ; Gerst, KL; Matthews, ER; Evenden, A

    2015-01-01

    to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limitedthe timing and magnitude of precipitation (i.e. , larger butof monthly and annual precipitation (PPT, mm), mean monthly

  18. Specific Heat Exponent for the 3-d Ising Model from a 24-th Order High Temperature Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bhanot; M. Creutz; U. Glaessner; K. Schilling

    1993-12-10

    We compute high temperature expansions of the 3-d Ising model using a recursive transfer-matrix algorithm and extend the expansion of the free energy to 24th order. Using ID-Pade and ratio methods, we extract the critical exponent of the specific heat to be alpha=0.104(4).

  19. Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide hybrid redox battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B.; Hollandsworth, R.P.; Littauer, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The zinc/ferricyanide battery system is described for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications, with advantages of high cell voltage, near-ambient temperature operation, flowing alkaline electrolyte, low-cost reactant storage, low toxicity, potentially long cycle life and low projected capital costs. 13 refs.

  20. PHYS 445 Lecture 9 -Temperature and specific heat 9 -1 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser University. All rights reserved; further resale or copying is strictly prohibited.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boal, David

    PHYS 445 Lecture 9 - Temperature and specific heat 9 - 1 © 2001 by David Boal, Simon Fraser and specific heat What's Important: · thermal equilibrium · temperature · zeroth law of thermodynamics · equipartition theorem · specific heat of an ideal gas Text: Reif Approach to equilibrium (thermal) Let's return

  1. Specific effects of cycling stressful temperatures upon phenotypic and genetic variability of size traits in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debat, Vincent

    of Drosophila melanogaster. We used either cold stress (daily cycle 8­25 C, average 16.5 C) or heat stress with cold stress but a decrease with heat stress. With respect to constant- temperature conditions, evolvability (genetic CV) was increased by daily cold stress, but decreased by daily heat stress. Within

  2. Hot alkaline treatment to stimulate and consolidate the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 sand 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valera Villarroel, Cesar Amabilis

    2005-02-17

    An experimental study was conducted to verify experimentally whether sand consolidation by high-temperature alkaline treatment was possible in the heavy oil Bachaquero-01 reservoir. The experiments were conducted using sand samples from a core taken...

  3. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-31

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  4. Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  5. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  6. Low-temperature specific heat of rare-earth-doped silicate glasses D. A. van de Straat, J. Baak, and H. B. Brom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Thomas

    Low-temperature specific heat of rare-earth-doped silicate glasses D. A. van de Straat, J. Baak, The Netherlands Received 31 July 1995 The specific heat Cv of Pr3 - and Eu3 -doped silicate glasses has been for the two-level-system TLS contribution to the specific heat, Cv TLS . The values of Cv TLS and noticeably

  7. Development of alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollandsworth, R.P.; Adams, G.B.; Webber, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    The zinc/ferro-ferricyanide battery system is intended for utility load leveling and solar photovoltaic/wind applications with advantages of high cyclic efficiency, high cell voltage, near-ambient temperature operation, flowing alkaline electrolyte, low toxicity, potentially long cycle life and low projected capital costs. The system demonstrates excellent electrochemical performance. Cell voltages are 1.88 V OCV and 1.61 V discharge at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ or 57 mW/cm/sup 2/ in 2N NaOH at 40/sup 0/C (Nafion N-125 separator). Cell polarization losses are almost entirely resistive, and, within the separator. Over 800 4-h cycles have been demonstrated in cell of 60-cm/sup 2/ nominal area (70 ma.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 +- 2.1%. Similarly, a 60-cm/sup 2/ cell has demonstrated over 220, 11 to 17 hour cycles (255 +- 48 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity) with a mean energy efficiency of 75.3+-5.1%. Solar acceptability has been demonstrated with random cycling without zinc strip cycles and with typical switching times of less than 5 ms for switching from load to insolation or vice versa. The self-discharge rate has been measured at 1.6%/day. Criteria for separator selection have been established and compatibility with alkaline ferricyanide has been found to be the factor determining membrane life with resistance and electrolyte transference rate, as secondary factors.

  8. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

    1995-01-24

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  9. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  10. Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

    2012-11-13

    Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

  11. Advanced alkaline water electrolysis. Task 2 summary report. Model for alkaline water electrolysis systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaffe, M.R.; Murray, J.N.

    1980-04-01

    Task 2 involved the establishment of an engineering and economic model for the evaluation of various options in water electrolysis. The mode, verification of the specific coding and four case studies are described. The model was tested by evaluation of a nearly commercial technology, i.e., an 80-kW alkaline electrolyte system, operating at 60/sup 0/C, which delivers approximately 255 SLM, hydrogen for applications such as electrical generation cooling or semiconductor manufacturing. The calculated cost of hydrogen from this installed non-optimized case system with an initial cost to the customer of $87,000 was $6.99/Kg H/sub 2/ ($1.67/100 SCF) on a 20-yr levelized basis using 2.5 cents/kWh power costs. This compares favorably to a levelized average merchant hydrogen cost value of $9.11/Kg H/sub 2/ ($2.17/100 SCF) calculated using the same program.

  12. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  13. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    2002-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  14. Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

    2003-01-01

    A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

  15. Alkaline tolerant dextranase from streptomyces anulatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, Stephen R. (Berthoud, CO); Adney, William S. (Golden, CO); Vinzant, Todd B. (Golden, CO); Himmel, Michael E. (Littleton, CO)

    2003-01-01

    A process for production of an alkaline tolerant dextranase enzyme comprises culturing a dextran-producing microorganism Streptomyces anulatus having accession no. ATCC PTA-3866 to produce an alkaline tolerant dextranase, Dex 1 wherein the protein in said enzyme is characterized by a MW of 63.3 kDa and Dex 2 wherein its protein is characterized by a MW of 81.8 kDa.

  16. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  17. Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, David Joseph

    2013-07-16

    A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

  18. Removal of dissolved actinides from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krot, Nikolai N. (Chelomiya St., 2, Apartment 15, Moscow, RU); Charushnikova, Iraida A. (Svoboda St., Bldg. 7A, Apartment 15, Moscow, RU)

    1997-01-01

    A method of reducing the concentration of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline radwastes containing plutonium and neptunium values along with other transuranic values produced during the course of plutonium production. The OH.sup.- concentration of the alkaline radwaste is adjusted to between about 0.1M and about 4M. [UO.sub.2 (O.sub.2).sub.3 ].sup.4- ion is added to the radwastes in the presence of catalytic amounts of Cu.sup.+2, Co.sup.+2 or Fe.sup.+2 with heating to a temperature in excess of about 60.degree. C. or 85.degree. C., depending on the catalyst, to coprecipitate plutonium and neptunium from the radwaste. Thereafter, the coprecipitate is separated from the alkaline radwaste.

  19. Alkaline industrial waters and wetlands: prospects for effective treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ash, lime spoil, C&D waste, Solvay Process waste · CaO hydrolyzes and liberates OH- in solution Ca(OH)2 Ca2+ + 2OH- · NaOH-derived alkalinity at some sites: Bayer Process sources Alkaline leachates

  20. Isotope fractionation in surface ionization ion source of alkaline-earth iodides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, T.; Kanzaki, C.; Nomura, M.; Fujii, Y.

    2012-02-15

    The relationship between the isotope fractionation of alkaline-earth elements in the surface ionization ion source and the evaporation filament current, i.e., filament temperature, was studied. It was confirmed that the isotope fractionation depends on the evaporation filament temperature; the isotope fractionation in the case of higher temperature of filament becomes larger. The ionization and evaporation process in the surface ionization ion source was discussed, and it was concluded that the isotope fractionation is suppressed by setting at the lower temperature of evaporation filament because the dissociations are inhibited on the evaporation filament.

  1. Heat stable alkaline phosphatase from thermophiles. Final report, March-October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combie, J.D.; Runnion, K.N.; Williamson, M.L.

    1994-07-01

    Alkaline phosphatase has been the most widely used enzyme for colorimetric immunoassays. The current potential for this enzyme lies in biosensors, fieldable assay kits, biotechnology applications, degradation of certain nerve agents and pesticides and detoxification of heavy metal waste streams. While the commercial source of this enzyme is predominantly from mammalian tissues, expanded commercial application is restricted by the enzyme's instability at elevated temperatures. Although alkaline phosphatases are ubiquitous in nature, two isolates out of 44 alkaline phosphatase producing isolates occurring in habitats at 50 deg C and above have been isolated possessing extremely stable enzymes. One enzyme retained 98% of original activity following boiling for 1 hr. The secretion of the enzyme by the organism is an added benefit promoting efficient and economical production capability. Procedures for the screening, isolation, and optimal growth and fermentation of organisms acquired from geothermal sources located in Yellowstone National Park, WY are described. Purification was most effectively achieved using size exclusion chromatography where 101% of the activity and 33% of the crude mother liquor protein were recovered. Although the presence of manganese in the assay buffer was observed to significantly elevate the enzyme's catalytic activity, a precipitate incompatibility with calcium chloride, a requirement for high temperature stability, prohibits its use. Bacteria, Fermentation, Alkaline phosphatase, Biosensors, Biotechnology, Heat stable enzymes, Biochemistry, Bioremediation, Thermophilic microorganisms.

  2. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  3. Alkaline solution/binder ratio as a determining factor in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Santaquiteria, C.; Fernandez-Jimenez, A.; Palomo, A.

    2012-09-15

    This study investigates the effect of the alkaline solution/binder (S/B) ratio on the composition and nanostructure of the reaction products generated in the alkaline activation of aluminosilicates. The experiments used two mixtures of fly ash and dehydroxylated white clay and for each of these, varying proportions of the solution components. The alkali activator was an 8 M NaOH solution (with and without sodium silicate) used at three S/B ratios: 0.50, 0.75 and 1.25. The {sup 29}Si, {sup 27}Al MAS NMR and XRD characterisation of the reaction products reveal that for ratios nearest the value delivering suitable paste workability, the reaction-product composition and structure depend primarily on the nature and composition of the starting materials and the alkaline activator used. However, when an excess alkaline activator is present in the system, the reaction products tend to exhibit SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ratios of approximately 1, irrespective of the composition of the starting binder or the alkaline activator.

  4. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80?C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO{sub 2}, and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  5. Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from1 hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under high-carbonate alkalinity2 3 Romain Lafaya, b , German Montes-Hernandeza, *, Emilie Janotsb experiments in order to investigate the simultaneous25 serpentinization and carbonation of olivine-situ and in-situ mineral sequestration of27 CO2). For this case, specific experimental conditions were

  6. Tailoring electrode hydrophobicity to improve anode performance in alkaline media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    t s Backing layers may be permeable to catalyst solvent. 20 wt% PTFE optimal for alkaline anode. High the optimal PTFE loading was 20 wt% in alkaline media. We investigated PTFE and Fumion binders, determining of PTFE in the cathode backing layer [12]. Fairweather et al. determined that PTFE wet- proofing at less

  7. Permeability Modification Using a Reactive Alkaline-Soluble Biopolymer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snadra L. Fox; X. Xie; K. D. Schaller; E. P. Robertson; G. A. Bala

    2003-10-01

    Polymer injection has been used in reservoirs to alleviate contrasting permeability zones. Current technology relies on the use of cross-linking agents to initiate gelation. The use of biological polymers are advantageous in that they can block high permeability areas, are environmentally friendly, and have potential to form reversible gels without the use of hazardous cross-linkers. Recent efforts at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) have produced a reactive alkaline-soluble biopolymer from Agrobacterium sp. ATCC no. 31749 that gels upon decreasing the pH of the polymeric solution. The focus of this study was to determine the impact an alkaline-soluble biopolymer can have on sandstone permeability. Permeability modification was investigated by injecting solubilized biopolymer into Berea sandstone cores and defining the contribution of pH, salt, temperature, and Schuricht crude oil on biopolymer gelation. The biopolymer was soluble in KOH at a pH greater than 11.4 and gelled when the pH dropped below 10.8. The Berea sandstone core buffered the biopolymer solution, decreasing the pH sufficiently to form a gel, which subsequently decreased the permeability. The effluent pH of the control cores injected with 0.01 {und M} KOH (pH 12.0) and 0.10{und M} KOH (pH 13.0) decreased to 10.6 and 12.7, respectively. The permeability of the sandstone core injected with biopolymer was decreased to greater than 95% of the original permeability at 25 C in the presence of 2% NaCl, and Schuricht crude oil; however, the permeability increased when the temperature of the core was increased to 60 C. Residual resistance factors as high as 792 were seen in Berea cores treated with biopolymer. The buffering capacity of sandstone has been demonstrated to reduce the pH of a biopolymer solution sufficiently to cause the polymer to form a stable in-situ gel. This finding could potentially lead to alternate technology for permeability modification, thus extending the life of a reservoir and preventing premature abandonment.

  8. Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

    2001-01-01

    A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

  9. Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

    1980-03-13

    A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

  10. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-lin W.

    1994-01-01

    According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

  11. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01

    A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

  12. Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, C.L.W.

    1995-07-25

    A process is described for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO{sub 2}, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. 4 figs.

  13. Magic wavelengths in the alkaline earth ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Arora, Bindiya; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    We present magic wavelengths for the $nS$ - $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $nS$ - $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ transitions, with the respective ground and first excited $D$ states principal quantum numbers $n$ and $m$, in the Mg$^+$, Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$ and Ba$^+$ alkaline earth ions for linearly polarized lights by plotting dynamic polarizatbilities of the $nS$, $nP_{1/2,3/2}$ and $mD_{3/2,5/2}$ states of the ions. These dynamic polarizabilities are evaluated by employing a relativistic all-order perturbative method and their accuracies are ratified by comparing their static values with the available high precision experimental or other theoretical results. Moreover, some of the magic wavelengths identified by us in Ca$^+$ concurs with the recent measurements reported in [{\\bf Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 223001 (2015)}]. Knowledge of these magic wavelengths are propitious to carry out many proposed high precision measurements trapping the above ions in the electric fields with the corresponding frequencies.

  14. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Haverlock, T J.; Sachleben, R A.; Leonard, R A.; Conner, C; Lumetta, Gregg J. ); M. Cox, M. Hidalgo, and M. Valiente

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating U.S. national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products 99Tc and 137Cs from alkaline high-level wastes. Efficient economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous counter-current centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  15. Solvent Extraction of Tc and Cs from Alkaline Nitrate Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Conner, C.; Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Leonard, R.A.; Lumetta, G.J.; Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1999-07-11

    This paper summarizes progress at three collaborating US national laboratories on the extraction of the fission products {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs from alkaline high-level wastes (HLW). Efficient, economical processes for Tc and Cs extraction (SRTALK and alkaline-side CSEX, respectively) have been developed, and testing has progressed through batch tests on actual wastes and continuous countercurrent centrifugal-contactor tests on simulants.

  16. A NEW CONCEPT IN AN ELECTRICALLY RECHARGEABLE ZINC-AIR ALKALINE BATTERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    flow-thru porous zinc electrode with recirculating supersaturated zincate solution. An alkaline zinc battery

  17. Enhancement of specific heat capacity of high-temperature silica-nanofluids synthesized in alkali chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    chloride salt eutectics for solar thermal-energy storage applications Donghyun Shin, Debjyoti Banerjee December 2010 Keywords: Nanoparticle Specific heat capacity Alkali chloride eutectic Silicon dioxide

  18. Heat inactivation of alkaline phosphatase in human milk 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odumodu, Chinyelu Uzoamaka

    1979-01-01

    of bovine mii. k than in similar portions of human milk. The activity of the enzyme was, in general, three times more in colostrum than in normal human milk. A definite alkaline phosphatase acti. vity with stages of lactation wa- indeterminate because.... LIST OF FIGURES. I NTR ODD'CTI ON. vill 1X The Study and Its Purposes. The Objectives. . LITERATURE REVIEW 1 3 Distribution of the Enzyme in Various Milk Portions. Variation of Alkaline Phosphatase in Relation to 'the Progress of Lactation...

  19. Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

  20. Effect of alkalinity in irrigation water on selected greenhouse crops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valdez Aguilar, Luis Alonso

    2005-11-01

    Effect of Alkalinity in Irrigation Water on Selected Greenhouse Crops. (August 2004) Luis Alonso Valdez Aguilar, B.S., Universidad Aut??noma de Nuevo Le??n, Mexico; M.S., Universidad Aut??noma Chapingo, Mexico Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. David...

  1. Cactus and Alkalinity By Elton Roberts Ripon, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    their water directly from rain. These plants normally grow on a minimum of soil in rocky areas. Many appear dissolving in the rain water. It is this water that the cacti prefer. We have seen that dropping the p in general. The occurrence of highly alkaline water seems to be quite prevalent. For this reason we would

  2. Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

  3. High-performance alkaline ionomer for alkaline exchange membrane fuel cells L. Zeng, T.S. Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay used as the base polymer to synthesize the alkaline ionomer over the past decades [5,6]. Typically), responding to the number of the conductive groups in the polymer. An increase in the IEC, however, will lead

  4. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  5. Positive Active Material For Alkaline Electrolyte Storage Battert Nickel Electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernard, Patrick (Massy, FR); Baudry, Michelle (Le Pontaroux, FR)

    2000-12-05

    A method of manufacturing a positive active material for nickel electrodes of alkaline storage batteries which consists of particles of hydroxide containing mainly nickel and covered with a layer of a hydroxide phase based on nickel and yttrium is disclosed. The proportion of the hydroxide phase is in the range 0.15% to 3% by weight of yttrium expressed as yttrium hydroxide relative to the total weight of particles.

  6. Phase behavior and oil recovery investigations using mixed and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llave, F.M.; Gall, B.L.; French, T.R.; Noll, L.A.; Munden, S.A.

    1992-03-01

    The results of an evaluation of different mixed surfactant and alkaline-enhanced surfactant systems for enhanced oil recovery are described. Several mixed surfactant systems have been studies to evaluate their oil recovery potential as well as improved adaptability to different ranges of salinity, divalent ion concentrations, and temperature. Several combinations of screening methods were used to help identify potential chemical formulations and determine conditions where particular chemical systems can be applied. The effects of different parameters on the behavior of the overall surfactant system were also studied. Several commercially available surfactants were tested as primary components in the mixtures used in the study. These surfactants were formulated with different secondary as well as tertiary components, including ethoxylated and non-ethoxylated sulfonates and sulfates. Improved salinity and hardness tolerance was achieved for some of these chemical systems. The salinity tolerance of these systems were found to be dependent on the molecular weight, surfactant type, and concentration of the surfactant components.

  7. Tuning the Curie temperature of L1{sub 0} ordered FePt thin films through site-specific substitution of Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Dongbin; Sun, Cheng-Jun E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Heald, Steve M.; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, Gan Moog E-mail: msecgm@nus.edu.sg; Zhou, Tie-Jun; Bergman, Anders; Sanyal, Biplab

    2014-10-14

    In structurally ordered magnetic thin films, the Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of ferromagnetic films depends on the exchange integral of the short range ordered neighboring atoms. The exchange integral may be adjusted by controlling the elemental substitutional concentration at the lattice site of interest. We show how to control the T{sub C} in high anisotropy L1{sub 0} Fe{sub 50}Pt{sub 50} magnetic thin films by substituting Rh into the Pt site. Rh substitution in L1{sub 0} FePt modified the local atomic environment and the corresponding electronic properties, while retaining the ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The analysis of extended x-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra shows that Rh uniformly substitutes for Pt in L1{sub 0} FePt. A model of antiferromagnetic defects caused by controlled Rh substitution of the Pt site, reducing the T{sub C,} is proposed to interpret this phenomenon and its validity is further examined by ab initio density functional calculations.

  8. 2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pivovar, B.

    2012-02-01

    A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

  9. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2002-04-29

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2001 through March 31, 2002. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub X} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the fifth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During the previous (fourth) period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (at both Gavin and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub X} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the previous semi-annual technical progress report (April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001). During the current reporting period, additional balance of plant impact information was determined for one of the two tests. These additional balance-of-plant results are presented and discussed in this report. There was no other technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed.

  10. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  11. 2006 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -EnergyEnergySenior Chapter2Energy 06 Alkaline

  12. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    This document summarizes progress on the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2000 through September 30, 2000. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid will also be determined, as will the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NOX selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), First Energy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. This is the second reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, the first of four short-term sorbent injection tests were conducted at the First Energy Bruce Mansfield Plant. This test determined the effectiveness of dolomite injection through out-of-service burners as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from this unit. The tests showed that dolomite injection could achieve up to 95% sulfuric acid removal. Balance of plant impacts on furnace slagging and fouling, air heater fouling, ash loss-on-ignition, and the flue gas desulfurization system were also determined. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

  13. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-10-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

  14. Alkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    optimization is needed for the commercialization of alkaline membrane fuel cell (AMFC) technologiesAlkaline membrane fuel cells with in-situ cross-linked ionomers Yongjun Leng a , Lizhu Wang b membrane fuel cell (AMFC) in-situ cross-linking ionomer net water transport coefficient A B S T R A C

  15. Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Preparation of Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell Binders Based on Fluorinated Poly to be used in a Solid Alkaline Fuel Cell (SAFC) needs to (i) be insoluble in both aqueous solutions,10% > 320 °C). When used in a fuel cell as a binder in the membrane-electrodes assembly (MEA

  16. Genome Sequence of the Alkaline-Tolerant Cellulomonas sp. Strain FA1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cohen, Michael F.; Hu, Ping; Nguyen, My Vu; Kamennaya, Nina; Brown, Natasha; Woyke, Tanja; Kyrpides, Nikos; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Torok, Tamas

    2015-06-18

    We present the genome of the cellulose-degrading Cellulomonas sp. strain FA1 isolated from an actively serpentinizing highly alkaline spring. Knowledge of this genome will enable studies into the molecular basis of plant material degradation in alkaline environments and inform the development of lignocellulose bioprocessing procedures for biofuel production.

  17. Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high alkaline conditions Romain Available online 8 March 2012 Keywords: A1. Mineral replacement rate A1. Serpentinization A1. TG analyses B1. Alkaline medium B2. Chrysotile nanotubes a b s t r a c t Olivine mineral replacement by serpentine is one

  18. ForPeerReview Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    of industrial7 processes, e.g., lime production waste, steelworks slags, coal combustion residues, Solvay8ForPeerReview Only Biogeochemical reduction processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil processes in a hyper-alkaline affected leachate soil profile1 2 Ian T. Burke1* , Robert J.G. Mortimer1

  19. Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Alkaline Microfluidic Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell as a Cathode Characterization Platform Fikile R on an alkaline microfluidic fuel cell for catalyst and electrode characterization. Its constantly refreshing investigated and the dual effects of enhanced oxygen reduction reaction activity and improved ionic

  20. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

  1. Solid-State Water Electrolysis with an Alkaline Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leng, YJ; Chen, G; Mendoza, AJ; Tighe, TB; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2012-06-06

    We report high-performance, durable alkaline membrane water electrolysis in a solid-state cell. An anion exchange membrane (AEM) and catalyst layer ionomer for hydroxide ion conduction were used without the addition of liquid electrolyte. At 50 degrees C, an AEM electrolysis cell using iridium oxide as the anode catalyst and Pt black as the cathode catalyst exhibited a current density of 399 mA/cm(2) at 1.80 V. We found that the durability of the AEM-based electrolysis cell could be improved by incorporating a highly durable ionomer in the catalyst layer and optimizing the water feed configuration. We demonstrated an AEM-based electrolysis cell with a lifetime of > 535 h. These first-time results of water electrolysis in a solid-state membrane cell are promising for low-cost, scalable hydrogen production.

  2. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-06-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the seventh reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO3 removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the previous report (April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002). During the current period, there was no technical progress to report, because all planned testing as part of this project has been completed. The project period of performance was extended to allow the conduct of testing of another SO{sub 3} control technology, the sodium bisulfite injection process. However, these additional tests have not yet been conducted.

  3. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

  4. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2000-12-01

    A test program is being sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), EPRI, FirstEnergy, and TVA to investigate furnace injection of alkaline sorbents as a means of reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in the flue gas from coal-fired boilers. This test program is being conducted at the FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP), although later testing will be conducted at a TVA plant. A sorbent injection test was conducted the week of April 18, 2000. The test was the first of several short-term (one- to two-week duration) tests to investigate the effectiveness of various alkaline sorbents for sulfuric acid control and the effects of these sorbents on boiler equipment performance. This first short-term test investigated the effect of injecting dry dolomite powder (CaCO{sub 3} {center_dot} MgCO{sub 3}), a mineral similar to limestone, into the furnace of Unit 2. During the test program, various analytical techniques were used to assess the effects of sorbent injection. These primarily included sampling with the controlled condensation system (CCS) for determining flue gas SO{sub 3} content and an acid dew-point (ADP) meter for determining the sulfuric acid dew point (and, indirectly, the concentration of sulfuric acid) of the flue gas. EPA Reference Method 26a was used for determining hydrochloric acid (HCl) and hydrofluoric acid (HF), as well and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) and fluorine (F{sub 2}) concentrations in the flue gas. Fly ash resistivity was measured using a Southern Research Institute (SRI) point-to-plane resistivity probe, and unburned carbon in fly ash was determined by loss on ignition (LOI). Coal samples were also collected and analyzed for a variety of parameters. Finally, visual observations were made of boiler furnace and convective pass surfaces prior to and during sorbent injection.

  5. COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-04-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

  6. Contamination and purification of alkaline gas treating solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullough, J.G. [Proton Technology Ltd., Hawthorne, NY (United States); Nielsen, R.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Alkanolamine and potassium carbonate solutions in gas treating units removing carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulfide, or both are contaminated by impurities in the feed gases and makeup water and by the products of the degradation and oxidation of amines occurring in the units themselves. Feed gas impurities include oxygen, carbonyl sulfide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen cyanide, ammonia, brine, solid particles, heavy hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid, organic acids, and pipeline corrosion inhibitors. Impure makeup water contains sulfate, chloride, alkali metal, and alkaline earth ions (hardness). Reactions causing contamination in the units include oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate and thiosulfate, oxidation of amines to formic acid and other products, and degradation of amines by carbon dioxide. The resulting heat-stable salts and polymers reduce the gas absorbing capacity of alkanolamine solutions and increase their corrosiveness. Similar problems occur in potassium carbonate solutions, except that degradation products of amine activators are too dilute to be harmful. Contaminants are removed by inlet gas separation, charcoal and mechanical filtration, neutralization of heat-stable salts, reclaiming at both atmospheric and reduced pressure, upstream washing of the feed gas, electrodialysis, use of antioxidants, ion exchange, and blowdown and dumping of the solution.

  7. A baculovirus alkaline nuclease knockout construct produces fragmented DNA and aberrant capsids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okano, Kazuhiro [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States); Vanarsdall, Adam L. [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States); Rohrmann, George F. [Department of Microbiology, Nash Hall Room 220, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-3804 (United States)]. E-mail: rohrmanng@orst.edu

    2007-03-01

    DNA replication of bacmid-derived constructs of the Autographa californica multiple nucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) was analyzed by field inversion gel electrophoresis (FIGE) in combination with digestion at a unique Eco81I restriction enzyme site. Three constructs were characterized: a parental bacmid, a bacmid deleted for the alkaline nuclease gene, and a bacmid from which the gp64 gene had been deleted. The latter was employed as a control for comparison with the alkaline nuclease knockout because neither yields infectious virus and their replication is limited to the initially transfected cells. The major difference between DNA replicated by the different constructs was the presence in the alkaline nuclease knockout of high concentrations of relatively small, subgenome length DNA in preparations not treated with Eco81I. Furthermore, upon Eco81I digestion, the alkaline nuclease knockout bacmid also yielded substantially more subgenome size DNA than the other constructs. Electron microscopic examination of cells transfected with the alkaline nuclease knockout indicated that, in addition to a limited number of normal-appearing electron-dense nucleocapsids, numerous aberrant capsid-like structures were observed indicating a defect in nucleocapsid maturation or in a DNA processing step that is necessary for encapsidation. Because of the documented role of the baculovirus alkaline nuclease and its homologs from other viruses in homologous recombination, these data suggest that DNA recombination may play a major role in the production of baculovirus genomes.

  8. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

  9. Sodium Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions via Crystalline Urea-Functionalized Capsules: Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custelcean, Radu; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V; Rajbanshi, Arbin; Wan, Shun; Moyer, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The thermodynamics and kinetics of crystallization of sodium sulfate with a tripodal tris-urea receptor (L1) from aqueous alkaline solutions have been measured in the 15 55 C temperature range, with the goal of identifying the optimal conditions for efficient and quick sulfate removal from nuclear wastes. The use of radiolabeled Na235SO4 provided a practical way to monitor the sulfate concentration in solution by liquid scintillation counting. Our results are consistent with a two-step crystallization mechanism, involving relatively quick dissolution of crystalline L1 followed by the rate-limiting crystallization of the Na2SO4(L1)2(H2O)4 capsules. We found that temperature exerted relatively little influence over the equilibrium sulfate concentration, which ranged between 0.004 and 0.011 M. This corresponds to 77 91% removal of sulfate from a solution containing 0.0475 M initial sulfate concentration, as found in a typical Hanford waste tank. The apparent pseudo-first-order rate constant for sulfate removal increased 20-fold from 15 to 55 C, corresponding to an activation energy of 14.1 kcal/mol. At the highest measured temperature of 55 C, 63% and 75% of sulfate was removed from solution within 8 h and 24 h, respectively.

  10. Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    Temperature, Temperature, Earth, geotherm for total global heat flow Venus, geotherm for total global heat flow, 500 Ma #12;Temperature, Temperature, #12;Earth's modern regional continental geotherms Venusian Geotherms, 500 Ma Temperature, Temperature, After Blatt, Tracy, and Owens Petrology #12;Ca2Mg5Si8

  11. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

  12. Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

    2005-12-01

    Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

  13. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-05-15

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 deg. K between 20 and 50 deg. C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  14. The specific heat of pure and hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queen, Daniel Robert

    2011-01-01

    5 Specific heat of electron beam evaporated amorphous 5.1silicon 6 Specific heat of hydrogenated CVD technique 6.1The high temperature specific heat of HWCVD a-Si:H grown at

  15. Dispersion coefficients for the interactions of the alkali and alkaline-earth ions and inert gas atoms with a graphene layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Kiranpreet; Sahoo, B K

    2015-01-01

    Largely motivated by a number of applications, the van der Waals dispersion coefficients ($C_3$s) of the alkali ions (Li$^+$, Na$^+$, K$^+$ and Rb$^+$), the alkaline-earth ions (Ca$^+$, Sr$^+$, Ba$^+$ and Ra$^+$) and the inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar and Kr) with a graphene layer are determined precisely within the framework of Dirac model. For these calculations, we have evaluated the dynamic polarizabilities of the above atomic systems very accurately by evaluating the transition matrix elements employing relativistic many-body methods and using the experimental values of the excitation energies. The dispersion coefficients are, finally, given as functions of the separation distance of an atomic system from the graphene layer and the ambiance temperature during the interactions. For easy extraction of these coefficients, we give a logistic fit to the functional forms of the dispersion coefficients in terms of the separation distances at the room temperature.

  16. Complete recovery of Eu from BaMgAl10O17:Eu2+ alkaline fusion and its mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    and efficient process for recycling waste phosphors has been developed. The alkaline fusion process is used in BMA disintegration in the alkaline fusion process. X-ray diffraction analysis provides details recovery of rare earths from waste phosphors developed by Solvay-Rhodia operated in France in Saint Fons

  17. Carbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas1 emissions into the atmosphere2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    dioxide sequestration process. The overall carbonation reaction includes the following steps: (1)23 CaCarbonation of alkaline paper mill waste to reduce CO2 greenhouse gas1 emissions change.20 This study investigates experimentally the aqueous carbonation mechanisms of an alkaline paper

  18. Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

    2010-01-26

    A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

  19. Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum chemistry study using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joel L.

    Noncovalent interaction or chemical bonding between alkaline earth cations and benzene? A quantum earth metal ion±benzene complexes were performed using the density-functional theory (DFT) B3LYP and ab of the al- kaline earth metal ions to benzene may be attributed to s±p and p±p interactions, which are signi

  20. GENETIC OPTIMIZATION FOR ALKALINE pH OF A CYANIDE DIHYDRATASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS STUTZERI 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Mendoza, Alvaro

    2011-08-08

    is the cyanide dihydratase (CynDstut) found in Pseudomonas stutzeri AK61. The enzyme operates optimally around pH 7-8, but most polluted waters have much higher alkaline pH. The aim of this research project is to construct genetic mutants for this enzyme...

  1. Surface structural changes of perovskite oxides during oxygen evolution in alkaline electrolyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    May, Kevin J. (Kevin Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    Perovskite oxides such Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-6 (BSCF82) are among the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution reported to date. In this work it is shown via high resolution ...

  2. Separating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the atmosphere to the ocean on a similar time scale and that they penetrate into the ocean in a similar mannerSeparating natural and bomb-produced radiocarbon in the ocean: The potential alkalinity method M. Key Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, USA

  3. Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing-electrolyte alkaline fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing- electrolyte alkaline fuel cell Fikile R cell Electrode characterization X-ray micro-computed tomography Microfluidic fuel cell Carbonates a b a microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell as an analytical platform. Both anodes and cathodes were investigated

  4. Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

  5. MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

  6. Heating System Specification Specification of Heating System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Nancy

    Appendix A Heating System Specification /* Specification of Heating System (loosely based */ requestHeat : Room ­? bool; 306 #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION 307 /* user inputs */ living --- HEATERâ??ACTIVE --- ACTIVATINGâ??HEATER --- HEATERâ??RUNNING ; #12; APPENDIX A. HEATING SYSTEM SPECIFICATION

  7. Mechanism of CO Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Media J. S. Spendelow, J. D. Goodpaster, P. J. A. Kenis, and A. Wieckowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    of the mechanism of CO oxidation on Pt surfaces would be useful in optimizing Pt-based catalysts for fuel cell fuel cells (DMFCs) and reformate- fed hydrogen fuel cells.1-11 Alkaline electrolytes have been shown carbonation in alkaline media complicates the use of alkaline electrolytes for fuel cells.16 Fuel cells

  8. Development of conductometric biosensors based on alkaline phosphatases for the water quality control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhetskyy, A

    2008-01-01

    Researches are focused on the elaboration of enzymatic microconductometric device for heavy metal ions detection in water solutions. The manuscript includes a general introduction, the first chapter contains bibliographic review, the second chapter described the fundamentals of conductometric transducers, the third chapter examining the possibility to create and to optimize conductometric biosensor based on bovine alkaline phosphatase for heavy metals ions detection, the fourth chapter devoted to creation and optimization of conductometric biosensor based on alkaline phosphatase active microalgae and sol gel technology, the last chapter described application of the proposed algal biosensor for measurements of heavy metal ions toxicity of waste water, general conclusions stating the progresses achieved in the field of environmental monitoring

  9. Stainless steel anodes for alkaline water electrolysis and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev

    2014-01-21

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel anodes for use in alkaline water electrolysis was increased by immersion of the stainless steel anode into a caustic solution prior to electrolysis. Also disclosed herein are electrolyzers employing the so-treated stainless steel anodes. The pre-treatment process provides a stainless steel anode that has a higher corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel anode of the same composition.

  10. Advances in the growth of alkaline-earth halide single crystals for scintillator detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Neal, John S; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Beck, P; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.

    2014-01-01

    Alkaline-earth scintillators such as strontium iodide and other alkaline-earth halides activated with divalent europium represent some of the most efficient and highest energy resolution scintillators for use as gamma-ray detectors in a wide range of applications. These applications include the areas of nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, the detection of undeclared nuclear material, nuclear physics and materials science, medical diagnostics, space physics, high energy physics, and radiation monitoring systems for first responders, police, and fire/rescue personnel. Recent advances in the growth of large single crystals of these scintillator materials hold the promise of higher crystal yields and significantly lower detector production costs. In the present work, we describe new processing protocols that, when combined with our molten salt filtration methods, have led to advances in achieving a significant reduction of cracking effects during the growth of single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+. In particular, we have found that extended pumping on the molten crystal-growth charge under vacuum for time periods extending up to 48 hours is generally beneficial in compensating for variations in the alkaline-earth halide purity and stoichiometry of the materials as initially supplied by commercial sources. These melt-pumping and processing techniques are now being applied to the purification of CaI2:Eu2+ and some mixed-anion europium-doped alkaline-earth halides prior to single-crystal growth by means of the vertical Bridgman technique. The results of initial studies of the effects of aliovalent doping of SrI2:Eu2+ on the scintillation characteristics of this material are also described.

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Kenneth L.

    2008-11-20

    In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

  12. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  13. Oxidation of methanol on single crystal platinum electrodes in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripkovic, A.V.; Marinkovic, N.; Adzic, R.R.

    1995-10-01

    Methanol oxidation has been studied on three low-index single crystal Pt electrodes and four stepped surfaces, vicinal to the (111) and (100) orientations in alkaline solutions. Considering the onset of the reaction, it appears that the activity decreases in the sequence Pt(100), Pt(110) and Pt(111). This can also be inferred from the quasi-steady-state measurements. The current peaks, observed at different potentials, show the highest activity of Pt(111). The steps cause increase of the surface activity, but are prone to a fast poisoning. The reaction involves a formation of a small amount of CO on Pt(100) but a negligible amount on Pt(111). This was inferred from the in situ FTIR measurements. Two different reaction mechanisms were identified for the Pt(111) and Pt(100). The data clearly show that a large difference of the activity of Pt for methanol oxidation in acid and alkaline solutions originates in a smaller or negligible poisoning effects in alkaline solutions.

  14. Temperature dependent surface electrochemistry on Pt single crystals in alkaline electrolyte: Part 3: The oxygen reduction reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, T.J.; Stamenkovic, V.; Ross Jr., P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Jr. , in Interfacial Electrochemistry-Theory, ExperimentsComprehensive Treatise in Electrochemistry, ed. B.E.Conway,in Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry, ed. B.E.Conway, J.O’

  15. Correlating the hydrogen evolution reaction activity in alkaline electrolytes with the hydrogen binding energy on monometallic surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Myint, M; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2013-05-01

    The slow reaction kinetics of the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) on platinum in alkaline electrolytes hinders the development of alkaline electrolysers, solar hydrogen cells and alkaline fuel cells. A fundamental understanding of the exchange current density of the HER/HOR in alkaline media is critical for the search and design of highly active electrocatalysts. By studying the HER on a series of monometallic surfaces, we demonstrate that the HER exchange current density in alkaline solutions can be correlated with the calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) on the metal surfaces via a volcano type of relationship. The HER activity varies by several orders of magnitude from Pt at the peak of the plot to W and Au located on the bottom of each side of the plot, similar to the observation in acids. Such a correlation suggests that the HBE can be used as a descriptor for identifying electrocatalysts for HER/HOR in alkaline media, and that the HER exchange current density can be tuned by modifying the surface chemical properties.

  16. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments...

  17. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries [Bouncing alkaline batteries: A basic solution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bhadra, S.; Hertzberg, B. J.; Croft, M.; Gallaway, J. W.; Van Tassell, B. J.; Chamoun, M.; Erdonmez, C.; Zhong, Z.; Steingart, D. A.

    2015-03-13

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries had been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and that the coefficient of restitution saturates at a value of 0.63 ± .05 at 50% state if charge when the anode has densified intomore »porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity on in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction spectroscopy.« less

  18. ON THE SPECIFIC HEAT OF FERMI--PASTA--ULAM SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON THE SPECIFIC HEAT OF FERMI--PASTA--ULAM SYSTEMS Andrea CARATI, Luigi GALGANI Universit`a di)@mat.unimi.it ABSTRACT The specific heat of Fermi Pasta Ulam systems was up to now estimated through the energy, the specific heat is found to vanish for vanishing temperatures. Key Words: Fermi--Pasta--Ulam; specific heat

  19. Liquid Fuel Production from Biomass via High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; Michael G. McKellar

    2009-11-01

    A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Hydrogen from electrolysis allows a high utilization of the biomass carbon for syngas production. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-fed biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  20. Separation, Concentration, and Immobilization of Technetium and Iodine from Alkaline Supernate Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Harvey; Michael Gula

    1998-12-07

    Development of remediation technologies for the characterization, retrieval, treatment, concentration, and final disposal of radioactive and chemical tank waste stored within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex represents an enormous scientific and technological challenge. A combined total of over 90 million gallons of high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) are stored in 335 underground storage tanks at four different DOE sites. Roughly 98% of this waste is highly alkaline in nature and contains high concentrations of nitrate and nitrite salts along with lesser concentrations of other salts. The primary waste forms are sludge, saltcake, and liquid supernatant with the bulk of the radioactivity contained in the sludge, making it the largest source of HLW. The saltcake (liquid waste with most of the water removed) and liquid supernatant consist mainly of sodium nitrate and sodium hydroxide salts. The main radioactive constituent in the alkaline supernatant is cesium-137, but strontium-90, technetium-99, and transuranic nuclides are also present in varying concentrations. Reduction of the radioactivity below Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits would allow the bulk of the waste to be disposed of as LLW. Because of the long half-life of technetium-99 (2.1 x 10 5 y) and the mobility of the pertechnetate ion (TcO 4 - ) in the environment, it is expected that technetium will have to be removed from the Hanford wastes prior to disposal as LLW. Also, for some of the wastes, some level of technetium removal will be required to meet LLW criteria for radioactive content. Therefore, DOE has identified a need to develop technologies for the separation and concentration of technetium-99 from LLW streams. Eichrom has responded to this DOE-identified need by demonstrating a complete flowsheet for the separation, concentration, and immobilization of technetium (and iodine) from alkaline supernatant waste.

  1. Cellulose nanocrystal-based composite electrolyte with superior dimensional stability for alkaline fuel cell membranes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Yuan; Artmentrout, Aaron A.; Li, Juchuan; Tekinalp, Halil L.; Nanda, Jagjit; Ozcan, Soydan

    2015-05-13

    Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC)-based composite films were prepared as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and silica gel hybrid was used to bind the CNCs to form a robust composite film. The mass ratio (i.e., 1 : 1, 1 : 2) of PVA and silica gel was tuned to control the hydrophobicity of the resulting films. Composite films with a range of CNC content (i.e., 20 to 60%) were prepared to demonstrate the impact of CNC on the performance of these materials as a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells. Different from previously reported cross-linked polymermore »films, CNC-based composite films with 40% hydrophobic binder (i.e., PVA : silica gel=1 : 2) exhibited simultaneous low water swelling (e.g., ~5%) and high water uptake (e.g., ~80%) due to the hydrophilicity and extraordinary dimensional stability of CNC. It also showed a conductivity of 0.044 and 0.065 S/cm at 20 and 60 oC, respectively. To the best of our knowledge, the film with 60% CNC and 40% binder is characterized by the lowest hydroxide conductivity-normalized swelling ratio. Decreased CNC content (i.e., 40 and 20%) resulted in comparable hydroxide conductivity but a greater swelling ratio. These results demonstrate the advantage of CNC as a key component for a solid electrolyte for alkaline fuel cells over conventional polymers, suggesting the great potential of CNCs in improving the dimensional stability while maintaining the conductivity of existing anion exchange membranes.« less

  2. Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog Input/Output Module Ambient Temperature Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. McKay

    2011-02-01

    Water Power Calculator Temperature and Analog input/output Module Ambient Temperature Testing A series of three ambient temperature tests were conducted for the Water Power Calculator development using the INL Calibration Laboratory’s Tenney Environmental Chamber. The ambient temperature test results demonstrate that the Moore Industries Temperature Input Modules, Analog Input Module and Analog Output Module, ambient temperature response meet or exceed the manufactures specifications

  3. Alkaline Waterflooding Demonstration Project, Ranger Zone, Long Beach Unit, Wilmington Field, California. Fourth annual report, June 1979-May 1980. Volume 3. Appendices II-XVII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, J.D.

    1981-03-01

    Volume 3 contains Appendices II through XVII: mixing instructions for sodium orthosilicate; oil displacement studies using THUMS C-331 crude oil and extracted reservoir core material from well B-110; clay mineral analysis of B-827-A cores; sieve analysis of 4 Fo sand samples from B-110-IA and 4 Fo sand samples from B-827-A; core record; delayed secondary caustic consumption tests; long-term alkaline consumption in reservoir sands; demulsification study for THUMS Long Beach Company, Island White; operating plans and instructions for DOE injection demonstration project, alkaline injection; caustic pilot-produced water test graphs; well test irregularities (6/1/79-5/31/80); alkaline flood pump changes (6/1/79-5/31/80); monthly DOE pilot chemical waterflood injection reports (preflush injection, alkaline-salt injection, and alkaline injection without salt); and caustic safety procedures-alkaline chemicals.

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Rao, Linfeng

    2005-06-01

    Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution.

  5. Sulfate Separation from Aqueous Alkaline Solutions by Selective Crystallization of Alkali Metal Coordination Capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajbanshi, Arbin; Moyer, Bruce A; Custelcean, Radu

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembly of a tris(urea) anion receptor with Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} yields crystalline capsules held together by coordinating Na{sup +} or K{sup +} cations and hydrogen-bonding water bridges, with the sulfate anions encapsulated inside urea-lined cavities. The sodium-based capsules can be selectively crystallized in excellent yield from highly competitive aqueous alkaline solutions ({approx}6 M Na{sup +}, pH 14), thereby providing for the first time a viable approach to sulfate separation from nuclear wastes.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, James C.; Billings, Amanda Y.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Vienna, John D.

    2010-02-26

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  8. Current distributions and dissolution mechanisms during localized corrosion of steels in alkaline environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, H.S.; Ryan, M.P.; Virtanen, S.; Schmuki, P.

    1997-12-31

    In situ corrosion investigations of iron were carried out in alkaline environments to determine the stages of corrosion that may be encountered with steels in concrete. The electrochemical and chemical processes taking place on Fe have been studied using x-ray absorption, current density mapping of the iron surface and artificial pits. The x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy was used to observe the conversion of Fe to oxide in hydroxide solutions. The oxide formed was electrochemically active and changes in valence states between 2+ and 3+ were observed during electrochemical cycling between the passive state and hydrogen evolution. The oxide continued to thicken during the cycling with very little dissolution or any conversion back to the metallic state. Current density mapping in chloride/hydroxide solution showed that corrosion took place in highly localized areas confined by the formation of a corrosion product shell. The activity within the shell decayed on removing a supporting cathodic area limiting but reactivated on its replacement. Artificial pits were used to study the anodic processes taking place within the region confined by the corrosion product shell. The local pH and anodic behavior were similar to that observed in neutral or slightly acid bulk solutions. The dissolution within the artificial pits in alkaline bulk solutions was found to be sensitive to the presence of small-quantities of nitrite.

  9. Investigations Into the Nature of Alkaline Soluble, Non-Pertechnetate Technetium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapko, Brian M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Chatterjee, Sayandev; Edwards, Matthew K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Peterson, Reid A.; Sinkov, Sergey I.

    2013-11-14

    This report summarizes work accomplished in fiscal year (FY) 2013, exploring the chemistry of a low-valence technetium(I) species, [Tc(CO)3(H2O)3]+, a compound of interest due to its implication in the speciation of alkaline-soluble technetium in several Hanford tank waste supernatants. Various aspects of FY 2013’s work were sponsored both by Washington River Protection Solutions and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection; because of this commonality, both sponsors’ work is summarized in this report. There were three tasks in this FY 2013 study. The first task involved examining the speciation of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ in alkaline solution by 99Tc nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The second task involved the purchase and installation of a microcalorimeter suitable to study the binding affinity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ with various inorganic and organic compounds relevant to Hanford tank wastes, although the actual measure of such binding affinities is scheduled to occur in future FYs. The third task involved examining the chemical reactivity of [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ as relevant to the development of a [(CO)3Tc(H2O)3]+ spectroelectrochemical sensor based on fluorescence spectroscopy.

  10. Specific heat and entropy of tachyon Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst Trojan

    2011-08-15

    We consider an ideal Fermi gas of tachyons and derive a low temperature expansion of its thermodynamical functions. The tachyonic specific heat is linear dependent on temperature $C_V=\\epsilon_Fk_FT$ and formally coincides with the specific heat of electron gas if the tachyon Fermi energy is defined as $\\epsilon_F=\\sqrt{k_F-m^2}$.

  11. Entanglement area law from specific heat capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Marcus Cramer

    2015-08-20

    We study the scaling of entanglement in low-energy states of quantum many-body models on lattices of arbitrary dimensions. We allow for unbounded Hamiltonians such that systems with bosonic degrees of freedom are included. We show that if at low enough temperatures the specific heat capacity of the model decays exponentially with inverse temperature, the entanglement in every low-energy state satisfies an area law (with a logarithmic correction). This behaviour of the heat capacity is typically observed in gapped systems. Assuming merely that the low-temperature specific heat decays polynomially with temperature, we find a subvolume scaling of entanglement. Our results give experimentally verifiable conditions for area laws, show that they are a generic property of low-energy states of matter, and, to the best of our knowledge, constitute the first proof of an area law for unbounded Hamiltonians beyond those that are integrable.

  12. Specific heat of a particle on the cone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Moreira, Jr.; E. S. Oliveira

    2006-04-05

    This work investigates how a conical singularity can affect the specific heat of systems. A free nonrelativistic particle confined to the lateral surface of a cone -- conical box -- is taken as a toy model. Its specific heat is determined as a function of the deficit angle and the temperature. For a vanishing deficit angle, the specific heat is that of a particle in a flat disk where a characteristic temperature separates quantum and classical behaviors, as usual. By increasing the deficit angle the characteristic temperature increases also, and eventually another characteristic temperature (which does not depend on the deficit angle) arises. When the cone gets sufficiently sharp, at low and intermediate temperatures the azimuthal degree of freedom is suppressed. At low temperatures the specific heat varies discontinuously with the deficit angle. Connections between certain theorems regarding common zeros of the Bessel functions and this discontinuity are reported.

  13. Specific heat anomalies of open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Peter Hänggi; Peter Talkner

    2009-05-21

    The evaluation of the specific heat of an open, damped quantum system is a subtle issue. One possible route is based on the thermodynamic partition function which is the ratio of the partition functions of system plus bath and of the bath alone. For the free damped particle it has been shown, however, that the ensuing specific heat may become negative for appropriately chosen environments. Being an open system this quantity then naturally must be interpreted as the change of the specific heat obtained as the difference between the specific heat of the heat bath coupled to the system degrees of freedom and the specific heat of the bath alone. While this difference may become negative, the involved specific heats themselves are always positive; thus, the known thermodynamic stability criteria are perfectly guaranteed. For a damped quantum harmonic oscillator, instead of negative values, under appropriate conditions one can observe a dip in the difference of specific heats as a function of temperature. Stylized minimal models containing a single oscillator heat bath are employed to elucidate the occurrence of the anomalous temperature dependence of the corresponding specific heat values. Moreover, we comment on the consequences for the interpretation of the density of states based on the thermal partitionfunction.

  14. Low Specific Activity (LSA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of Low Specific Activity (LSA) material.  This...

  15. Solar Photovoltaic SPECIFICATION, CHECKLIST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHECKLIST AND GUIDE Renewable Energy Ready Home Renewable Energy Ready Home SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC SPECIFICATION, CHECKLIST AND GUIDE i Table of Contents About the...

  16. Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D. Goodpaster, Paul J. A. Kenis, and Andrzej Wieckowski*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Methanol Dehydrogenation and Oxidation on Pt(111) in Alkaline Solutions Jacob S. Spendelow, Jason D, and oxidation of methanol on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions has been examined from a fundamental mechanistic.COhasbeenconfirmedasthemainpoisoningspecies,affectingtherateofmethanoldehydrogenation primarily through repulsive interactions with methanol dehydrogenation intermediates. At direct methanol

  17. Temperature System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConference Tight Oil1 Soil Water and Temperature

  18. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Studies at PNNL are directed toward new solvent formulation for the practical sodium pseudohydroxide extraction systems.

  19. Competition between Metal-Amido and Metal-Imido Chemistries in the Alkaline Earth Series: An Experimental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    produced by the reaction of ammonia or ND3 and barium vapor in the presence of a dc discharge. Transitions, they represent successive steps in reduction of nitrogen to ammonia. Aside from these relationships, metal- amido and alkaline earth metal-amido and -imido species have recently been proposed as materials for storage

  20. Charge carriers in alkaline direct oxidation fuel cells Liang An, T. S. Zhao,* Yinshi Li and Qixing Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Charge carriers in alkaline direct oxidation fuel cells Liang An, T. S. Zhao,* Yinshi Li and Qixing than Na+ ions. In a fuel cell system, charge carriers represent positively or negatively charged ions single-ion fuel cells is obvious; e.g. H+ ion is the charge carrier in proton exchange membrane fuel

  1. An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    An alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell with a cation exchange membrane Liang An and T. S. Zhao the performance of anion exchange membrane (AEM) direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs) is that state-of-the-art AEMs exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM- DEFCs) have received ever-increasing attention, mainly

  2. Chromate Reduction in Highly Alkaline Groundwater by Zerovalent Iron: Implications for Its Use in a Permeable Reactive Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Ian

    chromite ore processing residue (COPR). This study compares Cr(VI) removal from COPR leachate and chromate leachate. The reaction is first order with respect to both [Cr(VI)] and the iron surface area, but iron form in COPR leachate. Leachate from highly alkaline COPR contains Ca, Si, and Al that precipitate

  3. The isolation and characterization of tegument specific cDNA clones from a Fasciola hepatica expression library 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiefer, Michael Monroe

    1988-01-01

    betagalactosidase fusion proteins in E. coli. Clone M3 produced a fusion protein of 138 Kd and clones 10, 20 and 21 all produced a 130 Kd fusion protein. Using fusion-protein-specific antibodies, the native antigen molecular weights for clones M3 and 21 were... using the fusion-protein-specific antibodies in immunofluorescence assays on cryostat sections of adult flukes. The specific antibodies from clones M3 and 20 were also used in an alkaline phosphatase assay done on thin sections of adult flukes...

  4. Ultrasonic hydrometer. [Specific gravity of electrolyte

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swoboda, C.A.

    1982-03-09

    The disclosed ultrasonic hydrometer determines the specific gravity (density) of the electrolyte of a wet battery, such as a lead-acid battery. The hydrometer utilizes a transducer that when excited emits an ultrasonic impulse that traverses through the electrolyte back and forth between spaced sonic surfaces. The transducer detects the returning impulse, and means measures the time t between the initial and returning impulses. Considering the distance d between the spaced sonic surfaces and the measured time t, the sonic velocity V is calculated with the equation V = 2d/t. The hydrometer also utilizes a thermocouple to measure the electrolyte temperature. A hydrometer database correlates three variable parameters including sonic velocity in and temperature and specific gravity of the electrolyte, for temperature values between 0 and 40/sup 0/C and for specific gravity values between 1.05 and 1.30. Upon knowing two parameters (the calculated sonic velocity and the measured temperature), the third parameter (specific gravity) can be uniquely found in the database. The hydrometer utilizes a microprocessor for data storage and manipulation.

  5. Microlaminated high temperature intermetallic composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, R.G.; Skelly, D.W.; Larsen, M. (GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)); Heathcote, J.; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Materials Dept.)

    1994-12-01

    The thrust to weight ratio of aircraft engines is limited by the density and elevated temperature capability of high temperature turbine materials. Single crystal superalloys, which are the current state-of-the-art in high temperature turbine blade materials, have limited potential for further increases in temperature capability. High temperature intermetallics offer the advantage of higher specific strength and higher temperature capability, but lack ductility and fracture toughness below 1,000 C. By compositing these very high temperature intermetallics with ductile metals, toughening may be improved to the point where the composites have applicability in aircraft engine turbine sections. Lamination of ductile metals with continuous intermetallic layers offers one means of producing such composites. Small lamellae thicknesses may have advantages related to intrinsic defect sizes and the effectiveness of ductile reinforcements in load-controlled applications where strength is important. Intermetallic composites will require a refractory metal for toughening because of the need for metal strength at temperatures above 1,100 C. Niobium-base alloys were selected as the toughening layer in this study because of experience with oxidation-resistant niobium alloys with low densities compared to superalloys and the existence of metal-intermetallic systems in equilibrium at high temperatures. Two microlaminated composite systems, Nb[sub 3]Al-Nb and Cr[sub 2]Nb(Cr) were chosen for microstructural and mechanical property evaluation. The choice of systems was partially based upon knowledge of phase relations between the metal and the intermetallic compositions.

  6. Specific light in sculpture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, John William

    1989-01-01

    Specific light is defined as light from artificial or altered natural sources. The use and manipulation of light in three dimensional sculptural work is discussed in an historic and contemporary context. The author's work ...

  7. Redesigning specificity in miniproteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christina Marie

    2006-01-01

    This work focuses on designing specific miniprotein interactions using computational models and then testing these designs with experiments. Miniproteins are small, autonomously-folding proteins that are excellent for ...

  8. High Temperatures & Electricity Demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

  9. FTIR study of the photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene over UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} nanoballs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhengru [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Qidong; Qu, Zhenping; Hou, Yang; Zhao, Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chen, Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, photocatalysts of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs were obtained via a hydrothermal treating of commercial P25 in alkaline solution, and then characterized with SEM, XRD, BET and surface photovoltage spectroscopy techniques. The UV-assisted photodegradation of gaseous benzene over P25 and the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs was monitored by an in situ infrared technique. The results demonstrated that the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs in anatase form were more active than commercial P25 in photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous benzene. The promoted activity of the hydrothermal-treated TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the increasing specific surface area and larger band gap induced by the reduced crystallite size. The spectra of FTIR indicated that weakly adsorbed phenol was formed as the reaction progress. Hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs are able to react with photo-produced phenol, which is then retained on the catalyst surface leading to the progressive deactivation of the catalyst in the gas-solid system.

  10. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  11. Mold, flow, and economic considerations in high temperature precision casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Matthew S

    2013-01-01

    Casting high temperature alloys that solidify through a noticeable two phase region, specifically platinum-ruthenium alloys, is a particularly challenging task due to their high melting temperature and this necessitates ...

  12. Understanding the Factors Affecting the Formation of Carbonyl Iron Electrodes in Rechargeable Alkaline Iron Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Yang, B; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2012-01-01

    Rechargeable iron-based alkaline batteries such as iron - air and nickel - iron batteries are attractive for large-scale electrical energy storage because iron is inexpensive, globally-abundant and environmentally-friendly. Further, the iron electrode is known for its robustness to repeated charge/discharge cycling. During manufacturing these batteries are charged and discharged 20 to 50 times during which the discharge capacity of the iron electrode increases gradually and attains a stable value. This process of achieving stable capacity is called formation. In this study we have focused our efforts on understanding the effect of electrode design on formation. We have investigated the role of wetting agent, pore-former additive, and sulfide additive on the formation of carbonyl iron electrodes. The wetting agent increased the rate of formation while the pore-former additive increased the final capacity. Sodium sulfide added to the electrolyte worked as a de-passivation agent and increased the final discharge capacity. We have proposed a phenomenological model for the formation process that predicts the rate of formation and final discharge capacity given the design parameters for the electrode. The understanding gained here will be useful in reducing the time lost in formation and in maximizing the utilization of the iron electrode. (C) 2012 The Electrochemical Society. [DOI: 10.1149/2.021301jes] All rights reserved.

  13. CP(N-1) Quantum Field Theories with Alkaline-Earth Atoms in Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Laflamme; W. Evans; M. Dalmonte; U. Gerber; H. Mejía-Díaz; W. Bietenholz; U. -J. Wiese; P. Zoller

    2015-07-24

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1+1)-d CP(N-1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3+1)-d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and $\\theta$ vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N-1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic state preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false $\\theta$-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  14. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of low-activity waste immobilization. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudohydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  15. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Custelcean, Radu; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Kang, Hyun-Ah; Keever, Tamara J.; Marchand, Alan P.; Gadthula, Srinivas; Gore, Vinayak K.; Huang, Zilin; Sivappa, Rasapalli; Tirunahari, Pavan K.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2005-09-26

    The purpose of this research involving collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is to explore new approaches to the separation of sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, and other sodium salts from high-level alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit is a major reduction in disposed waste volume, obviating the building of expensive new waste tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. Principles of ion recognition are being researched toward discovery of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from other waste components. The successful concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction using fluorinated alcohols and phenols is being developed at ORNL and PNNL toward a greater understanding of the controlling equilibria, role of solvation, and of synergistic effects involving crown ethers. Synthesis efforts are being directed toward enhanced sodium binding by crown ethers, both neutral and proton-ionizable. Studies with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent compositions that have promising properties.

  16. CP(N-1) Quantum Field Theories with Alkaline-Earth Atoms in Optical Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laflamme, C; Dalmonte, M; Gerber, U; Mejía-Díaz, H; Bietenholz, W; Wiese, U -J; Zoller, P

    2015-01-01

    We propose a cold atom implementation to attain the continuum limit of (1+1)-d CP(N-1) quantum field theories. These theories share important features with (3+1)-d QCD, such as asymptotic freedom and $\\theta$ vacua. Moreover, their continuum limit can be accessed via the mechanism of dimensional reduction. In our scheme, the CP(N-1) degrees of freedom emerge at low energies from a ladder system of SU(N) quantum spins, where the N spin states are embodied by the nuclear Zeeman states of alkaline-earth atoms, trapped in an optical lattice. Based on Monte Carlo results, we establish that the continuum limit can be demonstrated by an atomic quantum simulation by employing the feature of asymptotic freedom. We discuss a protocol for the adiabatic state preparation of the ground state of the system, the real-time evolution of a false $\\theta$-vacuum state after a quench, and we propose experiments to unravel the phase diagram at non-zero density.

  17. Assessment of commercially available ion exchange materials for cesium removal from highly alkaline wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, K.P.; Kim, A.Y.; Kurath, D.E.

    1996-04-01

    Approximately 61 million gallons of nuclear waste generated in plutonium production, radionuclide removal campaigns, and research and development activities is stored on the Department of Energy`s Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington. Although the pretreatment process and disposal requirements are still being defined, most pretreatment scenarios include removal of cesium from the aqueous streams. In many cases, after cesium is removed, the dissolved salt cakes and supernates can be disposed of as LLW. Ion exchange has been a leading candidate for this separation. Ion exchange systems have the advantage of simplicity of equipment and operation and provide many theoretical stages in a small space. The organic ion exchange material Duolite{trademark} CS-100 has been selected as the baseline exchanger for conceptual design of the Initial Pretreatment Module (IPM). Use of CS-100 was chosen because it is considered a conservative, technologically feasible approach. During FY 96, final resin down-selection will occur for IPM Title 1 design. Alternate ion exchange materials for cesium exchange will be considered at that time. The purpose of this report is to conduct a search for commercially available ion exchange materials which could potentially replace CS-100. This report will provide where possible a comparison of these resin in their ability to remove low concentrations of cesium from highly alkaline solutions. Materials which show promise can be studied further, while less encouraging resins can be eliminated from consideration.

  18. Modeling experimental results of diffusion of alkaline solutions through a compacted bentonite barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Raul; Cuevas, Jaime; Maeder, Urs K.

    2010-08-15

    The interaction between concrete/cement and swelling clay (bentonite) has been modeled in the context of engineered barrier systems for deep geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The geochemical transformations observed in laboratory diffusion experiments at 60 and 90 {sup o}C between bentonite and different high-pH solutions (K-Na-OH and Ca(OH){sub 2}-saturated) were reconciled with the reactive transport code CrunchFlow. For K-Na-OH solutions (pH = 13.5 at 25 {sup o}C) partial dissolution of montmorillonite and precipitation of Mg-silicates (talc-like), hydrotalcite and brucite at the interface are predicted at 60 {sup o}C, while at 90 {sup o}C the alteration is wider. Alkaline cations diffused beyond the mineralogical alteration zone by means of exchange with Mg{sup 2+} in the interlayer region of montmorillonite. Very slow reactivity and minor alteration of the clay are predicted in the Ca(OH){sub 2}-bentonite system. The model is a reasonable description of the experiments but also demonstrates the difficulties in modeling processes operating at a small scale under a diffusive regime.

  19. DOT specification packages evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Rawl, R.R. )

    1991-01-01

    During the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Department of Transportation (DOT) specification package system was implemented to serve as a useful and equivalent alternative to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Bureau of Explosives approval systems for Type B and fissile radioactive material package designs. When a package design was used by a large number of organizations, the package design was added to the DOT regulations as a specification package authorized for use by any shipper. In the mid-1970s, the NRC revised its package design certification system to the one in use today. This paper reports that, while the NRC and DOT transportation regulations have evolved over the years, the DOT specification package designs have remained largely unchanged. Questions have been raised as to whether these designs meet the current and proposed regulations. In order to enable the NRC and DOT to develop a regulatory analysis that will support appropriate action regarding the specification packages, a study is being performed to compile all available design, testing, and analysis information on these packages.

  20. IDC System Specification Document.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, David J.

    2014-12-01

    This document contains the system specifications derived to satisfy the system requirements found in the IDC System Requirements Document for the IDC Reengineering Phase 2 project. Revisions Version Date Author/Team Revision Description Authorized by V1.0 12/2014 IDC Reengineering Project Team Initial delivery M. Harris

  1. Methods of use of calcium hexa aluminate refractory linings and/or chemical barriers in high alkali or alkaline environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGowan, Kenneth A; Cullen, Robert M; Keiser, James R; Hemrick, James G; Meisner, Roberta A

    2013-10-22

    A method for improving the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of a liner in contact with at least one of an alkali and/or alkaline environments is provided. The method comprises lining a surface that is subject to wear by an alkali environment and/or an alkaline environment with a refractory composition comprising a refractory aggregate consisting essentially of a calcium hexa aluminate clinker having the formula CA.sub.6, wherein C is equal to calcium oxide, wherein A is equal to aluminum oxide, and wherein the hexa aluminate clinker has from zero to less than about fifty weight percent C.sub.12A.sub.7, and wherein greater than 98 weight percent of the calcium hexa aluminate clinker having a particle size ranging from -20 microns to +3 millimeters, for forming a liner of the surface. This method improves the insulating character/and or penetration resistance of the liner.

  2. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  3. ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphorus Speciation in Manure-Amended Alkaline Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    JournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Phosphorus Speciation in Manure-Amended Alkaline Soils Jeremy C. Hansen, Barbara J. Cade-Menun, and Daniel G or mononucleotides, allowing it toThe manure from stockpiles is applied to soils in solid form, while lagoon manure is applied as a liquid. Soil amendment with manure form relatively stable complexes in soil that are pro

  4. Low-temperature geothermal database for Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, G.

    1994-11-01

    The goals of the low-temperature assessment project, performed by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) is aimed primarily at updating the inventory of the nation's low and moderate temperature geothermal resources. The study has begun in Oregon, where the areas of Paisley, Lakeview, Burns/Hines, Lagrande, and Vale were identified over 40 sites as having potential for direct heat utilization. Specifics sites are outlined, detailing water temperature, flow, and current uses of the sites.

  5. Kinetics of hydrolysis and oxidation of carbon disulfide by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium and application to carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewuyi, Y.G.; Carmichael, G.R.

    1987-02-01

    Kinetic studies of the oxidation of carbon disulfide by hydrogen peroxide in alkaline medium were made spectrophotometrically. The reaction of CS/sub 2/ with OH/sup -/ ion was found to be rate controlling and proceeded by the formation of a dithiocarbonate complex. The major reaction product was sulfate with sulfur occurring as colloidal suspensions only at pH values less than 8. The formation of sulfate increased exponentially with time and was also found to be dependent on the rate of hydrolysis of CS/sub 2/. In addition, the production of sulfate showed large induction periods, suggesting either a complex mechanism or formation by secondary reactions. The results obtained for carbon disulfide were extended to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) oxidation in alkaline solutions. The removal of OCS (acid gas) from mixtures of gases by alkaline liquid absorbents (e.g. NaOH) and oxidation of subsequent solutions to sulfate is an important industrial practice. 42 references, 14 figures, 2 tables.

  6. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations Denis L 2014) We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene that at temperature T specific heat varies with temperature as Tn , where n ¼ 1 for graphene, n ¼ 1

  7. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Smirnov, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by the Company and ITER. The Fabrication Specifications may reflect some national requirements and regulations that are not fully provided here. This document presents the ITER CSI specifications.

  8. Specific heat in two-dimensional melting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Deutschländer; Antonio M. Puertas; Georg Maret; Peter Keim

    2014-05-14

    We report the specific heat $c_N$ around the melting transition(s) of micrometer-sized superparamagnetic particles confined in two dimensions, calculated from fluctuations of positions and internal energy, and corresponding Monte Carlo simulations. Since colloidal systems provide single particle resolution, they offer the unique possibility to compare the experimental temperatures of peak position of $c_N(T)$ and symmetry breaking, respectively. While order parameter correlation functions confirm the Kosterlitz-Thouless-Halperin-Nelson-Young melting scenario where translational and orientational order symmetries are broken at different temperatures with an intermediate so called hexatic phase, we observe a single peak of the specific heat within the hexatic phase, with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation. Thus, the peak is not associated with broken symmetries but can be explained with the total defect density, which correlates with the maximum increase of isolated dislocations. The absence of a latent heat strongly supports the continuous character of both transitions.

  9. Uncertainty in the reactive transport model response to an alkaline perturbation in a clay formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnol, A.; Blanc, P.; Xu, T.; Spycher, N.; Gaucher, E.C.

    2006-01-01

    parameters (permeability, capillary pressure of concrete/Concrete Clay Van Genuchten Po (Pa) Van Genuchten m Specific Heat (J/kg K) Permeability (

  10. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

    2004-06-30

    In this project, now completing its third year of its second renewal period, a collaborative project involving Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and the University of North Texas has been addressing outstanding questions regarding the separation of the bulk sodium constituents of alkaline tank waste. The principal potential benefit of this research is a major reduction in the volume of radioactive tank waste, obviating the building of expensive new tanks and reducing the costs of vitrification. As a general approach, principles of ion recognition are being explored toward discovery and basic understanding of liquid-liquid extraction systems that selectively separate sodium hydroxide and sodium salts from waste-like matrices. Questions being addressed pertain to applicable extraction equilibria and how extraction properties relate to extractant structure. Progress has included the elucidation of the promising concept of pseudo hydroxide extraction (PHE), demonstration of crown-ether synergized PHE, demonstration of combined sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate separation, and synthesis of novel ditopic receptors for ditopic PHE. In future efforts (pending renewal), a thermochemical study of PHE relating extractant acidity to extraction strength is proposed, and this study will be extended to systems containing crown ethers, including proton-ionizable ones. A series of crown ethers will be synthesized for this purpose and to investigate the extraction of bulk sodium salts (e.g., nitrate, nitrite, and sulfate), possibly in combination with sodium hydroxide. Simple proof-of-principle tests with real tank waste at PNNL will provide feedback toward solvent designs that have desirable properties. In view of the upcoming milestone of completion of the second renewal period, this report will, in addition to providing a summary of the past year's progress, summarize all of the work completed since the start of this project.

  11. Developing and Testing an Alkaline-Side Solvent Extraction Process for Technetium Separation from Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Ralph A.; Conner, Cliff; Liberatore, Matthew W.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Presley, Derek J.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J. )

    1998-11-01

    Engineering development and testing of the SRTALK solvent extraction process are discussed in this paper. This process provides a way to carry out alkaline-side removal and recovery of technetium in the form of pertechnetate anion from nuclear waste tanks within the DOE complex. The SRTALK extractant consists of a crown ether, bis-4,4'(5')[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6, in a modifier, tributyl phosphate, and a diluent, Isopar-L. The SRTALK flowsheet given here separates technetium form the waste and concentrates it by a factor of ten to minimize the load on downstream evaporator for the technetium effluent. In this work, we initially generated and correlated the technetium extraction data, measured the dispersion number for various processing conditions, and determined hydraulic performance in a single-stage 2-cm centrifugal contactor. Then we used extraction-factor analysis, single-stage contactor tests, and stage-to-stage process calculations to develop a SRTALK flowsheet . Key features of the flowsheet are (1) a low organic-to-aqueous (O/A) flow ratio in the extraction section and a high O/A flow ratio in the strip section to concentrate the technetium and (2) the use of a scrub section to reduce the salt load in the concentrated technetium effluent. Finally, the SRTALK process was evaluated in a multistage test using a synthetic tank waste. This test was very successful. Initial batch tests with actual waste from the Hanford nuclear waste tanks show the same technetium extractability as determined with the synthetic waste feed. Therefore, technetium removal from actual tank wastes should also work well using the SRTALK process.

  12. Oak Ridge Site Specific

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific adviSORy

  13. Pairing and specific heat in hot nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Gambacurta; Denis Lacroix; Nicu Sandulescu

    2013-07-15

    The thermodynamics of pairing phase-transition in nuclei is studied in the canonical ensemble and treating the pairing correlations in a finite-temperature variation after projection BCS approach (FT-VAP). Due to the restoration of particle number conservation, the pairing gap and the specific heat calculated in the FT-VAP approach vary smoothly with the temperature, indicating a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal phase, as expected in finite systems. We have checked that the predictions of the FT-VAP approach are very accurate when compared to the results obtained by an exact diagonalization of the pairing Hamiltonian. The influence of pairing correlations on specific heat is analysed for the isotopes $^{161,162}$Dy and $^{171,172}$Yb. It is shown that the FT-VAP approach, applied with a level density provided by mean field calculations and supplemented, at high energies, by the level density of the back-shifted Fermi gas model, can approximate reasonably well the main properties of specific heat extracted from experimental data. However, the detailed shape of the calculated specific heat is rather sensitive to the assumption made for the mean field.

  14. 3 omega method for specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Lu; W. Yi; D. L. Zhang

    2002-02-06

    We present a 3 omega method for simultaneously measuring the specific heat and thermal conductivity of a rod- or filament-like specimen using a way similar to a four-probe resistance measurement. The specimen in this method needs to be electrically conductive and with a temperature-dependent resistance, for acting both as a heater to create a temperature fluctuation and as a sensor to measure its thermal response. With this method we have successfully measured the specific heat and thermal conductivity of platinum wire specimens at cryogenic temperatures, and measured those thermal quantities of tiny carbon nanotube bundles some of which are only 10^-9 g in mass.

  15. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed of complex or 'recalcitrant' compounds will erroneously attribute a greater temperature sensitivity to those materials than they may actually possess.

  16. Water, salt water and alkaline solution uptake in epoxy thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, P.; Lees, Janet M.

    2013-05-10

    type and temperature, are explored. Experimental results, where the solution uptake in desiccated (D) or undesiccated (U) thin films of a commercially available epoxy matrix subjected to water (W), salt water (SW), or alkali concrete pore solution (CPS...

  17. Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivan Diaz-Loya, E.; Allouche, Erez N.; Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R.; Kupwade-Patil, Kunal

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

  18. CO adsorption and kinetics on well-characterized Pd films on Pt(111) in alkaline solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenz, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Wandelt, K.; Ross, P.N.; Markovic, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    The electrochemistry of CO on a bare Pt(111) electrode as well as a Pt(111) electrode modified with pseudomorphic thin palladium films has been studied in alkaline solution by means of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. First Pd films were prepared and well characterized in UHV and subsequently transferred into the electrochemical cell for the registration of the voltammetric profiles. The charge corresponding to the formation of underpotentially deposited hydrogen (H{sub upd}) on these Pt(111)-xPd surfaces was established in sulfuric acid solution as a function of x (0 {le} x {le} 1 Pd monolayer (ML)). All subsequent measurements were then performed on electrochemically deposited palladium films using the above H{sub upd}-charge vs. Pd coverage relationship to evaluate the amount of electrochemically deposited palladium. FTIR spectra for CO adsorbed on one monolayer and a submonolayer coverage are compared to those of the unmodified Pt(111) surface, all surfaces having identical 2D lattice structures. Infrared absorption bands of CO bound on either Pt(111) or Pt(111)-1ML Pd are clearly distinguished. Spectra of CO adsorbed on Pd submonolayers show characteristic features of both CO bound to Pt and to Pd, indicating that on Pt(111)-xPd surfaces there is no coupling between Pt-CO{sub ad} and Pd-CO{sub ad} molecules. The kinetics of CO oxidation on these surfaces is determined either by rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements or by FTIR spectroscopy, monitoring the CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} production. The oxidation of CO{sub ad} on Pt(111) and on Pd modified platinum surfaces starts at the same potential, ca. at 0.2 V. The oxidation rate is, however, considerably lower on the Pt(111)-xPd surfaces than on the Pt(111) surface. The kinetics of CO oxidation appears to be determined by the nature of adsorbed hydroxyl anions (OH{sub ad}), which are more strongly (less active) adsorbed on the highly oxophilic Pd atoms.

  19. Age and gender specific biokinetic model for strontium in humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shagina, N. B.; Tolstykh, E. I.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2015-03-01

    A biokinetic model for strontium in humans is necessary for quantification of internal doses due to strontium radioisotopes. The ICRP-recommended biokinetic model for strontium has limitation for use in a population study, because it is not gender specific and does not cover all age ranges. The extensive Techa River data set on 90Sr in humans (tens of thousands of measurements) is a unique source of data on long-term strontium retention for men and women of all ages at intake. These, as well as published data, were used for evaluation of age- and gender-specific parameters for a new compartment biokinetic model for strontium (Sr-AGe model). The Sr-AGe model has similar structure as the ICRP model for the alkaline earth elements. The following parameters were mainly reevaluated: gastro-intestinal absorption and parameters related to the processes of bone formation and resorption defining calcium and strontium transfers in skeletal compartments. The Sr-AGe model satisfactorily describes available data sets on strontium retention for different kinds of intake (dietary and intravenous) at different ages (0–80 years old) and demonstrates good agreement with data sets for different ethnic groups. The Sr-AGe model can be used for dose assessment in epidemiological studies of general population exposed to ingested strontium radioisotopes.

  20. Recovery of manganese oxides from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries. An application as catalysts for VOCs elimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, María V.; Falco, Lorena R.; Peluso, Miguel A.; Sambeth, Jorge E.; Thomas, Horacio J.

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) and a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.

  1. Development of Effective Solvent Modifiers for the Solvent Extraction of Cesium from Alkaline High-Level Tank Waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, Peter V.; Delmau, Laetitia H.; Moyer, Bruce A.; Lumetta, Gregg J. )

    2003-01-01

    A series of novel alkylphenoxy fluorinated alcohols were prepared and investigated for their effectiveness as modifiers in solvents containing calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 for extracting cesium from alkaline nitrate media. A modifier that contained a terminal 1,1,2,2-tetrafluoroethoxy group was found to decompose following long-term exposure to warm alkaline solutions. However, replacement of the tetrafluoroethoxy group with a 2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy group led to a series of modifiers that possessed the alkaline stability required for a solvent extraction process. Within this series of modifiers, the structure of the alkyl substituent (tert-octyl, tert-butyl, tert-amyl, and sec-butyl) of the alkylphenoxy moiety was found to have a profound impact on the phase behavior of the solvent in liquid-liquid contacting experiments, and hence on the overall suitability of the modifier for a solvent extraction process. The sec-butyl derivative[1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol] (Cs-7SB) was found to possess the best overall balance of properties with respect to third phase and coalescence behavior, cleanup following degradation, resistance to solids formation, and cesium distribution behavior. Accordingly, this modifier was selected for use as a component of the solvent employed in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) process for removing cesium from high level nuclear waste (HLW) at the U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Savannah River Site. In batch equilibrium experiments, this solvent has also been successfully shown to extract cesium from both simulated and actual solutions generated from caustic leaching of HLW tank sludge stored in tank B-110 at the DOE?s Hanford Site.

  2. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Technical progress report for the period of April--June, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study of the West Kiehl is to (1) quantify the incremental oil produced from the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project by classical engineering and numerical simulation techniques, (2) quantify the effect of chemical slug volume on incremental oil in the two swept areas of the field, (3) determine the economics of the application of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology, (4) forecast the results of injecting an alkaline--surfactant-polymer solution to mature waterfloods and polymer floods, and (5) provide the basis for independent operators to book additional oil reserves by using the alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology. This report will document the numerical simulation waterflood, polymer flood, alkaline-surfactant flood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood predictions from the West Kiehl and Prairie Creek South fields.

  3. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  4. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  5. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project is to develop a down-hole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole temperature up to 300 °C for measuring motor temperature; pump discharge pressure; and formation temperature and pressure.

  6. Finite Temperature Schrödinger Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bai-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Qing-Cai Wang; Yan Wang

    2011-06-11

    We know Schr\\"{o}dinger equation describes the dynamics of quantum systems, which don't include temperature. In this paper, we propose finite temperature Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature. When the temperature T=0, it become Shr\\"{o}dinger equation.

  7. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  8. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  9. Combined Utilization of Cation Exchanger and Neutral Receptor to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation of Sodium Salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Moyer, Bruce A.

    2004-03-29

    In this report, novel approaches to the selective liquid-liquid extraction separation of sodium hydroxide and sodium nitrate from high-level alkaline tank waste will be discussed. Sodium hydroxide can be successfully separated from alkaline tank-waste supernatants by weakly acidic lipophilic hydroxy compounds via a cation-exchange mechanism referred to as pseudo hydroxide extraction. In a multi-cycle process, as sodium hydroxide in the aqueous phase becomes depleted, it is helpful to have a neutral sodium receptor in the extraction system to exploit the high nitrate concentration in the waste solution to promote sodium removal by an ion-pair extraction process. Simultaneous utilization of an ionizable organic hydroxy compound and a neutral extractant (crown ether) in an organic phase results in the synergistic enhancement of ion exchange and improved separation selectivity due to the receptor's strong and selective sodium binding. Moreover, combination of the hydroxy compound and the crown ether provides for mutually increased solubility, even in a non-polar organic solvent. Accordingly, application of Isopar{reg_sign} L, a kerosene-like alkane solvent, becomes feasible. This investigation involves examination of such dual-mechanism extraction phases for sodium extraction from simulated and actual salt cake waste solutions. Sodium salts can be regenerated upon the contact of the loaded extraction phases with water. Finally, conditions of potential extraction/strip cycling will be discussed.

  10. Enhancing the Performance of the Rechargeable Iron Electrode in Alkaline Batteries with Bismuth Oxide and Iron Sulfide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manohar, AK; Yang, CG; Malkhandi, S; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-09-07

    Iron-based alkaline rechargeable batteries have the potential of meeting the needs of large-scale electrical energy storage because of their low-cost, robustness and eco-friendliness. However, the widespread commercial deployment of iron-based batteries has been limited by the low charging efficiency and the poor discharge rate capability of the iron electrode. In this study, we have demonstrated iron electrodes containing bismuth oxide and iron sulfide with a charging efficiency of 92% and capable of being discharged at the 3C rate. Such a high value of charging efficiency combined with the ability to discharge at high rates is being reported for the first time. The bismuth oxide additive led to the in situ formation of elemental bismuth and a consequent increase in the overpotential for the hydrogen evolution reaction leading to an increase in the charging efficiency. We observed that the sulfide ions added to the electrolyte and iron sulfide added to the electrode mitigated-electrode passivation and allowed for continuous discharge at high rates. At the 3C discharge rate, a utilization of 0.2 Ah/g was achieved. The performance level of the rechargeable iron electrode demonstrated here is attractive for designing economically-viable large-scale energy storage systems based on alkaline nickel-iron and iron-air batteries. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacillus cereus Phosphopentomutase Is an Alkaline Phosphatase Family Member That Exhibits an Altered Entry Point into the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panosian, Timothy D.; Nannemann, David P.; Watkins, Guy R.; Phelan, Vanessa V.; McDonald, W. Hayes; Wadzinski, Brian E.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, Tina M.

    2011-09-15

    Bacterial phosphopentomutases (PPMs) are alkaline phosphatase superfamily members that interconvert {alpha}-D-ribose 5-phosphate (ribose 5-phosphate) and {alpha}-D-ribose 1-phosphate (ribose 1-phosphate). We investigated the reaction mechanism of Bacillus cereus PPM using a combination of structural and biochemical studies. Four high resolution crystal structures of B. cereus PPM revealed the active site architecture, identified binding sites for the substrate ribose 5-phosphate and the activator {alpha}-D-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate (glucose 1,6-bisphosphate), and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate increased phosphorylation of the active site residue Thr-85. The phosphorylation of Thr-85 was confirmed by Western and mass spectroscopic analyses. Biochemical assays identified Mn{sup 2+}-dependent enzyme turnover and demonstrated that glucose 1,6-bisphosphate treatment increases enzyme activity. These results suggest that protein phosphorylation activates the enzyme, which supports an intermolecular transferase mechanism. We confirmed intermolecular phosphoryl transfer using an isotope relay assay in which PPM reactions containing mixtures of ribose 5-[{sup 18}O{sub 3}]phosphate and [U-{sup 13}C{sub 5}]ribose 5-phosphate were analyzed by mass spectrometry. This intermolecular phosphoryl transfer is seemingly counter to what is anticipated from phosphomutases employing a general alkaline phosphatase reaction mechanism, which are reported to catalyze intramolecular phosphoryl transfer. However, the two mechanisms may be reconciled if substrate encounters the enzyme at a different point in the catalytic cycle.

  12. Conceptual Model of Uranium in the Vadose Zone for Acidic and Alkaline Wastes Discharged at the Hanford Site Central Plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Szecsody, James E.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2014-09-01

    Historically, uranium was disposed in waste solutions of varying waste chemistry at the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The character of how uranium was distributed in the vadose zone during disposal, how it has continued to migrate through the vadose zone, and the magnitude of potential impacts on groundwater are strongly influenced by geochemical reactions in the vadose zone. These geochemical reactions can be significantly influenced by the disposed-waste chemistry near the disposal location. This report provides conceptual models and supporting information to describe uranium fate and transport in the vadose zone for both acidic and alkaline wastes discharged at a substantial number of waste sites in the Hanford Site Central Plateau. The conceptual models include consideration of how co-disposed acidic or alkaline fluids influence uranium mobility in terms of induced dissolution/precipitation reactions and changes in uranium sorption with a focus on the conditions near the disposal site. This information, when combined with the extensive information describing uranium fate and transport at near background pH conditions, enables focused characterization to support effective fate and transport estimates for uranium in the subsurface.

  13. Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartholomy, Obadiah

    2005-01-01

    on two different alkaline electrolyzers from the HYDROGEMS7. Stuart Energy IMET Alkaline Electrolyzer Specifications

  14. Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Is Required for the Calcification of Collagen in Serum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    of tendon and demineralized bone both calcify rapidly in serum. The speed, collagen matrix-type specificity, and extent of the re-cal- cification of demineralized bone in serum suggest that the serum calcification that purified type I collagen and demineralized bone matrix both calcify rapidly when incubated in serum

  15. Enhancing uranium uptake by amidoxime adsorbent in seawater: An investigation for optimum alkaline conditioning parameters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Sadananda; Tsouris, Costas; Zhang, Chenxi; Brown, Suree; Janke, Christopher James; Mayes, Richard T.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Gill, Gary; Dai, Sheng; Kim, J.; et al

    2015-09-07

    A high-surface-area polyethylene-fiber adsorbent (AF160-2) has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid. The grafted nitriles were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with potassium hydroxide (KOH) by varying different reaction parameters such as KOH concentration (0.2, 0.44, and 0.6 M), duration (1, 2, and 3 h), and temperature (60, 70, and 80 °C). Adsorbent screening was then performed with simulated seawater solutions containing sodium chloride and sodium bicarbonate, at concentrations found in seawater, and uranium nitrate at a uranium concentration ofmore »~7–8 ppm and pH 8. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and solid-state NMR analyses indicated that a fraction of amidoxime groups was hydrolyzed to carboxylate during KOH conditioning. The uranium adsorption capacity in the simulated seawater screening solution gradually increased with conditioning time and temperature for all KOH concentrations. It was also observed that the adsorption capacity increased with an increase in concentration of KOH for all the conditioning times and temperatures. AF160-2 adsorbent samples were also tested with natural seawater using flow-through experiments to determine uranium adsorption capacity with varying KOH conditioning time and temperature. Based on uranium loading capacity values of several AF160-2 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning time from 3 to 1 h at 60, 70, and 80 °C resulted in an increase of the uranium loading capacity in seawater, which did not follow the trend found in laboratory screening with stimulated solutions. Longer KOH conditioning times lead to significantly higher uptake of divalent metal ions, such as calcium and magnesium, which is a result of amidoxime conversion into less selective carboxylate. The scanning electron microscopy showed that long conditioning times may also lead to adsorbent degradation.« less

  16. Polyelectrolyte Complex Nanoparticles for Protection and Delayed Release of Enzymes in Alkaline pH and at Elevated Temperature during Hydraulic Fracturing of Oil Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barati Ghahfarokhi, Reza; Johnson, Stephen J.; McCool, Stan; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul; Liang, Jenn-Tai

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylenimine-dextran sulfate polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC) were used to entrap two enzymes used to degrade polymer gels following hydraulic fracturing of oil wells in order to obtain delayed release and to protect the enzyme from harsh...

  17. Corrosion resistant positive electrode for high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Otto, N.C.; Warner, B.T.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1982-07-07

    The corrosion rate of low carbon steel within a positive electrode of a high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell that includes FeS as active material is substantially reduced by incorporating therein finely divided iron powder in stoichiometric excess to the amount required to form FeS in the fully charged electrode. The cell typically includes an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal as negative electrode active material and a molten metal halide salt as electrolyte. The excess iron permits use of inexpensive carbon steel alloys that are substantially free of the costly corrosion resistant elements chromium, nickel and molybdenum while avoiding shorten cell life resulting from high corrosion rates.

  18. WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM CALIFORNIA'S CENTRAL VALLEY 1939-1948 Marine Biological i STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE #12;#12;a WATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM arid to avoid delay in publication. Washington D. CWATER TEMPERATURE RECORDS FROM

  19. Quasi-particle Specific Heats for the Crystalline Color Superconducting Phase of QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Casalbuoni; R. Gatto; M. Mannarelli; G. Nardulli; M. Ruggieri; S. Stramaglia

    2003-12-09

    We calculate the specific heats of quasi-particles of two-flavor QCD in its crystalline phases for low temperature. We show that for the different crystalline structures considered here there are gapless modes contributing linearly in temperature to the specific heat. We evaluate also the phonon contributions which are cubic in temperature. These features might be relevant for compact stars with an inner shell in a color superconducting crystalline phase.

  20. The relationship between coefficient of restitution and state of charge of zinc alkaline primary LR6 batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhadra, S; Hertzberg, BJ; Hsieh, AG; Croft, M; Gallaway, JW; Van Tassell, BJ; Chamoun, M; Erdonmez, C; Zhong, Z; Sholklapper, T; Steingart, DA

    2015-01-01

    The coefficient of restitution of alkaline batteries has been shown to increase as a function of depth of discharge. In this work, using non-destructive mechanical testing, the change in coefficient of restitution is compared to in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction data to determine the cause of the macroscopic change in coefficient of restitution. The increase in coefficient of restitution correlates to the formation of a percolation pathway of ZnO within the anode of the cell, and the coefficient of restitution levels off at a value of 0.66 +/- 0.02 at 50% state of charge when the anode has densified into porous ZnO solid. Of note is the sensitivity of coefficient of restitution to the amount of ZnO formation that rivals the sensitivity of in situ energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction.

  1. Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array SyStem SpecificationS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity that array will provide: 7% environmental impact Annual carbon offset: 2.4 million pounds of CO2Mesa Top Photovoltaic Array SyStem SpecificationS System size: 750 kW (DC, estimated) Characteristics: Single axis tracker photovoltaics, ground mounted Annual output: 1,200 MWh Location: Top of South

  2. Anomalous specific heat in ultradegenerate QED and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gerhold; A. Ipp; A. Rebhan

    2004-08-31

    We discuss the origin of the anomalous $T\\ln T^{-1}$ behavior of the low-temperature entropy and specific heat in ultradegenerate QED and QCD and report on a recent calculation which is complete to leading order in the coupling and which contains an infinite series of anomalous terms involving also fractional powers in $T$. This result involves dynamical hard-dense-loop resummation and interpolates between Debye screening effects at larger temperatures and non-Fermi-liquid behavior from only dynamically screened magnetic fields at low temperature.

  3. Waste Specification Records - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specification Records About Us Hanford Site Solid Waste Acceptance Program What's New Acceptance Criteria Acceptance Process Becoming a new Hanford Customer Annual Waste Forecast...

  4. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  5. High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervais, John W.

    High-K alkali basalts of the Western Snake River Plain: Abrupt transition from tholeiitic to mildly alkaline plume-derived basalts, Western Snake River Plain, Idaho John W. Shervais a, , Scott K. Vetter b Snake River Plain SRP Yellowstone plume hotspots Basaltic volcanism in the western Snake River Plain

  6. A Carbon-Supported Copper Complex of 3,5-Diamino-1,2,4-triazole as a Cathode Catalyst for Alkaline Fuel Cell Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Fuel Cell Applications Fikile R. Brushett, Matthew S. Thorum, Nicholas S. Lioutas, Matthew S. Naughton-tri/C) is investigated as a cathode material using an alkaline microfluidic H2/O2 fuel cell. The absolute Cu be realized by optimizing catalyst and electrode preparation procedures. Fuel cell-based systems hold promise

  7. Plasmid DNA minipreps (alkaline lysis method) 1. Centrifuge 1 mL of overnight bacterial culture in eppi tube for 2 min at 10,000 x g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    Plasmid DNA minipreps (alkaline lysis method) 1. Centrifuge 1 mL of overnight bacterial culture. Incubate on ice 5 min (or longer). 7. Centrifuge for 10 min at 16,000 x g at 4°C. 8. Transfer supernatant to new eppi tube; add equal volume PCI; mix by vortex. 9. Centrifuge for 5 min at 16,000 x g at room

  8. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, D.M.

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module comprises a series of solar cells having a thermally activated switch connected in parallel with several of the cells. The photovoltaic module is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient differing from the temperature coefficient of the module. The calibration temperatures of the switches are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module, the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells. By shorting some of the solar cells as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive. 2 figs.

  9. Temperature compensated photovoltaic array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosher, Dan Michael (Plano, TX)

    1997-11-18

    A temperature compensated photovoltaic module (20) comprised of a series of solar cells (22) having a thermally activated switch (24) connected in parallel with several of the cells (22). The photovoltaic module (20) is adapted to charge conventional batteries having a temperature coefficient (TC) differing from the temperature coefficient (TC) of the module (20). The calibration temperatures of the switches (24) are chosen whereby the colder the ambient temperature for the module (20), the more switches that are on and form a closed circuit to short the associated solar cells (22). By shorting some of the solar cells (22) as the ambient temperature decreases, the battery being charged by the module (20) is not excessively overcharged at lower temperatures. PV module (20) is an integrated solution that is reliable and inexpensive.

  10. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  11. Hanford Site environmental management specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grygiel, M.L.

    1998-06-10

    The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) uses this Hanford Site Environmental Management Specification (Specification) to document top-level mission requirements and planning assumptions for the prime contractors involved in Hanford Site cleanup and infrastructure activities under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management. This Specification describes at a top level the activities, facilities, and infrastructure necessary to accomplish the cleanup of the Hanford Site and assigns this scope to Site contractors and their respective projects. This Specification also references the key National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), and safety documentation necessary to accurately describe the cleanup at a summary level. The information contained in this document reflects RL`s application of values, priorities, and critical success factors expressed by those involved with and affected by the Hanford Site project. The prime contractors and their projects develop complete baselines and work plans to implement this Specification. These lower-level documents and the data that support them, together with this Specification, represent the full set of requirements applicable to the contractors and their projects. Figure 1-1 shows the relationship of this Specification to the other basic Site documents. Similarly, the documents, orders, and laws referenced in this specification represent only the most salient sources of requirements. Current and contractual reference data contain a complete set of source documents.

  12. Average and Local Structure, Debye Temperature, and Structural Rigidity in Some Oxide Compounds Related to Phosphor Hosts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    8, (46) Parkinson, D. H. The Specific Heats of Metals at LowA. Large Low-Temperature Specific Heat in Pyrochlore Bi 2 TiM. The Theory of the Specific Heat of Solids. Rep. Prog.

  13. Frequency dependence of specific heat in supercooled liquid water and emergence of correlated dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinji Saito; Iwao Ohmine; Biman Bagchi

    2013-03-30

    Molecular origin of the well-known specific heat anomaly in supercooled liquid water is investigated here by using extensive computer simulations and theoretical analyses. A rather sharp increase in the values of isobaric specific heat with lowering temperature and the weak temperature dependence of isochoric specific heat in the same range are reproduced in simulations. We calculated the spatiotemporal correlation among temperature fluctuations and examined the frequency dependent specific heat. The latter shows a rapid growth in the low frequency regime as temperature is cooled below 270 K. In order to understand the microscopic basis of this increase, we have performed a shell wise decomposition of contributions of distant molecules to the temperature fluctuations in a central molecule. This decomposition reveals the emergence, at low temperatures, of temporally slow, spatially long ranged large temperature fluctuations. The temperature fluctuation time correlation function (TFCF) can be fitted to a William-Watts stretched exponential form with the stretching parameter close to 0.6 at low temperatures, indicating highly non-exponential relaxation. Temperature dependence of the relaxation time of the correlation function can be fitted to Vogel-Fulcher-Tamermann expression which provides a quantitative measure of the fragility of the liquid. Interestingly, we find that the rapid growth in the relaxation time of TFCF with lowering temperature undergoes a sharp crossover from a markedly fragile state to a weakly fragile state around 220 K.

  14. Specific-heat discontinuity in impure two-band superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishonov, TM; Penev, ES; Indekeu, JO; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    2003-01-01

    at the critical temperature T-c decreases with increasing disorder, its ratio to the normal-state specific heat at T-c increases and slowly converges to the isotropic value. For strong disorder the deviation from the isotropic value is proportional to the elastic...

  15. Superconductivity at Any Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anber, Mohamed M; Sabancilar, Eray; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We construct a 2+1 dimensional model that sustains superconductivity at all temperatures. This is achieved by introducing a Chern Simons mixing term between two Abelian gauge fields A and Z. The superfluid is described by a complex scalar charged under Z, whereas a sufficiently strong magnetic field of A forces the superconducting condensate to form at all temperatures. In fact, at finite temperature, the theory exhibits Berezinsky-Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition due to proliferation of topological vortices admitted by our construction. However, the critical temperature is proportional to the magnetic field of A, and thus, the phase transition can be postponed to high temperatures by increasing the strength of the magnetic field. This model can be a step towards realizing the long sought room temperature superconductivity.

  16. High-temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-29

    A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

  17. Automatic temperature adjustment apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaplin, James E. (66 Overlook Rd., Bloomingdale, NJ 07403)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for increasing the efficiency of a conventional central space heating system is disclosed. The temperature of a fluid heating medium is adjusted based on a measurement of the external temperature, and a system parameter. The system parameter is periodically modified based on a closed loop process that monitors the operation of the heating system. This closed loop process provides a heating medium temperature value that is very near the optimum for energy efficiency.

  18. Temperature and RH Targets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presented by Vishal O Mittal of the Florida Solar Energy Center at the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting, San Francisco, September 14, 2006.

  19. Thermalisation time and specific heat of neutron stars crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Fortin; F. Grill; J. Margueron; N. Sandulescu

    2009-10-28

    We discuss the thermalisation process of the neutron stars crust described by solving the heat transport equation with a microscopic input for the specific heat of baryonic matter. The heat equation is solved with initial conditions specific to a rapid cooling of the core. To calculate the specific heat of inner crust baryonic matter, i.e., nuclear clusters and unbound neutrons, we use the quasiparticle spectrum provided by the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approach at finite temperature. In this framework we analyse the dependence of the crust thermalisation on pairing properties and on cluster structure of inner crust matter. It is shown that the pairing correlations reduce the crust thermalisation time by a very large fraction. The calculations show also that the nuclear clusters have a non-negligible influence on the time evolution of the surface temperature of the neutron star.

  20. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-06-15

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  1. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  2. Thermoelectric Temperature Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    NOTE 201TM TECHNICAL Optimizing Thermoelectric Temperature Control Systems #12;2 May 1995 92-040000A © 1995 Wavelength Electronics, Inc. Thermoelectric coolers (TECs) are used in a variety understanding of thermal management techniques and carefully select the thermoelectric module, temperature

  3. Reconstruction of the “phase separation – ordering” type and specific heat in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponomarev, Alexander N. E-mail: val110@mail.ru; Egorushkin, Valery E. E-mail: val110@mail.ru; Bobenko, Nadezda G.; Melnikova, Natalia V.

    2014-11-14

    The low-temperature behavior of the specific heat in disordered nanotubes strongly depends on structure changes and was not explained by the phonon contribution. Expression for electronic specific heat was carried out taking into account the multiple elastic scattering of electrons on impurities and structural inhomogeneities of short-range order type, it includes dependence on diameter of nanotube, concentration of impurities, parameters of short-range order (structural heterogeneity) and temperature. Anomalous low-temperature behavior of the specific heat of disordered CNT is shown to have electronic nature and may be associated with the electrons that are involved in restructuring.

  4. Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report Building Energy Data Exchange Specification Scoping Report The Building Energy Data Exchange Specification (BEDES),...

  5. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications Teams competing in the U.S. Department of...

  6. Kinetic studies of the [NpO? (CO?)?]?? ion at alkaline conditions using ¹³C NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panasci, Adele F. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Harley, Stephen J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Casey, William H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-04-21

    Carbonate ligand-exchange rates on the [NpO? (CO?)?]?? ion were determined using a saturation-transfer ¹³C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulse sequence in the pH range of 8.1 ? pH ? 10.5. Over the pH range 9.3 ? pH ? 10.5, which compares most directly with previous work of Stout et al.,1 we find an average rate, activation energy, enthalpy, and entropy of k298ex = 40.6(±4.3) s?¹, Ea =45.1(±3.8) kJ mol?¹, ?H = 42.6(±3.8) kJ mol?¹, and ?S = -72(±13) J mol?¹ K?¹, respectively. These activation parameters are similar to the Stout et al. results at pH 9.4. However, their room-temperature rate at pH 9.4, k298ex = 143(±1.0) s?¹, is ~3 times faster than what we experimentally determined at pH 9.3: k298ex = 45.4(±5.3) s?¹. Our rates for [NpO? (CO?)?]?? are also faster by a factor of ~3 relative to the isoelectronic [UO?(CO?)?]?? as reported by Brucher et al.2 of k298ex = 13(±3) s?¹. Consistent with results for the [UO?(CO?)?]?? ion, we find evidence for a proton-enhanced pathway for carbonate exchange for the [NpO?(CO?)?]?? ion at pH < 9.0.

  7. Temperature Measurements in the Magnetic Measurement Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    Several key LCLS undulator parameter values depend strongly on temperature primarily because of the permanent magnet material the undulators are constructed with. The undulators will be tuned to have specific parameter values in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF). Consequently, it is necessary for the temperature of the MMF to remain fairly constant. Requirements on undulator temperature have been established. When in use, the undulator temperature will be in the range 20.0 {+-} 0.2 C. In the MMF, the undulator tuning will be done at 20.0 {+-} 0.1 C. For special studies, the MMF temperature set point can be changed to a value between 18 C and 23 C with stability of {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure that the MMF temperature requirements are met, the MMF must have a system to measure temperatures. The accuracy of the MMF temperature measurement system must be better than the {+-}0.1 C undulator tuning temperature tolerance, and is taken to be {+-}0.01 C. The temperature measurement system for the MMF is under construction. It is similar to a prototype system we built two years ago in the Sector 10 alignment lab at SLAC. At that time, our goal was to measure the lab temperature to {+-}0.1 C. The system has worked well for two years and has maintained its accuracy. For the MMF system, we propose better sensors and a more extensive calibration program to achieve the factor of 10 increase in accuracy. In this note we describe the measurement system under construction. We motivate our choice of system components and give an overview of the system. Most of the software for the system has been written and will be discussed. We discuss error sources in temperature measurements and show how these errors have been dealt with. The calibration system is described in detail. All the LCLS undulators must be tuned in the Magnetic Measurement Facility at the same temperature to within {+-}0.1 C. In order to ensure this, we are building a system to measure the temperature of the undulators to {+-}0.01 C. This note describes the temperature measurement system under construction.

  8. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300°C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 ºC based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 ºC system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 °C.

  9. Structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X=Ca, Be, Mg) studied by a genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory

    2013-09-17

    The structures and stabilities of alkaline earth metal peroxides XO2 (X = Ca, Be, Mg) were studied using an adaptive genetic algorithm (GA) for global structure optimization in combination with first-principles calculations. From the adaptive GA search, we obtained an orthorhombic structure for CaO2 with 12 atoms in the unit cell, which is energetically more favorable than the previously proposed structures. Reaction energy of the decomposition CaO2 ? CaO + 1/2O2 determined by density functional theory (DFT) calculation shows that this orthorhombic calcium peroxide structure is thermodynamically stable. The simulated X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern using our predicted structure is in excellent agreement with experimental data. We also show that crystal phase BeO2 is unlikely to exist under normal conditions. MgO2 has a cubic pyrite structure, but it is not stable against decomposition: MgO2 ? MgO + 1/2O2.

  10. Specification No. 203-HJT-9001 R0 Specification for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY February 5, 2006 #12;Specification for Support Structure MERIT High Power Mercury and provide positional adjustment, and operation of the hydraulic jacks used for height adjustment assembled components shown in the drawing package, o Two (2) hydraulic hand pump/c

  11. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  12. Low temperature cryoprobe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Z.F.

    1988-04-12

    A portable, hand held probe usable within a small confine to produce a point source of nitrogen or helium at a relatively constant temperatures of 77 degrees Kelvin, is discussed. 3 figs.

  13. High-Temperature Superconductivity

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Johnson

    2010-01-08

    Like astronomers tweaking images to gain a more detailed glimpse of distant stars, physicists at Brookhaven National Laboratory have found ways to sharpen images of the energy spectra in high-temperature superconductors ? materials that carry electrical c

  14. The material dependence of temperature measurement resolution in thermal scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaowei; Hull, Robert [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-03-18

    Thermal scanning electron microscopy is a recently developed temperature mapping technique based on thermal diffuse scattering in electron backscatter diffraction in a scanning electron microscope. It provides nano-scale and non-contact temperature mapping capabilities. Due to the specific temperature sensitive mechanism inherent to this technique, the temperature resolution is highly material dependent. A thorough investigation of what material properties affect the temperature resolution is important for realizing the inherent temperature resolution limit for each material. In this paper, three material dependent parameters-the Debye-Waller B-factor temperature sensitivity, backscatter yield, and lattice constant-are shown to control the temperature resolution.

  15. Temperature measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bible, Don W. (Clinton, TN); Sohns, Carl W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods are described for a wireless instrumented silicon wafer that can measure temperatures at various points and transmit those temperature readings to an external receiver. The device has particular utility in the processing of semiconductor wafers, where it can be used to map thermal uniformity on hot plates, cold plates, spin bowl chucks, etc. without the inconvenience of wires or the inevitable thermal perturbations attendant with them.

  16. High temperature pressure gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Echtler, J. Paul (Pittsburgh, PA); Scandrol, Roy O. (Library, PA)

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  17. Study on multiphase flow and mixing in semidry flue gas desulfurization with a multifluid alkaline spray generator using particle image velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Y.G.; Wang, D.F.; Zhang, M.C. [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2009-06-15

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) technique was used to measure the velocity fields of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow in the experimental setup of a novel semidry flue gas desulfurization process with a multifluid alkaline spray generator. The flow structure, mixing characteristic, and interphase interaction of gas-droplet-solid multiphase flow were investigated both in the confined alkaline spray generator and in the duct bent pipe section. The results show that sorbent particles in the confined alkaline spray generator are entrained into the spray core zone by a high-speed spray jet and most of the sorbent particles can be effectively humidified by spray water fine droplets to form aqueous lime slurry droplets. Moreover, a minimum amount of air stream in the generator is necessary to achieve higher collision humidification efficiency between sorbent particles and spray water droplets and to prevent the possible deposition of fine droplets on the wall. The appropriate penetration length of the slurry droplets from the generator can make uniform mixing between the formed slurry droplets and main air stream in the duct bent pipe section, which is beneficial to improving sulfur dioxide removal efficiency and to preventing the deposition of droplets on the wall.

  18. Detailed evaluation of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer field project and it`s application to mature Minnelusa waterfloods. Annual technical report, January 1993--December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, M.J.

    1995-02-01

    The combination of an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent has the potential to produce additional oil beyond a waterflood. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer project is the most advanced application of this chemical enhanced oil recovery technique. The West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood was initiated in September 1987 as a secondary application after primary recovery. A preliminary analysis of the West Kiehl alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood indicates that incremental oil of 20% of the original stock tank oil in place will be produced above waterflooding. The cost of the incremental oil will be less than $2.50 per incremental barrel. A statistical analysis of approximately 120 Minnelusa oil fields in the Powder River Basin indicates that the original stock tank oil in place exceeds one billion barrels. If the enhanced oil recovery technology implemented at West Kiehl field could be successfully applied to these fields, the potential incremental oil recovery would approach 200 million barrels. This project (1) evaluates the geological deposition environment of West Kiehl and adjacent Minneluse sand reservoirs; (2) compares the production performance results of the best geologic and reservoir performance analogs and select two fields for future study; (3) compares the two best field analogs to the west Kiehl field using numerical simulation; (4) predict results of applying the enhancement technology on two mature Minneluse waterflood analog units using engineering and numerical simulation; (5) predict waterflood and polymer flood performance of the West Kiehl field using numerical simulation.

  19. Service Level Agreement/Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    Service Level Agreement/Specification For Maintenance and Associated Risk Management Services Team c. Contract Labour 4. REACTIVE MAINTENANCE 5. ESTATE DATA REQUIREMENTS 6. ESTATE EMERGENCY. RISK MANAGEMENT a. General b. Scope of Service c. Statement of Intent Service Level Agreement 2007 Vers

  20. Programme Specification 1. General Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Sriram

    , administrative and practical skills required in exhibition making. Able to: C. Professionalism C1. Take Institution Royal College of Art Professional Accreditation N/A Qualifications Framework Level 7 Credit Value as competent and #12;Programme Specification 2/10 responsible professionals, equipped with the knowledge

  1. Gas Slow Control System Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    AMS-02 TRD Gas Slow Control System Specifications v 4.2 26-06-2006 A. Bartoloni, B. Borgia, F. Bucci, F. R. Spada INFN Sezione di Roma 1- Roma, Italy #12;2/45 #12;3/45 1. ABSTRACT 5 2. GAS SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION 5 3. GAS CONTROL SYSTEM 8 4. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS 12 a. Universal Control System

  2. PROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme title: Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    in statistical theory and applications which enables graduates to enter specialist employment or academic in statistical computing and communication are assessed by coursework only. The summer project is assessedPROGRAMME SPECIFICATION Programme title: Statistics Final award (BSc, MA etc): (where stopping off

  3. Anomalous specific heat in high-density QED and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ipp; A. Gerhold; A. Rebhan

    2003-09-22

    Long-range quasi-static gauge-boson interactions lead to anomalous (non-Fermi-liquid) behavior of the specific heat in the low-temperature limit of an electron or quark gas with a leading $T\\ln T^{-1}$ term. We obtain perturbative results beyond the leading log approximation and find that dynamical screening gives rise to a low-temperature series involving also anomalous fractional powers $T^{(3+2n)/3}$. We determine their coefficients in perturbation theory up to and including order $T^{7/3}$ and compare with exact numerical results obtained in the large-$N_f$ limit of QED and QCD.

  4. Nuclear Superfluidity and Specific Heat in the Inner Crust of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Sandulescu

    2004-03-07

    We analyse the temperature dependence of pairing correlations in the inner crust matter of neutron stars. The study is done in a finite-temperature HFB approach and by using a zero range pairing force adjusted to the pairing properties of infinite neutron matter. Within the same approach we investigate how the specific heat of the inner crust depends on temperature, matter inhomogeneity, and the assumption used for the pairing force. It is shown that in a physical relevant range of densities the pairing properties of inner crust matter depend significantly on temperature. The finite-temperature HFB calculations show also that the specific heat is rather sensitive to the presence of nuclear clusters inside the inner crust. However, the most dramatic change of the specific heat is determined by the scenario used for the neutron matter superfluidity.

  5. Geometric Theory of Lattice Vibrations and Specific Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Shubin; Toshikazu Sunada

    2006-04-04

    We discuss, from a geometric standpoint, the specific heat of a solid. This is a classical subject in solid state physics which dates back to a pioneering work by Einstein (1907) and its refinement by Debye (1912). Using a special quantization of crystal lattices and calculating the asymptotic of the integrated density of states at the bottom of the spectrum, we obtain a rigorous derivation of the classical Debye $T^3$ law on the specific heat at low temperatures. The idea and method are taken from discrete geometric analysis which has been recently developed for the spectral geometry of crystal lattices.

  6. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature. 1 fig.

  7. Temperature initiated passive cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A passive cooling system for cooling an enclosure only when the enclosure temperature exceeds a maximum standby temperature comprises a passive heat transfer loop containing heat transfer fluid having a particular thermodynamic critical point temperature just above the maximum standby temperature. An upper portion of the heat transfer loop is insulated to prevent two phase operation below the maximum standby temperature.

  8. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  9. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  10. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2001-06-01

    Disposal of high-level nuclear waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  11. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.

    2000-06-01

    Disposal of high- level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Treatment processes themselves can exacerbate the problem by adding further volume to the waste. Waste retrieval and sludge washing, for example, will require copious amounts of sodium hydroxide. If the needed sodium hydroxide could be separated from the waste and recycled, however, the addition of fresh sodium hydroxide could be avoided, ultimately reducing the final waste volume and associated disposal costs. The major objective of this research is to explore new liquid- liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of sodium hydroxide from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford and Savannah River sites. Consideration is also given to separating potassium and abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  12. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bonnesen, Peter V.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Haverlock, Tamara J.

    2002-03-30

    This research has focused on new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to separation of major sodium salts from alkaline tank waste. It was the overall goal to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated. Sodium hydroxide represented the initial test case and primary focus. It is a primary component of the waste1 and has the most value for recycle. A full explanation of the relevance of this research to USDOE Environmental Management needs will be given in the Relevance, Impact, and Technology Transfer section below. It should be noted that this effort was predicated on the need for sodium removal primarily from low-activity waste, whereas evolving needs have shifted attention to volume reduction of the high-activity waste. The results of the research to date apply to both applications, though treatment of high-activity wastes raises new questions that will be addressed in the renewal period. Toward understanding the extractive chemistry of sodium hydroxide and other sodium salts, it was the intent to identify candidate extractants and determine their applicable basic properties regarding selectivity, efficiency, speciation, and structure. A hierarchical strategy was to be employed in which the type of liquid-liquid-extraction system varied in sophistication from simple, single-component solvents to solvents containing designer host molecules. As an aid in directing this investigation toward addressing the fundamental questions having the most value, a conceptualization of an ideal process was advanced. Accordingly, achieving adequate selectivity for sodium hydroxide represented a primary goal, but this result is worthwhile for waste applications only if certain conditions are met.

  13. Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.; Marchand, Alan P.; Bryan, Jeffrey C.; Bonnesen, Peter V.

    1999-06-01

    The objective of this research is to explore new liquid-liquid extraction approaches to the selective separation of major sodium salts from alkaline high-level wastes stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge sites. Disposal of high level waste is horrendously expensive, in large part because the actual radioactive matter in the tanks has been diluted over 1000-fold by ordinary inorganic chemicals. Since the residual bulk chemicals must still undergo expensive treatment and disposal after most of the hazardous radionuclides have been removed, large cost savings will result from processes that reduce the overall waste volume. It is proposed that major cost savings can be expected if sodium hydroxide needed for sludge washing can be obtained from the waste itself, thus avoiding the addition of yet another bulk chemical to the waste and still further increase of the waste volume and disposal cost. Secondary priority is given to separating potassium an d abundant anions, including nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, and carbonate. Salts of these ions represent possible additional value for recycle, alternative disposal, or even use as commodity chemicals. A comprehensive approach toward understanding the extractive chemistry of these salts is envisioned, involving systems of varying complexity, from use of simple solvents to new bifunctional host molecules for ion-pair recognition. These extractants will ideally require no adjustment of the waste composition and will release the extracted salt into water, thereby consuming no additional chemicals and producing no additional waste volume. The overall goal of this research is to provide a scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of new liquid-liquid extraction chemistry applicable to the bulk reduction of the volume of tank waste can be evaluated.

  14. Isotope specific arbitrary material sorter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.J.

    2015-12-08

    A laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide a rapid and unique, isotope specific method for sorting materials. The objects to be sorted are passed on a conveyor in front of a MEGa-ray beam which has been tuned to the nuclear resonance fluorescence transition of the desired material. As the material containing the desired isotope traverses the beam, a reduction in the transmitted MEGa-ray beam occurs. Alternately, the laser-based mono-energetic gamma-ray source is used to provide non-destructive and non-intrusive, quantitative determination of the absolute amount of a specific isotope contained within pipe as part of a moving fluid or quasi-fluid material stream.

  15. Industrial lead paint removal specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, R.C.

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the reader as to some of the pertinent rules and regulations promulgated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that may effect an industrial lead paint removal project. The paper discusses a recommended schedule of procedures and preparations to be followed by the lead paint removal specification writer when analyzing the possible impact of the project on the environment, the public and workers. Implications of the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) along with hazardous waste handling, manifesting, transporting and disposal procedures are discussed with special emphasis placed as to their impact on the writer and the facility owner. As the rules and regulations are highly complex, the writer has attempted to explain the methodology currently being used in state-of-the-art industrial lead abatement specifications.

  16. The Quantum Black Hole Specific Heat is Positive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrzej Z. Gorski; Pawel O. Mazur

    1997-05-16

    We suggest in this Letter that the Bekenstein-Hawking black hole entropy accounts for the degrees of freedom which are excited at low temperatures only and hence it leads to the negative specific heat. Taking into account the physical degrees of freedom which are excited at high temperatures, the existence of which we postulate, we compute the total specific heat of the quantum black hole that appears to be positive. This is done in analogy to the Planck's treatment of the black body radiation problem. Other thermodynamic functions are computed as well. Our results and the success of the thermodynamic description of the quantum black hole suggest an underlying atomic (discrete) structure of gravitation. The basic properties of these gravitational atoms are found.

  17. TRIDAC host computer functional specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, S.M.; Hunter, S.L.

    1983-08-23

    The purpose of this document is to outline the baseline functional requirements for the Triton Data Acquisition and Control (TRIDAC) Host Computer Subsystem. The requirements presented in this document are based upon systems that currently support both the SIS and the Uranium Separator Technology Groups in the AVLIS Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and upon the specific demands associated with the extended safe operation of the SIS Triton Facility.

  18. Chromosome specific repetitive DNA sequences

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyzis, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM); Meyne, Julianne (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A method is provided for determining specific nucleotide sequences useful in forming a probe which can identify specific chromosomes, preferably through in situ hybridization within the cell itself. In one embodiment, chromosome preferential nucleotide sequences are first determined from a library of recombinant DNA clones having families of repetitive sequences. Library clones are identified with a low homology with a sequence of repetitive DNA families to which the first clones respectively belong and variant sequences are then identified by selecting clones having a pattern of hybridization with genomic DNA dissimilar to the hybridization pattern shown by the respective families. In another embodiment, variant sequences are selected from a sequence of a known repetitive DNA family. The selected variant sequence is classified as chromosome specific, chromosome preferential, or chromosome nonspecific. Sequences which are classified as chromosome preferential are further sequenced and regions are identified having a low homology with other regions of the chromosome preferential sequence or with known sequences of other family me This invention is the result of a contract with the Department of Energy (Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36).

  19. High temperature lubricating process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert W. (Livermore, CA); Shell, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1982-01-01

    It has been difficult to provide adaquate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475.degree. C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface (14), such as in an engine (10) being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475.degree. C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining steps. A gas phase (42) is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant. The gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface. The load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant. The solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  20. Positive specific heat of the quantum corrected dilaton black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Grumiller; W. Kummer; D. V. Vassilevich

    2003-06-20

    Path integral quantization of dilaton gravity in two dimensions is applied to the CGHS model to the first nontrivial order in matter loops. Our approach is background independent as geometry is integrated out exactly. The result is an effective shift of the Killing norm: the apparent horizon becomes smaller. The Hawking temperature which is constant to leading order receives a quantum correction. As a consequence, the specific heat becomes positive and proportional to the square of the black hole mass.

  1. Low temperature reactive bonding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makowiecki, D.M.; Bionta, R.M.

    1995-01-17

    The joining technique is disclosed that requires no external heat source and generates very little heat during joining. It involves the reaction of thin multilayered films deposited on faying surfaces to create a stable compound that functions as an intermediate or braze material in order to create a high strength bond. While high temperatures are reached in the reaction of the multilayer film, very little heat is generated because the films are very thin. It is essentially a room temperature joining process. 5 figures.

  2. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  3. Temperature determination using pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Breiland, William G. (Albuquerque, NM); Gurary, Alexander I. (Bridgewater, NJ); Boguslavskiy, Vadim (Princeton, NJ)

    2002-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a surface upon which a coating is grown using optical pyrometry by correcting Kirchhoff's law for errors in the emissivity or reflectance measurements associated with the growth of the coating and subsequent changes in the surface thermal emission and heat transfer characteristics. By a calibration process that can be carried out in situ in the chamber where the coating process occurs, an error calibration parameter can be determined that allows more precise determination of the temperature of the surface using optical pyrometry systems. The calibration process needs only to be carried out when the physical characteristics of the coating chamber change.

  4. High temperature storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sammells, A.F.

    1988-06-07

    A high temperature electrochemical cell is described comprising: a solid-state divalent cation conducting electrolyte; a positive electrode in contact with the electrolyte; a solid-state negative electrode contacting a divalent cation conducting molten salt mediating agent providing ionic mediation between the solid-state negative electrode and the solid-state electrolyte.

  5. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  6. Transition temperature in QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, M.; Christ, N. H.; Mawhinney, R. D. [Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Datta, S.; Jung, C.; Schmidt, C.; Umeda, T. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Heide, J. van der; Kaczmarek, O.; Laermann, E.; Miao, C. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Karsch, F. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Bielefeld, D-33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Petreczky, P. [Physics Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Petrov, K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2006-09-01

    We present a detailed calculation of the transition temperature in QCD with two light and one heavier (strange) quark mass on lattices with temporal extent N{sub {tau}}=4 and 6. Calculations with improved staggered fermions have been performed for various light to strange quark mass ratios in the range, 0.05{<=}m-circumflex{sub l}/m-circumflex{sub s}{<=}0.5, and with a strange quark mass fixed close to its physical value. From a combined extrapolation to the chiral (m-circumflex{sub l}{yields}0) and continuum (aT{identical_to}1/N{sub {tau}}{yields}0) limits we find for the transition temperature at the physical point T{sub c}r{sub 0}=0.457(7) where the scale is set by the Sommer-scale parameter r{sub 0} defined as the distance in the static quark potential at which the slope takes on the value (dV{sub qq}(r)/dr){sub r=r{sub 0}}=1.65/r{sub 0}{sup 2}. Using the currently best known value for r{sub 0} this translates to a transition temperature T{sub c}=192(7)(4) MeV. The transition temperature in the chiral limit is about 3% smaller. We discuss current ambiguities in the determination of T{sub c} in physical units and also comment on the universal scaling behavior of thermodynamic quantities in the chiral limit.

  7. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  8. Project X functional requirements specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, S D; Kephart, R; Kerby, J; Kourbanis, I; Lebedev, V; Mishra, S; Nagaitsev, S; Solyak, N; Tschirhart, R

    2012-01-01

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  9. Localized temperature stability of low temperature cofired ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Steven Xunhu

    2013-11-26

    The present invention is directed to low temperature cofired ceramic modules having localized temperature stability by incorporating temperature coefficient of resonant frequency compensating materials locally into a multilayer LTCC module. Chemical interactions can be minimized and physical compatibility between the compensating materials and the host LTCC dielectrics can be achieved. The invention enables embedded resonators with nearly temperature-independent resonance frequency.

  10. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Research Establishment, Ris^, Denmark, published by the International Atomic Energy Agency,

  11. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1962. "Diatremes and Uranium Deposits in the Hopi Buttes,H. , 1970. "Low-Grade Uranium Deposits in Agpaitic NephelineL. Torkild, 1974B. "The Uranium Deposit at Kvanefjeld, The

  12. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Minerals," Danish Atomic Energy Commission, ResearchFront Range," U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Trace ElementMinerals," Danish Atomic Energy Commission, Risoe, Research

  13. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    1977. "Geology of Brazil's Uranium and Thorium Occurrences,"A tantalo-niobate of uranium, near pyrochlore. Isometric,niobate and tantalate of uranium, with ferrous iron and rare

  14. URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M.

    2011-01-01

    ComissSo Nacional de Energia Nuclear, and visits to fieldthe Comissao Hacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN). Until a few

  15. Alkaline Membrane Electrolysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research at NRELDepartmentJune 2, 2015AlignedRPTnnnn Membrane-Based

  16. Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing and Certification Terms of Reference Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Specifications, Testing...

  17. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines This factsheet explains studies conducted in a...

  18. Solar Water Heating: SPECIFICATION, CHECKLIST AND GUIDE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Heating SPECIFICATION, CHECKLIST AND GUIDE Renewable Energy Ready Home Table of Contents About the Renewable Energy Ready Home Specifications Assumptions of the RERH Solar...

  19. Frequency Dependent Specific Heat from Thermal Effusion in Spherical Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Jakobsen; Niels Boye Olsen; Tage Christensen

    2010-03-11

    We present a novel method of measuring the frequency dependent specific heat at the glass transition applied to 5-polyphenyl-4-ether. The method employs thermal waves effusing radially out from the surface of a spherical thermistor that acts as both a heat generator and thermometer. It is a merit of the method compared to planar effusion methods that the influence of the mechanical boundary conditions are analytically known. This implies that it is the longitudinal rather than the isobaric specific heat that is measured. As another merit the thermal conductivity and specific heat can be found independently. The method has highest sensitivity at a frequency where the thermal diffusion length is comparable to the radius of the heat generator. This limits in practise the frequency range to 2-3 decades. An account of the 3omega-technique used including higher order terms in the temperature dependency of the thermistor and in the power generated is furthermore given.

  20. Rechargeable alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery, Phase III. Final report, 26 October 1981-18 September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, G.B.; Hollandsworth, R.P.; Webber, B.D.

    1983-02-01

    Project effort was concentrated primarily on technical advancement of the alkaline zinc/ferricyanide battery to meet goals of scale-up and demonstration of solid-reactant storage with 1000-cm/sup 2/ full-scale cells; development of a conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar-photovoltaic storage system; demonstration of solar acceptance random cycling; and determination of cycle life of cells operating at 70- and 200-mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity. These goals were met in the design, fabrication, and cyclic testing of a 1000-cm/sup 2/ cell having a flow aspect ratio of 2:1. After some design optimization, energy efficiency in 2N NaOH at 43/sup 0/C is 74 to 78 percent. Testing has been in conjunction with a crystallizer/reservoir designed with a capacity of 300 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ that delivers solids-free electrolyte to the cell. A conceptual engineering design for a 50-kW solar storage-battery system has been formulated with mass and thermal balances computed. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests are in progress at 35 mA/cm/sup 2/ with 2N NaOH electrolyte with Nafion N-125 separator at 40/sup 0/C. Over 800 cycles at 70 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ capacity with mean energy efficiency of 76.6 +- 2.1 percent have been logged. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 83.3 +- 1.8 percent and 92.0 +- 1.8 percent, respectively. Single-cell (60-cm/sup 2/) cycle life tests run under similar conditions at 249 +- 45 mA.h/cm/sup 2/ have logged over 220 cycles with mean energy efficiency of 75.3 +- 5.1 percent. Mean voltaic and coulombic efficiencies are 84.7 +- 2.0 and 89.0 +- 6.0, respectively.

  1. Zero Temperature Hope Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rozsnyai, B F

    2002-07-26

    The primary purpose of the HOPE code is to calculate opacities over a wide temperature and density range. It can also produce equation of state (EOS) data. Since the experimental data at the high temperature region are scarce, comparisons of predictions with the ample zero temperature data provide a valuable physics check of the code. In this report we show a selected few examples across the periodic table. Below we give a brief general information about the physics of the HOPE code. The HOPE code is an ''average atom'' (AA) Dirac-Slater self-consistent code. The AA label in the case of finite temperature means that the one-electron levels are populated according to the Fermi statistics, at zero temperature it means that the ''aufbau'' principle works, i.e. no a priory electronic configuration is set, although it can be done. As such, it is a one-particle model (any Hartree-Fock model is a one particle model). The code is an ''ion-sphere'' model, meaning that the atom under investigation is neutral within the ion-sphere radius. Furthermore, the boundary conditions for the bound states are also set at the ion-sphere radius, which distinguishes the code from the INFERNO, OPAL and STA codes. Once the self-consistent AA state is obtained, the code proceeds to generate many-electron configurations and proceeds to calculate photoabsorption in the ''detailed configuration accounting'' (DCA) scheme. However, this last feature is meaningless at zero temperature. There is one important feature in the HOPE code which should be noted; any self-consistent model is self-consistent in the space of the occupied orbitals. The unoccupied orbitals, where electrons are lifted via photoexcitation, are unphysical. The rigorous way to deal with that problem is to carry out complete self-consistent calculations both in the initial and final states connecting photoexcitations, an enormous computational task. The Amaldi correction is an attempt to address this problem by distorting the outer part of the self-consistent potential in such a way that in the final state after photoexcitation or photoionization the newly occupied orbital sees the hole left in the initial state. This is very important to account for the large number of Rydberg states in the case of low densities. In the next Section we show calculated photoabsorptions compared with experimental data in figures with some rudimentary explanations.

  2. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  3. Dirac Equation at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Yao Wu; Bo-Jun Zhang; Xiao-Jing Liu; Nuo Ba; Yi-Heng Wu; Si-Qi Zhang; Jing Wang; Chun-Hong Li

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we propose finite temperature Dirac equation, which can describe the quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature for a relativistic particle of spin-1/2. When the temperature T=0, it become Dirac equation. With the equation, we can study the relativistic quantum systems in an arbitrary temperature.

  4. The Specification Process Background and Motivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    Violate Specification Document Minimal Interactions with Customer + 6 #12;+ + Types of Sotware Engineers

  5. Anomalous specific heat jump in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen Sedrakian; Herbert Müther; Artur Polls

    2006-09-20

    The thermodynamic functions of a Fermi gas with spin population imbalance are studied in the temperature-asymmetry plane in the BCS limit. The low temperature domain is characterized by anomalous enhancement of the entropy and the specific heat above their values in the unpaired state, decrease of the gap and eventual unpairing phase transition as the temperature is lowered. The unpairing phase transition induces a second jump in the specific heat, which can be measured in calorimetric experiments. While the superfluid is unstable against a supercurrent carrying state, it may sustain a metastable state if cooled adiabatically down from the stable high-temperature domain. In the latter domain the temperature dependence of the gap and related functions is analogous to the predictions of the BCS theory.

  6. Element-specific study of the temperature dependent magnetization of Co-Mn-Sb thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalhorst, J.

    2009-01-01

    is therefore of interest for spintronics applications. Itelectronic properties for spintronics applications, namely

  7. Species-specific phenological responses to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazer, SJ; Gerst, KL; Gerst, KL; Matthews, ER; Matthews, ER; Evenden, A

    2015-01-01

    and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem S USAN J. Mand precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem. Ecosphere 6(information is available from water-limited ecosystems. In

  8. Element-specific study of the temperature dependent magnetization of Co-Mn-Sb thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalhorst, J.

    2009-01-01

    is therefore of interest for spintronics applications. Itof highest interest for spintronic ap- plications such aselectronic properties for spintronics applications, namely

  9. Specific heats of quantum double-well systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Hasegawa

    2012-11-26

    Specific heats of quantum systems with symmetric and asymmetric double-well potentials have been calculated. In numerical calculations of their specific heats, we have adopted the combined method which takes into account not only eigenvalues of $\\epsilon_n$ for $0 \\leq n \\leq N_m$ obtained by the energy-matrix diagonalization but also their extrapolated ones for $N_m+1 \\leq n specific heats are shown to be rather different from counterparts of a harmonic oscillator. In particular, specific heats of symmetric double-well systems at very low temperatures have the Schottky-type anomaly, which is rooted to a small energy gap in low-lying two-level eigenstates induced by a tunneling through the potential barrier. The Schottky-type anomaly is removed when an asymmetry is introduced into the double-well potential. It has been pointed out that the specific-heat calculation of a double-well system reported by Feranchuk, Ulyanenkov and Kuz'min [Chem. Phys. 157, 61 (1991)] is misleading because the zeroth-order operator method they adopted neglects crucially important off-diagonal contributions.

  10. High specific activity silicon-32

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Brzezinski, Mark A. (Santa Barbara, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A process for preparation of silicon-32 is provided and includes contacting an irradiated potassium chloride target, including spallation products from a prior irradiation, with sufficient water, hydrochloric acid or potassium hydroxide to form a solution, filtering the solution, adjusting pH of the solution to from about 5.5 to about 7.5, admixing sufficient molybdate-reagent to the solution to adjust the pH of the solution to about 1.5 and to form a silicon-molybdate complex, contacting the solution including the silicon-molybdate complex with a dextran-based material, washing the dextran-based material to remove residual contaminants such as sodium-22, separating the silicon-molybdate complex from the dextran-based material as another solution, adding sufficient hydrochloric acid and hydrogen peroxide to the solution to prevent reformation of the silicon-molybdate complex and to yield an oxidization state of the molybdate adapted for subsequent separation by an anion exchange material, contacting the solution with an anion exchange material whereby the molybdate is retained by the anion exchange material and the silicon remains in solution, and optionally adding sufficient alkali metal hydroxide to adjust the pH of the solution to about 12 to 13. Additionally, a high specific activity silicon-32 product having a high purity is provided.

  11. Thermionic converter temperature controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaner, Benjamin J. (McMurray, PA); Wolf, Joseph H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Johnson, Robert G. R. (Trafford, PA)

    2001-04-24

    A method and apparatus for controlling the temperature of a thermionic reactor over a wide range of operating power, including a thermionic reactor having a plurality of integral cesium reservoirs, a honeycomb material disposed about the reactor which has a plurality of separated cavities, a solid sheath disposed about the honeycomb material and having an opening therein communicating with the honeycomb material and cavities thereof, and a shell disposed about the sheath for creating a coolant annulus therewith so that the coolant in the annulus may fill the cavities and permit nucleate boiling during the operation of the reactor.

  12. Drexel University Temperature Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; B. M. Chase

    2014-09-01

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) Drexel University Project 31091 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of new ceramic materials for advanced reactor applications. Accordingly, irradiations of transition metal carbides and nitrides were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in static capsules inserted into the A-3 and East Flux Trap Position 5 locations of the ATR.

  13. Crowdsourcing urban air temperatures from smartphone battery?temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overeem, A.

    Accurate air temperature observations in urban areas are important for meteorology and energy demand planning. They are indispensable to study the urban heat island effect and the adverse effects of high temperatures on ...

  14. Method for Synthesizing Extremeley High Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise and Glorieux, Benoit

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  15. Method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

    2007-11-06

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an aerodynamic levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  16. Method For Synthesizing Extremely High-Temperature Melting Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saboungi, Marie-Louise (Chicago, IL); Glorieux, Benoit (Perpignan, FR)

    2005-11-22

    The invention relates to a method of synthesizing high-temperature melting materials. More specifically the invention relates to a containerless method of synthesizing very high temperature melting materials such as borides, carbides and transition-metal, lanthanide and actinide oxides, using an Aerodynamic Levitator and a laser. The object of the invention is to provide a method for synthesizing extremely high-temperature melting materials that are otherwise difficult to produce, without the use of containers, allowing the manipulation of the phase (amorphous/crystalline/metastable) and permitting changes of the environment such as different gaseous compositions.

  17. High-temperature-measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1981-01-27

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2000/sup 0/C) is described. The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensonally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  18. Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    Philosophy 26 High Temperature Superconductivity By Ohm's Law, resistance will dim. Low temperature superconductivity was discovered in 1911 by Heike was explained by BCS theory. BCS theory explains superconductivity microscopically

  19. Unit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sannella, Don

    and impractical activity. When only finite sets of interactions are considered, successful testing can accept Unit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications. The problem of testing modular systems against algebraic specifications is discussed. We focus on systems

  20. Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Assembly Tolerance Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Assembly Tolerance Specifications A Thesis Presented ..........................................................................................................12 2.6.1 Multivariate Normal Distributions.8.3 Combined Assembly Specification Quality...............................................22 2.9 Multivariate

  1. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  2. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  3. Hot Pot Contoured Temperature Gradient Map

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Temperature gradient contours derived from Oski temperature gradient hole program and from earlier published information.

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENERGY ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD (EM SSAB) HANFORD Application No. (Please leave blank) MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION (December 2015)...

  5. Diagnosis of Acid Placement from Downhole Temperature Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Xuehao

    2012-10-19

    average area B(Vi) function of interstitial velocity 0 HClC concentration of HCl Cn covariance matrix Cpf heat capacity of the wellbore fluid Cps heat capacity of acid solution CpR heat capacity of rock c(t) time-dependent function... for estimating injection temperature D depth D(t) time function in the wormhole model Dtotal total depth of the wellbore section d observed data vector e residual vector ek specific kinetic energy ep specific potential energy eR specific...

  6. Nearly Constant Electrical Resistance over Large Temperature Range in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zexian, Cao

    , to be used as electrode material in Li-ion batteries9 , as cathode catalyst in alkaline fuel cells10 on the optimal synthesis and its employment as write- once optical recording media4,8 . In recently years, some

  7. Enhanced Specific Heat of Silica Donghyun Shin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Debjyoti

    Enhanced Specific Heat of Silica Nanofluid Donghyun Shin Debjyoti Banerjee e-mail: dbanerjee instrument was used to measure the specific heat of the neat molten salt eutectic and after addition of nanoparticles. The specific heat of the nanofluid was enhanced by 19­24%. The mea- surement uncertainty

  8. Negative specific heat in a thermodynamic model of multifragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Das; S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjiani

    2003-05-02

    We consider a soluble model of multifragmentation which is similar in spirit to many models which have been used to fit intermediate energy heavy ion collision data. In this model $c_v$ is always positive but for finite nuclei $c_p$ can be negative for some temperatures and pressures. Furthermore, negative values of $c_p$ can be obtained in canonical treatment. One does not need to use the microcanonical ensemble. Negative values for $c_p$ can persist for systems as large as 200 paticles but this depends upon parameters used in the model calculation. As expected, negative specific heats are absent in the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Continuous phase transition and negative specific heat in finite nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. N. De; S. K. Samaddar; S. Shlomo; J. B. Natowitz

    2006-01-30

    The liquid-gas phase transition in finite nuclei is studied in a heated liquid-drop model where the nuclear drop is assumed to be in thermodynamic equilibrium with its own evaporated nucleonic vapor conserving the total baryon number and isospin of the system. It is found that in the liquid-vapor coexistence region the pressure is not a constant on an isotherm indicating that the transition is continuous. At constant pressure, the caloric curve shows some anomalies, namely, the systems studied exhibit negative heat capacity in a small temperature domain. The dependence of this specific feature on the mass and isospin of the nucleus, Coulomb interaction and the chosen pressure is studied. The effects of the presence of clusters in the vapor phase on specific heat have also been explored.

  10. Effect of pre-oxidation and environmental aging on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealing glass with metallic interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-09-15

    A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two ferritic stainless steel coupons for strength evaluation. The steel coupons were pre-oxidized at elevated temperatures to promote thick oxide layers to simulate long-term exposure conditions. In addition, seals to as-received metal coupons were also tested after aging in oxidizing or reducing environments to simulate the actual SOFC environment. Room temperature tensile testing showed strength degradation when using pre-oxidized coupons, and more extensive degradation after aging in air. Fracture surface and microstructural analysis confirmed that the cause of degradation was formation of SrCrO4 at the outer sealing edges exposed to air.

  11. Specific heat of twisted bilayer graphene: Engineering phonons by atomic plane rotations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nika, Denis L. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States); Cocemasov, Alexandr I. [E. Pokatilov Laboratory of Physics and Engineering of Nanomaterials, Department of Physics and Engineering, Moldova State University, Chisinau MD-2009, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Balandin, Alexander A., E-mail: balandin@ee.ucr.edu [Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California—Riverside, Riverside, California, 92521 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    We have studied the phonon specific heat in single-layer, bilayer, and twisted bilayer graphene. The calculations were performed using the Born-von Karman model of lattice dynamics for intralayer atomic interactions and spherically symmetric interatomic potential for interlayer interactions. We found that at temperature T?specific heat varies with temperature as T{sup n}, where n?=?1 for graphene, n?=?1.6 for bilayer graphene, and n?=?1.3 for the twisted bilayer graphene. The phonon specific heat reveals an intriguing dependence on the twist angle in bilayer graphene, which is particularly pronounced at low temperature. The results suggest a possibility of phonon engineering of thermal properties of layered materials by twisting the atomic planes.

  12. High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy Lybeck

    2010-08-01

    ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

  13. Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liqiang Wei

    2006-05-23

    In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

  14. High temperature interfacial superconductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2012-06-19

    High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

  15. Exceptional enhancement of H{sub 2} production in alkaline environment over plasmonic Au/TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst under visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Xianguang; Liu, Guigao; Yu, Qing; Wang, Tao; Chang, Kun; Li, Peng; Liu, Lequan E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn; Ye, Jinhua E-mail: Lequan.Liu@tju.edu.cn

    2015-10-01

    A reaction environment modulation strategy was employed to promote the H{sub 2} production over plasmonic Au/semiconductor composites. It is shown that the fast consumption of the holes in plasmonic Au nanoparticles by methanol in alkaline reaction environment remarkably increases H{sub 2} generation rate under visible light. The photocatalytic reaction is mainly driven by the interband transition of plasmonic Au nanoparticles, and the apparent quantum efficiency of plasmon-assisted H{sub 2} production at pH 14 reaches 6% at 420 nm. The reaction environment control provides a simple and effective way for the highly efficient solar fuel production from biomass reforming through plasmonic photocatalysis in future.

  16. Measurement of thermodynamic temperature of high temperature fixed points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavrilov, V. R.; Khlevnoy, B. B.; Otryaskin, D. A.; Grigorieva, I. A.; Samoylov, M. L.; Sapritsky, V. I.

    2013-09-11

    The paper is devoted to VNIIOFI's measurements of thermodynamic temperature of the high temperature fixed points Co-C, Pt-C and Re-C within the scope of the international project coordinated by the Consultative Committee for Thermometry working group 5 'Radiation Thermometry'. The melting temperatures of the fixed points were measured by a radiance mode radiation thermometer calibrated against a filter radiometer with known irradiance spectral responsivity via a high temperature black body. This paper describes the facility used for the measurements, the results and estimated uncertainties.

  17. Syntheses and characterization of energetic compounds constructed from alkaline earth metal cations (Sr and Ba) and 1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia Zhengqiang; Chen Sanping; Wei Qing; Qiao Chengfang

    2011-07-15

    Two new energetic compounds, [M(BTE)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}]{sub n} (M=Sr(1), Ba(2)) [H{sub 2}BTE=1,2-bis(tetrazol-5-yl)ethane], have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that they are isomorphous and exhibit 2D (4,4) net framework, generated by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs linked up by two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE, and the resulting 2D structure is interconnected by hydrogen-bond and strong face to face {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions between two tetrazole rings to lead to a 3D supramolecular architecture. DSC measurements show that they have significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. Moreover, the photoluminescence properties, thermogravimetric analyses, and flame colors of the as-prepared compounds are also investigated in this paper. - Graphical abstract: Two novel 2D isomorphous alkaline earth metal complexes were assembled by 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two independent binding modes of H{sub 2}BTE ligands, and the catalytic performances toward thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate and photoluminescent properties of them were investigated. Highlights: > Two novel alkaline earth energetic coordination polymers have been prepared.{yields} Both structures are layered based on 4-connected Sr{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10}/Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} SBUs and two distinct H{sub 2}BTE coordination modes.{yields} The dehydrated products of the compounds possess good thermostability and significant catalytic effects on thermal decomposition of AP.

  18. In situ generation of steam and alkaline surfactant for enhanced oil recovery using an exothermic water reactant (EWR)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Eric P

    2011-05-24

    A method for oil recovery whereby an exothermic water reactant (EWR) encapsulated in a water soluble coating is placed in water and pumped into one or more oil wells in contact with an oil bearing formation. After the water carries the EWR to the bottom of the injection well, the water soluble coating dissolves and the EWR reacts with the water to produce heat, an alkali solution, and hydrogen. The heat from the EWR reaction generates steam, which is forced into the oil bearing formation where it condenses and transfers heat to the oil, elevating its temperature and decreasing the viscosity of the oil. The aqueous alkali solution mixes with the oil in the oil bearing formation and forms a surfactant that reduces the interfacial tension between the oil and water. The hydrogen may be used to react with the oil at these elevated temperatures to form lighter molecules, thus upgrading to a certain extent the oil in situ. As a result, the oil can flow more efficiently and easily through the oil bearing formation towards and into one or more production wells.

  19. Quantum Chaos at Finite Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Caron; H. Jirari; H. Kröger; X. Q. Luo; G. Melkonyan; K. J. M. Moriarty

    2001-06-23

    We use the quantum action to study quantum chaos at finite temperature. We present a numerical study of a classically chaotic 2-D Hamiltonian system - harmonic oscillators with anharmonic coupling. We construct the quantum action non-perturbatively and find temperature dependent quantum corrections in the action parameters. We compare Poincar\\'{e} sections of the quantum action at finite temperature with those of the classical action.

  20. Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury-Jet Target Experiment August 24Nov 1, 2005 #12;Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R09000R1a ii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM FOR THE HIGH POWER MERCURY

  1. Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Specification No. 203-HJT-9000R0 Procurement Specification for a Pump System for the High Power Mercury- Jet Target Experiment August 2005 #12;Draft Specification for Syringe Pump System High Power Mercury Target Experiment 203-HJT-9000R0 8/10/05 Draft Draftii SPECIFICATION FOR A PUMP SYSTEM

  2. Methods for chromosome-specific staining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, J.W.; Pinkel, D.

    1995-09-05

    Methods and compositions for chromosome-specific staining are provided. Compositions comprise heterogeneous mixtures of labeled nucleic acid fragments having substantially complementary base sequences to unique sequence regions of the chromosomal DNA for which their associated staining reagent is specific. Methods include ways for making the chromosome-specific staining compositions of the invention, and methods for applying the staining compositions to chromosomes. 3 figs.

  3. RECHARGEABLE HIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2014-01-01

    F. Eshman, High-Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleS. Sudar, High Performance Batteries for Electric-VehicleHIGH-TEMPERATURE BATTERIES Elton J. Cairns January 1981 TWO-

  4. Low Temperature Material Bonding Technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-10-10

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  5. Low temperature material bonding technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, J. Michael (Knoxville, TN); Foote, Robert S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-02-12

    A method of performing a lower temperature bonding technique to bond together two mating pieces of glass includes applying a sodium silicate aqueous solution between the two pieces.

  6. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  7. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report III, Volume 2. Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1982-01-01

    Report III, Volume 2 contains those specifications numbered K through Y, as follows: Specifications for Compressors (K); Specifications for Piping (L); Specifications for Structures (M); Specifications for Insulation (N); Specifications for Electrical (P); Specifications for Concrete (Q); Specifications for Civil (S); Specifications for Welding (W); Specifications for Painting (X); and Specifications for Special (Y). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available for the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors.

  8. Temperature standards, what and where: resources for effective temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, W.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Many standards have been published to describe devices, methods, and other topics. How they are developed and by whom are briefly described, and an attempt is made to extract most of those relating to temperature measurements. A directory of temperature standards and their sources is provided.

  9. The speed of sound and specific heat in the QCD plasma: hydrodynamics, fluctuations and conformal symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajiv V. Gavai; Sourendu Gupta; Swagato Mukherjee

    2005-01-05

    We report the continuum limits of the speed of sound, c_s, and the specific heat at constant volume, c_v, in quenched QCD at temperatures of 2Tc and 3Tc. At these temperatures, c_s is within 2-sigma of the ideal gas value, whereas c_v differs significantly from the ideal gas. However, both are compatible with results expected in a theory with conformal symmetry. We investigate effective measures of conformal symmetry in the high temperature phase of QCD.

  10. Renewable Energy Ready Home Solar Photovoltaic Specifications...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Photovoltaic Specification, Checklist and Guide, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. rerhsolarelectricguide.pdf More Documents & Publications Solar Water...

  11. Specificity and completion time distributions of biochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    order to produce specific complex structures from a large set of similar biochemical building blocks, many biochemical systems require high sensitivity to small molecular...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SITE-SPECIFIC ADVISORY BOARD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paducah Citizens Advisory Board: Ben Peterson, Chair, Renie Barger, Chair-Elect; Robert Smith, Federal Coordinator; Eric Roberts, Contractor Support Staff Portsmouth Site-Specific...

  13. Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Biological Specifications for Fish Friendly Turbines The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Hydropower Turbine Sys- tem (AHTS) Program supports the research and...

  14. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, VOL. 55, NO. 5, MAY 2008 1477 Individualized Short-Term Core Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for real-time con- tinuous monitoring and prediction of body core temperature would be highly desirable-Term Core Temperature Prediction in Humans Using Biomathematical Models Andrei V. Gribok, Mark J. Buller modeling techniques to predict individual- specific body core temperature variations during physical

  15. The radial temperature distribution of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrica,Traian

    The radial temperature distribution of a constricted oxygen arc in plasma arc cutting Sung Je Kim Gas supply, O2 RHF Starter 2 Components of cutting system Cutting torch components Plasma Arc Cutting High Temperature & Plasma Laboratory University of Minnesota #12;Rotating anode Torch body Power Supply

  16. New High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

    -TEMPERATURE superconductors, materials that carry electricity without resistance at temperatures inexplicably far above one finds its target. Computa- tional biologists in Germany and the United States offered bold new plenty going for them. They're abundant and carbon-free, and their prices are dropping. But they're part

  17. Global Temperature November 3, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    of instrumental temperature measurements occurred when the 1997-98 "El Nino of the century" occurred on the back of a strong two-decade warming trend; in addition, the global temperature impact of the El Nino, which typically lags the El Nino by a few months, coincided almost precisely with calendar year 1998. As a result

  18. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1990-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a hybrid ceramic/metallic rotor member having ceramic/metal joint structure. The disclosed joint is able to endure higher temperatures than previously possible, and aids in controlling heat transfer in the rotor member.

  19. Pion dynamics at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toublan, D.

    1997-11-01

    The pion decay constant and mass are computed at low temperature within chiral perturbation theory to two loops. The effects of the breaking of Lorentz symmetry by the thermal equilibrium state are discussed. The validity of the Gell-Mann{endash}Oakes{endash}Renner relation at finite temperature is examined. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Microbial impacts on geothermometry temperature predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshiko Fujita; David W. Reed; Kaitlyn R. Nowak; Vicki S. Thompson; Travis L. McLing; Robert W. Smith

    2013-02-01

    Conventional geothermometry approaches assume that the composition of a collected water sample originating in a deep geothermal reservoir still reflects chemical equilibration of the water with the deep reservoir rocks. However, for geothermal prospecting samples whose temperatures have dropped to <120°C, temperature predictions may be skewed by the activity of microorganisms; microbial metabolism can drastically and rapidly change the water’s chemistry. We hypothesize that knowledge of microbial impacts on exploration sample geochemistry can be used to constrain input into geothermometry models and thereby improve the reliability of reservoir temperature predictions. To evaluate this hypothesis we have chosen to focus on sulfur cycling, because of the significant changes in redox state and pH associated with sulfur chemistry. Redox and pH are critical factors in defining the mineral-fluid equilibria that form the basis of solute geothermometry approaches. Initially we are developing assays to detect the process of sulfate reduction, using knowledge of genes specific to sulfate reducing microorganisms. The assays rely on a common molecular biological technique known as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), which allows estimation of the number of target organisms in a particular sample by enumerating genes specific to the organisms rather than actually retrieving and characterizing the organisms themselves. For quantitation of sulfate reducing genes using qPCR, we constructed a plasmid (a piece of DNA) containing portions of two genes (known as dsrA and dsrB) that are directly involved with sulfate reduction and unique to sulfate reducing microorganisms. Using the plasmid as well as DNA from other microorganisms known to be sulfate reducers or non-sulfate reducers, we developed qPCR protocols and showed the assay’s specificity to sulfate reducers and that a qPCR standard curve using the plasmid was linear over >5 orders of magnitude. As a first test with actual field samples, the assay was applied to DNA extracted from water collected at springs located in and around the town of Soda Springs, Idaho. Soda Springs is located in the fold and thrust belt on the eastern boundary of the track of the Yellowstone Hotspot, where a deep carbon dioxide source believed to originate from Mississippian limestone contacts acidic hydrothermal fluids at depth. Both sulfate and sulfide have been measured in samples collected previously at Soda Springs. Preliminary results indicate that sulfate reducing genes were present in each of the samples tested. Our work supports evaluation of the potential for microbial processes to have altered water chemistry in geothermal exploration samples.

  1. Formal Specification of Operating System Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Paul E.

    Formal Specification of Operating System Operations Dan Zhou Department of Computer Science.black@nist.gov This paper describes the development of a formal specification for a secure operating system architecture operations. We also provide a uniform environment for system commands that change the security state

  2. Executing Verified Compiler Specification Koji Okuma1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minamide, Yasuhiko

    Executing Verified Compiler Specification Koji Okuma1 and Yasuhiko Minamide2 1 Doctoral Program {okuma,minamide}@score.is.tsukuba.ac.jp Abstract. Much work has been done in verifying a compiler compiler specification and a correct compiler implementation. To fill this gap and obtain a correct

  3. Monitor-Based Formal Specification of PCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, David L.

    111 Monitor-Based Formal Specification of PCI Monitor-Based Formal Specification of PCI Kanna ContributionsContributions zWith our methodology, zProtocols are more easily specified ­PCI protocol specified zGood debugging strategies ­PCI Protocol Bugs Discovered #12;444 Copyright by Kanna Shimizu 2002777 Methodology

  4. Plutonium Immobilization Can Loading Preliminary Specifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kriikku, E.

    1998-11-25

    This report discusses the Plutonium Immobilization can loading preliminary equipment specifications and includes a process block diagram, process description, equipment list, preliminary equipment specifications, plan and elevation sketches, and some commercial catalogs. This report identifies loading pucks into cans and backfilling cans with helium as the top priority can loading development areas.

  5. Product specification Supersedes data 1998 Mar 24

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ida, Nathan

    DATA SHEET Product specification Supersedes data 1998 Mar 24 2000 Jun 13 DISCRETE SEMICONDUCTORS KMZ51 Magnetic field sensor M3D495 #12;2000 Jun 13 2 Philips Semiconductors Product specification output voltage 8 -Iflip flip coil handbook, halfpage 41 58 MGD827 pin 1 index Hext Fig.1 Simplified

  6. Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freezing Spring Temperatures Damage Knobcone Pine Stanley L. Krugman U. S. FOREST SERVICE RESEARCH, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage knobcone pine conelets. Berkeley, Calif.. Pacific pine, conelets, freezing temperature) Krugman, Stanley L. 1966. Freezing spring temperatures damage

  7. Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

    2011-10-01

    Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

  8. Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

  9. Quad Remote Diode and Local Temperature Sensor with SMBus Interface and TruThermTM Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    package Key Specifications Local Temperature Accuracy ±2.0°C (max) Remote Diode Temperature Accuracy ±0 Information Part Number Package Marking NS Package Number Transport Media LM95234CISD 95234CI SDA14B (LLP-14 Block Diagram 20106302 www.national.com 2 LM95234 #12;Pin Descriptions Label Pin # Function Typical

  10. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  11. Journal of Low Temperature Physics manuscript No. (will be inserted by the editor)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    silver heat exchangers and large pumping systems.1,2,3,4. They can achieve large 3He flow rates (a few specific heat materials. High purity insulators at temperatures well below the Debye temperature refrigerators (PT-DR) in the frame- work of a scientific-industrial collaboration (CNRS-L'Air Liquide). Two

  12. Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Burgett Geothermal Greenhouses Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal...

  13. Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature Geothermal Electrical Power Generation Systems Using Oilfield Fluids Research Initiative Will Demonstrate Low Temperature...

  14. Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Encapsulation of High Temperature Thermoelectric Modules Presents concept for hermetic encapsulation of TE modules...

  15. Pairing properties and specific heat of the inner crust of a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Pastore

    2014-12-29

    We investigate the pairing properties at finite temperature of the Wigner-Seitz cells in the inner crust of a neutron star obtained with the recent Brussels-Montreal Skyrme functional BSk21. In particular we analyze the phenomena of persistence and reentrance of pairing correlations and their impact on the specific heat in the low-density region of the inner crust.

  16. Pairing properties and specific heat of the inner crust of a neutron star

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pastore, A

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the pairing properties at finite temperature of the Wigner-Seitz cells in the inner crust of a neutron star obtained with the recent Brussels-Montreal Skyrme functional BSk21. In particular we analyze the phenomena of persistence and reentrance of pairing correlations and their impact on the specific heat in the low-density region of the inner crust.

  17. Chemical Equilibration at the Hagedorn Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Noronha-Hostler; C. Greiner; I. A. Shovkovy

    2007-03-23

    One important question in relativistic heavy ion collisions is if hadrons, specifically anti-hyperons, are in equilibrium before thermal freezeout because strangeness enhancement has long been pointed to as a signature for Quark Gluon Plasma. Because anti-baryons have long equilibration times in the hadron gas phase it has been suggested that they are "born" into equilibrium. However, Hagedorn states, massive resonances, which are thought to appear near the critical temperature, contribute to fast chemical equilibration times for a hadron gas by providing extra degrees of freedom. Here we use master equations to describe the interplay between Hagedorn resonances, pions, and baryon anti-baryon pairs as they equilibrate over time and observe if the baryons and anti-baryons are fully equilibrated within the fireball.

  18. High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisa Anita Roed; Kristine Niss; Bo Jakobsen

    2015-06-11

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependence of the characteristic timescale associated with the specific heat is compared to the equivalent timescale from dielectric spectroscopy performed under identical conditions. It is shown that the ratio between the two timescales is independent of both temperature and pressure. This observation is non-trivial and demonstrates the existence of specially simple molecular liquids in which different physical relaxation processes are both as function of temperature and pressure/density governed by the same underlying "inner clock." Furthermore, the results are discussed in terms of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids, like the measured liquid, comply to the isomorph theory.

  19. Room temperature water Leidenfrost droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck Celestini; Thomas Frisch; Yves Pomeau

    2013-08-05

    We experimentally investigate the Leidenfrost effect at pressures ranging from 1 to 0.05 atmospheric pressure. As a direct consequence of the Clausius-Clapeyron phase diagram of water, the droplet temperature can be at ambient temperature in a non-sophisticated lab environment. Furthermore, the lifetime of the Leidenfrost droplet is significantly increased in this low pressure environment. The temperature and pressure dependance of the evaporation rate are successfully tested against a recently proposed model. These results may pave a way to reach efficient Leidenfrost micro-fluidic and milli-fluidic applications.

  20. Method for measuring surface temperature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A. (Los Alamos, NM); Baker, Sheila N. (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-07-28

    The present invention relates to a method for measuring a surface temperature using is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methyl pyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  1. Investigation of biologically-designed metal-specific chelators for potential metal recovery and waste remediation applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Ockwig, Nathan W.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria, algae and plants produce metal-specific chelators to capture required nutrient or toxic trace metals. Biological systems are thought to be very efficient, honed by evolutionary forces over time. Understanding the approaches used by living organisms to select for specific metals in the environment may lead to design of cheaper and more effective approaches for metal recovery and contaminant-metal remediation. In this study, the binding of a common siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), to three aqueous metal cations, Fe(II), Fe(III), and UO{sub 2}(VI) was investigated using classical molecular dynamics. DFO-B has three acetohydroxamate groups and a terminal amine group that all deprotonate with increasing pH. For all three metals, complexes with DFO-B (-2) are the most stable and favored under alkaline conditions. Under more acidic conditions, the metal-DFO complexes involve chelation with both acetohydroxamate and acetylamine groups. The approach taken here allows for detailed investigation of metal binding to biologically-designed organic ligands.

  2. Alternatives to Nitric Acid Stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process for Cesium Removal from Alkaline High-Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Haverlock, Tamara; Bazelaire, Eve; Bonnesen, Peter V; Ditto, Mary E; Moyer, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    Effective alternatives to nitric acid stripping in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent have been demonstrated in this work. The CSSX solvent employs calix[4]arene-bis(tert-octylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) as the cesium extractant in a modified alkane diluent for decontamination of alkaline high-level wastes. Results reported in this paper support the idea that replacement of the nitrate anion by a much more hydrophilic anion like borate can substantially lower cesium distribution ratios on stripping. Without any other change in the CSSX flowsheet, however, the use of a boric acid stripping solution in place of the 1 mM nitric acid solution used in the CSSX process marginally, though perhaps still usefully, improves stripping. The less-than-expected improvement was explained by the carryover of nitrate from scrubbing into stripping. Accordingly, more effective stripping is obtained after a scrub of the solvent with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide. Functional alternatives to boric acid include sodium bicarbonate or cesium hydroxide as strip solutions. Profound stripping improvement is achieved when trioctylamine, one of the components of the CSSX solvent, is replaced with a commercial guanidine reagent (LIX 79). The more basic guanidine affords greater latitude in selection of aqueous conditions in that it protonates even at mildly alkaline pH values. Under process-relevant conditions, cesium distributions on stripping are decreased on the order of 100-fold compared with current CSSX performance. The extraction properties of the solvent were preserved unchanged over three successive extract-scrub-strip cycles. From the point of view of compatibility with downstream processing, boric acid represents an attractive stripping agent, as it is also a potentially ideal feed for borosilicate vitrification of the separated 137Cs product stream. Possibilities for use of these results toward a dramatically better next-generation CSSX process, possibly one employing the more soluble cesium extractant calix[4]arene-bis(2 ethylhexylbenzo-18-crown-6) (BEHBCalixC6) are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of some transport and thermodynamic properties of superheated steam: Effects of steam temperature and pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devahastin, S.; Mujumdar, A.S.

    2000-05-01

    For machine computation of drying, humidification and dehumidification processes it is necessary to have reliable correlations to predict transport and thermodynamic properties of the drying medium as functions of temperature and pressure. In this paper empirical correlations for specific volume, dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity as well as specific isobaric heat capacity of superheated steam over the temperature range of 160--500 C and the pressure range of 100--500 kPa are presented. The Prandtl numbers at various temperatures and pressures are also presented. Comments on the properties and the use of these correlations are given.

  4. Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Brief Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding--Abbreviated Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Soil Profile Rebuilding Specification (Brief Version)--1 Soil Profile Rebuilding--Abbreviated Specification Specification for Restoration of Graded and Compacted Soils that will be Vegetated 1. PURPOSE AND DESCRIPTION Purpose Soil Profile Rebuilding is an appropriate soil restoration technique for sites where

  5. Evaluation of compost specifications for stormwater management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birt, Lindsay Nicole

    2009-05-15

    , and interrill erodibility were determined and compared across five compost treatments following TxDOT specifications for compost applied as an erosion control and two control treatments of topsoil (TS) and hydroseeding (HS) applied at 5 cm depth. The simulator...

  6. BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BRASIL Language Specification March 9, 2010 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Getting Started: Simulations in BRASIL 4 2.1 The State-Effect Design Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Supporting the State-Effect Pattern in BRASIL

  7. SAVCBS 2003 Specification and Verification of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavens, Gary T.

    Specifications in the Development Process: An AsmL Demonstration 97 Mike Barnett (Microsoft Research) Mae COMMITTEE Mike Barnett (Microsoft Research, USA) Mike Barnett is a Research Software Design Engineer

  8. Double Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUSIENE, W.T.

    2000-04-27

    This specification establishes the performance requirements and provides the references to the requisite codes and standards to he applied during the design of the Double-Shell Tank (DST) Utilities Subsystems that support the first phase of waste feed delivery (WFD). The DST Utilities Subsystems provide electrical power, raw/potable water, and service/instrument air to the equipment and structures used to transfer low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) to designated DST staging tanks. The DST Utilities Subsystems also support the equipment and structures used to deliver blended LAW and HLW feed from these staging tanks to the River Protection Project (RPP) Privatization Contractor facility where the waste will be immobilized. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

  9. Specification for the Open Checklist Interactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    responsibilities include the development of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology of Standards and Technology Dr. Patrick D. Gallagher, Director NIST Interagency Report 7692 #12;SPECIFICATION

  10. Dimerization specificities of leucine zipper mutants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieker, Jennifer Dawn

    2013-02-22

    -1 DIMEItIZA TION SPECIFICITIES OF LEUCINE ZIPPER MUTAIV TS A Senior Thesis By Jennifer Dawn Rieker 1997-98 University Undergraduate Research Fellow Texas ARM University Group: Biochemistry/Chemistry DIMERIZATION SPECIFICITIES OF LEUCINE ZIPPER... MUTANTS by Jennifer Dawn Rieker Submitted to the Office of Honors Programs and Academic Scholarships, Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 1997-98 UNVERSITY UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH FELLOWS PROGRAM April 16, 1998...

  11. Low to moderate temperature nanolaminate heater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, J. Del (Livermore, CA); Nunes, Peter J. (Danville, CA); Simpson, Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hau-Riege, Stefan (Fremont, CA); Walton, Chris (Oakland, CA); Carter, J. Chance (Livermore, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-01-11

    A low to moderate temperature heat source comprising a high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures wherein the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is positioned between two thin pieces to form a close contact sheath. In one embodiment the high temperature energy source modified to output low to moderate temperatures is a nanolaminate multilayer foil of reactive materials that produces a heating level of less than 200.degree. C.

  12. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 01) EPA 402K-13001, February 2013 iaprev1.pdf More Documents...

  13. Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02) Indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications Version 1 (Rev. 02), November 2013,...

  14. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.(y), wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  15. High temperature thermometric phosphors for use in a temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1998-03-24

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub (x)},Eu{sub (y)}, wherein: 0.1 wt %{<=}x{<=}20 wt % and 0.1 wt %{<=}y{<=}20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  16. Solvent extraction of technetium from alkaline waste media using bis-4,4{prime}(5{prime})[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnesen, P.V.; Presley, D.J.; Moyer, B.A.

    1995-07-01

    The crown ether bis-4,4`(5`)[(tert-butyl)cyclohexano]-18-crown-6 can be utilized in a solvent-extraction process for the removal of technetium as pertechnetate ion, TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} from solutions simulating highly radioactive alkaline defense wastes (``tank wastes``) stored at several sites in the United States. The process employs non-halogenated and non-volatile diluents and modifiers and includes an efficient stripping procedure using only water. More than 95% of the pertechnetate present at 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} M in Melton Valley (Oak Ridge, TN) and Hanford (Washington) tank-waste simulants was removed following two cross-current extraction contacts using 0.02 M bis-4,4`(5`)[(tertbutyl)cyclohexano]- 18-crown-6 in 2:1 vol/vol TBP/Isopar{reg_sign} M diluent at 25 C. Similarly, for both simulants, more than 98% of the pertechnetate contained in the solvent was back-extracted following two cross-current stripping contacts using deionized water.

  17. Finite Temperature Dynamical Correlations in Massive Integrable Quantum Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. H. L. Essler; R. M. Konik

    2009-10-07

    We consider the finite-temperature frequency and momentum dependent two-point functions of local operators in integrable quantum field theories. We focus on the case where the zero temperature correlation function is dominated by a delta-function line arising from the coherent propagation of single particle modes. Our specific examples are the two-point function of spin fields in the disordered phase of the quantum Ising and the O(3) nonlinear sigma models. We employ a Lehmann representation in terms of the known exact zero-temperature form factors to carry out a low-temperature expansion of two-point functions. We present two different but equivalent methods of regularizing the divergences present in the Lehmann expansion: one directly regulates the integral expressions of the squares of matrix elements in the infinite volume whereas the other operates through subtracting divergences in a large, finite volume. Our central results are that the temperature broadening of the line shape exhibits a pronounced asymmetry and a shift of the maximum upwards in energy ("temperature dependent gap"). The field theory results presented here describe the scaling limits of the dynamical structure factor in the quantum Ising and integer spin Heisenberg chains. We discuss the relevance of our results for the analysis of inelastic neutron scattering experiments on gapped spin chain systems such as CsNiCl3 and YBaNiO5.

  18. Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in Southeastern Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neupane, Ghanashyam; Mattson, Earl D.; McLing, Travis L.; Palmer, Carl D.; Smith, Robert W.; Wood, Thomas R.; Podgorney, Robert K.

    2015-03-01

    Southeastern Idaho exhibits numerous warm springs, warm water from shallow wells, and hot water within oil and gas test wells that indicate a potential for geothermal development in the area. Although the area exhibits several thermal expressions, the measured geothermal gradients vary substantially (19 – 61 ºC/km) within this area, potentially suggesting a redistribution of heat in the overlying ground water from deeper geothermal reservoirs. We have estimated reservoir temperatures from measured water compositions using an inverse modeling technique (Reservoir Temperature Estimator, RTEst) that calculates the temperature at which multiple minerals are simultaneously at equilibrium while explicitly accounting for the possible loss of volatile constituents (e.g., CO2), boiling and/or water mixing. Compositions of a selected group of thermal waters representing southeastern Idaho hot/warm springs and wells were used for the development of temperature estimates. The temperature estimates in the the region varied from moderately warm (59 ºC) to over 175 ºC. Specifically, hot springs near Preston, Idaho resulted in the highest temperature estimates in the region.

  19. Apparatus and method for high temperature viscosity and temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Krishnan (Mississippi State, MS); Shah, Vimal (Houston, TX); Costley, R. Daniel (Mississippi State, MS); Singh, Jagdish P. (Mississippi State, MS)

    2001-01-01

    A probe for measuring the viscosity and/or temperature of high temperature liquids, such as molten metals, glass and similar materials comprises a rod which is an acoustical waveguide through which a transducer emits an ultrasonic signal through one end of the probe, and which is reflected from (a) a notch or slit or an interface between two materials of the probe and (b) from the other end of the probe which is in contact with the hot liquid or hot melt, and is detected by the same transducer at the signal emission end. To avoid the harmful effects of introducing a thermally conductive heat sink into the melt, the probe is made of relatively thermally insulative (non-heat-conductive) refractory material. The time between signal emission and reflection, and the amplitude of reflections, are compared against calibration curves to obtain temperature and viscosity values.

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W. Weber-induced Defects in HTS Practical Materials HTS4Fusion Conductor Workshop, KIT, 27 May 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Options / Materials "Demo" design (magnetic field, temperature, fluence

  1. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class temperature. #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear Fusion 2. There are a few different energy scales

  2. Thermal disconnect for high-temperature batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jungst, Rudolph George (Albuquerque, NM); Armijo, James Rudolph (Albuquerque, NM); Frear, Darrel Richard (Austin, TX)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of high temperature thermal disconnect has been developed to protect electrical and mechanical equipment from damage caused by operation at extreme temperatures. These thermal disconnects allow continuous operation at temperatures ranging from 250.degree. C. to 450.degree. C., while rapidly terminating operation at temperatures 50.degree. C. to 150.degree. C. higher than the continuous operating temperature.

  3. Single-Duct Constant Air Volume System Supply Air Temperature Reset: Using Return Air Temperature or Outside Air Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Claridge, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01

    The supply air temperature set point for a singleduct constant air volume air handling unit (AHU) system is often reset based on either return air temperature or outside air temperature in order to reduce simultaneous cooling and heating energy...

  4. High-temperature corrosion control of lagged piping system components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, R. (Dept. of the Navy, Naval Sea Systems Command, Code 05M11, Washington, DC (US)); Kogler, R.A. (Advanced Technology Inc., Arlington, VA (US))

    1990-07-01

    Over the past several years, the U.S. Navy has stepped up efforts to eliminate corrosion aboard its ships. One of the most effective techniques the Navy has employed is the application of sprayed aluminum for high-temperature corrosion protection. This sacrificial coating has performed well in the corrosion protection of high-temperature lagged steam valves and associated piping systems. Because of the superiority of the sprayed aluminum system over the conventional methods of protection for these piping systems, the Navy has realized considerable cost savings. These savings are the direct result of major reductions in routine maintenance associated with the application of sprayed aluminum coatings for corrosion protection purposes. This article discusses specific U.S. Navy experience with the use of sprayed aluminum coatings for high-temperature applications as well as current Navy practice regarding the use of this corrosion control coating.

  5. Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Hänggi; Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Peter Talkner

    2008-05-26

    We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_Dspecific heat based on the thermodynamic prescription becomes negative. This anomaly is rooted in an ill-defined density of states of the damped free particle which assumes unphysical negative values when gamma/omega_D>1.

  6. The Specific Heat of a Ferromagnetic Film.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Freire; Denjoe O'Connor; C. R. Stephens

    1995-03-19

    We analyze the specific heat for the $O(N)$ vector model on a $d$-dimensional film geometry of thickness $L$ using ``environmentally friendly'' renormalization. We consider periodic, Dirichlet and antiperiodic boundary conditions, deriving expressions for the specific heat and an effective specific heat exponent, $\\alpha\\ef$. In the case of $d=3$, for $N=1$, by matching to the exact exponent of the two dimensional Ising model we capture the crossover for $\\xi_L\\ra\\infty$ between power law behaviour in the limit ${L\\over\\xi_L}\\ra\\infty$ and logarithmic behaviour in the limit ${L\\over\\xi_L}\\ra0$ for fixed $L$, where $\\xi_L$ is the correlation length in the transverse dimensions.

  7. US Department of Transportation specification packages evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    Specification packages are broad families of package designs and approved by the Department of Transportation (DOT) for transport of certain classes of radioactive materials, with each specification containing a number of designs of various sizes. Many of the individual package designs are not supported by reasonably current safety analyses. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff to collect all related information, perform analyses, and identify alternative actions that will enable NRC and DOT to make informed decisions on whether to retain, withdraw, or modify the existing regulatory permission for the use of specification packages to transport radioactive and fissile materials. This paper presents the background, issues, and progress made in this activity.

  8. US Department of Transportation specification packages evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratledge, J.E.; Rawl, R.R.

    1992-03-01

    Specification packages are broad families of package designs and approved by the Department of Transportation (DOT) for transport of certain classes of radioactive materials, with each specification containing a number of designs of various sizes. Many of the individual package designs are not supported by reasonably current safety analyses. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) asked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) staff to collect all related information, perform analyses, and identify alternative actions that will enable NRC and DOT to make informed decisions on whether to retain, withdraw, or modify the existing regulatory permission for the use of specification packages to transport radioactive and fissile materials. This paper presents the background, issues, and progress made in this activity.

  9. AWS breaks new ground with soldering specification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vianco, Paul Thomas

    2008-08-01

    Joining technologies continue to advance with new materials, process innovations, and inspection techniques. An increasing number of high-valued, high-reliability applications -- from boilers and ship hulls to rocket motors and medical devices -- have required the development of industry standards and specifications in order to ensure that the best design and manufacturing practices are being used to produce safe, durable products and assemblies. Standards writing has always had an important role at the American Welding Society (AWS). The AWS standards and specifications cover such topics as filler materials, joining processes, inspection techniques, and qualification methods that are used in welding and brazing technologies. These AWS standards and specifications, all of which are approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), have also provided the basis for many similar documents used in Europe and in Pacific Rim countries.

  10. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, C.T.; Takeyama, Masao.

    1994-02-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250 C and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr[sub 2]Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements. 14 figures.

  11. Two-phase chromium-niobium alloys exhibiting improved mechanical properties at high temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Takeyama, Masao (Tokyo, JP)

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses chromium-niobium alloys which exhibit improved mechanical properties at high temperatures in the range of 1250.degree. C. and improved room temperature ductility. The alloys contain a Cr.sub.2 Nb-rich intermetallic phase and a Cr-rich phase with an overall niobium concentration in the range of from about 5 to about 18 at. %. The high temperature strength is substantially greater than that of state of the art nickel-based superalloys for enhanced high temperature service. Further improvements in the properties of the compositions are obtained by alloying with rhenium and aluminum; and additional rare-earth and other elements.

  12. Possible Routes to Frictionless Transport of Electronic Fluids in High-Temperature Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zotin K-H Chu

    2009-12-23

    Electric-field-driven transport of electronic fluids in metallic glasses as well as three-dimensional amorphous superconductors are investigated by using the verified approach which has been successfully adopted to study the critical transport of glassy solid helium in very low temperature environment. The critical temperatures related to the nearly frictionless transport of electronic fluids were found to be directly relevant to the superconducting temperature of amorphous superconductors after selecting specific activation energies. Our results imply that optimal shear-thinning is an effective way to reach high-temperature charged superfluidity or superconductivity.

  13. ROC analysis in patient specific quality assurance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlone, Marco; MacPherson, Miller; Cruje, Charmainne; Rangel, Alejandra; McCabe, Ryan; Nielsen, Michelle

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) methods in patient specific IMRT quality assurance (QA) in order to determine unbiased methods to set threshold criteria for {gamma}-distance to agreement measurements. Methods: A group of 17 prostate plans was delivered as planned while a second group of 17 prostate plans was modified with the introduction of random multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors that are normally distributed with {sigma}{approx}{+-}0.5, {+-}1.0, {+-}2.0, and {+-}3.0 mm (a total of 68 modified plans were created). All plans were evaluated using five different {gamma}-criteria. ROC methodology was applied by quantifying the fraction of modified plans reported as 'fail' and unmodified plans reported as 'pass.'Results: {gamma}-based criteria were able to attain nearly 100% sensitivity/specificity in the detection of large random errors ({sigma} > 3 mm). Sensitivity and specificity decrease rapidly for all {gamma}-criteria as the size of error to be detected decreases below 2 mm. Predictive power is null with all criteria used in the detection of small MLC errors ({sigma} < 0.5 mm). Optimal threshold values were established by determining which criteria maximized sensitivity and specificity. For 3%/3 mm {gamma}-criteria, optimal threshold values range from 92% to 99%, whereas for 2%/2 mm, the range was from 77% to 94%. Conclusions: The optimal threshold values that were determined represent a maximized test sensitivity and specificity and are not subject to any user bias. When applied to the datasets that we studied, our results suggest the use of patient specific QA as a safety tool that can effectively prevent large errors (e.g., {sigma} > 3 mm) as opposed to a tool to improve the quality of IMRT delivery.

  14. Integrated Emissivity And Temperature Measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poulsen, Peter (Livermore, CA)

    2005-11-08

    A multi-channel spectrometer and a light source are used to measure both the emitted and the reflected light from a surface which is at an elevated temperature relative to its environment. In a first method, the temperature of the surface and emissivity in each wavelength is calculated from a knowledge of the spectrum and the measurement of the incident and reflected light. In the second method, the reflected light is measured from a reference surface having a known reflectivity and the same geometry as the surface of interest and the emitted and the reflected light are measured for the surface of interest. These measurements permit the computation of the emissivity in each channel of the spectrometer and the temperature of the surface of interest.

  15. Specific Mass Estimates for A Vapor Core Reactor With MHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Travis; Smith, Blair; Anghaie, Samim [Innovative Nuclear Space Power and Propulsion Institute (INSPI), PO Box 116502, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6502 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the development of a system concept for space power generation and nuclear electric propulsion based on a vapor core reactor (VCR) with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power conversion system, coupled to a magnetoplasma-dynamic (MPD) thruster. The VCR is a liquid-vapor core reactor concept operating with metallic uranium or uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) vapor as the fissioning fuel and alkali metals or their fluorides as working fluid in a closed Rankine cycle with MHD energy conversion. Gaseous and liquid-vapor core reactors can potentially provide the highest reactor and cycle temperature among all existing or proposed fission reactor designs. This unique feature makes this reactor concept a very natural and attractive candidate for very high power (10 to 1000 MWe) and low specific mass (0.4 to 5 kg/kWe) nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) applications since the MHD output could be coupled with minimal power conditioning to MPD thrusters or other types of thruster for producing thrust at very high specific impulse (I{sub sp} 1500 to 10,000 s). The exceptional specific mass performance of an optimized VCRMHD- NEP system could lead to a dramatic reduction in the cost and duration of manned or robotic interplanetary as well as interstellar missions. The VCR-MHD-NEP system could enable very efficient Mars cargo transfers or short (<8 month) Mars round trips with less initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO). The system could also enable highly efficient lunar cargo transfer and rapid missions to other destinations throughout the solar system. (authors)

  16. DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Wendy; Gregory, Arofan

    2013-04-03

    DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook Wendy Thomas Arofan Gregory NADDI 2013 3.2 Public Review 3.2 schema complete and in subversion site branches/proposed3.2/schema Field level documentation has been revised throughout and is available...DDI Specification: Current Status and Outlook Wendy Thomas Arofan Gregory NADDI 2013 3.2 Public Review • 3.2 schema complete and in subversion site branches/proposed3.2/schema • Field level documentation has been revised throughout...

  17. Engineered waste-package-system design specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-05-01

    This report documents the waste package performance requirements and geologic and waste form data bases used in developing the conceptual designs for waste packages for salt, tuff, and basalt geologies. The data base reflects the latest geotechnical information on the geologic media of interest. The parameters or characteristics specified primarily cover spent fuel, defense high-level waste, and commercial high-level waste forms. The specification documents the direction taken during the conceptual design activity. A separate design specification will be developed prior to the start of the preliminary design activity.

  18. LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS RADIATION EFFECTS ON FUSION MAGNET COMPONENTS ­ 1: SUPERCONDUCTORS Harald W, Austria Introduction: The ITER-Magnets, Neutron Spectra Low Temperature Superconductors Stabilizer HTS Conclusions WAMSDO Workshop, Geneva 14 November 2011 #12;LOW TEMPERATURE PHYSICS Overview: ITER 300

  19. Tuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbonammonia borane nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    the hydrogen storage properties. For example, the dehydrogenation temperature of ammonia borane (ABTuning dehydrogenation temperature of carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites Saghar Sepehri, Betzaida temperature and kinetics of coherent carbon­ammonia borane nanocomposites prepared by sol­gel synthesis

  20. RFID tag antenna based temperature sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Rahul

    Temperature monitoring is important in a number of fields, particularly cold supply chain applications. Most commercial wireless temperature sensors consist of transceivers, memory and batteries to maintain a temperature ...

  1. High temperature superconductor current leads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

    1995-01-01

    An electrical lead having one end for connection to an apparatus in a cryogenic environment and the other end for connection to an apparatus outside the cryogenic environment. The electrical lead includes a high temperature superconductor wire and an electrically conductive material distributed therein, where the conductive material is present at the one end of the lead at a concentration in the range of from 0 to about 3% by volume, and at the other end of the lead at a concentration of less than about 20% by volume. Various embodiments are shown for groups of high temperature superconductor wires and sheaths.

  2. Crystal face temperature determination means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nason, D.O.; Burger, A.

    1994-11-22

    An optically transparent furnace having a detection apparatus with a pedestal enclosed in an evacuated ampule for growing a crystal thereon is disclosed. Temperature differential is provided by a source heater, a base heater and a cold finger such that material migrates from a polycrystalline source material to grow the crystal. A quartz halogen lamp projects a collimated beam onto the crystal and a reflected beam is analyzed by a double monochromator and photomultiplier detection spectrometer and the detected peak position in the reflected energy spectrum of the reflected beam is interpreted to determine surface temperature of the crystal. 3 figs.

  3. Dry-out and low temperature calcination of DST/SST waste blend high temperature melter feed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.D.; Tracey, E.M.

    1996-02-01

    The FY1994 DST/SST blend was prepared in accordance with the DST/SST blend feed specification. The laboratory preparation steps and observations were compared with an existing experience base to verify the acceptability of the feed specification for simulant make-up. The most significant test results included a variety of features. Ferrocyanide breaks down to NH{sub 3} plus formate, during the low-temperature calcining phase of the tests. Ferrocyanide displayed no redox reactivity with the nitrates and nitrites contained in the slurry in the absence of sugar. Sugar displays a redox reaction with the nitrates and nitrites in the blend similar to the redox. reaction observed in the LLW feed simulant. Boiling of a free flowing slurry occurs at temperatures below about 120{degrees}C. When about 45% of the total water loss has occurred, the feed slurry congeals and continues to lose water, shrinking and developing shrinkage cracks. Water stops coming off between 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C. Slurry shear strength and viscosity strongly increase as the weight percent solids increases from 20 wt% to 45 wt%. The 45 wt% solids corresponds to approximately a 40 % water loss. The principle beat sensitivity for this material is the exothermic reaction which is activated when the temperature exceeds about 250{degrees}C. The breakdown of ferrocyanide to ammonia and formate under strongly basic conditions may begin at temperatures less than 100{degrees}C, but the rate increased strongly with increasing temperature and appeared to be completed in the time of our tests. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results on feed slurry without and with ferrocyanide showed only endothermic behavior. This is consistent with the dry out and low temperature calcine studies which did not indicate any exothermic behavior for the feed slurry with and without ferrocyanide.

  4. Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Savings Project: Lower Water Heating Temperature Addthis Project Level Easy Energy Savings 12-30 annually for each 10F...

  5. Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Room Temperature Dispenser Photocathode Using Elemental Cesium Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have...

  6. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on...

  7. Advanced Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Temperature Absorption Chiller Module Integrated with a CHP System at a Distributed Data Center - Presentation by Exergy Partners Corp., June 2011 Advanced Low Temperature...

  8. Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Litchfield Correctional Center District Heating Low Temperature...

  9. Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

  10. HYDROGEN SULFIDE -HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE - HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A Foundation. ii #12;HYDROGEN SULFIDE-HIGH TEMPERATURE DRILLING CONTINGENCY PLAN OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 139

  11. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

  12. Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use of Low Heat Rejection Concepts Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use...

  13. Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Acid Doped Membranes for High Temperature PEMFC to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group, May 25, 2004 in Philadelphia, PA.

  14. High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  15. High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermoelectric Materials Characterization for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program...

  16. Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Manufacturing Barriers to High Temperature PEM Commercialization Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D...

  17. COS FUV Grating Holographic Recording Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS FUV Grating Holographic Recording Specification Date: February 3, 2000 Document Number: COS-08, COS Instrument Scientist, CU/CASA Date Reviewed By: R. Cahill 11-17-98 R. Cahill, Optical Designer-12-98 J. Andrews, COS Experiment Manager, CU/CASA Date Approved By: J. Green 11-13-98 J. C. Green, COS

  18. Unit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sannella, Don

    and impractical activity. When only finite sets of interactions are considered, successful testing can acceptUnit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications Patricia D.L. Machado 1 and Donald Sannella 2 1 Science, University of Edinburgh Abstract. The problem of testing modular systems against algebraic

  19. Unit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sannella, Don

    and impractical activity. When only finite sets of interactions are considered, successful testing can acceptUnit Testing for Casl Architectural Specifications Patricia D.L. Machado1 and Donald Sannella2 1 Science, University of Edinburgh Abstract. The problem of testing modular systems against algebraic

  20. Site-specific strategies for cotton management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabile, Marcelo de Castro Chaves

    2005-08-29

    and their outcomes are promising. Historical yield data from yield monitors and height data from the HMAP (plant height mapping) system were used to select representative areas within the field, and areas of average conditions were used as sampling sites... II USE OF SITE-SPECIFIC DATA FOR COTMAN SITE SELECTION ...................6 Introduction............................................................................................................6 Literature Review...

  1. Signature and Specification Matching Amy Moormann Zaremski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , software libraries, component retrieval, library indexing, sub­ typing, signature matching, specification matching #12; Abstract Large libraries of software components hold great potential as a resource for software engineers, but to utilize them fully, we need to be able: (1) to locate components in the library

  2. The Technical Specification for the Security Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Gallagher, Under Secretary for Standards and Technology and Director #12;The Technical Specification's responsibilities include the development of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards of Standards and Technology Special Publication 800-126, Revision 2 58 pages (Sep. 2011) #12;The Technical

  3. The Technical Specification for the Security Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. economy and public welfare by providing technical leadership for the nation`s measurement and standards include the development of technical, physical, administrative, and management standards and guidelinesThe Technical Specification for the Security Content Automation Protocol (SCAP): SCAP Version 1

  4. On Hydrophobicity and Conformational Specificity in Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandelin, Erik

    On Hydrophobicity and Conformational Specificity in Proteins Erik Sandelin1 2 Stockholm of monomeric globular single domain proteins. We find that the total fraction of hydrophobic residues is roughly constant and has no discernible dependence on protein size. This results in a decrease

  5. Generating Test Data From Statebased Specifications 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Generating Test Data From State­based Specifications 1 A. Jefferson Offutt 1 , Shaoying Liu 2 testing in industry is conducted at the system level, most formal research has focused on the unit level. As a result, most system level testing techniques are only described informally. This paper presents formal

  6. Product specification Supersedes data of September 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    Semiconductors, SC04 1997 Jul 15 DISCRETE SEMICONDUCTORS 2N3904 NPN switching transistor book, halfpage M3D186 #12;1997 Jul 15 2 Philips Semiconductors Product specification NPN switching transistor 2N3904 DESCRIPTION 1 collector 2 base 3 emitter Fig.1 Simplified outline (TO-92; SOT54) and symbol. handbook

  7. Product specification Supercedes data of September 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    Semiconductors, SC04 1997 Jun 20 DISCRETE SEMICONDUCTORS 2N3906 PNP switching transistor book, halfpage M3D186 #12;1997 Jun 20 2 Philips Semiconductors Product specification PNP switching transistor 2N390654) and symbol. handbook, halfpage1 3 2 MAM280 1 2 3 QUICK REFERENCE DATA SYMBOL PARAMETER CONDITIONS

  8. Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    Transforming and Refining Abstract Constraint Specifications Alan M. Frisch1 , Brahim Hnich2 , Ian choose model transformations to reduce greatly the amount of effort that is required to solve a problem by systematic search. It is a consid- erable challenge to automate such transformations. A problem may be viewed

  9. Original Investigation Vessel Specific Coronary Artery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Original Investigation Vessel Specific Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring: An Automatic System Rahil heart as well as per coronary artery on non-contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomographic images and tested on 157 data sets. Statistical testing included determining Pearson's correlation coefficients

  10. Original Investigations Vessel Specific Coronary Artery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Original Investigations Vessel Specific Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring: An Automatic System Rahil heart as well as per coronary artery on non-contrast-enhanced cardiac computed tomographic images and tested on 157 data sets. Statistical testing included determining Pearson's correlation coefficients

  11. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and res

  12. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  13. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  14. Temperature controlled high voltage regulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiaro, Jr., Peter J. (Clinton, TN); Schulze, Gerald K. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-04-20

    A temperature controlled high voltage regulator for automatically adjusting the high voltage applied to a radiation detector is described. The regulator is a solid state device that is independent of the attached radiation detector, enabling the regulator to be used by various models of radiation detectors, such as gas flow proportional radiation detectors.

  15. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  16. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  17. temperature heat pumps applied to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application of industrial heat pumps June 21 th 2012 J-L Peureux, E. Sapora, D. Bobelin EDF R&D #12;Achema 2012 Frankfurt There are thermal requirements in the industrial plant Treq Heat exchanger = Cons ~ 0 CO2 ~ -100% Treq

  18. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  19. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature turbine engine includes a rotor portion having axially stacked adjacent ceramic rotor parts. A ceramic/ceramic joint structure transmits torque between the rotor parts while maintaining coaxial alignment and axially spaced mutually parallel relation thereof despite thermal and centrifugal cycling.

  20. Multi-phase glass-ceramics as a waste form for combined fission products: alkalis, alkaline earths, lanthanides, and transition metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Turo, Laura A.; Riley, Brian J.; Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna

    2012-04-01

    In this study, multi-phase silicate-based glass-ceramics were investigated as an alternate waste form for immobilizing non-fissionable products from used nuclear fuel. Currently, borosilicate glass is the waste form selected for immobilization of this waste stream, however, the low thermal stability and solubility of MoO{sub 3} in borosilicate glass translates into a maximum waste loading in the range of 15-20 mass%. Glass-ceramics provide the opportunity to target durable crystalline phases, e.g., powellite, oxyapatite, celsian, and pollucite, that will incorporate MoO{sub 3} as well as other waste components such as lanthanides, alkalis, and alkaline earths at levels 2X the solubility limits of a single-phase glass. In addition a glass-ceramic could provide higher thermal stability, depending upon the properties of the crystalline and amorphous phases. Glass-ceramics were successfully synthesized at waste loadings of 42, 45, and 50 mass% with the following glass additives: B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO and SiO{sub 2} by slow cooling form from a glass melt. Glass-ceramics were characterized in terms of phase assemblage, morphology, and thermal stability. The targeted phases: powellite and oxyapatite were observed in all of the compositions along with a lanthanide borosilicate, and cerianite. Results of this initial investigation of glass-ceramics show promise as a potential waste form to replace single-phase borosilicate glass.

  1. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Gougar

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  2. Baseline Concept Description of a Small Modular High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gougar, Hans D.

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a description of generic small modular high temperature reactors (herein denoted as an smHTR), summarize their distinguishing attributes, and lay out the research and development (R&D) required for commercialization. The generic concepts rely heavily on the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor designs developed in the 1980s which were never built but for which pre-licensing or certification activities were conducted. The concept matured more recently under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, specifically in the areas of fuel and material qualification, methods development, and licensing. As all vendor-specific designs proposed under NGNP were all both ‘small’ or medium-sized and ‘modular’ by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Department of Energy (DOE) standards, the technical attributes, challenges, and R&D needs identified, addressed, and documented under NGNP are valid and appropriate in the context of Small Modular Reactor (SMR) applications. Although the term High Temperature Reactor (HTR) is commonly used to denote graphite-moderated, thermal spectrum reactors with coolant temperatures in excess of 650oC at the core outlet, in this report the historical term High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) will be used to distinguish the gas-cooled technology described herein from its liquid salt-cooled cousin. Moreover, in this report it is to be understood that the outlet temperature of the helium in an HTGR has an upper limit of 950 degrees C which corresponds to the temperature to which certain alloys are currently being qualified under DOE’s ARC program. Although similar to the HTGR in just about every respect, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) may have an outlet temperature in excess of 950 degrees C and is therefore farther from commercialization because of the challenges posed to materials exposed to these temperatures. The VHTR is the focus of R&D under the Generation IV program and its specific R&D needs will be included in this report when appropriate for comparison. The distinguishing features of the HTGR are the refractory (TRISO) coated particle fuel, the low-power density, graphite-moderated core, and the high outlet temperature of the inert helium coolant. The low power density and fuel form effectively eliminate the possibility of core melt, even upon a complete loss of coolant pressure and flow. The graphite, which constitutes the bulk of the core volume and mass, provides a large thermal buffer that absorbs fission heat such that thermal transients occur over a timespan of hours or even days. As chemically-inert helium is already a gas, there is no coolant temperature or void feedback on the neutronics and no phase change or corrosion product that could degrade heat transfer. Furthermore, the particle coatings and interstitial graphite retain fission products such that the source terms at the plant boundary remain well below actionable levels under all anticipated nominal and off-normal operating conditions. These attributes enable the reactor to supply process heat to a collocated industrial plant with negligible risk of contamination and minimal dynamic coupling of the facilities (Figure 1). The exceptional retentive properties of coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix were first demonstrated in the DRAGON reactor, a European research facility that began operation in 1964.

  3. Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov Calculation of Specific Heat of the Inner Crust of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuya Nakano; Masayuki Matsuzaki

    2001-03-21

    We calculate the specific heat of the inner crust of neutron stars within a local-density approximation to an improved relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov theory. Non-uniformness of the system enhances the specific heat in particular at low temperatures. The degree of enhancement is similar to that in the spherical phase of Elgar{\\o}y et al. We examine a schematic interpolation between the results of Broglia et al. adopting the Gogny force and ours based on the Lagrangian of the relativistic mean field model.

  4. Phenomenological two-gap model for the specific heat of MgB2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouquet, F.; Wang, Y.; Fisher, R.A.; Hinks, D.G.; Jorgensen, J.D.; Junod, A.; Phillips, N.E.

    2001-06-22

    The authors show that the specific heat of the superconductor MgB{sub 2} in zero field, for which significant non-BCS features have been reported, can be fitted, essentially within experimental error, over the entire range of temperature to T{sub c} by a phenomenological two-gap model. The resulting gap parameters agree with previous determinations from band-structure calculations, and from various spectroscopic experiments. The determination from specific heat, a bulk property, shows that the presence of two superconducting gaps in MgB{sub 2} is a volume effect.

  5. specificity of genomics-based protein-function prediction, although whether specific experimental testing of protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lässig, Michael

    specificity of genomics-based protein-function prediction, although whether specific experimental interactome. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 98, 4569­4574 9 Dwight, S.S. et al. (2002) Saccharomyces Genome for predicting protein­protein interactions from genomic data. Science 302, 449­453 17 Troyanskaya, O.G. et al

  6. Air Cooling for High Temperature Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waye, S.; Musselman, M.; King, C.

    2014-09-01

    Current emphasis on developing high-temperature power electronics, including wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide and gallium nitride, increases the opportunity for a completely air-cooled inverter at higher powers. This removes the liquid cooling system for the inverter, saving weight and volume on the liquid-to-air heat exchanger, coolant lines, pumps, and coolant, replacing them with just a fan and air supply ducting. We investigate the potential for an air-cooled heat exchanger from a component and systems-level approach to meet specific power and power density targets. A proposed baseline air-cooled heat exchanger design that does not meet those targets was optimized using a parametric computational fluid dynamics analysis, examining the effects of heat exchanger geometry and device location, fixing the device heat dissipation and maximum junction temperature. The CFD results were extrapolated to a full inverter, including casing, capacitor, bus bar, gate driver, and control board component weights and volumes. Surrogate ducting was tested to understand the pressure drop and subsequent system parasitic load. Geometries that met targets with acceptable loads on the system were down-selected for experimentation. Nine baseline configuration modules dissipated the target heat dissipation, but fell below specific power and power density targets. Six optimized configuration modules dissipated the target heat load, exceeding the specific power and power density targets. By maintaining the same 175 degrees C maximum junction temperature, an optimized heat exchanger design and higher device heat fluxes allowed a reduction in the number of modules required, increasing specific power and power density while still maintaining the inverter power.

  7. NEW OPTICAL SENSOR SUITE FOR ULTRAHIGH TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell G. May; Tony Peng; Tom Flynn

    2004-12-01

    Accomplishments during the Phase I of a program to develop and demonstrate technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. Engineers from Prime Research, LC and Babcock and Wilcox Research Center collaborated to generate a list of potential applications for robust photonic sensors in existing and future boiler plants. From that list, three applications were identified as primary candidates for initial development and demonstration of high-temperature sensors in an ultrasupercritical power plant. A matrix of potential fiber optic sensor approaches was derived, and a data set of specifications for high-temperature optical fiber was produced. Several fiber optic sensor configurations, including interferometric (extrinsic and intrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer), gratings (fiber Bragg gratings and long period gratings), and microbend sensors, were evaluated in the laboratory. In addition, progress was made in the development of materials and methods to apply high-temperature optical claddings to sapphire fibers, in order to improve their optical waveguiding properties so that they can be used in the design and fabrication of high-temperature sensors. Through refinements in the processing steps, the quality of the interface between core and cladding of the fibers was improved, which is expected to reduce scattering and attenuation in the fibers. Numerical aperture measurements of both clad and unclad sapphire fibers were obtained and used to estimate the reduction in mode volume afforded by the cladding. High-temperature sensors based on sapphire fibers were also investigated. The fabrication of an intrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity within sapphire fibers was attempted by the bulk diffusion of magnesium oxide into short localized segments of longer sapphire fibers. Fourier analysis of the fringes that resulted when the treated fiber was interrogated by a swept laser spectrometer suggested that an intrinsic cavity had been formed in the fiber. Also, an unclad sapphire fiber was tested as a temperature sensor at moderate temperatures (up to 775 C).

  8. Open Quantum Systems at Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan F. Triana

    2015-08-25

    It is known that the origin of the deviations from standard thermodynamics proceed from the strong coupling to the bath. Here, it is shown that these deviations are related to the power spectrum of the bath. Specifically, it is shown that the system thermal-equilibrium-state cannot be characterized by the canonical Boltzmann's distribution in quantum mechanics. This is because the uncertainty principle imposed a lower bound of the dispersion of the total energy of the system that is dominated by the spectral density of the bath. However, in the classical case, for a wide class of systems that interact via central forces with pairwise-self-interacting environment, the system thermal equilibrium state is exactly characterized by the canonical Boltzmann distribution. As a consequence of this analysis and taking into account all energy scales in the system and reservoir interaction, an effective coupling to the environment is introduced. Sample computations in different regimes predicted by this effective coupling are shown. Specifically, in the strong coupling effective regime, the system exhibits deviations from standard thermodynamics and in the weak coupling effective regime, quantum features such as stationary entanglement are possible at high temperatures. Moreover, it is known that the spectrum of thermal baths depends on the non-Markovian character. Hence, non-Markovian interactions have a important role in the thermal equilibrium state of physical systems. For example, in quantum optomechanics is looked up to cool the mechanical system through an auxiliary system which generally is a cavity. This cooling process takes into account the non-Markovian interaction and as it is shown here, it is more effective than if we use only the Markovian approximation in the equation of motion for the different modes.

  9. EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2011-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

  10. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bibler, Jane P. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

  11. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine; Castro, J.R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States). Cancer Center]|[California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). School of Medicine

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  12. Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

    1995-08-15

    A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: ASTM Biodiesel Specifications

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropaneAlternativeASTM Biodiesel Specifications

  14. Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Temperature & Nuclear Fusion 4 October 2011 Goals · Review temperature in stars · Practice using the important energy scales for nuclear fusion Temperature 1. For each relation we regularly use in class-Boltzmann equation: L = 4R2 T4 . (d) In fusion energy generation: T . #12;temperature & nuclear fusion 2 Nuclear

  15. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

    1986-04-22

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illiminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature. 3 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael (Livermore, CA); Hirschfeld, Tomas B. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for remotely monitoring temperature. Both method and apparatus employ a temperature probe material having an excitation-dependent emission line whose fluorescence intensity varies directly with temperature whenever excited by light having a first wavelength and whose fluorescence intensity varies inversely with temperature whenever excited by light having a second wavelength. Temperature is measured by alternatively illuminating the temperature probe material with light having the first wavelength and light having the second wavelength, monitoring the intensity of the successive emissions of the excitation-dependent emission line, and relating the intensity ratio of successive emissions to temperature.

  17. LIQUID BIO-FUEL PRODUCTION FROM NON-FOOD BIOMASS VIA HIGH TEMPERATURE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Hawkes; J. E. O'Brien; M. G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    Bio-Syntrolysis is a hybrid energy process that enables production of synthetic liquid fuels that are compatible with the existing conventional liquid transportation fuels infrastructure. Using biomass as a renewable carbon source, and supplemental hydrogen from high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE), bio-syntrolysis has the potential to provide a significant alternative petroleum source that could reduce US dependence on imported oil. Combining hydrogen from HTSE with CO from an oxygen-blown biomass gasifier yields syngas to be used as a feedstock for synthesis of liquid transportation fuels via a Fischer-Tropsch process. Conversion of syngas to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, using a biomass-based carbon source, expands the application of renewable energy beyond the grid to include transportation fuels. It can also contribute to grid stability associated with non-dispatchable power generation. The use of supplemental hydrogen from HTSE enables greater than 90% utilization of the biomass carbon content which is about 2.5 times higher than carbon utilization associated with traditional cellulosic ethanol production. If the electrical power source needed for HTSE is based on nuclear or renewable energy, the process is carbon neutral. INL has demonstrated improved biomass processing prior to gasification. Recyclable biomass in the form of crop residue or energy crops would serve as the feedstock for this process. A process model of syngas production using high temperature electrolysis and biomass gasification is presented. Process heat from the biomass gasifier is used to heat steam for the hydrogen production via the high temperature steam electrolysis process. Oxygen produced form the electrolysis process is used to control the oxidation rate in the oxygen-blown biomass gasifier. Based on the gasifier temperature, 94% to 95% of the carbon in the biomass becomes carbon monoxide in the syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Assuming the thermal efficiency of the power cycle for electricity generation is 50%, (as expected from GEN IV nuclear reactors), the syngas production efficiency ranges from 70% to 73% as the gasifier temperature decreases from 1900 K to 1500 K. Parametric studies of system pressure, biomass moisture content and low temperature alkaline electrolysis are also presented.

  18. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  19. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  20. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1993-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  1. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  2. High temperature turbine engine structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carruthers, William D. (Mesa, AZ); Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ)

    1992-01-01

    A high temperature ceramic/metallic turbine engine includes a metallic housing which journals a rotor member of the turbine engine. A ceramic disk-like shroud portion of the engine is supported on the metallic housing portion and maintains a close running clearance with the rotor member. A ceramic spacer assembly maintains the close running clearance of the shroud portion and rotor member despite differential thermal movements between the shroud portion and metallic housing portion.

  3. High Temperature | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature Cements Jump

  4. Comment on ``Specific Heat and Shape Transitions in Light sd Nuclei''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Cole; H. G. Miller; R. M. Quick

    1994-09-02

    This comment re-examines the origin of structure seen in the computed specific heat of finite nuclei. In a recent paper, Civitarese and Schvellinger suggest that such structure is due to model-space truncation in the calculations. We reaffirm our conclusion that the structure is caused by a collective-to-non-collective phase transformation at low temperatures, signaled by a change in the nuclear level density below 10 MeV excitation energy.

  5. A new method for computation of QCD thermodynamics: EOS, specific heat and speed of sound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajiv V. Gavai; Sourendu Gupta; Swagato Mukherjee

    2005-09-26

    We propose a new variant of the operator method for the computation of the equation of state of QCD, which yields positive pressure for all temperatures and all values of temporal lattice spacings. Using this new method, we calculate the continuum limit of pressure, energy density, entropy density, specific heat, and the speed of sound, in quenched QCD, for 0.9 \\le T/T_c \\le 3.

  6. On the critical behavior of the specific heat in glass-formers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Fernandez; V. Martin-Mayor; P. Verrocchio

    2006-02-20

    We show numeric evidence that, at low enough temperatures, the potential energy density of a glass-forming liquid fluctuates over length scales much larger than the interaction range. We focus on the behavior of translationally invariant quantities. The growing correlation length is unveiled by studying the Finite Size effects. In the thermodynamic limit, the specific heat and the relaxation time diverge as a power law. Both features point towards the existence of a critical point in the metastable supercooled liquid phase.

  7. Realistic Hot Water Draw Specification for Rating Solar Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.

    2012-06-01

    In the United States, annual performance ratings for solar water heaters are simulated, using TMY weather and specified water draw. A more-realistic ratings draw is proposed that eliminates most bias by improving mains inlet temperature and by specifying realistic hot water use. This paper outlines the current and the proposed draws and estimates typical ratings changes from draw specification changes for typical systems in four cities.

  8. Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

    1998-01-27

    A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

  9. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  10. Specific heat anomalies of small quantum systems subjected to finite baths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Hasegawa

    2011-11-19

    We have studied the specific heat of the $(N_S+N_B)$ model for an $N_S$-body harmonic oscillator (HO) system which is strongly coupled to an $N_B$-body HO bath without dissipation. The system specific heat of $C_S(T)$ becomes $N_S k_B$ at $T \\rightarrow \\infty$ and vanishes at $T = 0$ in accordance with the third law of thermodynamics. The calculated $C_S(T)$ at low temperatures is not proportional to $N_S$ and shows an anomalous temperature dependence, strongly depending on $N_S$, $N_B$ and the system-bath coupling. In particular at very low (but finite) temperatures, it may become {\\it negative} for a strong system-bath coupling, which is in contrast with {\\it non-negative} specific heat of an HO system with $N_S=1$ reported by G-L. Ingold, P. H\\"{a}nggi and P. Talkner [Phys. Rev. E {\\bf 79}, 061105 (2005)]. Our calculation indicates an importance of taking account of finite $N_S$ in studying open quantum systems which may include an arbitrary number of particles in general.

  11. Liquidus temperature and chemical durability of selected glasses to immobilize rare earth oxides waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohd Fadzil, Syazwani Binti; Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Riley, Brian J.

    2015-06-30

    Pyroprocessing is a reprocessing method for managing and reusing used nuclear fuel (UNF) by dissolving it in an electrorefiner with a molten alkali or alkaline earth chloride salt mixture while avoiding wet reprocessing. Pyroprocessing UNF with a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt releases the fission products from the fuel and generates a variety of metallic and salt-based species, including rare earth (RE) chlorides. If the RE-chlorides are converted to oxides, borosilicate glass is a prime candidate for their immobilization because of its durability and ability to dissolve almost any RE waste component into the matrix at high loadings. Crystallization that occurs in waste glasses as the waste loading increases may complicate glass processing and affect the product quality. This work compares three types of borosilicate glasses in terms of liquidus temperature (TL): the International Simple Glass designed by the International Working Group, sodium borosilicate glass developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power, and the lanthanide aluminoborosilicate (LABS) glass established in the United States. The LABS glass allows the highest waste loadings (over 50 mass% RE2O3) while possessing an acceptable chemical durability.

  12. Specific acoustic impedance measurements of an air-filled thermoacoustic prime mover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnott, W.P.; Bass, H.E.; Raspet, R. )

    1992-12-01

    Thermoacoustic heat engines can be used to produce sound from heat and to transport heat using sound. The air-filled prime mover studied is a quarter wavelength resonator that produces sound at nominally 115 Hz for a temperature difference of [Delta]T = 176 K. Specific acoustic impedance at the mouth of the prime mover was measured as a function of the temperature difference between the hot and cold heat exchangers. The real part of the impedance changes sign for sufficiently large temperature differences, indicating the possibility of sound production. The theoretically predicted radiation impedance of an open pipe was compared to the measured impedance curves. The operating point was confirmed from the intersection of these experimental and theoretical impedance curves. These measurements allow for analysis of the prime mover as a sound source as discussed in a recent theoretical paper [T. B. Gabrielson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 90, 2628-2636 (1991)]. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Testing from Structured Algebraic Specifications: The Oracle Problem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machado, Patricia D L

    Work in the area of specification-based testing has pointed out that testing can be effectively used to verify programs against formal specifications. The aim is to derive test information from formal specifications so ...

  14. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-10-28

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity Cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  15. Production Of High Specific Activity Copper-67

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ott, Martin A. (Los Alamos, NM); Fowler, Malcolm (Los Alamos, NM); Heaton, Richard C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-12-03

    A process for the selective production and isolation of high specific activity cu.sup.67 from proton-irradiated enriched Zn.sup.70 target comprises target fabrication, target irradiation with low energy (<25 MeV) protons, chemical separation of the Cu.sup.67 product from the target material and radioactive impurities of gallium, cobalt, iron, and stable aluminum via electrochemical methods or ion exchange using both anion and cation organic ion exchangers, chemical recovery of the enriched Zn.sup.70 target material, and fabrication of new targets for re-irradiation is disclosed.

  16. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific

  17. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific January 12,

  18. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific January 12,

  19. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific January 12,9,

  20. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific January

  1. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific January3

  2. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite Specific

  3. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak Ridge Site

  4. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak Ridge

  5. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak Ridge3:

  6. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak Ridge3:4:

  7. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak

  8. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak4 Annual

  9. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak4

  10. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak41, 2015

  11. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak41,

  12. Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996How to ApplytheExecutive71.1 OMB ControlOak ofSite SpecificOak41,Tuesday,

  13. FTCP Site Specific Information | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing22,673,list7.pdfFORD FORDDepartmentSite Specific

  14. Specifications and Test Procedures | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3 Special Report: OAS-RA-14-03SpecializedSpecifications

  15. Method and apparatus for optical temperature measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1994-09-20

    A temperature probe and a method for using said probe for temperature measurements based on changes in light absorption by the probe are disclosed. The probe comprises a first and a second optical fiber that carry light to and from the probe, and a temperature sensor material, the absorbance of which changes with temperature, through which the light is directed. Light is directed through the first optical fiber, passes through the temperature sensor material, and is transmitted by a second optical fiber from the material to a detector. Temperature-dependent and temperature-independent factors are derived from measurements of the transmitted light intensity. For each sensor material, the temperature T is a function of the ratio, R, of these factors. The temperature function f(R) is found by applying standard data analysis techniques to plots of T versus R at a series of known temperatures. For a sensor having a known temperature function f(R) and known characteristic and temperature-dependent factors, the temperature can be computed from a measurement of R. Suitable sensor materials include neodymium-doped borosilicate glass, accurate to [+-]0.5 C over an operating temperature range of about [minus]196 C to 400 C; and a mixture of D[sub 2]O and H[sub 2]O, accurate to [+-]0.1 C over an operating range of about 5 C to 90 C. 13 figs.

  16. Specifications of the octupole magnets required for the ATF2...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Specifications of the octupole magnets required for the ATF2 ultra-low * lattice Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Specifications of the octupole...

  17. An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?lveczky, Peter Csaba

    An Object-Oriented Algebraic Steam-Boiler Control Specification computations cannot happen. 1 Introduction The steam-boiler control specification problem has been

  18. How to Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific Neighborhoods How to Design and Market Energy Efficiency Programs to Specific Neighborhoods This presentation, given...

  19. The Specific Heat of Normal, Degenerate Quark Matter: Non-Fermi Liquid Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; H. J. de Vega

    2001-02-26

    In normal degenerate quark matter, the exchange of dynamically screened transverse gluons introduces infrared divergences in the quark self-energies that lead to the breakdown of the Fermi liquid description. If the core of neutron stars are composed of quark matter with a normal component, cooling by direct quark Urca processes may be modified by non-Fermi liquid corrections. We find that while the quasiparticle density of states is finite and non-zero at the Fermi surface, its frequency derivative diverges and results in non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat of the normal, degenerate component of quark matter. We study these non-perturbative non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat and the temperature dependence of the chemical potential and show that these lead to a reduction of the specific heat.

  20. A computer program to determine the specific power of prismatic-core reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, D.

    1987-05-01

    A computer program has been developed to determine the maximum specific power for prismatic-core reactors as a function of maximum allowable fuel temperature, core pressure drop, and coolant velocity. The prismatic-core reactors consist of hexagonally shaped fuel elements grouped together to form a cylindrically shaped core. A gas coolant flows axially through circular channels within the elements, and the fuel is dispersed within the solid element material either as a composite or in the form of coated pellets. Different coolant, fuel, coating, and element materials can be selected to represent different prismatic-core concepts. The computer program allows the user to divide the core into any arbitrary number of axial levels to account for different axial power shapes. An option in the program allows the automatic determination of the core height that results in the maximum specific power. The results of parametric specific power calculations using this program are presented for various reactor concepts.