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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Alkaline and alkaline earth metal phosphate halides and phosphors  

SciTech Connect

Compounds, phosphor materials and apparatus related to nacaphite family of materials are presented. Potassium and rubidium based nacaphite family compounds and phosphors designed by doping divalent rare earth elements in the sites of alkaline earth metals in the nacaphite material families are descried. An apparatus comprising the phosphors based on the nacaphite family materials are presented herein. The compounds presented is of formula A.sub.2B.sub.1-yR.sub.yPO.sub.4X where the elements A, B, R, X and suffix y are defined such that A is potassium, rubidium, or a combination of potassium and rubidium and B is calcium, strontium, barium, or a combination of any of calcium, strontium and barium. X is fluorine, chlorine, or a combination of fluorine and chlorine, R is europium, samarium, ytterbium, or a combination of any of europium, samarium, and ytterbium, and y ranges from 0 to about 0.1.

Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Cleaver, Robert John

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

Liquid metal batteries : ambipolar electrolysis and alkaline earth electroalloying cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three novel forms of liquid metal batteries were conceived, studied, and operated, and their suitability for grid-scale energy storage applications was evaluated. A ZnlITe ambipolar electrolysis cell comprising ZnTe dissolved ...

Bradwell, David (David Johnathon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Probing the Kondo lattice model with alkaline-earth-metal atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study transport properties of alkaline-earth-metal atoms governed by the Kondo lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, at low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

Foss-Feig, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Hermele, Michael [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rey, Ana Maria [Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); JILA, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); NIST, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Alkali or alkaline earth metal promoted catalyst and a process for methanol synthesis using alkali or alkaline earth metals as promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a heterogeneous catalyst comprising reduced copper chromite impregnated with an alkali or alkaline earth metal. There is thus no need to add a separate alkali or alkaline earth compound. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Liquefaction process for solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved liquefaction process wherein wall scale and particulate agglomeration during the liquefaction of solid carbonaceous materials containing alkaline earth metal humates is reduced and/or eliminated by subjecting the solid carbonaceous materials to controlled cyclic cavitation during liquefaction. It is important that the solid carbonaceous material be slurried in a suitable solvent or diluent during liquefaction. The cyclic cavitation may be imparted via pressure cycling, cyclic agitation and the like. When pressure cycling or the like is employed an amplitude equivalent to at least 25 psia is required to effectively remove scale from the liquefaction vessel walls.

Epperly, William R. (Summit, NJ); Deane, Barry C. (East Brunswick, NJ); Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

Marra, J.; Billings, A.

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alkaline earth filled nickel skutterudite antimonide thermoelectrics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material including a body centered cubic filled skutterudite having the formula A.sub.xFe.sub.yNi.sub.zSb.sub.12, where A is an alkaline earth element, x is no more than approximately 1.0, and the sum of y and z is approximately equal to 4.0. The alkaline earth element includes guest atoms selected from the group consisting of Be, Mb, Ca, Sr, Ba, Ra and combinations thereof. The filled skutterudite is shown to have properties suitable for a wide variety of thermoelectric applications.

Singh, David Joseph

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

9

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Salt Fluxes for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2001... for Alkali and Alkaline Earth Element Removal from Molten Aluminum ... Solid chloride salts containing MgC2 can be used to remove alkali...

11

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, J.A.; Turner, C.B.; Johnson, I.

1980-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

12

Method of increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for increasing the sulfation capacity of alkaline earth carbonates to scrub sulfur dioxide produced during the fluidized bed combustion of coal in which partially sulfated alkaline earth carbonates are hydrated in a fluidized bed to crack the sulfate coating and convert the alkaline earth oxide to the hydroxide. Subsequent dehydration of the sulfate-hydroxide to a sulfate-oxide particle produces particles having larger pore size, increased porosity, decreased grain size and additional sulfation capacity. A continuous process is disclosed.

Shearer, John A. (Chicago, IL); Turner, Clarence B. (Shorewood, IL); Johnson, Irving (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

About Rare Earth Metals | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Rare Earth Metals About Rare Earth Metals What Are Rare Earths? Ames Laboratory's Materials Preparation Center The Ames Process for Purification of Rare...

14

Noble metal alkaline zeolites for catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for producing a noble-metal containing zeolite suitable for catalytic reforming contacting a zeolite selected from alkaline faujasites and L zeolites and zeolites and zeolites isostructural thereto, with a noble-metal compound selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} and Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for a effective amount of time to incorporate Pt and/or Pd into the pore surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the Pt and/or Pd throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C, to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Ex-situ and in-situ spectroscopic studies of the passive film on alkali and alkaline earth metals in nonaqueous solvents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide on potassium-dosed Ag(111) has been investigated with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), work function measurements, and Auger electron (AES), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), and high resolution electron energy loss (HREELS), spectroscopies. Unlike the behavior observed for other K-modified single-crystal metal surfaces, the TPD spectra of near-saturation coverages of CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) for K coverages in the range 0.13 < {Theta}{sub K} < 0.47 exhibit a sharply defined m/e = 44 peak at 796 +/{minus} 6 K with no evidence for the desorption of CO at any temperature. Similar TPD experiments involving mixtures of natural and {sup 18}0-labelled CO{sub 2} indicate that the oxygen atoms undergo partial scrambling, suggesting that the overall process cannot be represented in terms of a simple adsorption/desorption of CO{sub 2}. The HREELS spectra of CO{sub 2}-saturated K/Ag(111) show, in addition to very minor features, a sharp peak at about 1480 cm{sup {minus}1}, and XPS spectra of the same interface display a C(ls) peak with a binding energy characteristic of an electron-rich carbon species. This information is consistent with the presence of a carbon-bound CO species on the surface. Evidence against the complete dissociation of CO{sub 2} was obtained from TPD which failed to reveal features associated with carbonate (decomposition) expected to be formed via the reaction of CO{sub 2} and adsorbed O. It is proposed that CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) binds through the carbon to the surface leading to the partial'' dissociation (or activation) of each CO{sub 2} molecule into adsorbed CO and O. Within this model, such adsorbed O would serve as a bridge between the carbon atoms of neighboring activated'' CO{sub 2} molecules, and therefore undergo exchange prior to or during thermal desorption.

Wang, K.; Chottiner, G.S.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Scherson, D.A. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Chemistry)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Ex-situ and in-situ spectroscopic studies of the passive film on alkali and alkaline earth metals in nonaqueous solvents. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide on potassium-dosed Ag(111) has been investigated with temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), work function measurements, and Auger electron (AES), X-ray photoelectron (XPS), and high resolution electron energy loss (HREELS), spectroscopies. Unlike the behavior observed for other K-modified single-crystal metal surfaces, the TPD spectra of near-saturation coverages of CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) for K coverages in the range 0.13 < {Theta}{sub K} < 0.47 exhibit a sharply defined m/e = 44 peak at 796 +/{minus} 6 K with no evidence for the desorption of CO at any temperature. Similar TPD experiments involving mixtures of natural and {sup 18}0-labelled CO{sub 2} indicate that the oxygen atoms undergo partial scrambling, suggesting that the overall process cannot be represented in terms of a simple adsorption/desorption of CO{sub 2}. The HREELS spectra of CO{sub 2}-saturated K/Ag(111) show, in addition to very minor features, a sharp peak at about 1480 cm{sup {minus}1}, and XPS spectra of the same interface display a C(ls) peak with a binding energy characteristic of an electron-rich carbon species. This information is consistent with the presence of a carbon-bound CO species on the surface. Evidence against the complete dissociation of CO{sub 2} was obtained from TPD which failed to reveal features associated with carbonate (decomposition) expected to be formed via the reaction of CO{sub 2} and adsorbed O. It is proposed that CO{sub 2} on K/Ag(111) binds through the carbon to the surface leading to the ``partial`` dissociation (or activation) of each CO{sub 2} molecule into adsorbed CO and O. Within this model, such adsorbed O would serve as a bridge between the carbon atoms of neighboring ``activated`` CO{sub 2} molecules, and therefore undergo exchange prior to or during thermal desorption.

Wang, K.; Chottiner, G.S.; Herrera-Fierro, P.; Scherson, D.A. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Chemistry

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Rare Earth Metals and Alloys | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mpc » Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Mpc » Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Rare Earth Metals and Alloys Terbium (Tb) and Cerium (Ce) phosphors in your computer screen allow you to see GREEN. Europium (Eu) is the source of the RED light and BLUE emitted by our display. The Ames Laboratory has been actively involved in the preparation of very pure rare earth metals since the early 1940's when Dr. Frank H. Spedding and his group of pioneers developed the ion-exchange process, a technique that separates the "fraternal fifteen" plus yttrium and scandium. As a result of this and subsequent work, high-purity oxides are available from which high-purity rare earth metals can be prepared. In most cases, the rare earth oxides are first converted to their respective fluorides and are then reduced metallothermicaly on a kilogram

18

Rare Earth Metal research, at DOE  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Citations Database - Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals DOE Green Energy - LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells...

19

DOE Science Showcase - Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases Rare Earth Metal Research from DOE Databases Information Bridge Energy Citations Database Highlighted documents of Rare Earth Metal research in DOE databases Information Bridge - Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces DOE R&D Project Summaries - Structural and magnetic studies on heavy rare earth metals at high pressures using designer diamonds Energy Citations Database - Intermultiplet transitions in rare-earth metals DOE Green Energy - LaNi.sub.5 is-based metal hydride electrode in Ni-MH rechargeable cells Science.gov - H.R.4866 - Rare Earths Supply-Chain Technology and Resources Transformation Act of 2010 WorldWideScience.org - China produces most of the world's rare earth metals DOepatents - Recycling of rare earth metals from rare earth-transition metal alloy scrap by liquid metal extraction

20

Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Catalytic reforming process using noble metal alkaline zeolites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes improvement in a process wherein a gasoline boiling range hydrocarbonaceous feedstock is catalytically reformed in the presence of hydrogen in a reforming process unit comprised of serially connected reactors wherein each of the reactors contains a supported noble metal-containing catalyst. The improvement comprises the noble-metal catalyst of at least one reactor being selected from the group consisting of alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite and zeolites isostructural thereto, which catalysts are prepared by a: contacting an alkaline faujasite zeolite, L zeolite, or zeolite isostructural thereto, with a noble metal composition selected from Pt(acetylacetonate){sub 2} or Pd(acetylacetonate){sub 2} for an effective amount of time to form a substantially homogeneous mixture and to incorporate the platinum and/or palladium into the near surface regions of the zeolite, but not to disperse the platinum and/or palladium throughout the entire zeolite; and calcining the so treated zeolite at a temperature from about 250 {degrees} C to about 600 {degrees} C for an effective amount of time.

Schweizer, A.E.

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

22

IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 95. Alkaline Earth Carbonates in Aqueous Systems. Part 2. Ca  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alkaline earth carbonates are an important class of minerals. This article is part of a volume in the IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series that compiles and critically evaluates solubility data of the alkaline earth carbonates in water and in simple aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 1 outlined the procedure adopted in this volume, and presented the beryllium and magnesium carbonates. Part 2, the current paper, compiles and critically evaluates the solubility data of calcium carbonate. The chemical forms included are the anhydrous CaCO{sub 3} types calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, the monohydrate monohydrocalcite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot} H{sub 2}O), the hexahydrate ikaite (CaCO{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O), and an amorphous form. The data were analyzed with two model variants, and thermodynamic data of each form consistent with each of the models and with the CODATA key values for thermodynamics are presented.

De Visscher, Alex; Vanderdeelen, Jan [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, and Centre for Environmental Engineering Research and Education (CEERE), Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE launches rare earth metals research hub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATL011113_hub ATL011113_hub 01/11/2013 DOE launches rare earth metals research hub Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. High Resolution Image The Department of Energy has launched a research hub that focuses on solutions to the domestic shortages of rare earth metals and other materials critical for U.S. energy security. Housed at Ames Laboratory in Iowa, Lawrence Livermore has been involved in establishing this Energy Innovation Hub since its conception more than two years ago. In 2010, on behalf of DOE, LLNL hosted the first U.S.-Japan

24

SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} - two new Ae-Zn-Sn polar intermetallic compounds (Ae: alkaline earth metal)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}, two closely related new polar intermetallic compounds, were obtained by high temperature reactions of the elements. Their crystal structures were determined with single crystal XRD methods, and their electronic structures were analyzed by means of DFT calculations. The Zn-Sn structure part of SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} comprises (anti-)PbO-like {l_brace}ZnSn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} and {l_brace}SnZn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} layers. Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} shows similar {l_brace}ZnSn{sub 4/4}{r_brace} layers and {l_brace}Sn{sub 4}Zn{r_brace} slabs constructed of a covalently bonded Sn scaffold capped by Zn atoms. For both phases, the two types of layers are alternatingly stacked and interconnected via Zn-Sn bonds. SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} adopts the SrPd{sub 2}Bi{sub 2} structure type, and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} is isotypic to the R{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Ge{sub 6} compounds (R=La, Ce, Pr, Nd). Band structure calculations indicate that both SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6} are metallic. Analyses of the chemical bonding with the electron localization function (ELF) show lone pair like basins at Sn atoms and Zn-Sn bonding interactions between the layers for both title phases, and covalent Sn-Sn bonding within the {l_brace}Sn{sub 4}Zn{r_brace} layers of Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of the new Ae-Zn-Sn polar intermetallic phases SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New polar intermetallic phases SrZn{sub 2}Sn{sub 2} and Ca{sub 2}Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 6}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Obtained by high temperature reactions of the elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single crystal XRD structure determination and DFT electronic structure calculations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Closely related crystal and electronic structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metallic conductivity coexisting with lone pairs and covalent bonding features.

Stegmaier, Saskia [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching (Germany); Faessler, Thomas F., E-mail: Thomas.Faessler@lrz.tum.de [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lichtenbergstrasse 4, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Production, Refining and Recycling of Rare Earth Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium is targeting on overview of the current state of the art for production, refining and recycling of the rare earth metals. In addition the symposium is...

26

DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RFI on Rare Earth Metals RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These materials are important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. In a March 17 speech, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow announced that DOE is developing its

27

DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RFI on Rare Earth Metals RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI on Rare Earth Metals May 6, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy has released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. The request is specifically focused on rare earth metals (e.g., lanthanum, cerium and neodymium) and several other metals including lithium and cobalt, but respondents are welcome to identify other materials of interest. These materials are important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. In a March 17 speech, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Policy & International Affairs David Sandalow announced that DOE is developing its

28

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100--160 C and the pressure range of 40--65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H[sub 2]/CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.; Palekar, V.M.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

29

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

31

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF2 and BaF2. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 {per_thousand}nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF2, BaF2, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs+ relative to Na+, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang, Zhiguo; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Monte Carlo simulations of electron thermalization in alkali iodide and alkaline-earth fluoride scintillators  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo model of electron thermalization in inorganic scintillators, which was developed and applied to CsI in a previous publication [Wang et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 064903 (2011)], is extended to another material of the alkali halide class, NaI, and to two materials from the alkaline-earth halide class, CaF{sub 2} and BaF{sub 2}. This model includes electron scattering with both longitudinal optical (LO) and acoustic phonons as well as the effects of internal electric fields. For the four pure materials, a significant fraction of the electrons recombine with self-trapped holes and the thermalization distance distributions of the electrons that do not recombine peak between approximately 25 and 50 nm and extend up to a few hundreds of nanometers. The thermalization time distributions of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, NaI, and CsI extend to approximately 0.5, 1, 2, and 7 ps, respectively. The simulations show that the LO phonon energy is a key factor that affects the electron thermalization process. Indeed, the higher the LO phonon energy is, the shorter the thermalization time and distance are. The thermalization time and distance distributions show no dependence on the incident {gamma}-ray energy. The four materials also show different extents of electron-hole pair recombination due mostly to differences in their electron mean free paths (MFPs), LO phonon energies, initial densities of electron-hole pairs, and static dielectric constants. The effect of thallium doping is also investigated for CsI and NaI as these materials are often doped with activators. Comparison between CsI and NaI shows that both the larger size of Cs{sup +} relative to Na{sup +}, i.e., the greater atomic density of NaI, and the longer electron mean free path in NaI compared to CsI contribute to an increased probability for electron trapping at Tl sites in NaI versus CsI.

Wang Zhiguo; Gao Fei; Kerisit, Sebastien [Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Xie Yulong [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Campbell, Luke W. [National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements In Fly Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic Elements in Fly Ash Ann G. Kim 1 1 ORISE Research Fellow, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 626 Cochrans Mill Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 KEYWORDS: Coal Utilization By-Products, leaching, pH ABSTRACT In the US, over 100 million tons of coal utilization by-products (CUB) are generated annually. To determine if exposure of these materials to aqueous fluids poses an environmental threat, researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have conducted extensive leaching tests. Five 1 kg samples of 35 PC fly ashes have been leached with acid, neutral and alkaline solutions at an approximate rate of 130 mL/d for 1 to 3 months. The leachates are

34

Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets. 3 figs.

Schmidt, F.A.; Peterson, D.T.; Wheelock, J.T.; Jones, L.L.; Lincoln, L.P.

1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Rare earth-transition metal scrap treatment method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rare earth-transition metal (e.g. iron) scrap (e.g. Nd-Fe-B scrap) is melted to reduce the levels of tramp oxygen and nitrogen impurities therein. The tramp impurities are reduced in the melt by virtue of the reaction of the tramp impurities and the rare earth to form dross on the melt. The purified melt is separated from the dross for reuse. The oxygen and nitrogen of the melt are reduced to levels acceptable for reuse of the treated alloy in the manufacture of end-use articles, such as permanent magnets.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA); Jones, Lawrence L. (Des Moines, IA); Lincoln, Lanny P. (Woodward, IA)

1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

36

Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

Tierney, John W. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wender, Irving (Pittsburgh, PA); Palekar, Vishwesh M. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchangers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, R.G.; Stephens, H.P.; Stohl, F.V.

1983-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Catalysis using hydrous metal oxide ion exchanges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a process which is catalyzed by a catalyst comprising an active metal on a carrier, said metal being active as a catalyst for the process, an improvement is provided wherein the catalyst is a hydrous, alkali metal or alkaline earth metal titanate, zirconate, niobate or tantalate wherein alkali or alkaline earth metal cations have been exchanged with a catalytically effective amount of cations of said metal.

Dosch, Robert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Stephens, Howard P. (Albuquerque, NM); Stohl, Frances V. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Progress in alkaline peroxide dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports recent progress on two alkaline peroxide dissolution processes: the dissolution of low-enriched uranium metal and silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) targets. These processes are being developed to substitute low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in targets used for production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. Issues that are addressed include (1) dissolution kinetics of silicide targets, (2) {sup 99}Mo lost during aluminum dissolution, (3) modeling of hydrogen peroxide consumption, (4) optimization of the uranium foil dissolution process, and (5) selection of uranium foil barrier materials. Future work associated with these two processes is also briefly discussed.

Chen, L.; Dong, D.; Buchholz, B.A.; Vandegrift, G.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.; Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya  

SciTech Connect

Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Novel refractory alkaline earth silicate sealing glasses for planar solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel refractory Sr-Ca-Y-B-Si sealing glass (glass-ceramic) was developed for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objective was to develop sealing glass with desired thermal properties and minimal interfacial reactions with SOFC components, ceramic electrolyte and metallic interconnect. The current glass was different from conventional sealing glass in that the sealing temperatures were targeted higher (>950 degree C) and hence more refractory. Six glasses were formulated and made by conventional glass-making process. Thermal properties were characterized in the glass state and the sintered (crystallized) state. The effect of formulation on thermal properties was discussed. Candidate glasses were also aged for 1000 to 2000 h at elevated temperatures. Thermal expansion measurements showed minimal change after aging. A candidate glass (YSO-1) was used in sealing ceramic electrolyte to a metallic interconnect from 900 degree C to 1050 degree C in air. The interfacial microstructure was characterized and SrCrO4 was identified near the metal interface. Possible reaction mechanism for the chromate formation was discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Alkaline battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery is described having an excellent cycle characteristic, having a negative electrode which comprises a base layer of zinc active material incorporating cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and an outer layer made up of cadmium metal and/or a cadmium compound and applied to the surface of the base layer of zinc active material.

Furukawa, N.; Inoue, K.; Murakami, S.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

44

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

DOE Announces Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals March 22, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy today released a Request for Information (RFI) soliciting information from the public on rare earth metals and other materials used in the energy sector. Responses to this RFI will inform an update to DOE's Critical Materials Strategy (pdf - 5.7mb ), released December 15, 2010, that assessed the use of rare earth metals and other materials important to the development and deployment of a variety of clean energy technologies, such as wind turbines, hybrid vehicles, solar panels and energy efficient light bulbs. The updated strategy, expected later this year, will include additional analysis of rapidly-changing market conditions. It will analyze the use

47

Production, Recovery and Recycling of Rare Earth Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium is targeting on overview of the current state of the art for production, recovery and recycling of the rare earth. In addition the symposium is ...

48

PRODUCTION OF METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described producing metallic thorium, titanium, zirconium, or hafnium from the fluoride. In the process, the fluoride is reduced with alkali or alkaline earth metal and a booster compound (e.g. iodine or a decomposable oxysalt) in a sealed bomb at superatmospheric pressure and a temperature above the melting point of the metal to be produced.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Production, Refining and Recycling of Rare Earth Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013... that by utilizing induction melting and vacuum distillation, RE metals with ... of Nd are simulated using the present thermodynamic database.

51

Production of aluminum metal by electrolysis of aluminum sulfide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Production of metallic aluminum by the electrolysis of Al.sub.2 S.sub.3 at 700.degree.-800.degree. C. in a chloride melt composed of one or more alkali metal chlorides, and one or more alkaline earth metal chlorides and/or aluminum chloride to provide improved operating characteristics of the process.

Minh, Nguyen Q. (Woodridge, IL); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Tucson, AZ); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Phase Transitions and Equations of State of Alkaline Earth Fluorides CaF2 SrF2 and BaF2 to Mbar Pressures  

SciTech Connect

Phase transitions and equations of state of the alkaline earth fluorides CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, and BaF{sub 2} were examined by static compression to pressures as high as 146 GPa. Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on polycrystalline samples in the laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We confirmed that at pressures less than 10 GPa all three materials undergo a phase transition from the cubic (Fm3{sup -}m) fluorite structure to the orthorhombic (Pnam) cotunnite-type structure. This work has characterized an additional phase transition in CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}: these materials were observed to transform to a hexagonal (P6{sub 3}/mmc) Ni{sub 2}In-type structure between 63-79 GPa and 28-29 GPa, respectively, upon laser heating. For SrF{sub 2}, the Ni{sub 2}In-type phase was confirmed by Rietveld refinement. Volumes were determined as a function of pressure for all high-pressure phases and fit to the third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state. For CaF{sub 2} and SrF{sub 2}, the fluorite-cotunnite transition results in a volume decrease of 8-10%, while the bulk modulus of the cotunnite-type phase is the same or less than that of the fluorite phase within uncertainty. For all three fluorides, the volume reduction associated with the further transition to the Ni{sub 2}In-type phase is {approx}5%. The percentage increase in the bulk modulus ({Delta}K) across the transition is greater when the cation is smaller. While for BaF{sub 2}, {Delta}K is 10-30%, {Delta}K values for SrF{sub 2} and CaF{sub 2} are 45-65% and 20-40%. Although shock data for CaF{sub 2} have been interpreted to show a transition to a highly incompressible phase above 100 GPa, this is not consistent with our static equation of state data.

S Dorfman; F Jiang; Z Mao; A Kubo; Y Meng; V Prakapenda; T Duffy

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof.

Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA); Curtis, Paul G. (Tracy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Method of coating metal surfaces to form protective metal coating thereon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for forming a protective metal coating on a metal surface using a flux consisting of an alkali metal fluoride, an alkaline earth metal fluoride, an alkali metal fluoaluminate, an alkali metal fluosilicate, and mixtures thereof. The flux, in particulate form, is mixed with particles of a metal coating material which may comprise aluminum, chromium, mixtures thereof, and alloys containing at least 50 wt. % aluminum and the particulate mixture is applied to the metal surface in a single step, followed by heating the coated metal surface to a temperature sufficient to cause the metal coating material to react with the metal surface to form a protective reaction product in the form of a metal coating bonded to the metal surface. The metal surface which reacts with the metal coating material to form the protective coating may comprise Fe, Co, Ni, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Hf, Ta, W, Re and alloys thereof. 1 figure.

Krikorian, O.H.; Curtis, P.G.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Layered Rare Earth and Transition Metal Materials: Synthesis, Modification and Catalytic Application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research contains three parts; the first two parts of this thesis demonstrate the synthesis of rare earth layered materials and their application in (more)

Zhang, Yashan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to a process for extracting technetium from nuclear wastes and more particularly to a process for extracting technetium from alkaline waste solutions containing technetium and high concentrations of alkali metal nitrates. A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate comprises the steps of: contacting the aqueous alkaline solution with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent, the diluent being a water-immiscible organic liquid in which the crown ether is soluble, for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution into the solvent; separating the solvent containing the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution; and stripping the technetium values from the solvent by contacting the solvent with water.

Moyer, B.A.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

Effect of high-energy electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on fluorides of alkaline earth elements (CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, and BaF{sub 2})  

SciTech Connect

The effect of high-energy (150 eV) electron irradiation in an electron microscope column on crystals of fluorides of alkaline earth elements CaF{sub 2}, SrF{sub 2}, and BaF{sub 2} is studied. During structural investigations by electron diffraction and electron microscopy, the electron irradiation causes chemical changes in MF{sub 2} crystals such as the desorption of fluorine and the accumulation of oxygen in the irradiated area with the formation of oxide MO. The fluorine desorption rate increases significantly when the electron-beam density exceeds the threshold value of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pA/cm{sup 2}). In BaF{sub 2} samples, the transformation of BaO into Ba(OH){sub 2} was observed when irradiation stopped. The renewal of irradiation is accompanied by the inverse transformation of Ba(OH){sub 2} into BaO. In the initial stage of irradiation of all MF{sub 2} compounds, the oxide phase is in the single-crystal state with a lattice highly matched with the MF{sub 2} matrix. When the irradiation dose is increased, the oxide phase passes to the polycrystalline phase. Gaseous products of MF{sub 2} destruction (in the form of bubbles several nanometers in diameter) form a rectangular array with a period of {approx}20 nm in the sample.

Nikolaichik, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics Technology and High Purity Materials (Russian Federation); Sobolev, B. P., E-mail: sobolev@ns.crys.ras.ru; Zaporozhets, M. A.; Avilov, A. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

ELECTROLYTIC PROCESS FOR PRODUCING METALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing beryllium halides to beryllium. The beryllfum halide fs placed in an eutectic mixture of alkali halides and alkaline earth halides. The constituents of this eutectic bath are so chosen that it has a melting point less than the boiling point of mercury, which acts as a cathode for the system. The beryllium metal is then deposited in the mercury upon electrolysis.

Kopelman, B.; Holden, R.B.

1961-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Transition-Metal Hydrides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics Transition-Metal Hydride Electrochromics A new type of electrochromic hydride material has interesting and unusual properties. Thin Ni-Mg films, for example, are mirror-like in appearance and have very low visible transmittance. On exposure to hydrogen gas or on reduction in alkaline electrolyte, the films become transparent. The transition is believed to result from formation of nickel magnesium hydride, Mg2NiH4. Switchable mirrors based on rare earth hydrides were discovered in 1996 at Vrije University in the Netherlands, Rare earth-magnesium alloy films were subsequently found to be superior to the pure lanthanides in maximum transparency and mirror-state reflectivity by Philips Laboratories. The newer transition-metal types which use less expensive and less reactive materials were discovered at LBNL. This has now become a very active area of study with a network of researchers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

RARE-EARTH METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM LIQUID U-Bi  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fission product metals can be removed from solution in liquid bismuth without removal of an appreciable quantity of uranium by contacting the liquid metal solution with fused halides, as for example, the halides of sodium, potassium, and lithium and by adding to the contacted phases a quantity of a halide which is unstable relative to the halides of the fission products, a specific unstable halide being MgCl/sub 3/.

Wiswall, R.H.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

METAL-MATRIX COMPOSITES AND THERMAL SPRAY COATINGS FOR EARTH MOVING MACHINES  

SciTech Connect

In the 11th quarter, further testing was performed on thermal spray coatings. A component coated and fused in the 9th quarter underwent high-stress abrasive wear testing. The test successfully showed this coating could survive in a high stress, sliding wear environment as the base layer in an FGM design coating. Work on the ferrous metal-matrix composites was completed in previous quarter and therefore no update is provided.

D. Trent Weaver; Matthew T. Kiser

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

URANIUM IN ALKALINE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combine to indicate uranium enrichment of an alkaline magma.uranium, the Ilfmaussaq intrusion contains an unusually high enrichment

Murphy, M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Anodes for alkaline electrolysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making an anode for alkaline electrolysis cells includes adsorption of precursor material on a carbonaceous material, conversion of the precursor material to hydroxide form and conversion of precursor material from hydroxide form to oxy-hydroxide form within the alkaline electrolysis cell.

Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Zinc alkaline secondary battery  

SciTech Connect

A zinc alkaline secondary battery with improved service life in which a multi-layer separator is interposed between the negative and positive electrodes and the quantity of the alkaline electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the negative electrode is less than that of the electrolyte in the layer of the separator adjacent to the positive electrode.

Furukawa, N.; Nishizawa, N.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Synthesis, structural characterization and magnetic properties of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=rare-earth metal)  

SciTech Connect

A series of rare-earth metal-magnesium-germanides RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) has been synthesized by reactions of the corresponding elements at high temperature. Their structures have been established by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction and belong to the Mo{sub 2}FeB{sub 2} structure type (space group P4/mbm (No. 127), Z=2; Pearson symbol tP10). Temperature dependent DC magnetization measurements indicate Curie-Weiss paramagnetism in the high-temperature regime for all members of the family, excluding Y{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, Sm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, and Lu{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}. At cryogenic temperatures (ca. 60 K and below), most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases enter into an antiferromagnetic ground-state, except for Er{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} and Tm{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2}, which do not undergo magnetic ordering down to 5 K. The structural variations as a function of the decreasing size of the rare-earth metals, following the lanthanide contraction, and the changes in the magnetic properties across the series are discussed as well. - Graphical Abstract: The structure of RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) can be best viewed as 2-dimensional slabs of Mg and Ge atoms (anionic sub-lattice), and layers of rare-earth metal atoms (cationic sub-lattice) between them. Within this description, one should consider the Ge-Ge dumbbells (formally Ge{sup 6-}{sub 2}), interconnected with square-planar Mg atom as forming flat [MgGe{sub 2}] layers (z=0), stacked along the c-axis with the layers at z=1/2, made of rare-earth metal cations (formally RE{sup 3+}). Highlights: > RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} (RE=Y, Nd, Sm, Gd-Tm, Lu) are new ternary germanides. > Their structures can be recognized as a 1:1 intergrowth of CsCl- and AlB{sub 2}-like slabs. > Ge atoms are covalently bound into Ge{sub 2} dumbbells. > Most RE{sub 2}MgGe{sub 2} phases are antiferromagnetically ordered at cryogenic temperatures.

Suen, Nian-Tzu; Tobash, Paul H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Bobev, Svilen, E-mail: bobev@udel.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Microstructural investigations of rare-earth transition-metal-based magnetocaloric materials for near-room-temperature applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOGO LOGO Spomenka Kobe, Paul McGuiness, Boris Saje Jožef Stefan Institute Rare-Earth Permanent Magnets in Europe KOLEKTOR *China's Complete Control of Global High-Tech Magnet Industry Rare-earth minerals are used in: rechargeable batteries (in camcorders), cell phones, PDAs, laptop computers and other portable devices.. wind turbines, drinking water filters, petrochemical catalysts, polishing powders, hydrogen storage, fluorescent lighting, flat panels, color televisions, glass, ceramics and automotive catalysts. fiberoptics, dental and surgical lasers, MRI systems, as medical contrast agents, in medical isotopes and in positron emission tomography scintillation detectors. magnetic refrigeration rechargeable batteries used in hybrid vehicles permanent magnets

68

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

Method for removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

This report details the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which involves electrorefining spent fuel in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI-U/PuCl{sub 3}) at 500{degree}C. The total heavy metal chloride concentration in the salt will be about 2 mol %. At some point, the concentrations of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products in the salt must be reduced to lower the amount of heat generated in the electrorefiner. The heavy metal concentration in the salt must be reduced before removing the fission products from the salt. The operation uses a lithium-cadmium alloy anode that is solid at 500{degree}C, a solid mandrel cathode with a ceramic catch crucible below to collect heavy metal that falls off it, and a liquid cadmium cathode. The design criteria that had to be met by this equipment included the following: (1) control of the reduction rate by lithium, (2) good separation between heavy metal and rare earths, and (3) the capability to collect heavy metal and rare earths over a wide range of salt compositions. In tests conducted in an engineering-scale electrorefiner (10 kg uranium per cathode), good separation was achieved while removing uranium and rare earths from the salt. Only 13% of the rare earths was removed, while 99.9% of the uranium in the salt was removed; subsequently, the rare earths were also reduced to low concentrations. The uranium concentration in the salt was reduced to 0.05 ppm after uranium and rare earths were transferred from the salt to a solid mandrel cathode with a catch crucible. Rare earth concentrations in the salt were reduced to less than 0.01 wt % in these operations. Similar tests are planned to remove plutonium from the salt in a laboratory-scale (100--300 g heavy metal) electrorefiner.

Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Process for Rare Earths Recovery from Bastnasite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Alternative Process for Rare Earths Recovery from ... Emerging Issues Around Critical Metals for Clean Energy Automotive Applications.

72

Rare Earth Metals | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are critical components in modern electronic technologies, ranging from TVs, fluorescent light bulbs, cell phones and computers to "green" magnets in electric motors that power...

73

Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor - Energy ...  

Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; Success Stories; News; Events; Electricity Transmission Early Stage R&D Advanced Materials Aluminum ...

74

Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor - Energy ...  

High-voltage electric power transmission cables based on pure aluminum strands with a stranded steel core (ACSR) or stranded aluminum ... Applications and Industries.

75

Rare earth thermoelectrics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The author reviews the thermoelectric properties of metallic compounds which contain rare-earth atoms. They are the group of metals with the largest value ever reported of the Seebeck coefficient. An increase by 50% of the Seebeck would make these compounds useful for thermoelectric devices. The largest Seebeck coefficient is found for compounds of cerium (e.g., CePd{sub 3}) and ytterbium (e.g., YbAl{sub 3}). Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the maximum observed Seebeck. The author discusses the theoretical model which has been used to calculate the Seebeck coefficient. He is solving this model for other configurations (4f){sup n} of rare-earth ground states.

Mahan, G.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Earth materials and earth dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

Bennett, K; Shankland, T. [and others

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Improved method for preparing rare earth sesquichalcogenides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for the preparation of high purity rare earth sesquichalcogenides is described. The rare earth, as one or more pieces of the metal, is sealed under a vacuum with a stoichiometric amount of sulfur or selenium and a small amount of iodine into a quartz reaction vessel. The sealed vessel is then heated to above the vaporization temperature of the chalcogen and below the melting temperature of the rare earth metal and maintained until the product has been formed. The iodine is then vaporized off leaving a pure product. The rare earth sulfides and selenides thus formed are useful as semiconductors and as thermoelectric generators. 3 tables.

Takeshita, T.; Beaudry, B.J.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1982-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

Zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The zinc electrode in alkaline electrolyte is unusual in that supersaturated zincate solutions can form during discharge and spongy or mossy zinc deposits can form on charge at low overvoltages. The effect of additives on regular pasted ZnO electrodes and calcium zincate electrodes is discussed. The paper also reports on in situ x-ray absorption (XAS) results on mossy zinc deposits.

McBreen, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermodynamic properties of some metal oxide-zirconia systems  

SciTech Connect

Metal oxide-zirconia systems are a potential class of materials for use as structural materials at temperatures above 1900 K. These materials must have no destructive phase changes and low vapor pressures. Both alkaline earth oxide (MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO)-zirconia and some rare earth oxide (Y2O3, Sc2O3, La2O3, CeO2, Sm2O3, Gd2O3, Yb2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, and Er2O3)-zirconia system are examined. For each system, the phase diagram is discussed and the vapor pressure for each vapor species is calculated via a free energy minimization procedure. The available thermodynamic literature on each system is also surveyed. Some of the systems look promising for high temperature structural materials.

Jacobson, N.S.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Industrial Ecology and Metal Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Topic Title: Powerpoint: Industrial Ecology and Metal Production Topic Summary: Metal extraction is on the the most Earth-intrusive industrial...

82

The Influence of Nb on the Rare Earth Heavy Rail Steel Mechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Micro-alloying through the additions of Nb or rare earth (RE) elements has been proved ... Group Metals by the Metal-ion Reducing Bacterium Shewanella Algae.

83

Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2001 ... TMS: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Home ... Rare Earth Oxide Coatings for Life Extension of Chromia Forming Alloys by Stela...

84

Induction slag reduction process for making titanium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Continuous process for preparing titanium comprising fluorinating titanium ore, and reducing the formed alkaline earth fluotitanate with an alkaline earth metal in an induction slag reactor.

Traut, Davis E. (Corvallis, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification. The process involves acidifying the wastes with an oxidizing agent such as nitric acid, then adding formic acid as a reducing agent, and then mixing with glass formers to produce a melter feed. The nitric acid contributes nitrates that act as an oxidant to balance the redox of the melter feed, prevent reduction of certain species to produce conducting metals, and lower the pH of the wastes to a suitable level for melter operation. The formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury for removal by steam stripping, and MnO.sub.2 to the Mn(II) ion to prevent foaming of the glass melt. The optimum amounts of nitric acid and formic acid are determined in relation to the composition of the wastes, including the concentrations of mercury (II) and MnO.sub.2, noble metal compounds, nitrates, formates and so forth. The process minimizes the amount of hydrogen generated during treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product.

Hsu, Chia-lin W. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Process for treating alkaline wastes for vitrification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention is a process for treating alkaline waste materials, including high level radioactive wastes, for vitrification. The process involves adjusting the pH of the wastes with nitric acid, adding formic acid (or a process stream containing formic acid) to reduce mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2} to the Mn(II) ion, and mixing with class formers to produce a melter feed. The process minimizes production of hydrogen due to noble metal-catalyzed formic acid decomposition during, treatment, while producing a redox-balanced feed for effective melter operation and a quality glass product. An important feature of the present invention is the use of different acidifying and reducing, agents to treat the wastes. The nitric acid acidifies the wastes to improve yield stress and supplies acid for various reactions; then the formic acid reduces mercury compounds to elemental mercury and MnO{sub 2}) to the Mn(II) ion. When the pH of the waste is lower, reduction of mercury compounds and MnO{sub 2}) is faster and less formic acid is needed, and the production of hydrogen caused by catalytically-active noble metals is decreased.

Hsu, Chia-lin W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Rare Earth Extraction by Molten Oxide Electrolysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Production, Refining and Recycling of Rare Earth Metals ... Electrolysis in molten halides is an established method for the reduction but requires ... Recycling of Different Sintered Magnet Grades by Hydrogen Processing Yielding...

88

New Proton-Ionizable, Calixarene-Based Ligands for Selective Metal Ion Separations  

SciTech Connect

The project objective was the discovery of new ligands for performing metal ion separations. The research effort entailed the preparation of new metal ion complexing agents and polymers and their evaluation in metal ion separation processes of solvent extraction, synthetic liquid membrane transport, and sorption. Structural variations in acyclic, cyclic, and bicyclic organic ligands were used to probe their influence upon the efficiency and selectivity with which metal ion separations can be performed. A unifying feature of the ligand structures is the presence of one (or more) side arm with a pendent acidic function. When a metal ion is complexed within the central cavity of the ligand, ionization of the side arm(s) produces the requisite anion(s) for formation of an overall electroneutral complex. This markedly enhances extraction/transport efficiency for separations in which movement of aqueous phase anions of chloride, nitrate, or sulfate into an organic medium would be required. Through systematic structural variations, new ligands have been developed for efficient and selective separations of monovalent metal ions (e.g., alkali metal, silver, and thallium cations) and of divalent metal ion species (e.g., alkaline earth metal, lead, and mercury cations). Research results obtained in these fundamental investigations provide important insight for the design and development of ligands suitable for practical metal ion separation applications.

Bartsch, Richard A.

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

89

CADMIUM-RARE EARTH BORATE GLASS AS REACTOR CONTROL MATERIAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor control rod fabricated from a cadmiumrare earth-borate glass is presented. The rare earth component of this glass is selected from among those rare earths having large neutron capture cross sections, such as samarium, gadolinium or europium. Partlcles of this glass are then dispersed in a metal matrix by standard powder metallurgy techniques.

Ploetz, G.L.; Ray, W.E.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Towards metal electrode interface scavenging of rare-earth scandates: A Sc2O3 and Gd2O3 study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous Gd"2O"3 and Sc"2O"3 thin films were deposited on Si by high-pressure sputtering (HPS). In order to reduce the uncontrolled interfacial SiO"x growth, firstly a metallic film of Gd or Sc was sputtered in pure Ar plasma. Subsequently, they were ... Keywords: Gadolinium oxide, High-k, Scandium oxide, Scavenging

M. A. Pampilln; P. C. Feijoo; E. San Andrs; M. Toledano-Luque; A. del Prado; A. J. Blzquez; M. L. Luca

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry...

92

GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE (1)Google Earth Features The Google Earth of the Google Earth window. Often when opening up the Google Earth program, the view Bar Controls View Screen #12;GOOGLE EARTH QUICK GUIDE Controls. The following

Smith-Konter, Bridget

93

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles Title Laboratory-scale evaluation of secondary alkaline zinc batteries for electric vehicles...

94

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth and Aquatic Sciences Earth and Aquatic Sciences SHARE Earth and Aquatic Sciences Create and apply new knowledge across multiple scales to aid decision makers on the stewardship of air, water and land resources. Many factors affect the fate, transport and transformation of metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands. A fundamental understanding of environmental inorganic and biological interactions is needed for deriving practical solutions to management of DOE lands. ORNL applies molecular to field-scale chemistry, hydrology and microbiology expertise, together with neutron scattering, nano-materials sciences facilities, computing resources and comprehensive models in environmental remediation sciences research. Multiple research projects are carried out with aims of

95

Molten metal reactors  

SciTech Connect

A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

Bingham, Dennis N; Klingler, Kerry M; Turner, Terry D; Wilding, Bruce M

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optical manipulation of ultrafast electron and nuclear motion on metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

We study the unoccupied electronic structure and dynamics of chemisorbed atoms and molecules on metal surfaces by time resolved two-photon photoemission (TR-2PP). spectroscopy, low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), and theory. Our research concerns simple atomic adsorbates such as alkali and alkaline earth atoms, which provide fundamentally important models for adsorbate-surface interactions, and more complex adsorbates such as fullerenes on noble metals, which illustrate emergent interfacial properties that derive from intrinsic molecular attributes, and moleculemolecule and molecule-surface interactions. Our goal is to understand how these interactions contribute to formation of the interfacial electronic structure, and how thus formed electronic properties affect interfacial phenomena of importance to energy transduction and storage. Moreover, we explore how the interfacial electronic excitation drives dynamical phenomena such as charge transfer and surface femtochemistry.

Petek, Hrvoje

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

97

Au/MxOy/TiO2 catalysts for CO oxidation: promotional effect of main-group, transition, and rare-earth metal oxide additives.  

SciTech Connect

Au/TiO2 catalysts are active for CO oxidation, but they suffer from high-temperature sintering of the gold particles, and few attempts have been made to promote or stabilize Au/TiO2. Our recent communication addressed these issues by loading gold onto Al2O3/TiO2 prepared via surface-sol-gel processing of Al(sec-OC4H9)3 on TiO2. In our current full paper, Au/Al2O3/TiO2 catalysts were prepared alternatively by thermal decomposition of Al(NO3)3 on TiO2 followed by loading gold, and the influences of the decomposition temperature and Al2O3 content were systematically surveyed. This facile method was subsequently extended to the preparation of a battery of metal oxide-modified Au/TiO2 catalysts virtually not reported. It was found that Au/TiO2 modified by CaO, NiO, ZnO, Ga2O3, Y2O3, ZrO2, La2O3, Pr2O3, Nd2O3, Sm2O3, Eu2O3, Gd2O3, Dy2O3, Ho2O3, Er2O3, or Yb2O3 could retain significant activity at ambient temperature even after aging in O2-He at 500 C, whereas unmodified Au/TiO2 lost its activity. Moreover, some 200 C-calcined promoted catalysts showed high activity even at about -100 C. The deactivation and regeneration of some of these new catalysts were studied. This work furnished novel catalysts for further fundamental and applied research.

Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Alkaline Electrolysis Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, GE developed electrolyzer stack technologies to meet DOEs goals for low cost electrolysis hydrogen. The main barrier to meeting the targets for electrolyzer cost was in stack assembly and construction. GEs invention of a single piece or monolithic plastic electrolyzer stack reduces these costs considerably. In addition, GE developed low cost cell electrodes using a novel application of metal spray coating technology. Bench scale stack testing and cost modeling indicates that the DOE targets for stack capital cost and efficiency can be met by full-scale production of industrial electrolyzers incorporating GEs stack technology innovations.

RIchard Bourgeois; Steven Sanborn; Eliot Assimakopoulos

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

99

GistEarth (GistEarth)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Gist earth color map. High values are on top. ... Graphics Window (GfxWindowDestination), Home, Global (GlobalErrorScaling). ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

100

Preliminary Heavy Metal Survey of a Spent Alkaline Battery Waste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications. Presentation Title...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Preferential Acidic, Alkaline and Neutral Solubility of Metallic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

water is a neutral liquid, representative of exposure to surface water or groundwater. Acetic acid is a weak organic acid, and is an indicator of potential leaching during...

102

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed | Stanford Synchrotron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Wednesday, November 27, 2013 The formation of Earth's metallic core, which makes up a third of our planet's mass, represents the most significant differentiation event in Earth's history. Earth's present layered structure with a metallic core and an overlying silicate mantle would have required mechanisms to separate iron alloy from a silicate phase. Percolation of liquid iron alloy moving through a solid silicate matrix (much as water percolates through porous rock, or even coffee grinds) has been proposed as a possible model for core formation (Figure 1). Many previous experimental results have ruled out percolation as a major core formation mechanism for Earth at the relatively lower pressure conditions in the upper mantle, but until now experimental

103

Porous metallic bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous metallic bodies having a substantially uniform pore size of less than about 200 microns and a density of less than about 25 percent theoretical, as well as the method for making them, are disclosed. Group IIA, IIIB, IVB, VB, and rare earth metal hydrides a

Landingham, R.L.

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

104

Pantex Earth Day 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Earth Day 2012 May 17, 2012 Julie Chavarria Earth Day 2012 Saturday, April 21 st 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Held at Thompson Park in Amarillo, TX Sponsored by B&W...

105

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) Place Livermore, California Zip 94550 Product CoolEarth is a concentrated PV developer using inflatable concentrators to focus light onto triple-junction cells. References CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar) is a company located in Livermore, California . References ↑ "CoolEarth (formerly Cool Earth Solar)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=CoolEarth_formerly_Cool_Earth_Solar&oldid=343892" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

106

Rare Earth Elements in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

107

Searching for life where the sun don't shine : explorations to the seafloors of Earth and Europa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrothermal vents on Earth's seafloor host entire ecosystems that live off energy from chemosynthesis rather than photosynthesis. This energy process uses chemical reactions between metals and hot gases from inside Earth's ...

Fitzpatrick, Garret R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Alkaline injection for enhanced oil recovery: a status report  

SciTech Connect

In the past several years, there has been renewed interest in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by alkaline injection. Alkaline solutions also are being used as preflushes in micellar/polymer projects. Several major field tests of alkaline flooding are planned, are in progress, or recently have been completed. Considerable basic research on alkaline injection has been published recently, and more is in progress. This paper summarizes known field tests and, where available, the amount of alkali injected and the performance results. Recent laboratory work, much sponsored by the U.S. DOE, and the findings are described. Alkaline flood field test plans for new projects are summarized.

Mayer, E.H.; Berg, R.L.; Carmichael, J.D.; Weinbrandt, R.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Collision cross sections and equilibrium fractions of ions and atoms in metal-vapor targets. Project progress report, June 1, 1980-April 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to measure atomic collision cross sections and equilibrium fractions of ions and atoms in metal vapor targets. The goal is to obtain experimental information on atomic collision processes of importance to the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. In particular, in connection with the development of negative ion sources, we have measured D/sup -/ formation cross sections in alkaline-earth metal vapor targets. During the period covered in this report we have completed electron transfer cross section measurements of D/sup +/ ions and D/sup 0/ atoms in collision with calcium and strontium vapor. We have also completed differential cross section measurements for H/sup -/ formation in H/sup +/ + Mg collisions. Finally, state-of-the-art computer instrumentation has been interfaced to the experiment.

Morgan, T.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Earth, Space Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences Earth, Space Sciences /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Earth, Space Sciences National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)» Earth A team of scientists is working to understand how local changes in hydrology might bring about major changes to the Arctic landscape, including the possibility of a large-scale carbon release from thawing permafrost. Bryan Travis, an expert in fluid dynamics, is author of the Mars global hydrology numerical computer model, or MAGHNUM, used for calculating heat and fluid transport phenomena. (MAGHNUM was previously

111

Earth's Core Hottest Layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth's Core Hottest Layer Earth's Core Hottest Layer Name: Alfred Status: Grade: 6-8 Location: FL Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Why is the inner core the hottest layer? How is that possible? Replies: There are two factors causing the center of the Earth hotter than various layers of the Earth's. First, the more dense is the layer. The denser layer, the hotter it will be. In addition, the source of the heating is due to heat produced by nuclear decay. These substances tend to be more dense than lower dense substances. So the source of heat (temperature) is higher, the greater will be the temperature. Having said all that, the reasons are rather more complicated in the "real" Earth. If the inner layers were less dense they would rise (bubble) to the "surface" leaving the inner layers more dense and thus hotter layers.

112

Earth & Environmental Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science Earth & Environmental Science1354608000000Earth & Environmental ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Earth & Environmental Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Reference Data Sources Organizations Journals Key Resources AGRICOLA The catalog and index to the collections of the National Agricultural Library, as well as a primary public source for world-wide access to agricultural information. BioOne A global, not-for-profit collaboration bringing together scientific societies, publishers, and libraries to provide access to critical, peer-reviewed research in the biological, ecological, and environmental

113

Original Google Earth Links | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Original Google Earth Links Jump to: navigation, search Google Earth Google Earth.png Install Google Earth and explore: Renewable Energy Activity, by state Renewable Incentive...

114

Extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using an ion-exchange column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective extraction of cesium from an alkaline leaching solution of spent catalysts using phenolic resins was studied. The resins were synthesized by alkaline polycondensation of formaldehyde by phenol, resorcinol, catechol, and phloroglucinol. Their ionoselectivities for five alkali metals were evaluated with a solid-liquid extraction, and their ion-exchange capacities were compared. The resin with the best selectivity for cesium was tested with a real solution at different pH values. An on-column extraction is proposed to obtain cesium with high purity.

Dumont, N.; Favre-Reguillon, A.; Dunjic, B.; Lemaire, M. [Institut De Recherches sur la Catalyse et Laboratoire de Catalyse et Synthese Organique, Villeubanne (France)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Parasitic corrosion resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O.sub.2 cells  

SciTech Connect

A consumable metal anode which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA); Smith, David F. (Boulder Creek, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Parasitic corrosion-resistant anode for use in metal/air or metal/O/sub 2/ cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A consumable metal anode is described which is used in refuelable electrochemical cells and wherein at least a peripheral edge portion of the anode is protected against a corrosive alkaline environment of the cell by the application of a thin metal coating, the coating being formed of metals such as nickel, silver, and gold.

Joy, R.W.; Smith, D.F.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

Rare earth gas laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high energy gas laser with light output in the infrared or visible region of the spectrum is described. Laser action is obtained by generating vapors of rare earth halides, particularly neodymium iodide or, to a lesser extent, neodymium bromide, and disposing the rare earth vapor medium in a resonant cavity at elevated temperatures; e.g., approximately 1200/sup 0/ to 1400/sup 0/K. A particularly preferred gaseous medium is one involving a complex of aluminum chloride and neodymium chloride, which exhibits tremendously enhanced vapor pressure compared to the rare earth halides per se, and provides comparable increases in stored energy densities.

Krupke, W.F.

1975-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of Alkaline Sorbents on ESP Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many energy companies need to reduce sulfur trioxide (SO3) emissions and/or sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions. Injection of an alkaline sorbent into the boiler or into the duct after the air heater is a relatively simple and inexpensive means of meeting this need. These processes can, however, have a negative effect on the performance of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) most plants are equipped with for particulate control. Hence, there is a need to understand and be able to predict the impact of these ...

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

119

Alkali/ Alkaline-Earth Content Effects on Properties of High-Alumina ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance ... Glasses tested had a high content of alumina (>20 wt%), moderate to high content of boria, and...

120

Earth's Global Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An update is provided on the Earth's global annual mean energy budget in the light of new observations and analyses. In 1997, Kiehl and Trenberth provided a review of past estimates and performed a number of radiative computations to better ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo; Jeffrey Kiehl

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alkaline chemistry of transuranium elements and technetium and the treatment of alkaline radioactive wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Goal of this survey is to generalize the known data on fundamental physical-chemical properties of TRUs and Tc, methods for their isolation, and to provide recommendations that will be useful for partitioning them from alkaline high-level wastes.

Delegard, C.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Peretrukhin, V.F.; Shilov, V.P.; Pikaev, A.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physical Chemistry

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Stray current interference control for HVDC earth currents  

SciTech Connect

High-voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines exist around the world, with several in the US. When one conductor must be taken out of operation (in case of emergency), the earth may be used as an alternate conductor. The earth current may be accumulated on and discharged from underground metallic structures that cross the voltage gradient created by the current. Test results on two lines showed that stray current interference is not a major problem if mitigated properly.

Fitzgerald, J.H. III [PSG Corrosion Engineering/Corrpro Cos., Detroit, MI (United States); Kroon, D.H. [Corrpro Companies Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

SP-19: Electrochemistry of Enargite: Reactivity in Alkaline Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reactivity of enargite samples from Montana, US and Quiruvilca, Peru were studied under alkaline conditions, pH range of 8-13, using a cyclic voltammetry...

124

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

125

Rechargeable Zn-MnO sub 2 alkaline batteries  

SciTech Connect

In this paper progress in the development of rechargeable alkaline zinc-manganese dioxide cells is described. The advantages and limitations of the system are evaluated. Laboratory tests run on commercial primary alkaline cells as well as model simulations of a bipolar MnO{sub 2} electrode show that the rechargeable alkaline battery may be able to compete with lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, and secondary lithium cells for low- to moderate-rate applications. However, because of this poor performance at high rates and low temperatures, the alkaline MnO{sub 2} battery is not suitable for present automotive starting applications.

Wruck, W.J.; Reichman, B.; Bullock, K.R.; Kao, W.H. (Corporate Applied Research, Johnson Controls, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

High performance metal/air fuel cells. Part 1. General review. [Li, Al, Ca, Cd, Mg  

SciTech Connect

Metal/air fuel cells are reviewed in terms of their potential application in electric vehicles. Attention is focused on those metals (light alkali and alkaline earth metals, and aluminum) which, in combination with oxygen, have theoretical energy densities (2--13 kWh/kg-metal) exceeding that of gasoline (utilized in automobiles at 2--3 kWh/kg). Lithium and aluminum have yielded 8- and 4 kWh/kg, respectively, in laboratory experimental cells. The slurry Zn/air system achieves 0.85 kWh/kg-Zn in prototype vehicle cells and is reviewed for comparison. Calcium can probably yield 1.8 kWh/kg-Ca, but its potential as a fuel has not yet been fully explored. The remaining metals appear to be unsuitable for use in aqueous electrolyte fuel cells. The discharge characteristics of lithium, aluminum, and (possibly) calcium/air cells indicate the potential for electric vehicles of the highway performance and minimum range (300 miles) of subcompact automobiles, rapid refueling for unlimited range extension, and the storage in the fuel cell of sufficient metal for ranges in excess of 1000 miles. Barriers to the concept are the economic necessity of recycling cell reaction products (except in the case of calcium), the expansion or creation of vast metal production industries, and the change-over of existing service station infrastructures to allow electric vehicle servicing. The energy efficiency of a transportation system using aluminum was estimated using data on the current aluminum production industry. The total estimated cost of ownership and operation of an aluminum/air cell was 3.0--3.6 cents/km. The relative rarity of lithium would complicate its use. 6 tables.

Cooper, J. F.

1977-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Corrosion-resistant metal surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal surfaces having thereon an ultrathin (e.g., less than ten nanometer thickness) corrosion-resistant film, thereby rendering the metal surfaces corrosion-resistant. The corrosion-resistant film includes an at least partially crosslinked amido-functionalized silanol component in combination with rare-earth metal oxide nanoparticles. The invention also relates to methods for producing such corrosion-resistant films.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Good Earths and Rare Earths | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths Good Earths and Rare Earths April 20, 2011 - 6:17pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What does this mean for me? Rare earth elements -- dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium -- are essential to a wide range of green energy technologies ranging from windmills to electric vehicles One of their primary uses is in permanent magnets, which amount to over a $4 billion global industry Ames Laboratory recently discovered a way to make these magnets cheaper and greener and signed a cooperative research and development agreement with Molycorp Inc. -- the Western hemisphere's only producer of rare-earth oxides. China holds about 36 percent of world's rare-earth reserves, (compared to 13 percent in the U.S.), but it currently produces 95 percent

129

Modeling the earth system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

Ojima, D. [ed.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to metal carbides for production of liquid fuels and chemicals. Quarterly technical status report, April 1--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Previous work at MIT indicates that essentially stoichiometric, rather than catalytic, reactions with alkaline earth metal oxides offer technical and economic promise as an innovative approach to upgrading natural gas to premium products such as liquid hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. In this approach, methane would be reacted with relatively low cost and recyclable alkaline earth metal oxides, such as CaO and MgO, at high temperatures (>1500{degrees}C) to achieve very high (i.e. approaching 100%) gas conversions to H{sub 2}, CO and the corresponding alkaline earth metal carbides. These carbides exist stably in solid form at dry ambient conditions and show promise for energy storage and long distance transport. The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop new scientific and engineering knowledge bases for further assessment of the approach by performing laboratory-scale experiments and thermodynamic and thermochemical kinetics calculations. Work on this project will be performed according to two tasks. Under Task 1 (Industrial Chemistry), a laboratory-scale electric arc discharge plasma reactor is being constructed and will be used to assess the technical feasibility of producing Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} from MgO and methane, and to identify the operating conditions of interest for the commercial production of Mg{sub 2}C{sub 3} and/or CaC{sub 2} from MgO and/or CaO and methane. Under Task 2 (Mechanistic Foundations), preliminary thermodynamic calculations were performed for the Ca-C-H-O and Mg-C-H-O systems using the Chemkin program. A scoping run with CaO in an electrical screen heater reactor under reduced methane pressure was also conducted. No appreciable quantity of acetylene was detected upon hydrolysis of the solid residue. This can be attributed to the very small quantity of methane at the very low pressure coupled with inadequate contacting of whatever methane was present with the CaO powder.

Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Laboratory study on the behaviour of spent AA household alkaline batteries in incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quantitative evaluation of emissions from incineration is essential when Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) studies consider this process as an end-of-life solution for some wastes. Thus, the objective of this work is to quantify the main gaseous emissions produced when spent AA alkaline batteries are incinerated. With this aim, batteries were kept for 1 h at 1273 K in a refractory steel tube hold in a horizontal electric furnace with temperature control. At one end of the refractory steel tube, a constant air flow input assures the presence of oxygen in the atmosphere and guides the gaseous emissions to a filter system followed by a set of two bubbler flasks having an aqueous solution of 10% (v/v) nitric acid. After each set of experiments, sulphur, chlorides and metals (As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, Tl and Zn) were analyzed in both the solutions obtained from the steel tube washing and from the bubblers. Sulphur, chlorides and metals were quantified, respectively, using barium sulfate gravimetry, the Volhard method and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The emissions of zinc, the most emitted metal, represent about 6.5% of the zinc content in the batteries. Emissions of manganese (whose oxide is the main component of the cathode) and iron (from the cathode collector) are negligible when compared with their amount in AA alkaline batteries. Mercury is the metal with higher volatility in the composition of the batteries and was collected even in the second bubbler flask. The amount of chlorides collected corresponds to about 36% of the chlorine in the battery sleeve that is made from PVC. A considerable part of the HCl formed in PVC plastic sleeve incineration is neutralized with KOH, zinc and manganese oxides and, thus, it is not totally released in the gas. Some of the emissions are predictable through a thermodynamic data analysis at temperatures in the range of 1200-1300 K taking into account the composition of the batteries. This analysis was done for most of potential reactions between components in the batteries as well as between them and the surrounding atmosphere and it reasonably agrees the experimental results. The results obtained show the role of alkaline batteries at the acid gases cleaning process, through the neutralization reactions of some of their components. Therefore, LCA of spent AA alkaline batteries at the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process must consider this contribution.

Almeida, Manuel F. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)], E-mail: mfa@fe.up.pt; Xara, Susana M.; Delgado, Julanda; Costa, Carlos A. [LEPAE, Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Lab celebrates Earth Day  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab celebrates Earth Day Lab celebrates Earth Day Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest Issue:Dec. 2013 - Jan. 2014 All Issues » submit Lab celebrates Earth Day Multiple activities focus on environmental protection. May 1, 2013 A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab A team from Industrial Hygiene and Safety during the Great Garbage Grab. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Great Garbage Grab From April 1 - 12 employees were encouraged to don work gloves and very attractive orange vests to pick up litter around their workplace-both on and off Lab property. This year's winner of the coveted Traveling Trash Trophy (for picking up the most litter) went to the Worker Safety and

133

Removal of plutonium and americium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High salt content, alkaline waste solutions containing plutonium and americium are contacted with a sodium titanate compound to effect removal of the plutonium and americium from the alkaline waste solution onto the sodium titanate and provide an effluent having a radiation level of less than 10 nCi per gram alpha emitters.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Calixarene crown ether solvent composition and use thereof for extraction of cesium from alkaline waste solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solvent composition and corresponding method for extracting cesium (Cs) from aqueous neutral and alkaline solutions containing Cs and perhaps other competing metal ions is described. The method entails contacting an aqueous Cs-containing solution with a solvent consisting of a specific class of lipophilic calix[4]arene-crown ether extractants dissolved in a hydrocarbon-based diluent containing a specific class of alkyl-aromatic ether alcohols as modifiers. The cesium values are subsequently recovered from the extractant, and the solvent subsequently recycled, by contacting the Cs-containing organic solution with an aqueous stripping solution. This combined extraction and stripping method is especially useful as a process for removal of the radionuclide cesium-137 from highly alkaline waste solutions which are also very concentrated in sodium and potassium. No pre-treatment of the waste solution is necessary, and the cesium can be recovered using a safe and inexpensive stripping process using water, dilute (millimolar) acid solutions, or dilute (millimolar) salt solutions. An important application for this invention would be treatment of alkaline nuclear tank wastes. Alternatively, the invention could be applied to decontamination of acidic reprocessing wastes containing cesium-137.

Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Presley, Derek J. (Ooltewah, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SEPARATION OF TRANSURANIC ELEMENTS FROM RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating neptunium and plutonium values from rare earths and alkaline earth fission products present on a solid mixed actinide carrier (Th or U(IV) oxalate or fluoride) --fission product carrier (LaF/sub 3/, CeF/sub 3/, SrF/sub 2/, CaF/sub 2/, YF/sub 3/, La oxalate, cerous oxalate, Sr oxalate, Ca oxalate or Y oxalate) by extraction of the actinides at elevated temperature with a solution of ammonium fluoride and/or ammonium oxalate is described. Separation of the fission-product-containing carriers from the actinide solution formed and precipitation of the neptunium and plutonium from the solution with mineral acid are also accomplished. (AEC)

Kohman, T.P.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Earth flyby anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the planet-centric system, a spacecraft should have the same initial and final energies, even though its energy and angular momentum will change in the barycenter of the solar system. However, without explanation, a number of earth flybys have yielded small energy changes.

Nieto, Michael Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, John D [PROPULSION LAB.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Earth's ...as conduit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes that take place on the Earth's surfaces are intimately coupled with the overly- ing air," explains Judith Perlinger. "An intense and complex exchange takes place when atmospheric chemicals, heat devices (MCCDs) which they use to collect semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) present in trace

Honrath, Richard E.

138

An alkaline spring system within the Del Puerto ophiolite (California USA): A Mars analog site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mars appears to have experienced little compositional differentiation of primitive lithosphere, and thus much of the surface of Mars is covered by mafic lavas. On Earth, mafic and ultramafic rocks present in ophiolites, oceanic crust and upper mantle that have been obducted onto land, are therefore good analogs for Mars. The characteristic mineralogy, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities of cold-water alkaline springs associated with these mafic and ultramafic rocks represent a particularly compelling analog for potential life-bearing systems. Serpentinization, the reaction of water with mafic minerals such as olivine and pyroxene, yields fluids with unusual chemistry (Mg-OH and Ca-OH waters with pH values up to {approx}12), as well as heat and hydrogen gas that can sustain subsurface, chemosynthetic ecosystems. The recent observation of seeps from pole-facing crater and canyon walls in the higher Martian latitudes supports the hypothesis that even present conditions might allow for a rockhosted chemosynthetic biosphere in near-surface regions of the Martian crust. The generation of methane within a zone of active serpentinization, through either abiogenic or biogenic processes, could account for the presence of methane detected in the Martian atmosphere. For all of these reasons, studies of terrestrial alkaline springs associated with mafic and ultramafic rocks are particularly timely. This study focuses on the alkaline Adobe Springs, emanating from mafic and ultramafic rocks of the California Coast Range, where a community of novel bacteria is associated with the precipitation of Mg-Ca carbonate cements. The carbonates may serve as a biosignature that could be used in the search for evidence of life on Mars.

Blank, J.G.; Green, S.; Blake, D.; Valley, J.; Kita, N.; Treiman, A.; Dobson, P.F.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress  

SciTech Connect

The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Google Earth through a Keyhole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Earth through a Keyhole John Cloud NOAA Central Library #12;#12;Fort Huachuca, Arizona #12;#12;#12;Google Ocean #12;#12;The Roots of Google Earth 2001: Keyhole Corporation founded in Mountain View, California. Develops Keyhole Markup Language (KML), etc. 2003:Keyhole develops EarthSystemTM 2004: Google

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effect of pre-oxidation and environmental aging on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) sealing glass with metallic interconnect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two ferritic stainless steel coupons for strength evaluation. The steel coupons were pre-oxidized at elevated temperatures to promote thick oxide layers to simulate long-term exposure conditions. In addition, seals to as-received metal coupons were also tested after aging in oxidizing or reducing environments to simulate the actual SOFC environment. Room temperature tensile testing showed strength degradation when using pre-oxidized coupons, and more extensive degradation after aging in air. Fracture surface and microstructural analysis confirmed that the cause of degradation was formation of SrCrO4 at the outer sealing edges exposed to air.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Man on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Man on Earth Man on Earth Name: jmagee Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: How long has man as a species existed on the planet? Replies: Human evolution is a matter of considerable debate. Since the phrase in the question, "man as a species," is a bit vague, here is a brief run-down of the fossil evidence for the evolution of hominids (animals able to walk upright): Australopithecus - the first hominid, appeared on the African savannas 2-3 million years ago. Brain size was 1/3 modern human's. Homo habilis - the first hominid to make and use tools. Homo erectus - a. k. a. Peking and Java man, evolved from Homo habilis about 1.5 million years ago, built fires, resided in huts, and had a brain capacity of 1,000 ml (versus modern man's 1,375 ml).

143

Metal Aminoboranes  

Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be ...

144

Superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth  

SciTech Connect

A superhydrophobic powder is prepared by coating diatomaceous earth (DE) with a hydrophobic coating on the particle surface such that the coating conforms to the topography of the DE particles. The hydrophobic coating can be a self assembly monolayer of a perfluorinated silane coupling agent. The DE is preferably natural-grade DE where organic impurities have been removed. The superhydrophobic powder can be applied as a suspension in a binder solution to a substrate to produce a superhydrophobic surface on the substrate.

Simpson, John T. (Clinton, TN); D'Urso, Brian R. (Clinton, TN)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

Gruen, D.M.

1959-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

146

Earth Sciences | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogeochemistry Multiscale Energy Science Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information Science and Technology Quantum Information Science Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Research Areas | Earth Sciences SHARE Earth Sciences Computational Earth Sciences research at ORNL encompasses many important aspects of global and regional Earth system model development and analysis. We focus on numerical methods development and implementation, data analytics, verification and validation of Earth system components, and the development of methods to characterize stochastic behavior. Significant progress is underway in the areas of scalable time stepping algorithms,

147

Senior Earth Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appear today. My expertise is studying land vegetation using Earth orbiting satellites. I am assigned by NASA to the United States (US) Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) in Washington, where I co-chair the Observations Interagency Working Group. I have provided my resume for your information. NASAs and NOAAs Earth orbiting satellites make measurements that enable our understanding of climate change and the global integrated Earth system. These satellites provide high accuracy, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution, global observations of the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface that cannot be acquired by any other method. To understand climate change, satellite observations must be of sufficient duration to distinguish long-term trends from short-term cycles created by processes such as extreme weather and El Nino. Land vegetation is a critical aspect of the global carbon cycle because plants absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere via the process of photosynthesis and incorporate or store this carbon in wood and soil. In the global carbon cycle, carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere (Figure 1). The amount

Compton Tucker; Senior Earth Scientist; Compton Tucker; Before The

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Rare Earths from Monazite - Indian Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

149

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and OverviewInnovation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Welcome and Overview Innovation for Our Energy Future Bryan Pivovar National Renewable Energy Laboratory AMFC Workshop May 8, 2011 Innovation for Our Energy Future 2 Welcome - Your participation is appreciated - Date of Workshop Innovation for Our Energy Future 3 Meeting Location Innovation for Our Energy Future Workshop Agenda SUNDAY, MAY 8, 2011 1:00 pm - 1:15 pm Welcome and Opening Remarks (Salon H) 1:15 pm - 1:45 pm Workshop Overview: Dr. Bryan Pivovar, NREL (Salon H) 1:45 pm - 2:15 pm Alkaline Membrane Research Overview: Prof. Andy Herring, Colorado School of Mines (Salon H) 2:15 pm - 2:45 pm Alkaline Electrocatalysis Research Overview: Prof. Sanjeev Mukerjee, Northeastern University (Salon H) 2:45 pm - 3:15 pm AMFCs: Tokuyama Perspective:

150

Magnetism of rare earth epitaxial films and rare earth based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The cases of heavy and light rare earth will be successively presented, the latter being of particular interest because ... Back to Seminar Home Page. ...

151

Replacing the Rare Earth Intellectual Capital  

SciTech Connect

The rare earth crisis slowly evolved during a 10 to 15 year period beginning in the mid-1980s, when the Chinese began to export mixed rare earth concentrates. In the early 1990s, they started to move up the supply chain and began to export the individual rare earth oxides and metals. By the late 1990s the Chinese exported higher value products, such as magnets, phosphors, polishing compounds, catalysts; and in the 21st century they supplied finished products including electric motors, computers, batteries, liquid-crystal displays (LCDs), TVs and monitors, mobile phones, iPods and compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. As they moved to higher value products, the Chinese slowly drove the various industrial producers and commercial enterprises in the US, Europe and Japan out of business by manipulating the rare earth commodity prices. Because of this, the technically trained rare earth engineers and scientists who worked in areas from mining to separations, to processing to production, to manufacturing of semifinished and final products, were laid-off and moved to other fields or they retired. However, in the past year the Chinese have changed their philosophy of the 1970s and 1980s of forming a rare earth cartel to control the rare earth markets to one in which they will no longer supply the rest of the world (ROW) with their precious rare earths, but instead will use them internally to meet the growing demand as the Chinese standard of living increases. To this end, they have implemented and occasionally increased export restrictions and added an export tariff on many of the high demand rare earth elements. Now the ROW is quickly trying to start up rare earth mines, e.g. Molycorp Minerals in the US and Lynas Corp. in Australia, to cover this shortfall in the worldwide market, but it will take about five years for the supply to meet the demand, even as other mines in the ROW become productive. Unfortunately, today there is a serious lack of technically trained personnel to bring the entire rare earth industry, from mining to original equipment manufacturers (OEM), up to full speed in the next few years. Accompanying this decline in technical expertise, innovation and new products utilizing rare earth elements has slowed dramatically, and it may take a decade or more to recapture America's leading role in technological advancements of rare earth containing products. Before the disruption of the US rare earth industry, about 25,000 people were employed in all aspects of the industry from mining to OEM. Today, only about 1,500 people are employed in these fields. The ratio of non-technically trained persons to those with college degrees in the sciences or engineering varies from about 8 to 1 to about 4 to 1, depending on the particular area of the industry. Assuming an average of 6 to 1, the number of college degree scientists and engineers has decreased from about 4,000 to 250 employed today. In the magnetic industry the approximate numbers are: 6,000 total with 750 technically trained people in the 1980s to 500 totally employed today of which 75 have degrees. The paucity of scientists and engineers with experience and/or training in the various aspects of production and commercialization of the rare earths is a serious limitation to the ability of the US to satisfy its own needs for materials and technologies (1) to maintain our military strength and posture, (2) to assume leadership in critical energy technologies, and (3) to bring new consumer products to the marketplace. The lack of experts is of even greater national importance than the halting in the 1990s and the recent restart of the mining/benification/separation effort in the US; and thus governmental intervention and support for at least five to 10 years will be required to ameliorate this situation. To respond quickly, training programs should be established in conjunction with a national research center at an educational institution with a long tradition in multiple areas of rare earth and other critical elements research and technology. This center should

Gschneidner, Jr., Karl

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Earth System Analysis for Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Earth System Analysis for Sustainability By Hans JoachimSystem Analysis for Sustainability. MIT Press, Cambridge,the factors shaping sustainability yet undertaken and makes

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Stone's code reveals Earth's processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

determine the best methods to capture the greenhouse gas that increases global warming. August 27, 2013 Ian Stone At the Lab's Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division,...

154

Primordial origins of Earth's carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter we review the astrophysical origins of Earth's carbon, starting from the products of the Big Bang and culminating with the Earth's formation. We review the measured compositions of different primitive objects including comets, various classes of meteorites and interstellar dust particles. We discuss the composition of the Solar Nebula, especially with regards to the distribution of volatiles such as carbon. We discuss dynamical models of planetary formation from planetesimals and planetary embryos, and the timescale for volatile delivery to the growing Earth from different sources. Finally, we review Earth's carbon reservoirs. Throughout the chapter we highlight open questions related to planet formation, meteoritics, and geochemistry.

Marty, Bernard; Raymond, Sean N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Virtual Fieldwork Using Google Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtual Fieldwork Using Google Earth Advanced Techniques #12;Digital Explorer 1 Gough Square London Fieldwork Using Google Earth compiled by Jamie Buchanan-Dunlop Digital Explorer 71 Regent Studios 8 Andrews Buchanan-Dunlop © 2008 Google © 2008 Ricardo Sgrillo All rights reserved cover design by rob `at

Smith-Konter, Bridget

156

Alkaline solution absorption of carbon dioxide method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides (or pH) in alkaline solutions, using the tendency of hydroxides to adsorb CO{sub 2}. The method comprises passing CO{sub 2} over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the CO{sub 2} concentration. Comparison of the measurements yields the adsorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to adsorption fraction. A schematic is given of a process system according to a preferred embodiment of the invention. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

158

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward increasing the cycle life of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator.

Yeo, R.S.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Entire Environmental and Earth Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tides Filtering Sediments Diamond Colors Iceberg Composition Ice Cores Slicks Geomagnetic Drift Earth's Core Geomagnetic Drift (2) Tilt of Earth's Axis Water's Origin Void...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

162

Combined Extraction of Cesium, Strontium, and Actinides from Alkaline Media: An Extension of the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Process Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wastes present at DOE long-term storage sites are usually highly alkaline, and because of this, much of the actinides in these wastes are in the sludge phase. Enough actinide materials still remain in the supernatant liquid that they require separation followed by long-term storage in a geological repository. The removal of these metals from the liquid waste stream would permit their disposal as low-level waste and dramatically reduce the volume of high-level wastes.

Kenneth Raymond

2004-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Development of an alkaline/surfactant/polymer compositional reservoir simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mathematical formulation of a generalized three-dimensional compositional reservoir simulator for high-pH chemical flooding processes is presented in this work. The model assumes local thermodynamic equilibrium with respect to both reaction chemistry and phase behavior and calculates equilibrium electrolyte and phase compositions as a function of time and position. The reaction chemistry considers aqueous electrolytic chemistry, precipitation/dissolution of minerals, ion exchange reactions on matrix surface, reaction of acidic components of crude oil with the bases in the aqueous solution and cation exchange reactions with the micelles. The simulator combines this detailed reaction chemistry associated with these processes with the extensive physical and flow property modeling schemes of an existing chemical flood simulator (UTCHEM) to model the multiphase, multidimensional displacement processes. The formulation of the chemical equilibrium model is quite general and is adaptable to simulate a variety of chemical descriptions. In addition to its use in the simulation of high-pH chemical flooding processes, the model will find application in the simulation of other reactive flow problems like the ground water contamination, reinjection of produced water, chemical waste disposal, etc. in one, two or three dimensions and under multiphase flow conditions. In this work, the model is used to simulate several hypothetical cases of high-pH chemical floods, which include cases from a simple alkaline preflush of a micellar/polymer flood to surfactant enhanced alkaline-polymer flooding and the results are analyzed. Finally, a few published alkaline, alkaline-polymer and surfactant-alkaline-polymer corefloods are simulated and compared with the experimental results.

Bhuyan, D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Earth Day | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day Earth Day Earth Day If you do not see the event begin at 3pm ET, please refresh your browser. Are you looking for ways to go green while saving yourself some green? Or are you interested in learning how to incorporate renewable energy options -- like solar, wind and geothermal -- into your home? This Earth Day, hang out with Energy Department experts to learn how you can reduce your energy use, improve your home's comfort and cut your energy bills. We hope you'll join us on April 22 at 3 pm ET for a Google+ Hangout on home energy efficiency tips and advice, and learn how you can submit your questions now. During the Hangout, we'll be sharing some of our Twitter followers' favorite energy-savings tips -- share yours now using #tipsEnergy. Panelists include:

165

Beginning of life on Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beginning of life on Earth Beginning of life on Earth Name: beatnik Status: N/A Age: 12 Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: I am twelve years old and want to know how life began on earth. Replies: I am 43 years old and so would I! Scientists believe that lightning striking the atmosphere of the earth long ago caused certain simple chemicals like ammonia to form into more complicated chemicals that could lead to living cells. These chemicals then could hook together in chains to form molecules that direct life, such as RNA and DNA. One theory also says that fats in the primitive ocean acted on by waves, formed large globules enclosing these life directing chemicals, and that these structures eventually formed primitive cells. Then inside the cells, conditions could evolve to allow the chemistry of life to work better and better, and so on

166

Trellis Earth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trellis Earth Trellis Earth Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Trellis Earth Name Trellis Earth Address 13315 NE Airport Way Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97230 Sector Efficiency Product Renewable bioplastic bags, cutlery, flatware and packaging Website http://www.trellisearth.com/ Coordinates 45.563182°, -122.524952° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.563182,"lon":-122.524952,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

167

Earth Day Electronics Recycling Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth Day Electronics Recycling Collection The U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC in collaboration with UNICOR Federal Prison Industries C E L E B R A T E E A R T H D A Y A...

168

Extractive Metallurgy of Rare Earths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 24, 2006 ... The extractive metallurgy of the rare-earth elements has several features that make it uniquea variety of both input ores and final products,...

169

Stratospheric Satellites for Earth Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, robust, yet inexpensive observational platforms and networks of platforms will make revolutionary Earth science observations possible in the next 30 years. One new platform concept that is needed is a long-duration stratospheric balloon ...

Alexey Pankine; Kerry Nock; Zhanqing Li; David Parsons; Michael Purucker; Warren Wiscombe; Elliot Weinstock

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

The Annual Cycle of Earth Radiation Budget from Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal cycle of the Earth radiation budget is investigated by use of data from the Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES). Monthly mean maps of reflected solar flux and Earth-emitted flux on a 1 equal-angle grid are used for ...

Pamela E. Mlynczak; G. Louis Smith; David R. Doelling

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Metal Preparation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Tap water Ambient to 71 Ambient to 160 30??60 2-Wash Alkaline cleaner, 7.5??22.5 g/L (1??3 oz/gal) 60??71 140??160 60??90 3-Rinse Tap water 60??71 140??160 30??60 4-Wash Alkaline cleaner, 7.5??22.5 g/L (1??3 oz/gal) 60??71 140??160 60??90 5-Rinse Tap water Ambient to 71 Ambient to 160 30??60 6-Rinse Tap water...

172

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning December 15, 2010 - 9:20am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion on "rare earth materials" that are critical to the production of clean energy technologies. Tune in here. The Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow will give the keynote, speaking to the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. You can check back to the Energy Blog for more info later today. Ginny Simmons is a New Media Specialist and contractor to the Office of Public Affairs.

173

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning December 15, 2010 - 9:20am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion on "rare earth materials" that are critical to the production of clean energy technologies. Tune in here. The Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David Sandalow will give the keynote, speaking to the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. You can check back to the Energy Blog for more info later today. Ginny Simmons is a New Media Specialist and contractor to the Office of Public Affairs.

174

Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition  

SciTech Connect

The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Computer Modeling Illuminates Degradation Pathways of Cations in Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cation degradation insights obtained by computational modeling could result in better performance and longer lifetime for alkaline membrane fuel cells.

Not Available

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Research on the Process of Alkaline Pressure Oxidation for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Powders for ... Comparison between HDPE/Clay and HDPE/Piassava Fiber/Clay Treated by ... Effects of Rare Earth Pr on the Mechanical and Electrochemical Properties of Pb-based Alloys.

177

Reading Comprehension - The Earth's Energy Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Earth's Energy Budget The Earth's Energy Budget The way the Earth interacts with the sun's energy can be displayed in a diagram called the _________ Earth's energy budget globe warming schedule Earth's flow chart . It displays the sun's energy that reaches us and how much of that energy is _________ going absorbed and reflected destroyed wasted by the earth and its atmosphere. Solar energy reaches earth as _________ Superman a gas electromagnetic radiation quickly as possible . Once the energy reaches earth, some of it is absorbed by the atmosphere, including _________ lakes mountains people clouds . Some of it makes it to the earth's surface, and is absorbed by land and oceans. The amount of energy absorbed affects _________ tides temperature nothing fishing . The energy that is not absorbed by the earth or its atmosphere is _________

178

Thermal treatment for recovery of manganese and zinc from zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1% of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.

Belardi, G. [Institute for Environmental Engineering and Geosciences (CNR) Area della Ricerca CNR, via Salaria km 29,300, Monterotondo, 00016 Rome (Italy); Lavecchia, R.; Medici, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy); Piga, L., E-mail: luigi.piga@uniroma1.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Materials and Environment, Sapienza University of Rome, via Eudossiana 84, 00184 Rome (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Improving chemical flood efficiency with micellar/alkaline/polymer processes  

SciTech Connect

A laboratory study was undertaken to find more efficient, lower-cost chemical systems for the recovery of waterflood residual oil. The authors' investigation emphasized alkaline-augmented processes because alkali is much less expensive than surfactant. The strategy was to replace some of or all the high-cost surfactants in a micellar formulation with lower-cost alkali and still maintain the high tertiary oil recoveries obtained with micellar flooding. Baseline oil recoveries in Berea corefloods were determined for two interfacially active crude oils with micellar/polymer (MP) and alkaline/polymer (AP) systems. A combination process was then developed in which a small micellar slug is injected first, followed by a larger AP slug. This process is referred to as a micellar/alkaline/polymer (MAP) flood. Phase-behavior studies guided the design and optimization of all three chemical processes in the coreflood experiments. Detailed effluent analyses and in-situ mobility measurements provided information about possible oil recovery mechanisms.

Shuler, P.J.; Kuehne, D.L.; Lerner, R.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Liquidfree Mechanochemical Preparation of Rare Earth Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... structures using mechanical processing in the form of ball milling or grinding. ... Application of [A336][P507]/[P204] on High Selective Extraction and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Assessment of Environmental Impact of Rare Earth Metals Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) Ions onto Biomass Ash ... Tellurium Supply Sensitivity to Growth of Non-Traditional Copper Extraction Techniques - Implications for...

182

Functionality of alkaline cooked corn bran on tortilla texture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of pericarp and nixtamalized corn bran (NCB) level on corn tortilla attributes was evaluated. The effect of varying pH (4, 9 and 11) on fresh and dry mesa flour (pH 5, 7 and 10) tortillas was also evaluated. Nixtamal was washed at three different levels to obtain tortillas containing about 0, 50 and 100% pericarp. Fumaric acid and lime solutions were used to produce acidic and alkaline tortillas respectively. Tortilla texture was evaluated at 0, 1 and 7 days of storage objectively using a texture analyzer and subjectively using a solvability test. As pericarp content and pH increased tortillas were softer, more flexible and extensible with a darker yellow color. Acidic tortillas were harder with a white color. Pericarp improved texture of tortillas during storage. Commercial corn bran was alkaline treated to obtain NCB with functionality similar to nixtamalized corn pericarp. Dry masa flour (DMF) (1 kg) was mixed with 0, 50 and 100 g dry basis of NCB and processed into tortillas. Tortillas containing NCB had a pH of 9, were more flexible and rollable than control tortillas. Alkaline pH tortillas puffed during baking; these tortillas were yellow with a soft, moist texture. Tortillas containing nixtamalized rice and wheat brans were soft and flexible. A sensory panel found that tortillas containing nixtamalized cereal brans had a strong alkaline flavor and aroma and a blistered surface, with a soft, moist texture. NCB tortillas had the highest overall acceptability scores. Pericarp from nixtamal and alkaline pH slowed the staling mechanisms of tortillas. Nixtamalized commercial brans significantly improved the texture of corn tortillas during storage and enhanced the color, flavor and aroma of DMF tortillas. Nixtamalized cereal brans can be used as an effective additive to extend shelf stability of tortillas and enhance the flavor of DMF products. Tortillas containing NCB could be used in products such as wraps and fried tacos where the bright color and stronger flavor could be an advantage.

Guajardo Flores, Sara

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Earth's Heat Source - The Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

Manuel, Oliver K

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Earth's Heat Source - The Sun  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Sun encompasses planet Earth, supplies the heat that warms it, and even shakes it. The United Nation Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) assumed that solar influence on our climate is limited to changes in solar irradiance and adopted the consensus opinion of a Hydrogen-filled Sun, the Standard Solar Model (SSM). They did not consider the alternative solar model and instead adopted another consensus opinion: Anthropogenic greenhouse gases play a dominant role in climate change. The SSM fails to explain the solar wind, solar cycles, and the empirical link of solar surface activity with Earth changing climate. The alternative solar model, that was molded from an embarrassingly large number of unexpected observations revealed by space-age measurements since 1959, explains not only these puzzles but also how closely linked interactions between the Sun and its planets and other celestial bodies induce turbulent cycles of secondary solar characteristics that significantly affect Earth climate.

Oliver K. Manuel

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES): An Earth Observing System Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) is an investigation to examine the role of cloud/radiation feedback in the Earth's climate system. The CERES broadband scanning radiometers are an improved version of the Earth Radiation Budget ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Bruce R. Barkstrom; Edwin F. Harrison; Robert B. Lee III; G. Louis Smith; John E. Cooper

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Temporal Interpolation Methods for the Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) is a NASA multisatellite measurement program for monitoring the radiation environment of the earthatmosphere system. The CERES instrument was flown on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring ...

D. F. Young; P. Minnis; D. R. Doelling; G. G. Gibson; T. Wong

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

NEWTON's Environmental and Earth Science References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental and Earth Science References Environmental and Earth Science References Do you have a great reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: >NASA's Earth Science Division NASA's Earth Science Division Find the answers to the big questions of Earth Science such as "How is the World Changing?" The information and articles are provided by NASA's Earth Science Division Geology.com Resources Teaching Earth Science - Geology.com Geology.com provides news and information about Geology and Earth Science. It has a teacher resource section as well, which provides a collection of classroom activities and lesson plans, for earth science in the classroom. IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program IRIS's Seismographs in Schools Program Discover tools to share seismic data in real-time, classroom activities, and technical support documents for seismic instruments.

188

Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy conservation. In this program, the salt metal interactions were studies and the emissions at laboratory scale at OSU were monitored. The goal of the project was to obtain a fundamental understanding, based on first principles, of the pollutant formation that occurs when the salts are used in furnaces. This information will be used to control process parameters so that emissions are consistently below the required levels. The information obtained in these experiments will be used in industrial furnaces at aluminum plants and which will help in optimizing the process.

Yogeshwar Sahai

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Decomposition of Rare Earth Loaded Resin Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle R and D (FCR and D) program within the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is evaluating nuclear fuel cycle options, including once-through, modified open, and fully closed cycles. Each of these scenarios may utilize quite different fuel management schemes and variation in fuel types may include high thermal conductivity UO{sub 2}, thoria-based, TRISO, metal, advanced ceramic (nitride, carbide, composite, etc.), and minor actinide (MA) bearing fuels and targets. Researchers from the US, Europe, and japan are investigating methods of fabricating high-specific activity spherical particles for fuel and target applications. The capital, operating, and maintenance costs of such a fuel fabrication facility can be significant, thus fuel synthesis and fabrication processes that minimize waste and process losses, and require less footprint are desired. Investigations have been performed at the Institute for Transuranium Elements (ITU) and the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) studying the impact of americium and curium on the fuel fabrication process. proof of concept was demonstrated for fabrication of MA-bearing spherical particles, however additional development will be needed for engineering scale-up. Researchers at the Paul Scherer Institute (PSI) and the Japan Atomic Energy Association (JAEA) have collaborated on research with ceramic-metallic (CERMET) fuels using spherical particles as the ceramic component dispersed in the metal matrix. Recent work at the CEA evaluates the burning of MA in the blanket region of sodium fast reactors. There is also interest in burning MA in Canada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) reactors. The fabrication of uranium-MA oxide pellets for a fast reactor blanket or MA-bearing fuel for CANDU reactors may benefit from a low-loss dedicated footprint for producing MA-spherical particles. One method for producing MA-bearing spherical particles is loading the actinide metal on a cation exchange resin. The AG-50W resin is made of sulfonic acid functional groups attached to a styrene divinylbenzene copolymer lattice (long chained hydrocarbon). The metal cation binds to the sulfur group, then during thermal decomposition in air the hydrocarbons will form gaseous species leaving behind a spherical metal-oxide particle. Process development for resin applications with radioactive materials is typically performed using surrogates. For americium and curium, a trivalent metal like neodymium can be used. Thermal decomposition of Nd-loaded resin in air has been studied by Hale. Process conditions were established for resin decomposition and the formation of Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles. The intermediate product compounds were described using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and wet chemistry. Leskela and Niinisto studied the decomposition of rare earth (RE) elements and found results consistent with Hale. Picart et al. demonstrated the viability of using a resin loading process for the fabrication of uranium-actinide mixed oxide microspheres for transmutation of minor actinides in a fast reactor. For effective transmutation of actinides, it will be desirable to extend the in-reactor burnup and minimize the number of recycles of used actinide materials. Longer burn times increases the chance of Fuel Clad Chemical or Mechanical Interaction (FCCI, FCMI). Sulfur is suspected of contributing to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) thus it is necessary to maximize the removal of sulfur during decomposition of the resin. The present effort extends the previous work by quantifying the removal of sulfur during the decomposition process. Neodymium was selected as a surrogate for trivalent actinide metal cations. As described above Nd was dissolved in nitric acid solution then contacted with the AG-50W resin column. After washing the column, the Nd-resin particles are removed and dried. The Nd-resin, seen in Figure 1 prior to decomposition, is ready to be converted to Nd oxide microspheres.

Voit, Stewart L [ORNL; Rawn, Claudia J [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Rare Earth Composite Magnets with Increased Resistivity - Energy ...  

Dielectric rare earth fluorides are blended with rare earth magnet powders to produce high-resistivity fluoride composite rare earth magnets.

191

2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A workshop addressing the current state-of-the-art in alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs) was held May 8-9, 2011, at the Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This workshop was the second of its kind, with the first being held December 11-13, 2006, in Phoenix, Arizona. The 2011 workshop and associated workshop report were created to assess the current state of AMFC technology (taking into account recent advances), investigate the performance potential of AMFC systems across all possible power ranges and applications, and identify the key research needs for commercial competitiveness in a variety of areas.

Pivovar, B.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Light Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternative processes; Anode design and operation; Cell fundamentals and ... Hot-rolling technologies; Deformation of materials; Primary metal production.

193

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Alternative Earth Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Resources Inc Earth Resources Inc (Redirected from Nevada Geothermal Power) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Alternative Earth Resources Inc Name Alternative Earth Resources Inc Address 840 - 1140 West Pender St. Place Vancouver, B.C. Zip V6E 4G1 Sector Geothermal energy Website http://www.alternative-earth.c References Alternative Earth Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Alternative Earth Resources Inc is a company based in Vancouver, B.C.. Alternative Earth Resources Inc. (formerly Nevada Geothermal Power) is an experienced renewable energy company, focused on developing and generating clean, sustainable electric power from geothermal resources. The Company has headquarters in Vancouver, BC and trades on the Toronto Venture

195

Alternative Earth Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Earth Resources Inc Alternative Earth Resources Inc Name Alternative Earth Resources Inc Address 840 - 1140 West Pender St. Place Vancouver, B.C. Zip V6E 4G1 Sector Geothermal energy Website http://www.alternative-earth.c References Alternative Earth Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Alternative Earth Resources Inc is a company based in Vancouver, B.C.. Alternative Earth Resources Inc. (formerly Nevada Geothermal Power) is an experienced renewable energy company, focused on developing and generating clean, sustainable electric power from geothermal resources. The Company has headquarters in Vancouver, BC and trades on the Toronto Venture Exchange under the symbol AER. Alternative Earth holds leasehold interests in four geothermal projects

196

Happy Earth Day 2011! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Day 2011! Day 2011! Happy Earth Day 2011! April 22, 2011 - 7:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL Happy Earth Day! Today, April 22, marks the 41st anniversary of Earth Day. Check out these resources from the Department of Energy to help you celebrate, get in the Earth Day spirit, and take action: Earth Day Website This page from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy highlights other great resources to help you be energy efficient and Earth-friendly Earth Day 2011 Outreach Materials These materials from the Federal Energy Management Program will help you develop a workplace energy awareness program and "Act Now; Together We Can Create a Greener Future." Happy Earth Day! If you haven't already shared how you're celebrating, be sure to e-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at

197

Earth Day, Every Day | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day, Every Day Earth Day, Every Day Earth Day, Every Day April 20, 2011 - 5:09pm Addthis April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs April 22, 2011 is the 41st celebration of Earth Day, a day set aside to inspire awareness and appreciation for the Earth's natural environment. The first Earth Day focused on the United States, but has grown over the years and is now celebrated in more than 175 countries every year. To help celebrate, the Department of Energy is holding Earth Week festivities at our headquarters here in Washington, D.C. throughout this week. This year's theme is "Earth Day, Every Day! Changing Behavior to Reduce DOE's Carbon Footprint." Part of the celebration will include an outdoor Community Day celebration

198

The Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a new satellite sensor, the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) experiment. GERB is designed to make the first measurements of the Earth's radiation budget from geostationary orbit. Measurements at high absolute ...

J. E. Harries; J. E. Russell; J. A. Hanafin; H. Brindley; J. Futyan; J. Rufus; S. Kellock; G. Matthews; R. Wrigley; A. Last; J. Mueller; R. Mossavati; J. Ashmall; E. Sawyer; D. Parker; M. Caldwell; P. M. Allan; A. Smith; M. J. Bates; B. Coan; B. C. Stewart; D. R. Lepine; L. A. Cornwall; D. R. Corney; M. J. Ricketts; D. Drummond; D. Smart; R. Cutler; S. Dewitte; N. Clerbaux; L. Gonzalez; A. Ipe; C. Bertrand; A. Joukoff; D. Crommelynck; N. Nelms; D. T. Llewellyn-Jones; G. Butcher; G. L. Smith; Z. P. Szewczyk; P. E. Mlynczak; A. Slingo; R. P. Allan; M. A. Ringer

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

2008 Earth Day Award Ceremony Photographs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Williams (NA-50) 2008 Earth Day Award Ceremony Left to right: Glenn Podonsky (HS-1) and Jeffrey Salmon (S-4) 2008 Earth Day Award Ceremony Left to right: Glenn Podonsky (HS-1)...

200

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Google Earth Tour: How Contaminants Got There Click here to load the tour...then click the play button below...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface in Rn of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12

Rifford, Ludovic

202

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

Rifford, Ludovic

203

Google Earth Tip Sheet Switch between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Earth Tip Sheet Hide/Show Sidebar Add Placemark Add Polygon Add Path Add Image Overlay Show/Hide Ruler Show Sunlight Switch between Sky and Earth Email Print View in Google Maps Drag to rotate the view item Stop TourTransparency slider Google Earth User Interface New Placemark Dialog Box Name will appear

Smith-Konter, Bridget

204

Transpassive electrodissolution of depleted uranium in alkaline electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

To aid in removal of oralloy from the nuclear weapons stockpile, scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility are decontaminating oralloy parts by electrodissolution in neutral to alkaline electrolytes composed of sodium nitrate and sodium sulfate. To improve the process, electrodissolution experiments were performed with depleted uranium to understand the effects of various operating parameters. Sufficient precipitate was also produced to evaluate the feasibility of using ultrafiltration to separate the uranium oxide precipitates from the electrolyte before it enters the decontamination fixture. In preparation for the experiments, a potential-pH diagram for uranium was constructed from thermodynamic data for fully hydrated species. Electrodissolution in unstirred solutions showed that uranium dissolution forms two layers, an acidic bottom layer rich in uranium and an alkaline upper layer. Under stirred conditions results are consistent with the formation of a yellow precipitate of composition UO{sub 3}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, a six electron process. Amperometric experiments showed that current efficiency remained near 100% over a wide range of electrolytes, electrolyte concentrations, pH, and stirring conditions.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Schake, A.R.; Morgan, A.N.; Purdy, G.M.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Adding STARFire Analysis Layers to Google Earth through a KML Network Link 1) Launch Google Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adding STARFire Analysis Layers to Google Earth through a KML Network Link 1) Launch Google Earth 2) The network link will be added in the Places control within Google Earth. Select the node level in the tree layers for viewing within Google Earth. Double clicking on a layer will zoom you to the extent

206

Earth Advantage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Advantage Advantage Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Advantage Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97224 Product Earth Advantage partners with builders and developers to bring the most energy efficient ,sustainable and healthy homes to the market Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Earth Comfort | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comfort Comfort Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Comfort Place Okemos, Michigan Zip 48864 Sector Geothermal energy Product Earth Comfort is a website that gives information on how geothermal heating and cooling works and links to how much it would cost, dealers, etc. Coordinates 42.71511°, -84.430264° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.71511,"lon":-84.430264,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Alkaline Pressure Oxidation of Pyrite in the Presence of Silica Characterization of the Passivating Film.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alkaline pressure oxidation, particularly in the presence of trona as additive, can be used to oxidize high carbonate refractory gold ores as it prevents the (more)

Dani, Anirudha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project EMP: Earth Microbiome Project The Earth Microbiome Project is a proposed massively multidisciplinary effort to analyze microbial communities across the globe. The general premise is to examine microbial communities from their own perspective. We propose to characterize the Earth by environmental parameter space into different biomes and then explore these using samples currently available from researchers across the globe. We will analyze 200,000 samples from these communities using metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and amplicon sequencing to produce a global Gene Atlas describing protein space, environmental metabolic models for each biome, approximately 500,000 reconstructed microbial genomes, a global metabolic model, and a

210

Earth Tidal Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Tidal Analysis Earth Tidal Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Earth Tidal Analysis Details Activities (6) Areas (4) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir elastic parameters. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Enables estimation of in-situ reservoir hydraulic parameters. Thermal: Dictionary.png Earth Tidal Analysis: Earth tidal analysis is the measurement of the impact of tidal and barometric fluctuations on effective pore volume in a porous reservoir. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle

211

Corrosion Protection Mechanisms of Rare-earth Based Inhibitors in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

212

Assessment of Various Processes for Rare Earth Elements Recovery I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

213

Assessment and Management of Radioactivity in Rare Earth ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

214

Rare EarthRelated Research & Developments Networks At Work  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

215

High Density Nanocrystalline Rare Earth and Dysprosium-free ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

216

Understanding the Structural Stability of Rare-earth Containing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

217

Crystallization of Rare Earth Solution by Ammonium Bicarbonate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

218

Advance in Solvent Extraction and Separation of Rare Earths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

219

A Process Route for the Sarfartoq Rare Earth Project, Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

220

Recovery of Rare Earths from Permanent Magnets and Phosphors ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Recycling of Rare Earth Elements for the Synthesis of Permanent ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

222

Application of Ionic Liquid Extractants on Rare Earths Green ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

223

Two Exotic and Unique Families of Rare Earth Intermetallic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

224

Celebrate Earth Day! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Earth Day! Earth Day! Celebrate Earth Day! April 20, 2010 - 10:25am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Earth Day is a great time to commit to protecting the environment and saving money and energy at home. This year, April 22 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. In spring 1970, Sen. Gaylord Nelson created Earth Day to "force this issue onto the national agenda." Addressing the Earth Day 1970 audience in Denver, Colo., Nelson said, "Our goal is not just an environment of clean air and water and scenic beauty. The objective is an environment of decency, quality and mutual respect for all other human being and all living creatures." I think Sen. Nelson would be proud of the current level of enthusiasm

225

Celebrate Earth Day! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrate Earth Day! Celebrate Earth Day! Celebrate Earth Day! April 20, 2010 - 10:25am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Earth Day is a great time to commit to protecting the environment and saving money and energy at home. This year, April 22 marks the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. In spring 1970, Sen. Gaylord Nelson created Earth Day to "force this issue onto the national agenda." Addressing the Earth Day 1970 audience in Denver, Colo., Nelson said, "Our goal is not just an environment of clean air and water and scenic beauty. The objective is an environment of decency, quality and mutual respect for all other human being and all living creatures." I think Sen. Nelson would be proud of the current level of enthusiasm

226

Earth Power Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Power Resources Inc Earth Power Resources Inc (Redirected from Earth Power Resources) Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Power Resources Inc Address 2407 S Troost Avenue Place Tulsa, Oklahoma Zip 74114 Sector Geothermal energy Year founded 2000 References Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Earth Power Resources Inc is a company based in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Earth Power Resources Inc in Tulsa, OK is a private company categorized under: Electric Companies. Records show it was established in 2000 and incorporated in Oklahoma. References ↑ "Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Earth_Power_Resources_Inc&oldid=598202"

227

DOE Co-Spnsors Earth Day Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Co-Sponsors Earth Day Activities DOE Co-Sponsors Earth Day Activities Free trees and native plants are available to the first participants at the Idaho Falls Earth Day festivities in Tautphaus Park. There are a number of educational and environmentally-oriented activities for children at the Earth Day celebration. This year's Earth Day in April marks the 38th celebration of its kind since former Senator Gaylord Nelson first set aside the day in 1970 to honor the environment in which we live. Now Earth Day has expanded across the globe as nearly over a billion people celebrate with events, both large and small, in nearly 200 hundred different countries. Idaho Falls will join the celebration on Saturday, April 26 at the Tautphaus Park Zoo and Hockey Shelter. The Idaho Falls Earth Day Celebration will be held from 10 a.m. to

228

The role of noncovalent interactions in electrocatalysis : trends in fuel cell reactions on Pt in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

The classic models of metal electrode-electrolyte interfaces generally focus on either covalent interactions between adsorbates and solid surfaces or on long-range electrolyte-metal electrostatic interactions. Here we demonstrate that these traditional models are insufficient. To understand electrocatalytic trends in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and the oxidation of methanol on platinum surfaces in alkaline electrolytes, non-covalent interactions must be considered. We find that non-covalent interactions between hydrated alkali metal cations M{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} and adsorbed OH (OH{sub ad}) species increase in the same order as the hydration energies of the corresponding cations (Li{sup +} >> Na{sup +} > K{sup +} > Cs{sup +}) and also correspond to an increase in the concentration of OH{sub ad}-M{sup +}(H{sub 2}O){sub x} clusters at the interface. These trends are inversely proportional to the activities of the ORR, the HOR and the oxidation of methanol on platinum (Cs{sup +} > K{sup +} > Na{sup +} >> Li{sup +}), which suggests that the clusters block the platinum active sites for electrocatalytic reactions.

Strmcnik, D.; Kodama, K.; van der Vliet, D.; Greeley, J.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovicv, N. M.; Toyota Central R& D Labs

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in the semi-annual Technical Progress Report for the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. Additional balance of plant impact information for the two tests was reported in the Technical Progress Report for the time period October 1, 2001 through March 30, 2002. Additional information became available about the effects of byproduct magnesium hydroxide injection on SCR catalyst coupons during the long-term test at BMP, and those results were reported in the report for the time period April 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002. During the current period, process economic estimates were developed, comparing the costs of the furnace magnesium hydroxide slurry injection process tested as part of this project to a number of other candidate SO{sub 3}/sulfuric acid control technologies for coal-fired power plants. The results of this economic evaluation are included in this progress report.

Gary M. Blythe

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Field test of cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To demonstrate that cosurfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding is viable in recovering waterflood residual oil from sandstone reservoirs in the near-offshore Gulf of Mexico, a series of tests is being conducted in the White Caste field, Louisiana. The strategy adopted was to pilot the technology in three stages: (1) a flood without polymer to prove features of the process unrelated to achieving mobility control, (2) a test of process polymer injectivity in the same reservoir, and (3) a full process demonstration in a shallower sand. The first phase of the pilot is described in this paper; pilot design, slug formulation, and operations are summarized and key responses are documented and interpreted. Ref. 2 describes the polymer injectivity test. The final pilot stage has not been initiated yet.

Falls, A.H.; Thigpen, D.R.; Nelson, R.C.; Ciaston, J.W.; Lawson, J.B.; Good, P.A.; Ueber, R.C.; Shahin, G.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Precious Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Advances in the Extractive Metallurgy of Selected Rare and Precious Metals" ( 1991 Review of Extractive Metallurgy), J.E. Hoffmann, April 1991, pp. 18-23.

232

Influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers  

SciTech Connect

The influence of the Earth's magnetic field on large area photomultipliers proposed for a future deep sea neutrino telescope was studied under the EU-funded KM3NeT design study. The aims were to evaluate variations in PMT performance in the Earth's magnetic field and to decide whether the use of magnetic shielding is necessary. Measurements were performed on three Hamamatsu PMTs: two 8-inch R5912 types, one of these with super-bi-alkali photocathode, and a 10-inch R7081 type with a standard bi-alkali photocathode. The various characteristics of the PMTs were measured while varying the PMT orientations with respect to the Earth's magnetic field, both with and without a mu-metal cage as magnetic shield. In the 8-inch PMTs the impact of the magnetic field was found to be smaller than that on the 10-inch PMT. The increased quantum efficiency in the 8 super-bi-alkali PMT almost compensated its smaller detection surface compared to the 10' PMT. No significant effects were measured upon transit time and the fraction of spurious pulses. (authors)

Leonora, E.; Aiello, S. [INFN - National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Section of Catania, CO Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Leotta, G. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy of Catania, CO Via Santa Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Mixed metal films with switchable optical properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

Richardson, Thomas J.; Slack, Jonathan L.; Farangis, Baker; Rubin, Michael D.

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

234

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate gels that were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels maintained gel integrity in linear corefloods after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution at 125 F. At 175 F, Xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels were not stable either with or without subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-pol

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

EFFECT OF CATIONS ON ALUMINUM SPECIATION UNDER ALKALINE CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect

A series of experiments were performed to examine the effect of metal cations common to high level waste on the phase of aluminum formed. Experiments were performed at temperature of 150 C, 75 C, and room temperature, either without additional metal cation, or with 0.01-0.2 molar equivalents of either Ni{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Mn{sup 2+}, or Cr{sup 3+}. Results showed that temperature has the greatest effect on the phase obtained. At 150 C, boehmite is the only phase obtained, independent of the presence of other metal cations, with only one exception where a small amount of gibbsite was also detected in the product when 0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} was present. At 75 C, a mixture of phases is obtained, most commonly including bayerite and gibbsite; however, boehmite is also formed under some conditions, including in the absence of additional metal ion. At room temperature, in the absence of additional metal ion, a mixture of bayerite and gibbsite is obtained. The addition of another metal cation suppresses the formation of gibbsite, with a couple of exceptions (0.2 equivalents of Ni{sup 2+} or 0.01 equivalents of Cr{sup 3+}) where both phases are still obtained.

Taylor-Pashow, K.; Hobbs, D.

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geochemistry of Extremely Alkaline (pH[ 12) Ground Water in Slag-Fill Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in an alkaline sodium metasilicate/sodium carbonate (Na2SiO3/Na2CO3) solution and deoxidized in a nitric acid in alkaline Li salt solution involves two simultaneous processes: dissolution of aluminum and deposition effect. When the oxidizing species were used in the hydrotalcite coating bath, the aluminum dissolution

Bethke, Craig

237

An update of the polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour unit, Sublette County, Wyoming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Almy sand polymer-augmented alkaline flood at the Isenhour Unit, Sublette County, WY, is reviewed. This paper updates process technology, including the use of clay stabilization, sweep improvement, soda ash alkaline agent (to reduce interfacial tension (IFT) and mobilize residual oil), and anionic-polymer-blend mobility buffer. Oil production has been increasing at 20%/yr since the process start.

Doll, T.E.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Performance and produced polymer evaluation of four alkaline-surfactant-polymer projects concluded that only one of the projects could have benefited from combining the alkaline-surfactant-polymer and gelation technologies. Cambridge, the 1993 Daqing, Mellott Ranch, and the Wardlaw alkaline-surfacant-polymer floods were studied. An initial gel treatment followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood in the Wardlaw field would have been a benefit due to reduction of fracture flow. Numerical simulation demonstrated that reducing the permeability of a high permeability zone of a reservoir with gel improved both waterflood and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery. A Minnelusa reservoir with both A and B sand production was simulated. A and B sands are separated by a shale layer. A sand and B sand waterflood oil recovery was improved by 196,000 bbls or 3.3% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand. Alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery improvement over a waterflood was 392,000 bbls or 6.5% OOIP. Placing a gel into the B sand prior to an alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood resulted in 989,000 bbl or 16.4% OOIP more oil than only water injection. A sand and B sand alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery was improved by 596,000 bbls or 9.9% OOIP when a gel was placed in the B sand.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Earth Sciences annual report, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducts work in support of the Laboratory's energy, defense, and research programs. The Department is organized into ten groups. Five of these -- Nuclear Waste Management, Fossil Energy, Containment, Verification, and Research -- represent major programmatic activities within the Department. Five others -- Experimental Geophysics, Geomechanics, Geology/Geological Engineering, Geochemistry, and Seismology/Applied Geophysics -- are major disciplinary areas that support these and other laboratory programs. This report summarizes work carried out in 1987 by each group and contains a bibliography of their 1987 publications.

Younker, L.W.; Donohue, M.L.; Peterson, S.J. (eds.)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A discussion on the application and production of metal ion beams  

SciTech Connect

Metal ion beams, which are used in surface modification of metals and alloys as ion beam micrometallurgy, are promising candidates for advanced applications in semiconductors and insulators. Doping with transition metal and rare-earth metal ions in semiconductors and insulators to form metallic nanoclusters attracted much more attention recently, since their applications in diluted magnetic semiconductors, electroluminescent devices, giant magnetic resistance, etc. In this paper, some experiments for metal ion beams will be presented, and various methods and technologies for the production of metal ion beams will be discussed.

Ren Xiaotang; Zhao Ziqiang; Zhao Weijiang [Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University, Beijing, 100871 (China) and Key Laboratory of Heavy Ion Physics (Peking University), Ministry of Education, Beijing 100871 (China)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

METHOD OF SEPARATING TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM CERIUM SUB-GROUP RARE EARTH VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for separating plutonium from the cerium sub-group of rare earths when both are present in an aqueous solution. The method consists in adding an excess of alkali metal carbonate to the solution, which causes the formation of a soluble plutonium carbonate precipitate and at the same time forms an insoluble cerium-group rare earth carbonate. The pH value must be adjusted to bctween 5.5 and 7.5, and prior to the precipitation step the plutonium must be reduced to the tetravalent state since only tetravalent plutonium will form the soluble carbonate complex.

Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Metals on graphene: correlation between adatom adsorption behavior and growth morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of metal adatom adsorption on graphene by ab initio calculations. The calculations cover alkali metals, sp-simple metals, 3d and group 10 transition metals, noble metals, as well as rare earth metals. The correlation between the adatom adsorption properties and the growth morphology of the metals on graphene is also investigated. We show that the growth morphology is related to the ratio of the metal adsorption energy to its bulk cohesive energy (E(a)/E(c)) and the diffusion barrier (?E) of the metal adatom on graphene. Charge transfer, electric dipole and magnetic moments, and graphene lattice distortion induced by metal adsorption would also affect the growth morphologies of the metal islands. We also show that most of the metal nanostructures on graphene would be thermally stable against coarsening.

Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lu, Wencai; Tringides, Michael C.; Yao, Yongxin; Ho, Kai-Ming

2012-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Earth and Atmospheric Sciences | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Forensics Climate & Environment Sensors and Measurements Chemical & Engineering Materials Computational Earth Science Systems Modeling Geographic Information Science and Technology Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Physics More Science Home | Science & Discovery | More Science | Earth and Atmospheric Sciences SHARE Earth and Atmospheric Sciences At ORNL, we combine our capabilities in atmospheric science, computational science, and biological and environmental systems science to focus in the cross-disciplinary field of climate change science. We use computer models to improve climate change predications and to measure the impact of global warming on the cycling of chemicals in earth systems. Our Climate Change Science Institute uses models to explore connections among atmosphere,

244

Earth Day at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's celebration of Earth Day 2013 is all about sustainability as part of our commitment to Operational Excellence. Sustainable goals help us choose our direction as a...

245

VERDE: Visualizing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth ...  

Technology Marketing Summary VERDE is a software application utilizing the Google Earth(c) platform to provide real time visualization of the electric ...

246

Glossary Term - Composition of the Earth's Atmosphere  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Atmosphere Source: Definition of the U.S. Standard Atmosphere (1976) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 77th Edition Gas Formula Abundance percent by volume...

247

NEWTON's Environmental and Earth Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dissolving Rocks Eye of Hurricane Time Limit on Earthquake Aftershocks Oxygen in Underwater Cave Limnic Eruptions Extraterrestrial Plate Tectonics Earth's Core Hottest Layer...

248

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology, climate systems, and environmental engineering. Building on this scientific foundation, we also perform applied earth science research and technology development to support DOE in a number of its program areas. We currently organize our efforts in the following Division Programs: Fundamental and Exploratory Research--fundamental research in geochemistry, geophysics, and hydrology to provide a basis for new and improved energy and environmental technologies; Climate and Carbon Sciences--carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, and global and regional climate modeling, are the cornerstones of a major developing divisional research thrust related to understanding and mitigating the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere; Energy Resources--collaborative projects with industry to develop or improve technologies for the exploration and production of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs, and for the development of bioenergy; Environmental Remediation and Water Resources--innovative technologies for locating, containing, and remediating metals, radionuclides, chlorinated solvents, and energy-related contaminants in soils and groundwaters; Geologic Carbon Sequestration--development and testing of methods for introducing carbon dioxide to subsurface geologic reservoirs, and predicting and monitoring its subsequent migration; and Nuclear Waste and Energy--theoretical, experimental, and simulation studies of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Climate Science, Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, and Hydrogeology. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. In this document, we present summaries of selected current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, the projects described here are representative of the nature and breadth of the ESD research effort. We are proud of our scientific accomplishments and we hope that you will find this material useful and exciting. A list of publications for the period from J

DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

Determination of Unfiltered Radiances from the Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for determining unfiltered shortwave (SW), longwave (LW), and window radiances from filtered radiances measured by the Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) satellite instrument is presented. The method uses ...

Norman G. Loeb; Kory J. Priestley; David P. Kratz; Erika B. Geier; Richard N. Green; Bruce A. Wielicki; Patricia ORawe Hinton; Sandra K. Nolan

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Long Atmospheric Waves and the Polar-Plane Approximation to the Earths Spherical Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spherical geometry of the earth is replaced by polar cylindrical geometry, with a plane tangential to the earth at the pole. The resulting frequency and structure of free motions in an isothermal, adiabatic atmosphere with a resting basic ...

Alison F. C. Bridger; Duane E. Stevens

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Title Mixed Metal Films with Switchable Optical Properties Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-49043 Year of Publication 2001 Authors Richardson, Thomas J., Jonathan L. Slack, Baker Farangis, and Michael D. Rubin Journal Applied Physics Letters Volume 80 Pagination 1349-1351 Call Number LBNL-49043 Abstract Thin, Pd-capped metallic films containing magnesium and first row transition metals (Mn, Fe, Co) switch reversibly from their initial reflecting state to visually transparent states when exposed to gaseous hydrogen or following reduction cathodic polarization in an alkaline electrolyte. Reversion to the reflecting state is achieved by exposure to air or by anodic polarization. The films were prepared by co-sputtering from one magnesium target and one manganese, iron, or cobalt target. Both the dynamic optical switching range and the speed of the transition depend on the magnesium-transition metal ratio. Infrared spectra of films in the transparent, hydrided (deuterided) states support the presence of the intermetallic hydride phases Mg3MnH7, Mg2FeH6, and Mg2CoH5.

252

Research on separators for alkaline zinc batteries. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is concerned with the research and development of a hybrid separator as an improved battery separator in alkaline zinc secondary batteries. Particular emphasis has been directed toward mitigating the failure of zinc electrodes by controlling the permselectivity of the separator. Hybrid separators were synthesized and fabricated. These separators consist of a microporous film, radiation-grafted with a monomer containing ion-exchange groups. The new separator incorporates the favorable aspects of both ion-exchange membranes and microporous separators. Such a hybrid separator should ideally be highly specific for fast transport of electrolyte while inhibiting zincate diffusion. Hybrid separators with a wide range of percent graft (0 to 60%) were made by varying the monomer concentration and radiation time. The grafting of these ionic groups imparts the ion selectivity of the separators. The electrolyte uptake of hybrid separators is ca. 60 wt %. The higher the percent graft of the separator, the higher the water uptake and the lower the KOH uptake that are observed. The permeabilities of zincate ions were measured for a series of hybrid separators.

Yeo, R.S.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Session III: Rare Earth Recycling and Hydrometallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dresden and TU Dresden; 2Leibniz-Institute for Solid State and Materials Research Dresden; 3Korea Institute of Rare Metals; 4Korea Institute of Rare Metal

254

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Neither aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide nor silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems produced significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) is the first multi-satellite system designed to measure the Earth's radiation budget. It will fly on a low-inclination NASA satellite and two Sun-synchronous NOAA satellites during the mid-1980s. Each ...

Bruce R. Barkstrom

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

LANL | Solid Earth Geophysics | EES-17  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) LANL : Earth & Environmental Sciences : Solid Earth Geophysics (EES-17) Home Publications Collaboration & Links Staff Research Highlights Ground-Based Nuclear Explosion Monitoring Geodynamics & National Security Nonlinear Elasticity Time Reversal Los Alamos Seismic Network Stimulated Porous Fluid Flow Resource Recovery Seismic & Acoustic Imaging Exploration Geophysics Induced Seismicity Volcanoes & Earthquakes Other Research CONTACTS Group Leader Ken Rehfeldt Administrative Contacts Jody Benson Cecilia Gonzales Geophysics (EES-17) The Geophysics Group supports the national security mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory by providing technical expertise to monitor movement of Earth's crust while predicting the effects of these events on the environment. Though our focus is on seismic monitoring, we also apply electric, magnetic, radionuclide, and acoustic technologies to monitor underground explosions, maintain our ability to conduct tests, and develop the Yucca Mountain Project. In addition, we study the nonlinear properties of earth materials, imaging with seismic waves, how seismic waves affect the interaction of porous rocks and fluids, use of seismic waves to characterize underground oil reservoirs, volcanology and volcanic seismicity, advanced computational physics of earth materials, and using drilling technology to study the crust of the earth. These tasks are complemented by our extensive background in both conventional and hot dry rock geothermal energy development and geophysical support of the Nevada Test Site.

257

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M be a smooth connected compact surface), as the minimum of the lengths of the curves (drawn on M) joining x to y. Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation

Rifford, Ludovic

258

COUPLING THE ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER TECHNOLOGY AND THE GELATION TECHNOLOGY TO MAXIMIZE OIL PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or more efficient areal sweep efficiency for those with high permeability contrast ''thief zones''. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or those with thief zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. A prior fluid-fluid report discussed interaction of different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses. Aluminum-polyacrylamide, flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid flowing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid flowing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential pressures across cores. None of the gels tested appeared to alter alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution oil recovery. Total waterflood plus chemical flood oil recovery sequence recoveries were all similar.

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NETL 2011 Earth Day Poster Contest Winners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth Day Poster Contest Winners Earth Day Poster Contest Winners 2011 Earth Day Poster Winners Announced We are proud to announce the winners of the 2011 NETL Earth Day Poster contest. Students from schools across the country participated this year and we have chosen the top three entries in each grade (K-5). NETL Earth Day medals will be presented to all winners and certificates will be given to all participants. Photos of the winning entries are displayed below by grade. * Click on picture to bring up a larger PDF version * 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006 Kindergarten Winners First Grade Winners Second Grade Winners Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Winners Fourth Grade Winners Fifth Grade Winners Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Winners By Grade

260

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

For cermet inert anode containing oxide and metal phases useful for the electrolytic production of metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a ceramic phase including an oxide of Ni, Fe and M, where M is at least one metal selected from Zn, Co, Al, Li, Cu, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Ta, W, Mo, Hf and rare earths, preferably Zn and/or Co. Preferred ceramic compositions comprise Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, NiO and ZnO or CoO. The cermet inert anode also comprises a metal phase such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. A preferred metal phase comprises Cu and Ag. The cermet inert anodes may be used in electrolytic reduction cells for the production of commercial purity aluminum as well as other metals.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Liu, Xinghua (Monroeville, PA); Weirauch, Douglas A. (Murrysville, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, along with EPRI, the American Electric Power Company (AEP), FirstEnergy Corporation, the Tennessee Valley Authority, and Carmeuse North America. Sulfuric acid controls are becoming of increased interest for coal-fired power generating units for a number of reasons. In particular, sulfuric acid can cause plant operation problems such as air heater plugging and fouling, back-end corrosion, and plume opacity. These issues will likely be exacerbated with the retrofit of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for NOX control, as SCR catalysts are known to further oxidize a portion of the flue gas SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. The project tested the effectiveness of furnace injection of four different magnesium-based or dolomitic alkaline sorbents on full-scale utility boilers. These reagents were tested during one- to two-week tests conducted on two FirstEnergy Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) units. One of the sorbents tested was a magnesium hydroxide slurry byproduct from a modified Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime wet flue gas desulfurization process. The other three sorbents are available commercially and include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and commercially available magnesium hydroxide. The dolomite reagent was injected as a dry powder through out-of-service burners. The other three reagents were injected as slurries through air-atomizing nozzles inserted through the front wall of the upper furnace. After completing the four one- to two-week tests, the most promising sorbents were selected for longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm sorbent effectiveness over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP Unit 3, and the second was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant test provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. A final task in the project was to compare projected costs for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries to estimated costs for other potential sulfuric acid control technologies. Estimates were developed for reagent and utility costs, and capital costs, for furnace injection of magnesium hydroxide slurries and seven other sulfuric acid control technologies. The estimates were based on retrofit application to a model coal-fired plant.

Gary M. Blythe

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

SEPARATION OF METAL VALUES FROM NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for separating beryllium fluoride and an alkali metal fluoride from a mixture containing same and rare earth fluorides. The method comprises contacting said mixture with a liquid hydrogen fluoride solvent containing no more than about 30 per cent water by weight and saturated with a fluoride salt characterized by its solubility in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride for a period of time sufficient to dissolve said beryllium fluoride in said solvent. (AEC)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1962-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

Hobbs, David T. (1867 Lodgepole Ave., N. Augusta, SC 29841)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

267

Glossary Term - 10 Most Abundant Elements in the Earth's Crust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Earth's Crust Previous Term (10 Most Abundant Compounds in the Earth's Crust) Glossary Main Index Next Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Universe) 10 Most Abundant...

268

NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex employees plant trees as part...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex employees plant ... NNSA Celebrates Earth Week: Pantex employees plant trees as...

269

Rare-Earth Free Permanent Magnets - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, availability of rare-earth elements is a potential barrier to motor and generator applications. Thus, aiming at developing magnets without rare-earth...

270

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Earth Sciences Division annual...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Earth Sciences Division annual report, 1976. Research programs in Earth sciences Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

271

Preparations of rare earth-iron alloys by thermite reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for the preparation of high-purity rare earth-iron alloys by the aluminothermic reduction of a mixture of rare earth and iron fluorides.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Nevada, IA)

1986-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Experimental data developed to support the selection of a treatment process for West Valley alkaline supernatant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of West Valley Nuclear Services Co., Inc., the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has studied alternative treatment processes for the alkaline PUREX waste presently being stored in Tank 8D2 at West Valley, New York. Five tasks were completed during FY 1983: (1) simulation and characterization of the alkaline supernatant and sludge from the tank. The radiochemical and chemical distributions between the aqueous and solid phase were determined, and the efficiency of washing sludge with water to remove ions such as Na/sup +/ and SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ was investigated; (2) evaluation of a sodium tetraphenylboron (Na-TPB) precipitation process to recover cesium (Cs) and a sodium titanate (Na-TiA) sorption process to recover strontium (Sr) and plutonium (Pu) from the West Valley Alkaline supernatant. These processes were previously developed and tested at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Plant; (3) evaluation of an organic cation-exchange resin (Duolite CS-100) to recover Cs and Pu from the alkaline supernatant followed by an organic macroreticular cation exchange resin (Amberlite IRC-718) to recover Sr; (4) evaluation of an inorganic ion exchanger (Linde Ionsiv IE-95) to recover Cs, Sr, and Pu from the alkaline supernatant; and (5) evaluation of Dowex-1,X8 organic anion exchange resin to recover technetium (Tc) from alkaline supernatant. The findings of these tasks are reported. 21 references, 36 figures, 34 tables.

Bray, L.A.; Holton, L.K.; Myers, T.R.; Richardson, G.M.; Wise, B.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fusion for Earth and Space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact reactor concept (Williams, 2007) has the potential to provide clean, safe and unlimited supply of energy for Earth and Space applications. The concept is a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for individual home and space power. The concept also would make it possible for each plant or remote location to have it's own power source, on site, without the need for a connection to the power grid. This would minimize, or eliminate, power blackouts. The concept could replace large fission reactors and fossil fuel power plants plus provide energy for ships, locomotives, trucks and autos. It would make an ideal source of energy for space power applications and for space propulsion.

Williams, Pharis E

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

LANL | Earth and Environmental Sciences Division (EES)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EES Capabilities EES Capabilities To connect to an expanded list of key capabilities and the people at Los Alamos National Laboratory who have experience in those areas, use our Capabilities Search feature. search Click on the links below to explore our major capabilities and their research applications. Each capabilities page is cross-linked to relevant thrust development activities within EES Division. Computational Geoscience Earth Surface & Subsurface Characterization Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) Atmosphere, Environment & Ecosystems Imaging & Analysis of Earth & Atmosphere Signatures Energy, Earth & Environmental Systems Analysis Waste Characterization & Management Medical Ultrasound Imaging Carbon Sequestration Time Reversal More on Partnering in Technology at Los Alamos National Laboratory

275

SC e-journals, Earth Sciences  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Earth Sciences Earth Sciences Acta hydrochimica et hydrobiologica Advances in Geosciences - OAJ Aerobiologia Agricultural & Forest Meteorology Agronomy Journal American Journal of Science, The Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences Applied and Environmental Soil Science - OAJ Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Aquatic Geochemistry Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics - OAJ Atmospheric Environment BioEnergy Research Biogeochemistry Biogeosciences - OAJ Biology and Fertility of Soils Boundary-Layer Meteorology Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology, The Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society Bulletin of the Ecological Society of America Bulletin of Volcanology

276

Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

1980-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Microsoft Word - rare earth speech 3-18 6am  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REMARKS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY REMARKS PREPARED FOR DELIVERY TECHNOLOGY AND RARE EARTH METALS CONFERENCE 2010 KEYNOTE ADDRESS DAVID SANDALOW ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR POLICY & INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WASHINGTON, D.C. MARCH 17, 2010 [Acknowledgements.] 1. INTRODUCTION Thank you for the invitation to speak at this important conference. At energy conferences today, no topic is hotter than shale gas. The story is striking: recoverable reserves of shale gas have increased six-fold in the past few years, thanks to new drilling technologies. This increase has been transformational, with U.S. natural gas imports now predicted to drop steadily in the next decade and beyond, whereas just a few years ago imports were projected to climb for the foreseeable future. Large shale gas reserves are believed to exist

278

High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit  

SciTech Connect

Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Critchley, E. (Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit  

SciTech Connect

Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Critchley, E. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ranges of Atmospheric Mass and Composition of Super Earth Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Terrestrial-like exoplanets may obtain atmospheres from three primary sources: Capture of nebular gases, degassing during accretion, and degassing from subsequent tectonic activity. Here we model degassing during accretion to estimate the range of atmospheric mass and composition on exoplanets ranging from 1 to 30 Earth masses. We use bulk compositions drawn from primitive and differentiated meteorite compositions. Degassing alone can create a wide range of masses of planetary atmospheres, ranging from less than a percent of the planet's total mass up to ~6 mass% of hydrogen, ~20 mass% of water, and/or ~5 mass% of carbon compounds. Hydrogen-rich atmospheres can be outgassed as a result of oxidizing metallic iron with water, and excess water and carbon can produce atmospheres through simple degassing. As a byproduct of our atmospheric outgassing models we find that modest initial water contents (10 mass% of the planet and above) create planets with deep surface liquid water oceans soon after accretion is complete.

L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulfur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Gatrone, R.C.; Nash, K.L.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

282

Extracting metal ions with diphosphonic acid, or derivative thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermodynamically-unstable complexing agents which are diphosphonic acids and diphosphonic acid derivatives (or sulphur containing analogs), like carboxyhydroxymethanediphosphonic acid and vinylidene-1,1-diphosphonic acid, are capable of complexing with metal ions, and especially metal ions in the II, III, IV, V and VI oxidation states, to form stable, water-soluble metal ion complexes in moderately alkaline to highly-acidic media. However, the complexing agents can be decomposed, under mild conditions, into non-organic compounds which, for many purposes are environmentally-nondamaging compounds thereby degrading the complex and releasing the metal ion for disposal or recovery. Uses for such complexing agents as well as methods for their manufacture are also described.

Horwitz, Earl P. (Argonne, IL); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Argonne, IL); Nash, Kenneth L. (Argonne, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Enhanced Oil Recovery Using the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline Surfactant Polymer (ASP) process is a tertiary method of oil recovery that has promising results for future development. It has already been implemented in different areas of the United States such as Wyoming, west Texas, also in Canada and China. The success of this process depends on the proper combination of alkali, surfactant, and polymer and their compatibility with a reservoir. Therefore, the main objective of the proposed research is to identify chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids and rock. I hypothesize that testing different alkalis, polymers and surfactants will result not only in getting different profiles of rheological properties of ASP system, but also analyzing compatibility degrees of chemicals with formation fluids and rock properties such as rock wettability, oil mobility and sweep efficiency which will be affected by the designed ASP system. In this paper the results of chemical interactions between ASP chemicals and reservoir fluids are presented and the phenomena occurred are described. The experiments conducted are considered to be unique for a selected oil sample with certain values of API gravity, viscosity, and chemical composition. Lab experiments conducted show the effect of polymer, alkali and surfactant addition to an aqueous solution. Polymers were tested with alkali as a function of shear rate for the purposes of the buildup water viscosity in EOR. Different types of alkali at different concentrations are tested for alkali optimal concentration determination. The effect of adding surfactant at different concentrations has been tested, and acidic number of tested oil sample was identified. Polymers tested with alkali result in non-Newtonian behavior of the testing solution and display a shear thinning beneficial effect for the buildup water viscosity in EOR. The results show that acidic number of crude oil is a critical parameter that affects the optimal concentration for mixing chemicals and interfacial tension profile. The alkali and surfactant added to crude oil result in a significant reduction of interfacial tension and lead to increase of oil mobilization which is a desired output after ASP injection in EOR process.

Musharova, Darya

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thermostat Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...A thermostat metal is a composite material (usually in the form of sheet or strip) that consists of two or more materials bonded together, of which one can be a nonmetal. Because the materials bonded together to form the composite differ in

285

METAL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

Seybolt, A.U.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NETL 2012 Earth Day Poster Contest Winners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Earth Day Poster Winners Announced 2 Earth Day Poster Winners Announced We are proud to announce the winners of the 2012 NETL Earth Day Poster contest. Students from schools across the country participated this year and we have chosen the top three entries in each grade (K-5). NETL Earth Day medals will be presented to all winners and certificates will be given to all participants. Photos of the winning entries are displayed below by grade. * Click on picture to bring up a larger PDF version * 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006 Kindergarten Winners First Grade Winners Second Grade Winners Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Winners Fourth Grade Winners Fifth Grade Winners Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Winners By Grade Kindergarten 1st Place - Wyatt N. - Franklin Elementary - Vanderbilt, PA

287

Earth: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth: Energy Resources Earth: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Equivalent URI DBpedia Per Wikipedia, "Earth is the third planet from the Sun, and the largest of the terrestrial planets in the Solar System in terms of diameter, mass and density." Worldwide Alternative Energy Investments The following table summarizes worldwide alternative energy investments over time. All figures are in millions of U.S. dollars. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Earth&oldid=72128" Categories: Stubs Places What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

288

earth skin temperature | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

earth skin temperature earth skin temperature Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Earth Skin Temperature (° C)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Earth Skin Temperature (deg C)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated April 01st, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords climate

289

Friends of the Earth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the Earth of the Earth Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Friends of the Earth Name Friends of the Earth Address 9000 Gent Place Brussels, Belgium Phone number +32-9-242.87.52 Website http://www.motherearth.org/ Coordinates 50.8573142°, 4.3224777° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.8573142,"lon":4.3224777,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Earth Power Resources Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Resources Inc Power Resources Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Power Resources Inc Address 2407 S Troost Avenue Place Tulsa, Oklahoma Zip 74114 Sector Geothermal energy Year founded 2000 References Website[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Earth Power Resources Inc is a company based in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Earth Power Resources Inc in Tulsa, OK is a private company categorized under: Electric Companies. Records show it was established in 2000 and incorporated in Oklahoma. References ↑ "Website" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Earth_Power_Resources_Inc&oldid=598202" Categories: Utility Companies Organizations Stubs

291

NETL 2012 Earth Day Poster Contest Winners  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Earth Day Poster Winners Announced 3 Earth Day Poster Winners Announced We are proud to announce the winners of the 2013 NETL Earth Day Poster contest. Students from schools across the country participated this year and we have chosen the top three entries in each grade (K-5). NETL Earth Day medals will be presented to all winners and certificates will be given to all participants. Photos of the winning entries are displayed below by grade. * Click on picture to bring up a larger PDF version * 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006 Kindergarten Winners First Grade Winners Second Grade Winners Kindergarten First Grade Second Grade Third Grade Winners Fourth Grade Winners Fifth Grade Winners Third Grade Fourth Grade Fifth Grade Winners By Grade Kindergarten 1st - Natalie Esposito - Suncrest Primary, Morgantown, WV

292

Addressing the Complexity of the Earth System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the development of a prediction system that integrates physical, biogeochemical, and societal processes in a unified Earth system framework. Such development requires collaborations among physical and social scientists, and should ...

Carlos Nobre; Guy P. Brasseur; Melvyn A. Shapiro; Myanna Lahsen; Gilbert Brunet; Antonio J. Busalacchi; Kathy Hibbard; Sybil Seitzinger; Kevin Noone; Jean P. Ometto

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Precipitation from Space: Advancing Earth System Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances to space-based observing systems and data processing techniques have made precipitation datasets quickly and easily available via various data portals and widely used in Earth sciences. The increasingly lengthy time span of space-based ...

Paul A. Kucera; Elizabeth E. Ebert; F. Joseph Turk; Vincenzo Levizzani; Dalia Kirschbaum; Francisco J. Tapiador; Alexander Loew; M. Borsche

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Turbulent Channel Flows on a Rotating Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with flow in a rectilinear channel on a rotating earth. The flow is directed perpendicular to the background planetary vorticity; both an analytical theory and numerical simulations are employed. The analytical approach assumes ...

Robert A. Handler; Richard P. Mied; Gloria J. Lindemann; Thomas E. Evans

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Secrets of the Greatest Snow on Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State license plates and tourism brochures boast that Utah ski areas receive the greatest snow on Earth, but is there really anything special about Utah's snow? Often it is argued in ski industry brochures that Utah's snow is the greatest ...

W. James Steenburgh; Trevor I. Alcott

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Heat Storage Within the Earth System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the earth's heat budget provide a real-world constraint on the radiative forcing which is simulated in global climate change models. Assessments, such as the IPCC, would more effectively depict changes over time in the climate ...

Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F. (eds.)

1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ternary rare earth-lanthanide sulfides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new ternary rare earth sulfur compound having the formula: La.sub.3-x M.sub.x S.sub.4 where M is a rare earth element selected from the group europium, samarium and ytterbium and x=0.15 to 0.8. The compound has good high-temperature thermoelectric properties and exhibits long-term structural stability up to 1000.degree. C.

Takeshita, Takuo (Omiya, JP); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Beaudry, Bernard J. (Ames, IA)

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Process for removal of sulfur oxides from waste gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for removing sulfur oxides from waste gas is provided. The gas is contacted with a sorbent selected from sodium bicarbonate, trona and activated sodium carbonate and, utilizing an alkaline liquor containing borate ion so as to reduce flow rates and loss of alkalinity, the spent sorbent is regenerated with an alkaline earth metal oxide or hydroxide.

Lowell, P.S.; Phillips, J.L.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d < 5) tend to strongly chemisorb electrophilic molecules; this is a consequence of the manner in which new bonding states are introduced. More electronegative metals (d >> 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems.

Ward, J.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Several test results on earthing-resistance-estimation instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whenever earth construction work is done, the implanted number and depth of electrodes have to be estimated in order to obtain the required resistance value. We call this earth resistance estimation. Under conventional method of earth resistance estimation, ... Keywords: earthing-resistance estimation, resistivity sounding, soil layer

Hitoshi Kijima

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Earth resistivity estimation based on satellite imaging techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a useful technique for generating an earth resistivity map. Earth resistance is one of essential factors in a broad range of power system analysis and design. Information of earth resistivity is helpful for practical power system ... Keywords: Wenner method, classification technique, earth resistivity, multispectral, power system grounding, satellite image technology

Kwanchai Norsangsri; Thanatchai Kulworawanichpong

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Energy Conservation in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Energy Conservation in Metals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and...

305

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and the Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding froin swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetate-xanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differentia

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

SciTech Connect

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Coupling the Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Technology and The Gelation Technology to Maximize Oil Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gelation technologies have been developed to provide more efficient vertical sweep efficiencies for flooding naturally fractured oil reservoirs or reservoirs with different sand lenses with high permeability contrast. The field proven alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology economically recovers 15% to 25% OOIP more crude oil than waterflooding from swept pore space of an oil reservoir. However, alkaline-surfactant-polymer technology is not amenable to naturally fractured reservoirs or reservoirs with high permeability contrast zones because much of injected solution bypasses target pore space containing oil. This work investigates whether combining these two technologies could broaden applicability of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flooding into these reservoirs. Fluid-fluid interaction with different gel chemical compositions and alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9 have been tested. Aluminum-polyacrylamide gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at any pH. Chromium-polyacrylamide gels with polymer to chromium ion ratios of 25 or greater were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions if solution pH was 10.6 or less. When the polymer to chromium ion was 15 or less, chromium-polyacrylamide gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values up to 12.9. Chromium-xanthan gum gels were stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values of 12.9 at the polymer to chromium ion ratios tested. Silicate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and sulfomethylated resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were also stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Iron-polyacrylamide gels were immediately destroyed when contacted with any of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions with pH values ranging from 9.2 to 12.9. Gel solutions under dynamic conditions of linear corefloods showed similar stability to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions as in the fluid-fluid analyses with the exception of the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gels. Aluminum-polyacrylamide flowing gels are not stable to alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions of either pH 10.5 or 12.9, either in linear corefloods or in dual separate radial core, common manifold corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide flowing and rigid tonguing gels are stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. Rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained permeability reduction better than flowing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels. Chromium acetate gels were stable to injection of alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions at 72 F, 125 F and 175 F in linear corefloods. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels maintained diversion capability after injection of an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution in stacked; radial coreflood with a common well bore. Chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gel used to seal fractured core maintain fracture closure if followed by an alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Chromium acetatexanthan gum rigid gels are not stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection at 72, 125, and 175 F. Silicate-polyacrylamide gels are not stable with subsequent injection of either a pH 10.5 or a 12.9 alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution. Resorcinol-formaldehyde gels were stable to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer solution injection. When evaluated in a dual core configuration, injected fluid flows into the core with the greatest effective permeability to the injected fluid. The same gel stability trends to subsequent alkaline-surfactant-polymer injected solution were observed. Aluminum citrate-polyacrylamide, resorcinol-formaldehyde, and the silicate-polyacrylamide gel systems did not produce significant incremental oil in linear corefloods. Both flowing and rigid tonguing chromium acetate-polyacrylamide gels and the xanthan gum-chromium acetate gel system produced incremental oil with the rigid tonguing gel producing the greatest amount. Higher oil recovery could have been due to higher differential

Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi; Dan Wilson; Phil Dowling; David Stewart; Bill Jones

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Gamma-Rays from Grazing Incidence Cosmic Rays in the Earths Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions of grazing incidence, ultra high energy cosmic rays with the earths atmosphere may provide a new method of studying energetic cosmic rays with gamma-ray satellites. It is found that these cosmic ray interactions may produce gamma-rays on millisecond time scales which may be detectable by satellites. An extremely low gamma-ray background for transient gamma-ray events and a large area of interaction, the earths surface, make the scheme plausible. The effective cross section of detection of interactions for cosmic rays above 1020 eV is found to be more than two orders of magnitude higher than earth based detection techniques. This method may eventually offer an efficient way of probing this region of the cosmic ray energy spectrum where events are scarce. In this paper, a conceptual model is presented for the production of short bursts of gamma-rays based on these grazing incidence encounters with the earths atmosphere. Subject headings: atmospheric effects- cosmic rays- Earth- gamma-rays: bursts

Andrew Ulmer

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Clear-Sky Longwave Irradiance at the Earths SurfaceEvaluation of Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of the clear-sky longwave irradiance at the earths surface (LI) simulated in climate models and in satellite-based global datasets is presented. Algorithm-based estimates of LI, derived from global observations of column water ...

J. R. Garratt

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

LABORATORY MODELLING OF THE EARTH RADIATION BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method of the laboratory modelling of the Earth radiation belt is presented. Method can be used for the estimation of consequences of global energetic and communication projects realizations. The radiation belt of the Earth is the inner part of the magnetosphere, in which the geomagnetic field hold charged particles with kinetic energy from 10 KeV to 100 MeV. This belt play the essential role for the sun radiation regime for the Earth and for the electromagnetic waves propagation. As it is well known, even small alteration of solar activity influent essential upon the biological and ecological balance at the Earth for all levels- from viruses and micro-organisms to biological societies and ecological systems at all. The most bright indicator of the solar activity alteration are changes of the pathogenic organisms activity as a result of a displacement of biological equilibrium. But the other phenomena, which are not connected with pathogenic biological objects are very important for thelife on the Earth and ecological balance too, although they can not be so obviously observed.

Dr. Alexander Luchinskiy A; Prof Dr; Yakov S. Shifrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

NONE

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Prisbrey, Keith (Moscow, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions whereas the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

Kreuzmann, A.B.

1982-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

Method for the recovery of uranium values from uranium tetrafluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a novel method for the recovery of uranium from dry, particulate uranium tetrafluoride. In one aspect, the invention comprises reacting particulate uranium tetrafluoride and calcium oxide in the presence of gaseous oxygen to effect formation of the corresponding alkaline earth metal uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride. The product uranate is highly soluble in various acidic solutions wherein the product fluoride is virtually insoluble therein. The product mixture of uranate and alkaline earth metal fluoride is contacted with a suitable acid to provide a uranium-containing solution, from which the uranium is recovered. The invention can achieve quantitative recovery of uranium in highly pure form.

Kreuzmann, Alvin B. (Cincinnati, OH)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

Hobbs, D.T.

1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

EarthCraft Virginia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EarthCraft Virginia EarthCraft Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Name EarthCraft Virginia Place Richmond, VA Zip 23220 Website http://www.ecvirginia.org/ Coordinates 37.5464259°, -77.4644607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.5464259,"lon":-77.4644607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Rapporteur's Report - workshop on rare earth elements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Hosted by the MIT Energy Initiative, cambridge, Massachusetts december 3, 2010 Introduction The objective of the workshop was to exchange views and information on the material security challenges of rare earths and other elements critical for clean energy generation and use. This includes the description of current research topics around the supply chain and end uses, and to identify opportunities for Trans-Atlantic research cooperation. The workshop consisted of a series of brief presentations by researchers in the US and Europe, followed by a discussion of possible areas of collaboration proposed by the co-chairs. A list of the presentations and the agenda for the day is appended with this document.

318

Revelations about the center of the Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revelations about the center of the Earth Revelations about the center of the Earth -Press Release Number: PR-CARNEGIE-05-3 -Source: Carnegie Institution of Washington -Date issued: July 20, 2005 -Contact: Jung-Fu Lin +1 (925) 424-4157, j.lin@gl.ciw.edu; Viktor Struzhkin, +1 (202) 478-8952, v.struzhkin@gl.ciw.edu; or Steve Jacobsen, +1 (202) 478-7975, s.jacobsen@gl.ciw.edu Washington, D.C. Recently, seismologists have observed that the speed and direction of seismic waves in Earth's lower mantle, between 400 and 1,800 miles below the surface, vary tremendously. "I think we may have discovered why the seismic waves travel so inconsistently there," stated Jung-Fu Lin.* Lin was with the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory at the time of the study and lead author of the paper published

319

Earth Day event showcases LANL energy work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth Day showcases energy work Earth Day showcases energy work Earth Day event showcases LANL energy work The public is invited to learn about projects in energy conservation, generation, research, and management at an Energy Town Hall April 21. April 19, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact

320

Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long Fingers of Heat Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface Long Fingers of Heat Beneath Earth's Surface volcanic-hotspots1.jpg Why it Matters: A key mission for the Office of Basic Energy Science is related to new methods and techniques for geosciences imaging from the atomic scale to the kilometer scale. Geophysical imaging methods are needed to measure and monitor subsurface reservoirs for hydrocarbon production or for carbon dioxide storage resulting from large-scale carbon sequestration schemes. Key Challenges: Development of new approaches for regional and global seismic tomography using high-accuracy numerical schemes that treat wave propagation through complex 3D models of earth structure directly with spectral element methods. Accomplishments: A new, cutting-edge method for global seismic imaging that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Earth Week event all about energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth Week event all about energy Earth Week event all about energy Earth Week event all about energy People all across Northern New Mexico can learn about how they can play a role in energy research and energy and fuel conservation at an upcoming Energy Town Hall. April 16, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

322

Green Earth Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Fuels Earth Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Earth Fuels Place Houston, Texas Zip 77057 Product A producer and distributor of soy and palm based biodiesel Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

MIT- Earth Resources Laboratory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT- Earth Resources Laboratory MIT- Earth Resources Laboratory Name MIT- Earth Resources Laboratory Address 77 Massachusetts Avenue Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02139 Region Greater Boston Area Coordinates 42.359089°, -71.093412° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.359089,"lon":-71.093412,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

EarthTronics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EarthTronics Inc EarthTronics Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EarthTronics Inc. Place Muskegon, Michigan Zip 49440 Product Michigan-based firm that has licensed the Honeywell International brand for its gearless micro-scale turbines. Coordinates 43.23424°, -86.245929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.23424,"lon":-86.245929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Solar Power Beaming: From Space to Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Harvesting solar energy in space and power beaming the collected energy to a receiver station on Earth is a very attractive way to help solve mankind's current energy and environmental problems. However, the colossal and expensive 'first step' required in achieving this goal has to-date stifled its initiation. In this paper, we will demonstrate that recent advance advances in laser and optical technology now make it possible to deploy a space-based system capable of delivering 1 MW of energy to a terrestrial receiver station, via a single unmanned commercial launch into Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Figure 1 depicts the overall concept of our solar power beaming system, showing a large solar collector in space, beaming a coherent laser beam to a receiving station on Earth. We will describe all major subsystems and provide technical and economic discussion to support our conclusions.

Rubenchik, A M; Parker, J M; Beach, R J; Yamamoto, R M

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

A climatic thermostat making Earth habitable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean surface temperature on Earth and other planets with atmospheres is determined by the radiative balance between the non-reflected incoming solar radiation and the outgoing long-wave black-body radiation from the atmosphere. The surface temperature is higher than the black-body temperature due to the greenhouse warming. Balancing the ice-albedo cooling and the greenhouse warming gives rise to two stable climate states. A cold climate state with a completelyice-covered planet, called Snowball Earth, and a warm state similar to our present climate where greenhouse warming prevents the total glacition. The warm state has dominated Earth in most of its geological history despite a 30 % fainter young Sun. The warming could have been controlled by a greenhouse thermostat operating by temperature control of the weathering process depleting the atmosphere from $CO_2$. This temperature control has permitted life to evolve as early as the end of the heavy bombartment 4 billion years ago.

Peter D. Ditlevsen

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Earth Sciences report, 1989--1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) conducts work in support of the Laboratory's energy, defense, environmental, and basic research programs. The Department comprises more than 100 professional scientific personnel spanning a variety of subdisciplines: geology, seismology, physics, geophysics, geochemistry, geohydrology, chemical engineering, and mechanical engineering. Resident technical support groups add significant additional technical expertise, including Containment Engineering, Computations, Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry and Materials Science, and Technical Information. In total, approximately 180 professional scientists and engineers are housed in the Earth Sciences Department, making it one of the largest geo-science research groups in the nation. Previous Earth Sciences reports have presented an outline of the technical capabilities and accomplishments of the groups within the Department. In this FY 89/90 Report, we have chosen instead to present twelve of our projects in full-length technical articles. This Overview introduces those articles and highlights other significant research performed during this period.

Younker, L.W.; Peterson, S.J.; Price, M.E. (eds.)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Visualizing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the North American hurricane season, in partnership with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and working with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, we have developed a capability that helps visualize the status of the electric transmission system infrastructure. The capability toolkit, called VERDE - Visualizing Energy Resources Dynamically on Earth, takes advantage of the Google Earth platform to display spatiotemporally informed power grid and related data. Custom libraries describe the electrical transmission network in the Eastern United States and the dynamic status of each transmission line. Standard Google Earth layers provide additional spatial context. In addition to live status, VERDE provides a framework and mechanism to ingest and intuitively present predictive models, data from different sources, and response needs.

Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Stovall, John P [ORNL; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes June 24, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden If you are looking for a home with energy-efficient features that will provide a comfortable, tranquil, weather-resistant dwelling, an earth-sheltered house could be right for you. There are two basic types of earth-sheltered house designs-underground and bermed. Underground Earth-Sheltered Homes When an entire earth-sheltered house is built below grade or completely underground, it's called an underground structure. An atrium or courtyard

330

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes Efficient Earth-Sheltered Homes June 24, 2013 - 4:59pm Addthis This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden This house in Tempe, Arizona, uses earth-sheltered construction methods to help decrease cooling costs. | Photo by Pamm McFadden If you are looking for a home with energy-efficient features that will provide a comfortable, tranquil, weather-resistant dwelling, an earth-sheltered house could be right for you. There are two basic types of earth-sheltered house designs-underground and bermed. Underground Earth-Sheltered Homes When an entire earth-sheltered house is built below grade or completely underground, it's called an underground structure. An atrium or courtyard

331

Climate and Earth Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Science Highlights NERSC Citations HPC Requirements Reviews Home » Science at NERSC » Climate & Earth Science Climate & Earth Science NERSC users have made significant and long-lasting improvements to the scientific basis for assessing the potential consequences of climatic changes and costs of alternative response options. Efforts using higher resolution, improved physical, chemical, and biological process representations, and more precise uncertainty estimates continue to explore potential ecological, social, and economic implications of climatic change. There has has also been a significant increase in the number of computational studies involving the application of molecular dynamics in

332

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

RARE EARTHS, SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND APPLICATIONS: II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... electrodes in Ni - Metal Hydride batteries with 30% KOH electrolyte. In spite of ... The Joule-Thomson expansion of hydrogen gas offers a method to produce...

335

Earth & Aquatic Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resources. Many factors affect the fate, transport and transformation of metal and radionuclide contaminants found on DOE lands. A fundamental understanding of environmental...

336

Board on Earth Sciences and Resources and Its Activities -- Final Technical Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Board on Earth Sciences and Resources (BESR) provided oversight of the earth sciences and resources activities with the National Research Council (NRC). The Board reviewed research and public activities in the earth sciences; undertook analyses relevant to the discovery, supply, delivery, waste disposal and associated impacts and issues related to hydrocarbon, metallic, and nonmetallic mineral resources; and monitored the status of the earth sciences, assessed the health of the disciplines, identified research opportunities, and responded to specific agency requests for advice. These tasks were conducted by distinguished volunteers and NRC staff members that are representative of the breadth and depth of the earth sciences and resources disciplines (e.g., ecology, geophysics, geochemistry, geobiology, hydrology, geography, geographic information science, materials science, mineral resources and mining, energy resources, paleontology, visualization, remote sensing, geophysical data and information). Each year the Board held two meetings. Most recently at the May 2003 Board meeting, the main topic of discussion was Coordination of Geospatial Data in the Era of the Department of Homeland Security. Speakers were Steven Cooper, DHS; Barry Napier, FEMA; Bill Shinar, VGIN; Barbara Ryan, USGS; and Hank Garie, DOI. Other topics were Circum-Pacific Council for Energy and Mineral Resources and New Opportunities in the Geology Discipline (Pat Leahy, USGS); Challenges to Understanding Biological Change in a Fluid Landscape (Sue Haseltine, USGS); and GIS and Remote Sensing at the USDA (Rodney Brown, USDA). The Board and the AGI also held a Leadership Forum. At the October 2003 Board meeting in Irvine, California, the Board plans to discuss earth resource issues, develop a white paper on the future directions of the Board, and review two of its standing committees--Committee on Seismology and Geodynamics, and the Committee on Geological and Geotechnical Engineering. The Board will also review the status of studies under way (e.g., Research Priorities--Earth Science and Medicine) and the status of studies under development (e.g., Understanding and Confronting Terrorism). As a result of the continuous strategic planning process, the Board and its standing committees have become more active as exemplified by the increasing number of ad hoc study committees and reports published during the last few years. The Board collaborated throughout the reporting period with several NRC units (e.g., National Materials Advisory Board, Ocean Studies Board, Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, and the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change). The Board provided oversight of the earth sciences and resources activities at the NRC. In particular, it provided oversight of its ad hoc and continuing activities. Under NRC guidelines, the Board holds its committees' study findings confidential until reports are published.

Anthony R. de Souza, Ph.D. Director, Board on Earth Sciences and Resources

2003-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

S&TR | March 2005: Looking at Earth in Action  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

S&TR Search S&TR Search Go March 2005 The Laboratory in the News Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking Looking at Earth in Action Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals Patents and Awards S&TR Staff Spacer Gif Article title: Looking at Earth in Action; photo of San Andreas Fault in California. Surface outcropping of the San Andreas Fault near Parkfield, California. EXPERIMENTAL geophysicists at Livermore are tackling diverse challenges such as the storage of nuclear wastes, discovery of new energy sources, mitigation of greenhouse effects, and better understanding of nuclear weapons. They set up experiments in the laboratory so they can examine how specific environments alter material properties. According to Brian Bonner,

338

Surface structural changes of perovskite oxides during oxygen evolution in alkaline electrolyte  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Perovskite oxides such Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.8O3-6 (BSCF82) are among the most active catalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline solution reported to date. In this work it is shown via high resolution ...

May, Kevin J. (Kevin Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Alkaline resistant phosphate glasses and method of preparation and use thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A substantially alkaline resistant calcium-iron-phosphate (CFP) glass and methods of making and using thereof. In one application, the CFP glass is drawn into a fiber and dispersed in cement to produce glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) articles having the high compressive strength of concrete with the high impact, flexural and tensile strength associated with glass fibers.

Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO); Reis, Signo T. (Rolla, MO); Velez, Mariano (Rolla, MO); Day, Delbert E. (Rolla, MO)

2010-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Arsenic in Groundwater and Alkaline Lakes at the upper Paraguay basin, Pantanal, Brazil L, Brazil d Université de Provence, Aix Marseille 1, France e Departamento de Geografia, Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul, Três Lagoas, Brazil f Laboratoire de Géomophologie Appliquée, Université de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINERALOGY AND GENESIS OF SMECTITES IN AN ALKALINE-SALINE ENVIRONMENT OF PANTANAL WETLAND, BRAZIL, Universidade de Sa~o Paulo (USP), Av. Prof. Dr. Lineu Prestes, 338, 05508-900, Sa~o Paulo, Brazil 2 Soil-saline lake of Nhecola^ndia, a sub-region of the Pantanal wetland, Brazil, and then to identify the mechanisms

Ahmad, Sajjad

342

Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cool Earth Solar Cool Earth Solar Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Cool Earth Solar Name Cool Earth Solar Address 4659 Las Positas Rd, Bldg C Place Livermore, California Zip 94551 Sector Solar Product Electricty from High Concentrating PV Year founded 2007 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number 925.454.8506 Website http://www.coolearthsolar.com/ Coordinates 37.6971629°, -121.7339673° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.6971629,"lon":-121.7339673,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Earth Sciences Department Annual Report, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory comprises nine different disciplinary and programmatic groups that provide research in the geosciences, including nuclear waste management, containment of nuclear weapons tests, seismic treaty verification, stimulation of natural gas production by unconventional means, and oil shale retorting. Each group's accomplishments in 1984 are discussed, followed by a listing of the group's publications for the year.

Henry, A.L.; Donohue, M.L. (eds.)

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Atmospheric Heat Engines on Earth and Mars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The character of the Earth's atmospheric heat engine depends, inter alia, on the relatively tight linkage between surface fluxes of energy and of H20. On Mars, on the other hand, H2O-based latent heat fluxes are only a trivial fraction of total ...

J. R. Philip

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Dust Aerosol Important for Snowball Earth Deglaciation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most previous global climate model simulations could only produce the termination of Snowball Earth episodes at CO2 partial pressures of several tenths of a bar, which is roughly an order of magnitude higher than recent estimates of CO2 levels ...

Dorian S. Abbot; Itay Halevy

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

348

Observing and modeling Earths energy flows  

SciTech Connect

This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

SEPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM FROM MOLTEN SALT REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for selectively precipitating protactinium from a neutron- irradiated fused fluoride salt composition comprising at least one metal fluoride selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal fluoride and an alkaline earth metal fluoride containing dissolved thorium-232 values is presented. An inorganic metal oxide corresponding to any of the metal fluorides of the composition is also added. (AEC)

Shaffer, J.H.; Strain, J.E.; Cuneo, D.R.; Kelly, M.J.

1963-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process damage-free damascene metal gate technology for gentle integration of epitaxially grown high-k  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the first successful attempt to integrate crystalline high-k gate dielectrics into a virtually damage-free damascene metal gate process. Process details as well as initial electrical characterization results on fully functional gate ... Keywords: CMP, Crystalline high-k gate dielectric, Damascene metal gate, Gadolinium oxide, Rare-earth oxide

Ralf Endres; Yordan Stefanov; Frank Wessely; Florian Zaunert; Udo Schwalke

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Influence of Ocean Thermocline Temperatures on the Earths Surface Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled mixed layeratmospheric general circulation model has been used to evaluate the impact of ocean thermocline temperatures (and by proxy those of the deep ocean) on the surface climate of the earth. Particular attention has been devoted ...

Robert J. Oglesby; Monica Y. Stephens; Barry Saltzman

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of Earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model significantly extends its predecessor, the ...

James W. Hurrell; M. M. Holland; P. R. Gent; S. Ghan; Jennifer E. Kay; P. J. Kushner; J.-F. Lamarque; W. G. Large; D. Lawrence; K. Lindsay; W. H. Lipscomb; M. C. Long; N. Mahowald; D. R. Marsh; R. B. Neale; P. Rasch; S. Vavrus; M. Vertenstein; D. Bader; W. D. Collins; J. J. Hack; J. Kiehl; S. Marshall

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hadley Cell Dynamics in a Virtually Dry Snowball Earth Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hadley cell of a virtually dry snowball Earth atmosphere under equinox insolation is studied in a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. In contrast to the Hadley cell of modern Earth, momentum transport by dry convection, which ...

Aiko Voigt; Isaac M. Held; Jochem Marotzke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NREL: Wind Research - White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Earth Nation Installs Turbines: A Wind Powering America Success Story February 11, 2013 Almost 8 years after taking the initial steps to harness the wind, the White Earth...

355

Glossary Term - 10 Most Abundant Compounds in the Earth's Crust  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vanadis Previous Term (Vanadis) Glossary Main Index Next Term (10 Most Abundant Elements in the Earth's Crust) 10 Most Abundant Elements
in the Earth's Crust 10 Most Abundant...

356

NASA Research Strategy for Earth System Science: Climate Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the principles adopted by the NASA Earth Science Enterprise in formulating a comprehensive 20022010 research strategy for earth system science, and outlines one component of this broad interdisciplinary program, focused on ...

Ghassem Asrar; Jack A. Kaye; Pierre Morel

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

Suarez, Brandon H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Nimbus Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) Experiment: 1975 to 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three spectrally broadband measurement sets are presently being used for earth radiation budget (ERB) studies. These are the Nimbus-6 ERB (July 1975 to June 1978), the Nimbus-7 ERB (November 1978 to the present), and the Earth Radiation Budget ...

H. L. Kyle; A. Arking; J. R. Hickey; P. E. Ardanuy; H. Jacobowitz; L. L. Stowe; G. G. Campbell; T. Vonder Haar; F. B. House; R. Maschhoff; G. L. Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Stakeholder value network analysis for space-based earth observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Earth Science and Applications decadal survey released by the National Research Council in 2007 presents both an ambitious engineering challenge and a challenge for the entire Earth science community to come together ...

Sutherland, Timothy A. (Timothy Alan)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Metallic Glass II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 8, 2013 ... Application of Metallic Glass for High Performance Si Solar Cell: ... of the metallic glasses during heating is dependent on the thermal stability of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Light Metals 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2010 ... Softcover book: Light Metals 2008 Volume 2: Aluminum Reduction. Hardcover book and CD-ROM: Light Metals 2009...

362

Bulk Metallic Glasses IX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of elements to form metallic-glass alloys] have resulted in the required cooling rate ... Bauschinger Effect in Metallic Glass Nanowires under Cyclic Loading.

363

Bulk Metallic Glasses XI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013 ... A Bulk Metallic Glass with Record-breaking Damage Tolerance ... Oxidation on the Surface Characteristics of Zr-based Bulk Metallic Glasses.

364

Principal Metals Online  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic Title: WEB RESOURCE: Principal Metals Online Topic Summary: Principal Metals inventory database. Created On: 2/9/2007 5:41 AM, Topic View:.

365

Refractory Metals Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Refractory Metals Committee is part of the Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: Includes all technical aspects of the science of refractory metals and...

366

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a ...  

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a Hydrothermal Method. Battelle Number(s): 12234. ... Potential Industry Applications. ...

367

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, Emil L. (San Jose, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Lazarus, Jonathan D. (Sunnyvale, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heat dissipating nuclear reactor with metal liner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor containment including a reactor vessel disposed within a cavity with capability for complete inherent decay heat removal in the earth and surrounded by a cast steel containment member which surrounds the vessel is described in this disclosure. The member has a thick basemat in contact with metal pilings. The basemat rests on a bed of porous particulate material, into which water is fed to produce steam which is vented to the atmosphere. There is a gap between the reactor vessel and the steel containment member. The containment member holds any sodium or core debris escaping from the reactor vessel if the core melts and breaches the vessel.

Gluekler, E.L.; Hunsbedt, A.; Lazarus, J.D.

1985-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

A Review on Iron Separation in Rare Earths Hydrometallurgy Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... solvent extraction, and some alternative methods (e.g., thermal cracking). ... Assessment and Management of Radioactivity in Rare Earth Element Production ... Hydrometallurgical Plant Design Parameters for the Avalon Rare Earth Process ... Mitigation of Rare Earth Supply Risk Posed by Permanent Magnets Used in...

370

Modeling the Global Solar Radiation on the Earths Surface Using Atmospheric Deterministic and Intelligent Data-Driven Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three methods for analyzing and modeling the global shortwave radiation reaching the earths surface are presented in this study. Solar radiation is a very important input for many aspects of climatology, hydrology, atmospheric sciences, and ...

M. Santamouris; G. Mihalakakou; B. Psiloglou; G. Eftaxias; D. N. Asimakopoulos

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Clouds and the Earth''s Radiant Energy System (CERES) Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document. Volume I-Overviews (Subsystem 0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical bases for the Release 1 algorithms that will be used to process satellite data for investigation of the Clouds and the Earth''s Radiant Energy System (CERES) are described. The architecture for software implementation of the methodologies ...

Team CERES Science

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

373

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Flotation Flowsheet Development for Avalon Rare Metal's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

375

CIM-EARTH : Framework and case study.  

SciTech Connect

General equilibrium models have been used for decades to obtain insights into the economic implications of policies and decisions. Despite successes, however, these economic models have substantive limitations. Many of these limitations are due to computational and methodological constraints that can be overcome by leveraging recent advances in computer architecture, numerical methods, and economics research. Motivated by these considerations, we are developing a new modeling framework: the Community Integrated Model of Economic and Resource Trajectories for Humankind (CIM-EARTH). In this paper, we describe the key features of the CIM-EARTH framework and initial implementation, detail the model instance we use for studying the impacts of a carbon tax on international trade and the sensitivity of these impacts to assumptions on the rate of change in energy efficiency and labor productivity, and present results on the extent to which carbon leakage limits global reductions in emissions for some policy scenarios.

Elliott, J.; Foster, I.; Judd, K.; Moyer, E.; Munson, T.; Univ. of Chicago

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Earth's early atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Ideas about atmospheric composition and climate on the early Earth have evolved considerably over the last 30 years, but many uncertainties still remain. It is generally agreed that the atmosphere contained little or no free oxygen initially and that oxygen concentrations increased markely near 2.0 billion years ago, but the precise timing of and reasons for its rise remain unexplained. Likewise, it is usually conceded that the atmospheric greenhouse effect must have been higher in the past to offset reduced solar luminosity, but the levels of atmospheric carbon cioxide and other greenhouse gases required remain speculative. A better understanding of past atmospheric evolution is important to understanding the evolution of life and to predicting whether Earth-like planets might exist elsewhere in the galaxy.

Kasting, J.F. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States))

1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

LANL | Earth and Environmental Sciences Division (EES)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groups in EES Division Groups in EES Division The EES Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory is organized into four groups and the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP). The Groups are organized by their capabilities and expertise. Scientific advice is provided by the Science and Engineering Leadership Team (SELT), helping the EES technical staff become more effective at obtaining research and development funds. In late 2008, the EES Division was reorganized. Links to our former groups are available still. EES Organizational Chart Lab Organizational Chart (Internal Only) Repository Science (EES-12) Yucca Mountain Project and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Earth Systems Observations (EES-14) GGRL, Radiogeoprocesses, and Terrestrial Processes Computational Earth Sciences (EES-16)

378

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR EARTH PENETRATION  

SciTech Connect

A nuclear reactor apparatus for penetrating into the earth's crust is described. The apparatus comprises a cylindrical nuclear core operating at a temperature that is higher than the melting temperature of rock. A high-density ballast member is coupled to the nuclear core such that the overall density of the core-ballast assembly is greater than the density of molten rock. The nuclear core is thermally insulated so that its heat output is constrained to flow axially, with radial heat flow being minimized. In operation, the apparatus is placed in contact with the earth's crust at the point desired to be penetrated. The heat output of the reactor melts the underlying rock, and the apparatus sinks through the resulting magma. The fuel loading of the reactor core determines the ultimate depth of crust penetration. (AEC)

Adams, W.M.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Earth Tidal Analysis At Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area (1984) Exploration Activity Details Location Marysville Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Earth Tidal Analysis Activity Date 1984 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine porosity of the reservoir Notes The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Polymer quenched prealloyed metal powder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3 % Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Addressing the Complexity of the Earth System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the role of the Earth-system biosphere and illustrates the complex: biosphere-atmosphere interactions in the Amazon Basin, changes in nitrogen cycling, ocean chemistry, and land use. It introduces three important requirements for accelerating the development and use of Earth system information. The first requirement is to develop Earth system analysis and prediction models that account for multi-scale physical, chemical and biological processes, including their interactions in the coupled atmosphere-ocean-land-ice system. The development of these models requires partnerships between academia, national research centers, and operational prediction facilities, and builds upon accomplishments in weather and climate predictions. They will highlight the regional aspects of global change, and include modules for water system, agriculture, forestry, energy, air quality, health, etc. The second requirement is to model the interactions between humans and the weather-climate-biogeochemical system. The third requirement is to introduce novel methodologies to account for societal drivers, impacts and feedbacks. This is a challenging endeavor requiring creative solutions and some compromising because human behavior cannot be fully represented within the framework of present-day physical prediction systems.

Nobre, Carlos; Brasseur, Guy P.; Shapiro, Melvyn; Lahsen, Myanna; Brunet, Gilbert; Busalacchi, Antonio; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Seitzinger, Sybil; Noone, Kevin; Ometto, Jean P.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Earth Share Oregon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earth Share Oregon Earth Share Oregon Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Share Oregon Address 319 SW Washington Street Place Portland, Oregon Zip 97204 Region Pacific Northwest Area Notes Federation of 70 leading local and national non-profit conservation groups that provides a convenient way to support conservation and healthy communities Website http://www.earthshare-oregon.o Coordinates 45.519712°, -122.6751981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.519712,"lon":-122.6751981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

384

Honor the Earth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honor the Earth Honor the Earth Jump to: navigation, search Name Honor the Earth Place Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip 55404 Sector Renewable Energy Product Minnesota-based organisation working nationally to promote renewable energy on tribal lands to build leadership in Native communities for a new energy future rooted in environmental justice and seeking to mitigate global climate change. Coordinates 44.979035°, -93.264929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.979035,"lon":-93.264929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

385

Nuclear Georeactor Generation of Earth's Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this communication is to suggest that the mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field and the energy source for powering it are one and the same, a nuclear georeactor at the center of the Earth. Toward this end, I: i) Present evidence that the nuclear georeactor fission-product sub-shell is fluid; ii)Suggest that the geomagnetic field is generated within the georeactor sub-shell, rather than within Earth's iron-alloy fluid core; iii) Describe why convection appears more feasible within the georeactor sub-shell than within the iron-alloy core; iv) Disclose additional relative physical advantages for georeactor sub-shell dynamo operation; and, v) Outline briefly the research that should be conducted to advance the state of knowledge of georeactor-geomagnetic field generation. The concept of geomagnetic field production by the nuclear georeactor is presented specifically for the Earth. The concepts and principles, however, are generally applicable to planetary magnetic field production.

Herndon, J Marvin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nuclear Georeactor Generation of Earth's Geomagnetic Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this communication is to suggest that the mechanism for generating the geomagnetic field and the energy source for powering it are one and the same, a nuclear georeactor at the center of the Earth. Toward this end, I: i) Present evidence that the nuclear georeactor fission-product sub-shell is fluid; ii)Suggest that the geomagnetic field is generated within the georeactor sub-shell, rather than within Earth's iron-alloy fluid core; iii) Describe why convection appears more feasible within the georeactor sub-shell than within the iron-alloy core; iv) Disclose additional relative physical advantages for georeactor sub-shell dynamo operation; and, v) Outline briefly the research that should be conducted to advance the state of knowledge of georeactor-geomagnetic field generation. The concept of geomagnetic field production by the nuclear georeactor is presented specifically for the Earth. The concepts and principles, however, are generally applicable to planetary magnetic field production.

J. Marvin Herndon

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Precious Metals Conversion Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precious Metals Conversion Information. The Office of Weights and Measures (OWM) has prepared a Conversion Factors ...

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Corrosion of valve metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general survey related to the corrosion of valve metals or film-forming metals. The way these metals corrode with some general examples is described. Valve metals form relatively perfect oxide films with little breakdown or leakage when anodized. (FS)

Draley, J.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

METAL PRODUCTION AND CASTING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent covers a method and apparatus for collecting the molten metal produced by high temperature metal salt reduction. It consists essentially of subjecting the reaction vessel to centrifugal force in order to force the liberatcd molten metal into a coherent molten mass, and allowing it to solidify there. The apparatus is particularly suitable for use with small quantities of rare metals.

Magel, T.T.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Ceramic to metal seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Providing a high strength, hermetic ceramic to metal seal by essentially heating a wire-like metal gasket and a ceramic member, which have been chemically cleaned, while simultaneously deforming from about 50 to 95 percent the metal gasket against the ceramic member at a temperature of about 30 to 75 percent of the melting temperature of the metal gasket.

Snow, Gary S. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcox, Paul D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Exploring the Chemical Space for Rare-earth Additions to Optimize ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of Indonesia Rare Earth Minerals and their Potential Processing Techniques Characterization of Rare Earth Minerals with Field Emission...

392

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

393

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

394

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

395

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

396

How Are You Celebrating Earth Day? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Are You Celebrating Earth Day? Are You Celebrating Earth Day? How Are You Celebrating Earth Day? April 22, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Happy Earth Day! Today marks the 40th anniversary of celebrating Earth Day, and we hope you're getting into the spirit and committing to protecting the environment and saving energy. Check out EERE's Earth Day Web site and interactive animation for some great ideas and information to get you started. How are you celebrating Earth Day? Once you've shared your answer here, check out our guest post in today's GovGab! Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov

397

WRI-Earth Trends Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WRI-Earth Trends Data WRI-Earth Trends Data Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: WRI-Earth Trends Data Agency/Company /Organization: World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.wri.org/project/earthtrends WRI-Earth Trends Data Screenshot References: Earth Trends Data[1] About "Based on the World Resources series, EarthTrends is a free on-line resource that highlights the environmental, social, and economic trends that shape our world. The site offers the public a comprehensive collection of vital statistics, maps, and graphics for more than 200 countries. Much of the environmental information on the internet is fragmented, buried, or only available at a price. EarthTrends gathers data from more than 40 of the world's leading statistical agencies, along with

398

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

Wasan, D.T.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol; 1: Behavior of palladium electrode in alkaline medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct oxidation of organic compounds derived from biomass, such as alcohols, in a fuel cell is a very attractive way for converting chemical energy into electrical energy. The electrocatalytic oxidation of glycerol has been investigated at palladium electrodes in alkaline medium by electro-chemical and spectroscopic techniques. The kinetic parameters measured, together with other experimental data, allow one to suggest a mechanism. Diffusion is involved in the rate-determining step.

Yildiz, G.; Kadirgan, F. (Istanbul Teknik Univ. (Turkey))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

High-Strength / High Alkaline Resistant Fe-Phosphate Glass Fibers as Concrete Reinforcement  

SciTech Connect

Calcium-iron-phosphate glasses were developed whose chemical durabilities in alkaline solutions (pH 13) were comparable or superior to those of commercial alkaline-resistant (AR) silica-based glasses. However, the tensile strength of Ca-Fe-phosphate fibers, after being exposed to alkaline environments, including wet Portland cement pastes, is lower than that of current AR silicate fibers. Another series of Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses were developed with excellent chemical durability in strong acidic solutions (H2SO4, HF), indicating potential applications where silica-based fibers degrade very quickly, including E-glass. The new Ca-Fe-phosphate glasses can be melted and processed 300 to 500C lower than silica-based glasses. This offers the possibility of manufacturing glass fibers with lower energy costs by 40-60% and the potential to reduce manufacturing waste and lower gas emissions. It was found that Ca-Fe-phosphate melts can be continuously pulled into fibers depending on the slope of the viscosity-temperature curve and with viscosity ~100 poise, using multi-hole Pt/Rh bushings.

Mariano Velez

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Validation of Geolocation of Measurements of the Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) Scanning Radiometers aboard Three Spacecraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Clouds and the Earths Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument is a scanning radiometer for measuring Earth-emitted and -reflected solar radiation to understand Earths energy balance. One CERES instrument was placed into orbit aboard the ...

G. Louis Smith; Kory J. Priestley; Phillip C. Hess; Chris Currey; Peter Spence

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Metal-Air Battery - Energy Innovation Portal  

Partially alleviate gas accumulation and cathode consumption issues typical of primary alkaline batteries; Increases mechanical integrity; Suitable ...

406

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Rare-Earth-Free Traction Motor: Rare Earth-Free Traction Motor for Electric Vehicle Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: Baldor will develop a new type of traction motor with the potential to efficiently power future generations of EVs. Unlike todays large, bulky EV motors which use expensive, imported rare-earth-based magnets, Baldors motor could be light, compact, contain no rare earth materials, and have the potential to deliver more torque at a substantially lower cost. Key innovations in this project include the use of a unique motor design, incorporation of an improved cooling system, and the development of advanced materials manufacturing techniques. These innovations could significantly reduce the cost of an electric motor.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ion exchange behavior among metal trisilicates: probing selectivity, structures, and mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One model system for the investigation of selectivity in inorganic ion exchangers is a group of synthetic analogues of the mineral umbite. Hydrothermally synthesized trisilicates with the general form A2BSi3O9.H2O, where A is a monovalent cation, and B = Ti4+, Zr4+, and Sn4+ have been shown to have ion exchange properties. The extended three dimensional framework structure offers the ability to tune the selectivity based on the size of the cavities and channels. The unit cell volume, and therefore the pore size, can be altered by changing the size of the octahedral metal. The substitution of Ge for Si can also increase the pore size. A variety of cations have been exchanged into the trisilicates including alkali and alkaline earths, lanthanides, and actinides. The reason for the selectivity rests in the pocket of framework oxygens which make up the exchange sites. Close examination of the cation environments shows that the ions with the greatest affinity are those that have the closest contacts to the framework oxygens. For example, among alkali cations, zirconium trisilicate demonstrates the greatest affinity for Rb+ and has the most A-O contact distances approaching the sum of their ionic radii. The origins of selectivity also rely upon the valence of the incoming cation. When cations are of similar ionic radius, a cation of higher charge is always preferred over the lower valence. Ion exchange studies in binary solutions of cations of different valence, but similar size (1.0 ) have proven the selectivity series to be Th4+ > Gd3+ > Ca2+ > Na+. Through structural characterization, kinetic studies, and use of in situ x-ray diffraction techniques the origins of selectivity in these inorganic ion exchangers has been further elucidated. The principles gleaned from these studies can be applied to other inorganic framework materials. The umbite system has the potential to be altered and tailored for specific separation needs. The trisilicate materials presented in this work are representative of the types of advances in inorganic materials research and prove their potential as applicable compounds useful for solving real world problems.

Fewox, Christopher Sean

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Metal-Air Batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Alkali metal nitrate purification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for removing contaminants from impure alkali metal nitrates containing them. The process comprises heating the impure alkali metal nitrates in solution form or molten form at a temperature and for a time sufficient to effect precipitation of solid impurities and separating the solid impurities from the resulting purified alkali metal nitrates. The resulting purified alkali metal nitrates in solution form may be heated to evaporate water therefrom to produce purified molten alkali metal nitrates suitable for use as a heat transfer medium. If desired, the purified molten form may be granulated and cooled to form discrete solid particles of purified alkali metal nitrates.

Fiorucci, Louis C. (Hamden, CT); Morgan, Michael J. (Guilford, CT)

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

411

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Departments - Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

departments > ecology departments > ecology Ecology Department Core Capabilities Advanced Technology Bioenergy Biofuels Human Health Soil Systems Water Resources People Facilities, Centers & Labs Publications Ecology Department Principal Investigators Gary Andersen Harry Beller Nicholas Bouskill Eoin Brodie Romy Chakraborty Eric Dubinsky Hoi-Ying Holman Christer Jansson Janet Jansson Nigel Quinn Tamas Torok Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Historical Background ecology comic In 1995 the Center for Environmental Biotechnology was set up as a multidivisonal center under the direction of Dr. Jennie Hunter-Cevera. In 1998, the Ecology Department was created within the Earth Sciences

412

Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800 C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein. 1 figure.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1992-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800.degree. C. to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Ackerman, John P. (Downers Grove, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL); Johnson, Terry R. (Wheaton, IL); Pierce, R. Dean (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Uranium chloride extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels containing rare earth and noble metal fission products as well as other fission products is disclosed. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of Ca chloride and a U-Fe alloy which is liquid at about 800{degrees}C to dissolve uranium metal and the noble metal fission product metals and transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals leaving Ca chloride having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein. The Ca chloride and CaO and the fission products contained therein are separated from the U-Fe alloy and the metal values dissolved therein. The U-Fe alloy having dissolved therein reduced metals from the spent nuclear fuel is contacted with a mixture of one or more alkali metal or alkaline earth metal halides selected from the class consisting of alkali metal or alkaline earth metal and Fe or U halide or a combination thereof to transfer transuranium actinide metals and rare earth metals to the halide salt leaving the uranium and some noble metal fission products in the U-Fe alloy and thereafter separating the halide salt and the transuranium metals dissolved therein from the U-Fe alloy and the metals dissolved therein.

Miller, W.E.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Pierce, R.D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot

417

Lessen 2Lessen 2 Earth System Observation:Earth System Observation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T k t th E tTracks at the Equator 4 #12;Timing of Adjacent Landsat 5 or 7 Coverage Tracks 5 Adjacent an understanding of the total Earth system, and the effects of natural and human-induced changes on the global Landsat 1 in January 1975J y Radiation Research Satellite Nimbus (launches 1964-1978) ­ Successor

Li, Zhanqing

418

X3D-EarthBrowser: visualize our earth in your web browser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Earth data covering geodetic, meteorological and oceanographic information provides petabyte volumes of multi-dimensional data that can be accessed via dynamic data queries specifying the data subset to be processed and rendered in real-time. Our proposed ... Keywords: HTML5, WebGL, compression, terrain rendering

Pasquale Herzig; Michael Englert; Sebastian Wagner; Yvonne Jung; Ulrich Bockholt

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Earth Sciences Division annual report, 1976. [Research programs in Earth sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This compilation lists abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1976 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Subjects include: coal gasification, gas stimulation, geothermal fields, oil shale retorting, radioactive waste management, geochemistry, geophysics, seismology, explosive phenomenology, and miscellaneous studies.

Hornady, B.; Duba, A.

1977-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

SALICYLATE PROCESS FOR THORIUM SEPARATION FROM RARE EARTHS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of thorium from rare earths is accomplished by forming an aqueous solution of salts of thorium and rare earths and sufficient acetate buffer to provide a pH of between 2 and 5, adding an ammonium salicylate to the aqueous buffered solution, contacting the resultant solution with a substantially water-immiscible organic solvent mixture of an ether and an ester, and separating the solvent extract phase containing thorium salicylate from the aqueous phase containing the rare earths.

Cowan, G.A.

1959-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gravitomagnetism and the Earth-Mercury range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically work out the impact of the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect on the Earth-Mercury range caused by the gravitomagnetic field of the rotating Sun. The peak-to peak nominal amplitude of the resulting time-varying signal amounts to 1.75 10^1 m over a temporal interval 2 yr. Future interplanetary laser ranging facilities should reach a cm-level in ranging to Mercury over comparable timescales; for example, the BepiColombo mission, to be launched in 2014, should reach a 4.5 - 10 cm level over 1 - 8 yr. We looked also at other Newtonian (solar quadrupole mass moment, ring of the minor asteroids, Ceres, Pallas, Vesta, Trans-Neptunian Objects) and post-Newtonian (gravitoelectric Schwarzschild solar field) dynamical effects on the Earth-Mercury range. They act as sources of systematic errors for the Lense-Thirring signal which, in turn, if not properly modeled, may bias the recovery of some key parameters of such other dynamical features of motion. Their nominal peak-to-peak amplitudes are as large as 4 10^5 m (Schwarzschild), 3 10^2 m (Sun's quadrupole), 8 10^1 m (Ceres, Pallas, Vesta), 4 m (ring of minor asteroids), 8 10^-1 m (Trans-Neptunian Objects). Their temporal patterns are different with respect to that of the gravitomagnetic signal.

Lorenzo Iorio

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Bulk Metallic Glasses X  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Aerospace and Spacecraft Applications for Bulk Metallic Glasses and Matrix Composites Air Oxidation of a Binary Cu64.5Zr35.5 Bulk Metallic...

423

Bulk Metallic Glasses VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society ... Air-Oxidation of a ( Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5)98Er2 Bulk Metallic Glass at 350-500oc Anelastic...

424

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

As a new composition of matter, alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Metal phthalocyanine catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new composition of matter is described which is an alkali metal or ammonium or tetraalkylammonium diazidoperfluorophthalocyanatoferrate. Other embodiments of the invention comprise compositions wherein the metal of the coordination complex is cobalt, manganese and chromium.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mitigation of Rare Earth Supply Risk Posed by Permanent Magnets ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These include electric vehicles and wind generators. Volatility of the price of rare earth elements highlights the importance of a co-ordinated strategy to mitigate...

427

A Dynamic Study of an Earth Orbiting Tether Propulsion System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Commercial expansion beyond Earth orbit demands efficient, low cost and regular access to space that is not given by current launch systems. An alternative to (more)

Stasko, Stephen Edward

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

User:Woodjr/Sandbox/GoogleEarth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

experimental "GoogleEarth" result format for ask queries. Based on the Thematic Mapping API. Registered Energy Organizations, by Country (Worldwide, Default Visualization) Array...

429

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced...

430

Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites. Author(s), David L Poerschke, Carlos G Levi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), David L

431

The Earth Ritual: Subjugation and transformation of the environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Earth Ritual 11 line 4 With (this mantra) three times, offer the gtor ma and seal (it)with subduing (the earth)."You, Goddess, were mastered (by dint of) all the BuddhaProtectors methods of activity and especially,(the bodhisattva) stages... righthand as a five-spoked rdo rje and after waving his hand in the air, hetouches the earth, ritually establishing the earth in its pure vajra nature(Cantwell 1989: 230-231). DG begins the section with a purificatory mantrainvoking Am...

Cantwell, Cathy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration...

433

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory BTCbreakthrough curve(s) BUDBerkeley Unexploded-ordnance Discriminator BWCBerkeley Water Center Earth Sciences Division Berkeley Lab

DePaolo, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

logo Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Questions & Comments | Privacy & Security Notice You are using IE6. Older browsers present a security risk to...

435

Rare Earth Elements Industry Overview and Advanced Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 30, 2013 ... We'll review many of these applications including forecasts for growth. ... Volatility of the price of rare earth elements highlights the importance...

436

Replacing Critical Rare Earth Materials in High Energy Density ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... magnet motors (IPM) for hybride and electric vehicles and direct drive wind generators. Current motor designs use rare earth permanent magnets which easily...

437

Chapter 26: Earth's Interior Did you read chapter 26  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between science and "not science" How do we know anything about the Earth's Interior? Direct · Resulting shadow zone is bowl-

Hart, Gus

438

Rare Earth and Plutonium Doping of Apatite - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Rare Earth and Plutonium Doping of Apatite ... Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State of Ce ...

439

Precision metal rulers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... precision metal rulers. Our customers include state bureaus of Weights and Measures and departments of Agriculture. We also ...

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fasteners & Metals Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Fasteners & Metals Program. The Fastener Quality Act (FQA), Public Law 101-592, was ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

TMS Light Metals Publication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following instructions should be used when submitting a manuscript for any TMS Light Metals proceedings volume. INTRODUCTION. Orientation to...

442

Refractory Metals 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... TMS Structural Materials Division TMS: Refractory Metals Committee. Organizer( s), Omer Dogan, DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory

443

Destabilized and catalyzed borohydride for reversible hydrogen storage  

SciTech Connect

A process of forming a hydrogen storage material, including the steps of: providing a borohydride material of the formula: M(BH.sub.4).sub.x where M is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing an alanate material of the formula: M.sub.1(AlH.sub.4).sub.x where M.sub.1 is an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.2; providing a halide material of the formula: M.sub.2Hal.sub.x where M.sub.2 is an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal or transition metal and Hal is a halide and 1.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.4; combining the borohydride, alanate and halide materials such that 5 to 50 molar percent from the borohydride material is present forming a reaction product material having a lower hydrogen release temperature than the alanate material.

Mohtadi, Rana F. (Northville, MI); Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Gray, Joshua (Aiken, SC); Stowe, Ashley C. (Knoxville, TN); Sivasubramanian, Premkumar (Aiken, SC)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

444

Durable metallized polymer mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Synthesis, structure and characterization of molybdenum and rare earth chalcogenides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the synthetic exploratory synthesis of molybdenum chalcogenides and rare earth metal-rich ternary tellurides as a part of an effort to produce molecular building blocks of molybdenum chalcogenide clusters and to explore their structural relationships with solid state cluster networks. The tightly cross-linked Mo3nSe3n+2(n = 2, 3, ...?) clusters and chain compounds react with alkali metal cyanide or cyanide salt mixtures at temperatures of 450-675 C to yield reduced, cyanide-terminated molybdenum chalcogenide clusters that are thermodynamically stable. At temperatures of 650-675 C, linear chain compounds I6[Mo6Se8(CN)4(CN)2/2] (MI = K, Cs) were prepared from reactions of Mo6Se8 or elemental starting materials, Mo and Se with excess molten cyanide (KCN, CsCN). These are the first known compounds to feature linking of Mo6Se8 clusters via cyanide bridges. Magnetic susceptibility and EPR measurements indicate that there is one unpaired electron per cluster. A new reduced molecular octahedral complex, Na8[Mo6Se8(CN)6]20H2O was prepared by the reduction of [Mo6Se8(CN)6]7-with Zn in an aqueous NaCN solution. Single crystal structure was determined. Cyclic voltammetric measurements in basic aqueous media show multiple reversible redox waves corresponding to [Mo6Se8(CN)6]6-/7-, [Mo6Se8(CN)6]7-/8-, [Mo6Se8(CN)6]8-/9-redox couples with half-wave potentials of E1/2 = -0.442 V, -0.876 V, and 11.369 V respectively versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). UV-Vis studies support the presence of the reduced cluster compound. New reduced molecular tetrahedral complexes, K7Na[Mo4Se4(CN)12]5H2OMeOH, Na4Cs7[Mo4Se4(CN)12]Cl3, Na8[Mo4Se4(CN)12], and Na4K4[Mo4Se4(CN)12]12H2O were prepared. Preparation of Na8[Mo4Se4(CN)12] is an improved method for the synthesis of the Mo4Se4 core. Half-wave potentials of E1/2 for the [Mo4Se4(CN)12]6-/7-and [Mo4Se4(CN)12]7-/8-couples are 0.233 V, and -0.422 V respectively versus SHE. The molecular cubane clusters [Mo4Se4(CN)12]7-/8-play an essential role in the process by which the discrete [Mo6Se8(CN)6]6-and [Mo6Se8(CN)6]are excised from the CN-linked chain compound, K6Mo6Se8(CN)5. A new rare-earth telluride compound with the empirical composition of Gd4NiTe2 was synthesized from a high-temperature solid-state reaction. Gd4MTe2 (M = Ni) crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma. This unprecedented structure consists of a cluster condensation of Ni-centered gadolinium tricapped trigonal prisms along the rectangular faces of the trigonal prism such that the Ni atoms act as two of the caps to the trigonal prisms.

Magliocchi, Carmela Luisa

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Summary technical report on the electrochemical treatment of alkaline nuclear wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the laboratory studies investigating the electrolytic treatment of alkaline solutions carried out under the direction of the Savannah River Technology Center from 1985-1992. Electrolytic treatment has been demonstrated at the laboratory scale to be feasible for the destruction of nitrate and nitrite and the removal of radioactive species such as {sup 99}Tc and {sup 106}Ru from Savannah River Site (SRS) decontaminated salt solution and other alkaline wastes. The reaction rate and current efficiency for the removal of these species are dependent on cell configuration, electrode material, nature of electrode surface, waste composition, current density, and temperature. Nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide have been identified as the nitrogen-containing reaction products from the electrochemical reduction of nitrate and nitrite under alkaline conditions. The reaction mechanism for the reduction is very complex. Voltammetric studies indicated that the electrode reactions involve surface phenomena and are not necessarily mass transfer controlled. In an undivided cell, results suggest an electrocatalytic role for oxygen via the generation of the superoxide anion. In general, more efficient reduction of nitrite and nitrate occurs at cathode materials with higher overpotentials for hydrogen evolution. Nitrate and nitrite destruction has also been demonstrated in engineering-scale flow reactors. In flow reactors, the nitrate/nitrite destruction efficiency is improved with an increase in the current density, temperature, and when the cell is operated in a divided cell configuration. Nafion{reg_sign} cation exchange membranes have exhibited good stability and consistent performance as separators in the divided-cell tests. The membranes were also shown to be unaffected by radiation at doses approximating four years of cell operation in treating decontaminated salt solution.

Hobbs, D.T.

1994-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Investigation on application of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for alkaline waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

The stabilization of neptunium(IV) in alkaline solution by chemical reductants under various conditions was studied. Testing showed that neptunium(V) is slowly reduced to Np(IV) by V(IV) at room temperature in alkaline solutions. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction. Complete reduction of 2 x 10{sup -4} M Np(V) occurs in three hours at 80{degrees}C in 1 M NaOH with 0.02 M VOSO{sub 4-}. Under similar conditions, but in 5 M NaOH, only 15 to 20% of the Np(V) was reduced in 5 hours. In all cases, about 98 % of the initial neptunium was found in the precipitate. Thus V(IV) acts both as a reductant and as a precipitation carrier. Tests showed Np(V) reduction by hydrazine hydrate could be catalyzed by Pd(II). Reduction increased with temperature and catalyst concentration and decreased with hydroxide concentration. Reduction of Np(V) also takes place in 1 M NaOH solutions containing 1 M sodium formate and palladium. Increasing temperature accelerates reduction; with three hours` treatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 90{degrees}C, about 95 % of the initial 2 x 10{sup -4} M neptunium(V) is transformed to Np(IV). Organic complexants and organic acid anions hinder the decontamination of alkaline solutions from neptunium and plutonium by coprecipitation with d-element hydroxides (the Method of Appearing Reagents). It was found that ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) and N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetate (HEDTA) are decomposed by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in alkaline solution in the presence of cobalt compounds with heating and by Na2S208 at moderate temperatures. Citrate, glycolate, and oxalate are decomposed by Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} with heating. Oxidant amounts must be increased when NaNO{sub 2} also is present in solution. 8 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

Shilov, V.P.; Bessonov, A.A.; Garnov, A.Y.; Gelis, A.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dissolution of Mixed Zinc-Carbon and Alkaline Battery Powders in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat Treatment of Black Dross for the Production of a Value Added Material ... Leaching Studies for Metals Recovery from Waste Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs).

449

Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

Heung, L.K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wicks, G.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Earth Turbines Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbines Inc Turbines Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Turbines Inc Place Hinesburg, Vermont Zip 5461 Sector Wind energy Product Start-up company developing small-scale wind technology for the residential and commercial market. Coordinates 44.335002°, -73.109687° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.335002,"lon":-73.109687,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Earth Day Coalition | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Day Coalition Day Coalition Jump to: navigation, search Name Earth Day Coalition Address 3606 Bridge Avenue, Suite 4 Place Cleveland, Ohio Zip 44113 Coordinates 41.4829135°, -81.7117416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4829135,"lon":-81.7117416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Unprecedented accurate abundances: signatures of other Earths?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For more than 140 years the chemical composition of our Sun has been considered typical of solar-type stars. Our highly differential elemental abundance analysis of unprecedented accuracy (~0.01 dex) of the Sun relative to solar twins, shows that the Sun has a peculiar chemical composition with a ~20% depletion of refractory elements relative to the volatile elements in comparison with solar twins. The abundance differences correlate strongly with the condensation temperatures of the elements. A similar study of solar analogs from planet surveys shows that this peculiarity also holds in comparisons with solar analogs known to have close-in giant planets while the majority of solar analogs without detected giant planets show the solar abundance pattern. The peculiarities in the solar chemical composition can be explained as signatures of the formation of terrestrial planets like our own Earth.

Melendez, J; Gustafsson, B; Yong, D; Ramrez, I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

On the Variability of the Global Net Radiative Energy Balance of the Nonequilibrium Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent observations and model studies of the earths radiative energy balance have focused attention on the earths top of atmosphere (TOA) energy balance. This is the balance between the shortwave energy absorbed by the earth, which is ...

John E. Harries; Claudio Belotti

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Google Earth A Demo on some of the GIS capabilities of Google  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Earth A Demo on some of the GIS capabilities of Google Earth 1- Open Google Earth on your in a Name that you would like to represent your photo on Google Earth f. Navigate to location of the image website for navigating through Google Earth. You can also check out the new features in Version 5 like

Schweik, Charles M.

455

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, Lamar T. (Knoxville, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

Royer, L.T.

1987-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Supporting our scientists with Google Earth-based UIs.  

SciTech Connect

Google Earth and Google Maps are incredibly useful for researchers looking for easily-digestible displays of data. This presentation will provide a step-by-step tutorial on how to begin using Google Earth to create tools that further the mission of the DOE national lab complex.

Scott, Janine

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Data Webs for Earth Science Data Asvin Ananthanarayan,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Webs for Earth Science Data Asvin Ananthanarayan, Rajiv Balachandran, Yunhong Gu, Robert in Parallel Com- puting, Volume 29, 2003, pages 1363-1379. Abstract We describe high performance data webs for earth science data which are de- signed for interactively analyzing small to moderate size remote data

Grossman, Robert

459

Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ch.2 Solar Energy to Earth and the Seasons #12;Learning Objective One: The Solar System Sun Earth,083,000 km #12;Learning Objective Two: The Solar Energy Solar Radiation #12;What is Solar Energy? Energy is the capacity of a physical system to do work. The unit is Joule (J). Solar energy is radiant energy (i

Pan, Feifei

460

Fuzzy-wavelet based prediction of Earth rotation parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of Earth rotation parameters (ERPs) is of importance especially for near real-time applications including navigation, remote sensing, and hazard monitoring. Therefore, prediction of ERPs at least over a few days in the future is necessary. ... Keywords: Earth rotation, Fuzzy-inference systems, Prediction, Wavelet transform

O. Akyilmaz; H. Kutterer; C. K. Shum; T. Ayan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alkaline earth metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carbon Dioxide Carbonates in the Earth;s Mantle: Implications to the Deep Carbon Cycle  

SciTech Connect

An increase in the ionic character in C-O bonds at high pressures and temperatures is shown by the chemical/phase transformation diagram of CO{sub 2}. The presence of carbonate carbon dioxide (i-CO{sub 2}) near the Earth's core-mantle boundary condition provides insights into both the deep carbon cycle and the transport of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to anhydrous silicates in the mantle and iron core.

Yoo, Choong-Shik; Sengupta, Amartya; Kim, Minseob (Princeton); (WSU)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

462

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.

463

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions 3-D Earth model more accurately pinpoints explosions The purpose of this model is to assist the U.S. Air Force and the international Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization with more accurately locating all types of explosions. October 25, 2013 A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole. This model is used as the starting point to calculate the full SALSA3D velocity model. A one-dimensional velocity profile with depth plotted within a three-dimensional Earth. The colors are compressional wave velocity in km/s. The rays are examples coming from a pseudo station at the North Pole.

464

Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Abstract N/A Author Department of Geology and Geological Engineering niversity of Idaho Published Publisher Not Provided, 2001 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool? Citation Department of Geology and Geological Engineering niversity of Idaho. 2001. Behavior of Rare Earth Elements in Geothermal Systems- A New Exploration/Exploitation Tool?. (!) : (!) . Retrieved from

465

Celebrate Earth Day with Secretary Chu | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Celebrate Earth Day with Secretary Chu Celebrate Earth Day with Secretary Chu Celebrate Earth Day with Secretary Chu April 16, 2012 - 5:51pm Q&A What would you ask Secretary Chu about the environmental benefits of transitioning to a clean energy economy? Ask Us Addthis Celebrate Earth Day with Secretary Chu Amanda Scott Amanda Scott Former Managing Editor, Energy.gov How can I participate? Tweet questions @energy with the hashtag #AskEnergy. Email questions to newmedia@hq.doe.gov. This Friday, April 20, at 10:45am ET, join us for a conversation with Secretary Steven Chu on the environmental benefits of transitioning to a clean energy economy. As part of the Energy Department's Earth Day celebrations, Secretary Chu will host a livechat -- taking questions from in-person and online audiences -- which we'll stream on Energy.gov.

466

Life on Earth shockingly comes from out of this world  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 For immediate release: 06/05/2013 | NR-13-06-02 Synthesis of prebiotic hydrocarbons in impacts of simple icy mixtures on early Earth. Life on Earth shockingly comes from out of this world Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Early Earth was not very hospitable when it came to jump starting life. In fact, new research shows that life on Earth may have come from out of this world. Lawrence Livermore scientist Nir Goldman and University of Ontario Institute of Technology colleague Isaac Tamblyn (a former LLNL postdoc) found that icy comets that crashed into Earth billions of years ago could have produced life building organic compounds, including the building blocks of proteins and nucleobases pairs of DNA and RNA. Comets contain a variety of simple molecules, such as water, ammonia,

467

Simulations Reveal That Earth's Silica Is Predominantly Superficial - NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reveal Reveal Earth's Silica Is Predominantly Superficial Simulations Reveal Earth's Silica Is Predominantly Superficial May 24, 2010 Silica is one of the most common minerals on Earth. Not only does it make up two-thirds of our planet's crust, it is also used to create a variety of materials from glass to ceramics, computer chips and fiber optic cables. Yet new quantum mechanics results generated by a team of physicists from Ohio State University (OSU) show that this mineral only populates our planet superficially-in other words, silica is relatively uncommon deep within the Earth. Cross-section of the Earth Using several of the largest supercomputers in the nation, including the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center's (NERSC) Cray XT4 "Franklin" system, the team simulated the behavior of silica in

468

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Mineral Deformation at Earth's Core-Mantle Boundary Print Earth is a dynamic planet in which convection takes place on the scale of thousands of kilometers. Because Earth is mostly solid (except for its liquid-iron outer core), this convection causes deformation of solid rocks by plastic flow. At the core-mantle boundary (CMB), 2900 km deep, seismologists have discovered that seismic waves travel faster in certain directions. This seismic anisotropy appears to be related to the deformation of the constituent minerals. To understand the deformation mechanisms of mineral phases at this depth, researchers from Yale and UC Berkeley re-created the ultrahigh pressures of the deep Earth at ALS Beamline 12.2.2 while conducting in situ x-ray diffraction experiments to probe changes in crystal orientations.