Sample records for aliso canyon storage

  1. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

  2. Analysis of dust samples collected from spent nuclear fuel interim storage containers at Hope Creek, Delaware, and Diablo Canyon, California.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Charles R.; Enos, David George

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potentially corrosive environments may form on the surface of spent nuclear fuel dry storage canisters by deliquescence of deposited dusts. To assess this, samples of dust were collected from in-service dry storage canisters at two near-marine sites, the Hope Creek and Diablo Canyon storage installations, and have been characterized with respect to mineralogy, chemistry, and texture. At both sites, terrestrially-derived silicate minerals, including quartz, feldspars, micas, and clays, comprise the largest fraction of the dust. Also significant at both sites were particles of iron and iron-chromium metal and oxides generated by the manufacturing process. Soluble salt phases were minor component of the Hope Creek dusts, and were compositionally similar to inland salt aerosols, rich in calcium, sulfate, and nitrate. At Diablo Canyon, however, sea-salt aerosols, occurring as aggregates of NaCl and Mg-sulfate, were a major component of the dust samples. The seasalt aerosols commonly occurred as hollow spheres, which may have formed by evaporation of suspended aerosol seawater droplets, possibly while rising through the heated annulus between the canister and the overpack. The differences in salt composition and abundance for the two sites are attributed to differences in proximity to the open ocean and wave action. The Diablo Canyon facility is on the shores of the Pacific Ocean, while the Hope Creek facility is on the shores of the Delaware River, several miles from the open ocean.

  3. White Creek and Nine Canyon wind farms Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional wind storage and shaping services. Since these White Creek and Nine Canyon wind farms December 2006 2 Bonne ville Power Administration DOEBP-3770 November 2006...

  4. Hot Canyon

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This historical film footage, originally produced in the early 1950s as part of a series by WOI-TV, shows atomic research at Ames Laboratory. The work was conducted in a special area of the Laboratory known as the "Hot Canyon."

  5. Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact...

  6. Natural gas network resiliency to a %22shakeout scenario%22 earthquake.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Corbet, Thomas Frank,; Brooks, Robert E. [RBAC, Inc., Sherman Oaks, CA

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A natural gas network model was used to assess the likely impact of a scenario San Andreas Fault earthquake on the natural gas network. Two disruption scenarios were examined. The more extensive damage scenario assumes the disruption of all three major corridors bringing gas into southern California. If withdrawals from the Aliso Canyon storage facility are limited to keep the amount of stored gas within historical levels, the disruption reduces Los Angeles Basin gas supplies by 50%. If Aliso Canyon withdrawals are only constrained by the physical capacity of the storage system to withdraw gas, the shortfall is reduced to 25%. This result suggests that it is important for stakeholders to put agreements in place facilitating the withdrawal of Aliso Canyon gas in the event of an emergency.

  7. Sycamore Canyon Modernization

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Santee, CA The Sycamore Canyon Elementary School is one of five schools in the Santee district that has completed a modernization program. This first round of projects has helped inform the district's ongoing effort to modernize all of their facilities. The total energy use at Sycamore Canyon was successfully reduced by more than one-third, as compared to the pre-retrofit consumption. The school is currently operating with an energy use intensity of only 23 kBtu/SqFt, placing it in the top 99% of schools (per the EnergyStar rating system).

  8. Camp Pendleton Kings Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hills Grass Valley Black Mountain Cleghorn Lakes North Algodones Dunes Fish Creek Mountains Coyote Death Valley Surprise Canyon Pine Creek Hauser San Gabriel Piute Cypress ISA Table Mountain San Ysidro Rockhouse A Casa Diablo Southern Inyo Scodie Symmes Creek Independence Creek Moses White Mountains Cady

  9. New York Canyon Simulation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Engineered Geothermal Systems Demonstration Projects. Project objectives: To update the geologic model of New York Canyon with the assistance of state-of-the-art geophysical logs in new full-diameter wells and sub-surface microseismicmonitoring in new slim holes to be drilled in a ring around the EGS stimulation area; To create an exploitable geothermal reservoir through fracturing induced by long-term injection at moderate wellhead pressures.

  10. California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. Snake Hells Canyon Subbasin Inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snake Hells Canyon Subbasin Inventory May 2004 Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation .................................................................................................................. 1 1.1 The Subbasin Inventory and the Subbasin Planning Process Subbasin Inventory i May 2004 #12;LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1.LAND MANAGEMENT IN THE SNAKE HELLS CANYON

  12. Canyon Facilities - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,Computers »CafeteriasToursCancelingCanyon

  13. Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ltd. 1999. Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’sAppraisal of Martin Canyon Creek Restoration Final ProjectDublin, California, Martin Canyon Creek is a small tributary

  14. New York Canyon Stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raemy, B. Principal Investigator, TGP Development Company, LLC

    2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "Ă?Â?Ă?Â?No Go"Ă?Â?Ă?Âť decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

  15. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  16. Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Martin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration Owner’s Manual: FinalMartin Canyon Creek Stream Restoration in project documents,important component of stream restoration projects to assess

  17. ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KEHLER KL

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

  18. EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of processing the plutonium solutions to metal form using the F-Canyon and FB-Line facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  19. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The George Washington UniversityEnvironmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone ProjectBeneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon SiteFeasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic ArrayMay 2012

  20. Authigenic clay minerals in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group: Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, Waha Field, West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walling, Suzette Denise

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SUZETTE DENISE WALLING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Geology AUTHIGENIC CLAY MINERALS IN SANDSTONES OF THE DELAWARE MOUNTAIN GROUP: BELL CANYON AND CHERRY CANYON FORMATIONS, WAHA FIELD, WEST TEXAS...

  1. Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

  2. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    exposures in upper Chicken Creek Canyon. Figure 3-2a.Borings and test pits in Chicken Creek Canyon. Figure 3-2b.portion of upper Chicken Creek Canyon. Figure 3-2c. Borings

  3. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies. Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins...

  4. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- New York Canyon Stimulation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    New York Canyon Stimulation Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News...

  5. Annotated bibliography for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) with emphasis on the Grand Canyon population.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulet, C. T.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Glen Canyon Dam is a hydroelectric facility located on the Colorado River in Arizona that is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for multiple purposes including water storage, flood control, power generation, recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Glen Canyon Dam operations have been managed for the last several years to improve conditions for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other ecosystem components. An extensive amount of literature has been produced on the humpback chub. We developed this annotated bibliography to assist managers and researchers in the Grand Canyon as they perform assessments, refine management strategies, and develop new studies to examine the factors affecting humpback chub. The U.S. Geological Survey recently created a multispecies bibliography (including references on the humpback chub) entitled Bibliography of Native Colorado River Big Fishes (available at www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/data/COFishBib). That bibliography, while quite extensive and broader in scope than ours, is not annotated, and, therefore, does not provide any of the information in the original literature. In developing this annotated bibliography, we have attempted to assemble abstracts from relevant published literature. We present here abstracts taken unmodified from individual reports and articles except where noted. The bibliography spans references from 1976 to 2009 and is organized in five broad topical areas, including: (1) biology, (2) ecology, (3) impacts of dam operations, (4) other impacts, and (5) conservation and management, and includes twenty subcategories. Within each subcategory, we present abstracts alphabetically by author and chronologically by year. We present relevant articles not specific to either the humpback chub or Glen Canyon Dam, but cited in other included reports, under the Supporting Articles subcategory. We provide all citations in alphabetical order in Section 7.

  6. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  7. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  8. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  9. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  10. 20140430_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 April to 30 April 2014.

  11. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data 20130731

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 7/1/13 to 7/31/13.

  12. 20130416_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 4/16/13.

  13. Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 6/1/13 to 6/30/13

  14. Bayo Canyon, New Mexico, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A Lithologic and MonitorBayo Canyon, New

  15. Red Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:bJumpRed Bank, New Jersey: EnergyCanyon

  16. Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow,Bayport Biomass FacilityBear Canyon

  17. Spring Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity Corp JumpsourceSouthlake,AeHJump to:Spring Canyon

  18. Three Mile Canyon | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Ruby Canyon Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:Roscommon County,Vermont: Energy Resources JumpRuby Canyon

  20. Canyon Industries Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallaway ElectricCambridgeCanneltonCanyon Industries

  1. Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need for Management Compromise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I ;'. I Glen Canyon Dam, Fluctuating Water Levels, and Riparian Breeding Birds: The Need.--Large water releases from Glen Canyon Dam in May and June are harmful to riparian breeding birds along' INTRODUCTION 100,000,.... COLORAOQ RIVER NEAR GRAND CANYON (PHANTOM RANCHi The completion of Glen Canyon Dam

  2. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, James Winston

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Irion Counties indicate that Canyon sandstones in Irion County are younger than Canyon sandstones at Jameson field. Canyon sandstones at Brooks field in eastern Irion County (Fig. I) occur above the Fli ppen basinal shale "marker" (Elton, Rodgers... with the underly1ng shale is sharp; 7017 ft. 25 Fig. 9 Sedimentary structures in Canyon "A" sandstones, Union Texas Petroleum Sugg 4-1, Burnt Rock field, Lucky Canyon area, Irion County, Texas. Boldface letters (lower left) refer to photographs; small...

  3. Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology of the Florida Canyon gold deposit, Pershing County, Nevada, in: Gold and Silver...

  4. H CANYON PROCESSING IN CORRELATION WITH FH ANALYTICAL LABS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinheimer, E.

    2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Management of radioactive chemical waste can be a complicated business. H Canyon and F/H Analytical Labs are two facilities present at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC that are at the forefront. In fact H Canyon is the only large-scale radiochemical processing facility in the United States and this processing is only enhanced by the aid given from F/H Analytical Labs. As H Canyon processes incoming materials, F/H Labs provide support through a variety of chemical analyses. Necessary checks of the chemical makeup, processing, and accountability of the samples taken from H Canyon process tanks are performed at the labs along with further checks on waste leaving the canyon after processing. Used nuclear material taken in by the canyon is actually not waste. Only a small portion of the radioactive material itself is actually consumed in nuclear reactors. As a result various radioactive elements such as Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium are commonly found in waste and may be useful to recover. Specific processing is needed to allow for separation of these products from the waste. This is H Canyon's specialty. Furthermore, H Canyon has the capacity to initiate the process for weapons-grade nuclear material to be converted into nuclear fuel. This is one of the main campaigns being set up for the fall of 2012. Once usable material is separated and purified of impurities such as fission products, it can be converted to an oxide and ultimately turned into commercial fuel. The processing of weapons-grade material for commercial fuel is important in the necessary disposition of plutonium. Another processing campaign to start in the fall in H Canyon involves the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel for disposal in improved containment units. The importance of this campaign involves the proper disposal of nuclear waste in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations and the environment. As processing proceeds in the fall, H Canyon will have a substantial number of samples being sent to F/H Labs. All analyses of these samples are imperative to safe and efficient processing. The important campaigns to occur would be impossible without feedback from analyses such as chemical makeup of solutions, concentrations of dissolution acids and nuclear material, as well as nuclear isotopic data. The necessity of analysis for radiochemical processing is evident. Processing devoid of F/H Lab's feedback would go against the ideals of a safety-conscious and highly accomplished processing facility such as H Canyon.

  5. REMOVAL OF SOLIDS FROM HIGHLY ENRICHED URANIUM SOLUTIONS USING THE H-CANYON CENTRIFUGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T; Fernando Fondeur, F

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the dissolution of Pu-containing materials in HB-Line, highly enriched uranium (HEU) solutions stored in Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 of H-Canyon must be transferred to provide storage space. The proposed plan is to centrifuge the solutions to remove solids which may present downstream criticality concerns or cause operational problems with the 1st Cycle solvent extraction due to the formation of stable emulsions. An evaluation of the efficiency of the H-Canyon centrifuge concluded that a sufficient amount (> 90%) of the solids in the Tank 11.1 and 12.2 solutions will be removed to prevent any problems. We based this conclusion on the particle size distribution of the solids isolated from samples of the solutions and the calculation of particle settling times in the centrifuge. The particle size distributions were calculated from images generated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mean particle diameters for the distributions were 1-3 {micro}m. A significant fraction (30-50%) of the particles had diameters which were < 1 {micro}m; however, the mass of these solids is insignificant (< 1% of the total solids mass) when compared to particles with larger diameters. It is also probable that the number of submicron particles was overestimated by the software used to generate the particle distribution due to the morphology of the filter paper used to isolate the solids. The settling times calculated for the H-Canyon centrifuge showed that particles with diameters less than 1 to 0.5 {micro}m will not have sufficient time to settle. For this reason, we recommend the use of a gelatin strike to coagulate the submicron particles and facilitate their removal from the solution; although we have no experimental basis to estimate the level of improvement. Incomplete removal of particles with diameters < 1 {micro}m should not cause problems during purification of the HEU in the 1st Cycle solvent extraction. Particles with diameters > 1 {micro}m account for > 99% of the solid mass and will be efficiently removed by the centrifuge; therefore, the formation of emulsions during solvent extraction operations is not an issue. Under the current processing plan, the solutions from Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 will be transferred to the enriched uranium storage (EUS) tank following centrifugation. The solution from Tanks 11.1 and 12.2 may remain in the EUS tank for an extended time prior to purification. The effects of extended storage on the solution were not evaluated as part of this study.

  6. Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

  7. Financial Analysis of Experimental Releases Conducted at Glen Canyon Dam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration #12;ii FOREWORD This report was prepared by Argonne Canyon Dam (GCD) conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy's Western Area Power Administration (Western. The facilities known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects include dams equipped for power

  8. Thirty-five years at Pajarito Canyon Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A history of the research activities performed at the Pajarito Canyon Site from 1946 to 1981 is presented. Critical assemblies described include: the Topsy assembly; Lady Godiva; Godiva 2; Jezebel; Flattop; the Honeycomb assembly for Rover studies; Kiwi-TNT; PARKA reactor; Big Ten; and Plasma Cavity Assembly.

  9. Canyon incision and knickpoint propagation recorded by apatite He thermochronometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    low- temperature cooling histories that are consistent with the observed data. Derived cooling, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24-25, Haus 27, 14476 Potsdam, Germany b Berkeley Geochronology Center, 2455 Ridge over geological timescales. We analyzed four samples from the Cotahuasi­Ocońa canyon system

  10. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  11. ewly discovered at the bottom of the Hudson Canyon, the largest submarine canyon off the eastern United States, is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    also have implications in alternative energy and global warming, continues Rona, who likens methane, it is a potent greenhouse gas that contributes to global warming." Rona and his colleagues discovered the pits the canyon revealed abnormally high levels of methane, while sonar data collected by the free

  12. Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

  13. Environmental analysis of Lower Pueblo/Lower Los Alamos Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Becker, N.M.; Rodgers, J.C.; Hansen, W.R.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, Pueblo Canyon, and Los Alamos Canyon found residual contamination at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of residual radioactivity is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. However, residual radioactivity does not exceed proposed cleanup criteria in either lower Pueblo or lower Los Alamos Canyons. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to construct a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon to prevent further transport of residual radioactivity onto San Ildefonso Indian Pueblo land, and (3) to clean the residual radioactivity from the canyon system. Alternative 2, to cleanup the canyon system, is rejected as a viable alternative. Thousands of truckloads of sediment would have to be removed and disposed of, and this effort is unwarranted by the low levels of contamination present. Residual radioactivity levels, under either present conditions or projected future conditions, will not result in significant radiation doses to persons exposed. Modeling efforts show that future transport activity will not result in any residual radioactivity concentrations higher than those already existing. Thus, although construction of a sediment trap in lower Pueblo Canyon is a viable alternative, this effort also is unwarranted, and the no-action alternative is the preferred alternative.

  14. Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lata

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

  15. The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.H.

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

  16. A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

  17. 40Ar/39Ar Dating of the Bandelier Tuff and San Diego Canyon Ignimbrite...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Canyon Ignimbrites, Jemez Mountains, New Mexico- Temporal Constraints on Magmatic Evolution Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  18. Cross-shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents over an Isolated Coastal Canyon: Equilibrium Circulation and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    boundary layer in three distinct horizontal locations: along the upstream limb of the canyon (flux offCross-shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents over an Isolated Coastal Canyon of dense water by oscillatory barotropic currents incident upon an isolated coastal canyon. The physical

  19. INFLUENCE OF GEOMETRY ON THE MEAN FLOW WITHIN URBAN STREET CANYONS A COMPARISON OF WIND TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savory, Eric

    the canyon, the smaller the wind speed close to the cavity ground, giving increasingly poor ventilation, ventilation, vortex Nomenclature d = Displacement height (m); H, W = Height and width of canyon (m); k on the local pollutant transport. There have been many full-scale studies, such as De- Paul and Sheih (1986

  20. Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray SUMMARY: I climb ice in to ask about local climbing. The guys there told me there was ice nearby, in Clear Creek Canyon. I. Four pitches? Five? It was time to find a partner. The only ice climber I knew in Denver was a friend

  1. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons O. Richoux, C of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof

  2. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Canyon-infilling and gas hydrate occurrences in the frontal fold to infer the canyon-infilling, fold uplift, and gas hydrate occurrences beneath the frontal fold at the toe simu- lating reflector (BSR) on seismic sections indicates the base of gas hydrate stability zone

  3. Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the upper portion of Sandia Canyon, the first two were centered in a cattail-dominated marsh with a ponderosa pine overstory and the third web was placed in a much drier transition area with a ponderosa pine overstory. Webs 1 and 2 had the highest species diversity indices with deer mice the most commonly captured species in all webs. However, at Web 1, voles, shrews, and harvest mice, species more commonly found in moist habitats, made up a much greater overall percentage (65.6%) than did deer mice and brush mice (34.5%). The highest densities and biomass of animals were found in Web 1 with a continual decrease in density estimates in each web downstream. There is no statistical difference between the mean body weights of deer mice and brush mice between sites. Mean body length was also determined not to be statistically different between the webs (GLM [deer mouse], F = 0.89, p = 0.4117; GLM [brush mouse], F = 2.49, p = 0.0999). Furthermore, no statistical difference between webs was found for the mean lean body masses of deer and brush mice (GLM [deer mouse], F = 2.54, p = 0.0838; GLM [brush mouse], F = 1.60, p = 0.2229). Additional monitoring studies should be conducted in Sandia Canyon so comparisons over time can be made. In addition, rodent tissues should be sampled for contaminants and then compared to background or control populations elsewhere at the Laboratory or at an off-site location.

  4. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  5. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  6. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  7. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  8. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  9. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  10. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  11. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  12. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  13. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  14. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  15. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Thibedeau, Joe

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  16. The kinematics of debris flow transport down a canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paul M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    follows the style of 113 W 112 W Great Salt Lake I ayton E. Layton Farmington Centerville Bountiful ~v~ vv v Wasatch Mountains 41 N Study Area 10 miles Salt Lake City II II ll ( 1 km Figure t. Location of study area. Ughtning Canyon... of October (Warburton, 1987). Geologic Conditions The central geologic feature of the region is the normal Wasatch Fault, whose upthrown side is the Wasatch mountains (to the East) and whose downthrown side is the basin containing the Great Salt Lake (to...

  17. 20131101-1130_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Nov to 30 Nov 2013.

  18. 20140501-0531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 May to 31 May 2014.

  19. 20131001-1031_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 Oct 2013 to 31 Oct 2013.

  20. 20130901-0930_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 1 September 2013 to 30 September 2013.

  1. 20140101-0131_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Jan to 31 Jan 2014.

  2. 20140701-0731_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 July to 31 July 2014.

  3. 20140601-0630_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 June to 30 June 2014.

  4. 20130501-20130531_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from May 2013

  5. 20131201-1231_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Dec to 31 Dec 2013.

  6. 20140201-0228_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Feb to 28 Feb 2014.

  7. 20130801-0831_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderhoff, Alex

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 8/1/13 to 8/31/13.

  8. 20140301-0331_Green Machine Florida Canyon Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibedeau, Joe

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing innovative product developments to demonstrate financial and technical viability of producing electricity from low temperature geothermal fluids, coproduced in a mining operation, by employing ElectraTherm's modular and mobile heat-to-power "micro geothermal" power plant with output capacity expected in the 30-70kWe range. The Green Machine is an Organic Rankine Cycle power plant. The Florida Canyon machine is powered by geothermal brine with air cooled condensing. The data provided is an hourly summary from 01 Mar to 31 Mar 2014.

  9. American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources Jump to:Almo, Idaho: EnergyAltenCanyon Power Plant

  10. Mission Canyon, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV Jump to:1980)Bay,Canyon,

  11. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  12. Energy Storage

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Parans

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL Distinguished Scientist Parans Paranthaman is discovering new materials with potential for greatly increasing batteries' energy storage capacity and bring manufacturing back to the US.

  13. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  14. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .example system based on log-structured storage 10.1 SystemA storage bottleneck. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow and Pollutant Transport in Urban Street Canyons with Ground Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xian-Xiang

    Our study employed large-eddy simulation (LES) based on a one-equation subgrid-scale model to investigate the flow field and pollutant dispersion characteristics inside urban street canyons. Unstable thermal stratification ...

  16. Depositional environment and facies relationships of the Canyon sandstone, Val Verde Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Michael Harold

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    units of the Bouma turbi- dit. e sequence. The sequence of sedimentary structures and change in grain size indicate that the Canyon sandstone was deposited from a turbidity current flow. Complete bed sets are present within the cored interval...

  17. Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics of the Alaminos Canyon area, Gulf of Mexico.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechler, Suzanne Marie

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    morphology, salt structure, and suprasalt sediments indicate the majority of the slope is covered by a shallow salt canopy. The salt structure map indicates that the Alaminos Canyon study area represents a transition from a semi-continuous salt sheet...

  18. Explaining the relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gang, G-Young

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reached the peak of its cultural development and experienced great increase in population. After this period, lowered moisture on the Colorado Plateau coincided with depopulation and the cessation of building activities at 21 Chaco Canyon. Finally...

  19. Miocene unroofing of the Canyon Range during extension along the Sevier Desert Detachment, west central Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockli, Daniel F.; Linn, Jonathan K.; Walker, J. Douglas; Dumitru, Trevor A.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apatite fission track results from Neoproterozoic and Lower Cambrian quartzites collected from the Canyon Range in west central Utah reveal a significant early to middle Miocene cooling event (?19–15 Ma). Preextensional temperatures estimated from...

  20. Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Leslie Ann

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure...

  1. Integrated Project Management Planning for the Deactivation of the Savannah River Site F-Canyon Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, T.G.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explains the planning process that is being utilized by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to take the F-Canyon Complex facilities from operations to a deactivated condition awaiting final decommissioning.

  2. Theta13 Neutrino Experiment at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant, LBNL Engineering Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oshatz, Daryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL/PUB-5505 Neutrino Experiment atDiablo Canyon Power Plant LBNL Engineering Summary Report*DE-AC03-76SF00098 ? 13 LBNL Engineering Summary Report,

  3. Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oar, D.L.

    1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

  4. Microsoft Word - CX-Franklin-BadgerCanyonGrandview-RedMtnsDisconnectSw...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    8, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Franklin-Badger Canyon and Grandview-Red...

  5. Hydrogeology and tritium transport in Chicken Creek Canyon, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Preston D.; Javandel, Iraj

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-1. Location of the tritium plume based upon 3rd quarter,locations shown. Figure 3-5. Tritium activities (pCi/L) inCanyon. "ND" indicates no tritium detected. Figure 3-6.

  6. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  7. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, James Winston

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -1, Burnt Rock field. Letters at right of center column indicate turbi dite divisions . . . . . . . . . . 35 14. Grain size, compostion, and bedding types in Canyon sandstones, 7296-7299 feet, Phillips Petroleum Munn 1-A, Jameson field. Letters at right... divisions. . . . . . . . . . . 37 16. Grain size, composition, and bedding types in Canyon sandstones, 7377-7381 feet, Phillips Petroleum Munn 1-A, Jameson field. Letters at right of center column indicate turbi dite divisions...

  8. Depositional environment of Canyon (Cisco) sandstones, North Jameson field Mitchell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dally, David Jesse

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the lower shale; 6236 ft (1900. 7 m). Figure 7. Sedimentary structures in Canyon (Cisco) sand- stones, Sun McCa, be B-5, Jameson (North) Strawn field, Mitchell County, Texas. Boldface letters (lower left) refer to photographs; small capital letters...DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF CANYON (CISCO) SANDSTONES, NORTH JAMESON FIELD MITCHELL COUNTY, TEXAS A Thesis DAVID JESSE DALLY Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  9. Hydropower and the environment: A case study at Glen Canyon Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegner, D.L. [Denver Technical Service Center, Flagstaff, AZ (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The management of hydroelectric resources in the Colorado River requires a balancing of hydrologic, social, natural and cultural resources. The resulting management often has to deal with inherently conflicting objectives, short and long-term goals, time frames and operational flexibility. Glen Canyon Dam, AZ, on the Colorado River, controls the release of water into the Grand Canyon. The dam has been under intense public scrutiny since it was completed in 1963. An Environmental Impact Statement evaluating the future operations and options for Glen Canyon Dam was initiated by the Department of the Interior in 1989 and completed in 1995. An Adaptive Management approach to future operational management has been developed as part of the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement process. Future operations at Glen Canyon Dam will take into consideration the need to balance water movement and hydroelectricity development with natural, recreation, Native American and cultural needs. Future management of rivers requires acknowledgement of the dynamic nature of ecosystems and the need to link scientific information into the decision-making process. Lessons learned and programs developed at Glen Canyon Dam may be applied to other river systems.

  10. Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Estufa Canyon????????????. 70 19 The landscape gradient of Estufa Canyon?????????????... 74 20 A graph showing the rate of changes in the landscape gradients in the downstream direction of Estufa Canyon??????????????.. 77 21 A graph... steep slopes whereas fine surfaces occur in lower elevations and have low slopes. A surface of high elevation and with a steep slope (high surface roughness) is characterized by a high potential for mass movement. A surface of low elevation and a 21...

  11. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  12. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  13. H-CANYON AIR EXHAUST TUNNEL INSPECTION VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R.; Fogle, R.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Canyon at Savannah River Site is a large concrete structure designed for chemical separation processes of radioactive material. The facility requires a large ventilation system to maintain negative pressure in process areas for radioactive contamination control and personnel protection. The ventilation exhaust is directed through a concrete tunnel under the facility which is approximately five feet wide and 8 feet tall that leads to a sand filter and stack. Acidic vapors in the exhaust have had a degrading effect on the surface of the concrete tunnels. Some areas have been inspected; however, the condition of other areas is unknown. Experience from historical inspections with remote controlled vehicles will be discussed along with the current challenge of inspecting levels below available access points. The area of interest in the exhaust tunnel must be accessed through a 14 X 14 inch concrete plug in the floor of the hot gang valve corridor. The purpose for the inspection is to determine the condition of the inside of the air tunnel and establish if there are any structural concerns. Various landmarks, pipe hangers and exposed rebar are used as reference points for the structural engineers when evaluating the current integrity of the air tunnel.

  14. The Bayo Canyon/radioactive lanthanum (RaLa) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dummer, J.E.; Taschner, J.C.; Courtright, C.C.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LANL conducted 254 radioactive lanthanum (RaLa) implosion experiments Sept. 1944-March 1962, in order to test implosion designs for nuclear weapons. High explosives surrounding common metals (surrogates for Pu) and a radioactive source containing up to several thousand curies of La, were involved in each experiment. The resulting cloud was deposited as fallout, often to distances of several miles. This report was prepared to summarize existing records as an aid in evaluating the off-site impact, if any, of this 18-year program. The report provides a historical setting for the program, which was conducted in Technical Area 10, Bayo Canyon about 3 miles east of Los Alamos. A description of the site is followed by a discussion of collateral experiments conducted in 1950 by US Air Force for developing an airborne detector for tracking atmospheric nuclear weapons tests. All known off-site data from the RaLa program are tabulated and discussed. Besides the radiolanthanum, other potential trace radioactive material that may have been present in the fallout is discussed and amounts estimated. Off-site safety considerations are discussed; a preliminary off-site dose assessment is made. Bibliographical data on 33 persons important to the program are presented as footnotes.

  15. An In Situ Radiological Survey of Three Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Maurer

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in situ radiological survey of Mortandad, Ten Site, and DP Canyons at the Los Alamos National Laboratory was conducted during August 19-30, 1996. The purpose of this survey was to measure the quantities of radionuclides that remain in the canyons from past laboratory operations. A total of 65 in situ measurements were conducted using high-resolution gamma radiation detectors at 1 meter above the ground. The measurements were obtained in the streambeds of the canyons beginning near the water-release points at the laboratories and extending to the ends of the canyons. Three man-made gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected in the canyons: americium-241 ({sup 241}Am), cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs), and cobalt-60 ({sup 60}Co). Estimated contamination levels ranged from 13.3-290.4 picocuries per gram (pCi/g)for {sup 241}Am, 4.4-327.8 pCi/g for {sup 137}Cs, and 0.4-2.6 pCi/g for {sup 60}Co.

  16. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

  17. Long-term surveillance plan for the Burro Canyon disposal cell, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the US Department of Energy (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Burro Canyon disposal cell in San Miguel County, Colorado. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Burro Canyon disposal cell. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete at the Burro Canyon disposal cell and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. Attachment 1 contains the concurrence letters from NRC. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Burro Canyon disposal cell performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. Ground water monitoring will not be required at the Burro Canyon disposal cell because the ground water protection strategy is supplemental standards based on low yield from the uppermost aquifer.

  18. Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands, Utah, May 2010 One week after the fact, at the tail-end of the weekend, I'm sitting down to write

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Salt Creek Canyon, Canyonlands, Utah, May 2010 One week after the fact, at the tail the week following UM's graduation, and reserving backcountry camp sites in Canyonlands' Salt Creek Canyon. The itinerary would take us from the south end of Salt Creek Canyon to the Needles' District visitor center

  19. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  4. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by Russell C. Sears AR. Larson Fall 2009 Stasis: Flexible Transactional StorageC. Sears Abstract Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage by

  5. Environmental analysis of Acid/middle Pueblo Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Hansen, W.R.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological survey of the former radioactive waste treatment plant site (TA-45), Acid Canyon, and Pueblo Canyon found residual radioactivity at the site itself and in the channel and banks of Acid, Pueblo, and lower Los Alamos Canyons, all the way to the Rio Grande. The largest reservoir of radioactive material is in lower Pueblo Canyon, which is on DOE property. The only areas where residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed cleanup criteria are at the former vehicle decontamination facility, located between the former treatment plant site and Acid Canyon, around the former untreated waste outfall and for a short distance below, and in two small areas farther down in Acid Canyon. The three alternatives proposed are (1) to take no action, (2) to fence the areas where the residual radioactivity exceeds the proposed criteria (minimal action), and (3) to clean up the former vehicle decontamination facility and around the former untreated waste outfall. Calculations based on actual measurements indicate that the annual dose at the location having the greatest residual radioactivity would be about 12% of the applicable guideline. Most doses are much smaller than that. No environmental impacts are associated with either the no-action or minimal action alternatives. The impact associated with the cleanup alternative is very small. The preferred alternative is to clean up the areas around the former vehicle decontamination facility and the untreated waste outfall. This course of action is recommended not because of any real danger associated with the residual radioactivity, but rather because the cleanup operation is a minor effort and would conform with the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) philosophy.

  6. Safety analysis -- 200 Area Savannah River Plant, F-Canyon Operations. Supplement 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beary, M.M.; Collier, C.D.; Fairobent, L.A.; Graham, R.F.; Mason, C.L.; McDuffee, W.T.; Owen, T.L.; Walker, D.H.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The F-Canyon facility is located in the 200 Separations Area and uses the Purex process to recover plutonium from reactor-irradiated uranium. The irradiated uranium is normally in the form of solid or hollow cylinders called slugs. These slugs are encased in aluminum cladding and are sent to the F-Canyon from the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor areas or from the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the F-Canyon operations and is an update to a section of a previous SAR. The previous SAR documented an analysis of the entire 200 Separations Area operations. This SAR documents an analysis of the F-Canyon and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the Savannah River Implementation Plans. A substantial amount of the information supporting the conclusions of this SAR is found in the Systems Analysis. Some F-Canyon equipment has been updated during the time between the Systems Analysis and this SAR and a complete description of this equipment is included in this report. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the F-Canyon can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations and to the environment. In this report, risk is defined as the expected frequency of an accident, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequence in person-rem. The units of risk for radiological dose are person-rem/year. Maximum individual exposure values have also been calculated and reported.

  7. Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage rings are circular machines that store particle beams at a constant energy. Beams are stored in rings without acceleration for a number of reasons (Tab. 1). Storage rings are used in high-energy, nuclear, atomic, and molecular physics, as well as for experiments in chemistry, material and life sciences. Parameters for storage rings such as particle species, energy, beam intensity, beam size, and store time vary widely depending on the application. The beam must be injected into a storage ring but may not be extracted (Fig. 1). Accelerator rings such as synchrotrons are used as storage rings before and after acceleration. Particles stored in rings include electrons and positrons; muons; protons and anti-protons; neutrons; light and heavy, positive and negative, atomic ions of various charge states; molecular and cluster ions, and neutral polar molecules. Spin polarized beams of electrons, positrons, and protons were stored. The kinetic energy of the stored particles ranges from 10{sup -6} eV to 3.5 x 10{sup 12} eV (LHC, 7 x 10{sup 12} eV planned), the number of stored particles from one (ESR) to 1015 (ISR). To store beam in rings requires bending (dipoles) and transverse focusing (quadrupoles). Higher order multipoles are used to correct chromatic aberrations, to suppress instabilities, and to compensate for nonlinear field errors of dipoles and quadrupoles. Magnetic multipole functions can be combined in magnets. Beams are stored bunched with radio frequency systems, and unbunched. The magnetic lattice and radio frequency system are designed to ensure the stability of transverse and longitudinal motion. New technologies allow for better storage rings. With strong focusing the beam pipe dimensions became much smaller than previously possible. For a given circumference superconducting magnets make higher energies possible, and superconducting radio frequency systems allow for efficient replenishment of synchrotron radiation losses of large current electron or positron beams. Storage rings have instrumentation to monitor the electrical and mechanical systems, and the beam quality. Computers are used to control the operation. Large storage rings have millions of control points from all systems. The time dependent beam intensity I(t) can often be approximated by an exponential function I(t) = I(0) exp(-t/{tau}) (1) where the decay time {tau} and, correspondingly, the store time ranges from a few turns to 10 days (ISR). {tau} can be dominated by a variety of effects including lattice nonlinearities, beam-beam, space charge, intrabeam and Touschek scattering, interaction with the residual gas or target, or the lifetime of the stored particle. In this case, the beam lifetime measurement itself can be the purpose of a storage ring experiment. The main consideration in the design of a storage ring is the preservation of the beam quality over the store length. The beam size and momentum spread can be reduced through cooling, often leading to an increase in the store time. For long store times vacuum considerations are important since the interaction rate of the stored particles with the residual gas molecules is proportional to the pressure, and an ultra-high vacuum system may be needed. Distributed pumping with warm activated NEG surfaces or cold surfaces in machines with superconducting magnets are ways to provide large pumping speeds and achieve low pressures even under conditions with dynamic gas loads. The largest application of storage rings today are synchrotron light sources, of which about 50 exist world wide. In experiments where the beam collides with an internal target or another beam, a storage ring allows to re-use the accelerated beam many times if the interaction with the target is sufficiently small. In hadron collider and ion storage rings store times of many hours or even days are realized, corresponding to up to 1011 turns and thereby target passages. Ref. [3] is the first proposal for a collider storage ring. A number of storage rings exist where the beam itself or its decay products are the object of s

  8. Cool Storage Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  10. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  11. LABORATORY-NUMERICAL MODEL COMPARISONS OF CANYON FLOWS: A PARAMETER STUDY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but the enhanced viscosities needed to obtain numerical stability give boundary layers that are too wide along length scales, one the fluid depth and another a more narrow boundary-layer-like thickness [O(RoBu-1 is the interaction of an oscillatory, along-slope background current with an isolated canyon incised in an otherwise

  12. EA-1980: Spar Canyon-Round Valley Access Road System Improvements, Custer County, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess potential environmental impacts of proposed improvements to the access road system for its existing Spar Canyon-Round Valley Transmission Line located on Bureau of Land Management land in Custer County, Idaho.

  13. Air quality monitoring and modelling techniques for street canyons: the Paris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2000-37 Air quality monitoring and modelling techniques for street canyons: the Paris experience S of developing efficient air quality monitoring and modelling methodologies to cover the needs of public health, published in "Air Pollution Conference 2000, Cambridge : United Kingdom (2000)" #12;1 Introduction In recent

  14. Functional design criteria, Project W-059, B Plant Canyon ventilation upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roege, P.E.

    1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines the essential functions and requirements to be included in the design of the proposed B Plant canyon exhaust system upgrade. The project will provide a new exhaust air filter system and isolate the old filters from the airstream.

  15. Final Technical Report - Modernization of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Taddeucci, P E

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project (BCH) was purchased by the City of Boulder, CO (the city) in 2001. Project facilities were originally constructed in 1910 and upgraded in the 1930s and 1940s. By 2009, the two 10 MW turbine/generators had reached or were nearing the end of their useful lives. One generator had grounded out and was beyond repair, reducing plant capacity to 10 MW. The remaining 10 MW unit was expected to fail at any time. When the BCH power plant was originally constructed, a sizeable water supply was available for the sole purpose of hydroelectric power generation. Between 1950 and 2001, that water supply had gradually been converted to municipal water supply by the city. By 2001, the water available for hydroelectric power generation at BCH could not support even one 10 MW unit. Boulder lacked the financial resources to modernize the facilities, and Boulder anticipated that when the single, operational historical unit failed, the project would cease operation. In 2009, the City of Boulder applied for and received a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant for $1.18 million toward a total estimated project cost of $5.155 million to modernize BCH. The federal funding allowed Boulder to move forward with plant modifications that would ensure BCH would continue operation. Federal funding was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Boulder determined that a single 5 MW turbine/generator would be the most appropriate capacity, given the reduced water supply to the plant. Average annual BCH generation with the old 10 MW unit had been about 8,500 MW-hr, whereas annual generation with a new, efficient turbine could average 11,000 to 12,000 MW-hr. The incremental change in annual generation represents a 30% increase in generation over pre-project conditions. The old turbine/generator was a single nozzle Pelton turbine with a 5-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 82%. The new unit is a double nozzle Pelton turbine with a 10-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 88%. This alone represents a 6% increase in overall efficiency. The old turbine operated at low efficiencies due to age and non-optimal sizing of the turbine for the water flow available to the unit. It was shut down whenever water flow dropped to less than 4-5 cfs, and at that flow, efficiency was 55 to 60%. The new turbine will operate in the range of 70 to 88% efficiency through a large portion of the existing flow range and would only have to be shut down at flow rates less than 3.7 cfs. Efficiency is expected to increase by 15-30%, depending on flow. In addition to the installation of new equipment, other goals for the project included: �¢���¢ Increasing safety at Boulder Canyon Hydro �¢���¢ Increasing protection of the Boulder Creek environment �¢���¢ Modernizing and integrating control equipment into Boulder�¢����s municipal water supply system, and �¢���¢ Preserving significant historical engineering information prior to power plant modernization. From January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012, combined consultant and contractor personnel hours paid for by both the city and the federal government have totaled approximately 40,000. This equates roughly to seven people working full time on the project from January 2010 through December 2012. This project also involved considerable material expense (steel pipe, a variety of valves, electrical equipment, and the various components of the turbine and generator), which were not accounted for in terms of hours spent on the project. However, the material expense related to this project did help to create or preserve manufacturing/industrial jobs throughout the United States. As required by ARRA, the various components of the hydroelectric project were manufactured or substantially transformed in the U.S. BCH is eligible for nomination to

  16. Storage System and IBM System Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM® XIV® Storage System and IBM System Storage® SAN Volume Controller deliver high performance and smart management for SAP® landscapes IBM SAP International Competence Center #12;"The combination of the XIV Storage System and SAN Volume Controller gives us a smarter way to manage our storage. If we need

  17. Analysis of F-Canyon Effluents During the Dissolution Cycle with a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer/Multipath Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, E.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Air samples from F-Canyon effluents were collected at the F-Canyon stack and transported to a laboratory at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for analysis using a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in conjunction with a multipath cell. Air samples were collected during the decladding and acid cuts of the dissolution of the irradiated aluminum-cladded slugs. The FTIR analyses of the air samples show the presence of NO2, NO, HNO2, N2O, SF6, and 85Kr during the dissolution cycle. The concentration time profiles of these effluents corresponded with expected release rates from the F-Canyon operations.

  18. Long-term surveillance plan for the Burro Canyon disposal cell Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Burro Canyon disposal cell in San Miguel County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Burro Canyon disposal cell. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete at the Burro Canyon disposal cell and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. Attachment 1 contains the concurrence letters from NRC. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE has implemented to ensure that the Burro Canyon disposal cell performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. Ground water monitoring will not be required at the Burro Canyon disposal cell because the ground water protection strategy is supplemental standards based on low yield from the uppermost aquifer. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project`s long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR 40.27(b) and 40 CFR 192.03.

  19. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  20. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  1. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage: Storage Capacity,Thermodynamics and Kinetics. Abstract: Solid-state reversible...

  2. Lateral Continuity of the Eagle Ford Group Strata in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek, Terrell County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Rand D

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    simplistic assumptions about relevant horizontal reservoir heterogeneities can lead to sub-optimal or uneconomical exploitation. High-resolution correlation of individual beds in the Eagle Ford Group over several miles in Lozier Canyon and Antonio Creek...

  3. Laboratory Experiments on the Interaction of a Buoyant Coastal Current with a Canyon: Application to the East Greenland Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, David A.

    This paper presents a set of laboratory experiments focused on how a buoyant coastal current flowing over a sloping bottom interacts with a canyon and what controls the separation, if any, of the current from the upstream ...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News,...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrogen storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage Energy Department Awards 7M to Advance Hydrogen Storage Systems On June 12, 2014, in CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure...

  6. Capability to Recover Plutonium-238 in H-Canyon/HB-Line - 13248

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Kenneth S. Jr.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)] [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29802 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np- 237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase- 3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ?2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase- 1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material. (authors)

  7. Photon Storage Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, K.-J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sessler, "Analysis of Photon Storage Cavities for a Free-configuration of coupled storage cavity and PEL cavity. TheFig. 2. A ring resonator storage cavity coupled through a

  8. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  9. Decontamination of Savannah River Plant H-Area hot-canyon crane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rankin, W N; Sims, J R

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination techniques applicable to the remotely operated bridge cranes in canyon buildings at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) were identified and were evaluated in laboratory-scale tests. High pressure Freon blasting was found to be the most attractive process available for this application. Strippable coatings were selected as an alternative technique in selected applications. The ability of high pressure Freon blasting plus two strippable coatings (Quadcoat 100 and Alara 1146) to remove the type of contamination expected on SRP cranes was demonstrated in laboratory-scale tests. Quadrex HPS was given a contract to decontaminate the H-Area hot canyon crane. Decontamination operations were successfully carried out within the specified time-frame window. The radiation level goals specified by SRP were met and decontamination was accomplished with 85% less personnel exposure than estimated by SRP before the job started. This reduction is attributed to the increased efficiency of the new decontamination techniques used. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Modelling air pollution abatement in deep street canyons by means of air scrubbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Giovanni, Marina; Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Giammaria, Franco; Monaco, Alessio; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep street canyons are characterized by weak ventilation and recirculation of air. In such environment, the exposure to particulate matter and other air pollutants is enhanced, with a consequent worsening of both safety and health. The main solution adopted by the international community is aimed at the reduction of the emissions. In this theoretical study, we test a new solution: the removal of air pollutants close to their sources by a network of Air Pollution Abatement (APA) devices. The APA technology depletes gaseous and particulate air pollutants by a portable and low-consuming scrubbing system, that mimics the processes of wet and dry deposition. We estimate the potential pollutant abatement efficacy of a single absorber by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method. The presence of the scrubber effectively creates an additional sink at the bottom of the canyon, accelerating its cleaning process by up to 70%, when an almost perfect scrubber (90% efficiency) is simulated. The efficacy of absorber is not...

  11. Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Record of Decision, October 25, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE)1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects, BPA will build and operate a 12-mile long, 230-kilovolt (kV) double-circuit transmission line between the wind projects and BPA's new 230-kV John Day Substation in Sherman County, Oregon. BPA will also expand its existing 500-kV John Day Substation.

  12. Storage and IO Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Burst Buffer User Defined Images Archive Home R & D Storage and IO Technologies Storage and IO Technologies Burst Buffer NVRAM and Burst Buffer Use Cases In collaboration...

  13. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting IO Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file...

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to MW/40 MWI-IR Battery Energy Storage Facility", proc. 23rdcompressed air, and battery energy storage are all only 65

  15. Landslides and other mass movements near TA-33, northern White Rock Canyon, New Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dethier, D.P.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive slump complexes and at least two rock avalanches flank the eastern rim of the Pajarito Plateau along northern White Rock Canyon, north of TA-33. Landslides failed along mechanically weak rocks in the Santa Fe Group, within the Puye Formation, or in Pliocene alluvial and lacustrine units. The landslides are mainly of early or middle Pleistocene age. The toe area of at least,one slump complex has been active in the late Pleistocene, damming White Rock Canyon near the mouth of Water Canyon. Lacustrine sediment that filled this lake, or series of lakes, to an elevation of at least 1710 m is preserved at a number of upstream sites, including a deposit near the Buckman townsite that exposes 30 m of lacustrine sediment. Charcoal collected at several sites has been submitted for {sup 14}C dating. Landslides, however, probably do not represent a significant short-term threat to the material disposal areas at TA-33. Bedrock that lies beneath the TA-33 mesa is relatively stable, the mesa shows no signs of incipient failure, and past periods of slide activity were responses to rapid downcutting of the Rio Grande and climate change, probably over periods of several decades, at least. Rockfall and headward erosion of gullies do not represent significant decadal hazards on canyon rims near TA-33. Gully migration near MDA-K is a potential threat, but the gullies were not examined in detail. A system of north-trending faults, at least one of which displays Pleistocene activity, bisects the TA-33 mesa. If these faults are capable of producing significant seismic shaking, generalizations about landslide and rockfall hazards must be reevaluated.

  16. Deformation of a basement corner, Crazy Woman Canyon, northeastern Bighorn Mountains, Wyoming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gretchen Louise

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structures, and fractures and sample collecting in the field area were done during the summers of 1987-1988. Laboratory analysis was accomplished using the facilities of the Center for Tectonophysics and the Department of Geology at Texas ADAM University... the Bighorn Mountain front. Analysis of fracture, foliation, and calcite strain data, and deformation mechanisms suggest that the structures in Crazy Woman Canyon are locally controlled by pre-existing structures in the Precambrian basement. Interpreting...

  17. Hydrodynamic trapping in Mission Canyon Formation (Mississippian) reservoirs: Elkhorn Ranch field, North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demis, W.D. (Marathon Oil Co., Houston, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbons in Mission Canyon dolomite reservoirs in the Elkhorn Ranch field are trapped by downdip flow of formation water to the northeast. Elkhorn Ranch field is located on a north-plunging anticline with only 10 ft (3 m) of crestal closure. The Mission Canyon is a regressive, shallowing upward sequence of subtidal dolomitized mudstones and wackestones grading upward into sebkha-salina evaporites. Mission Canyon oil production is localized on the north and northeast side of the structure. Maps of porosity pinch-outs and permeability barriers defined from core data, superimposed upon the Mission Canyon structure, show that most of the oil cannot be trapped by stratigraphic facies change. Southwest-trending, updip porosity pinch-outs cross the north-plunging structural axis at an angle so low that hydrocarbons would leak out to the southwest under hydrostatic conditions. Downdip hydrodynamic flow to the northeast provides the critical trapping component. Regional maps of apparent formation water resistivity and water salinity show a region of fresher water south and southwest of the field. A regional potentiometric map constructed using Horner-plot extrapolated shut-in pressure data indicates a head gradient of about 20 ft/mi (4 m/km) to the northeast at Elkhorn Ranch field. This gradient corresponds to a calculated water-oil tilt of about 50 ft/mi (20 m/km). Observed tilt of the oil accumulation is actually about 25 ft/mi (5 m/km) to the northeast. This discrepancy might be the result of the field having not yet reached equilibrium with the invading water.

  18. Aliso Viejo, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisinInformation ASHRAE 169-2006AlgoilAlice

  19. Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

    1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

  20. LETTER REPORT SUMMARY RESULTS OF THE NRC TEAM INTERACTION SKILLS STUDY AT DIABLO CANYON POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauth, J. T.; Toquam, J. L.; Bramwell, A. T.; Fleming, T. E.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents information to participants in the Team Interaction Skills study conducted at Diablo Canyon Power Plant from September to November 1989. A study was conducted to develop and assess measures of team interaction skills of nuclear power plant control room crews in simulated emergency conditions. Data were collected at a boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWA) using three sets of rating scales; Behaviorally Anchored Rating Scales (BARS), Behavioral Frequency rating scales, and Technical Performance rating scales. Diablo Canyon Power Plant agreed to serve as the PWR plant in the study. Obse!Vers consisting of contract license examiners, Diablo Canyon Power Plant training instructors, and project staff used the rating scales to provide assessments of team interaction skills and technical skills of control room crews during emerg-3ncy scenarios as part of license requalification training. Crew members were also asked to providH self-ratings of their performance to gather information regarding crew responses to the Team Interactions Skills rating scales.

  1. Memorandum, Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Fire Safety in Selected Areas of 221-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY

  2. Memorandum Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1-H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Approval of a Permanent Variance Regarding Sprinklers and Fire Boundaries in Selected Areas of 22 1 -H Canyon at the Savannah River Site

  3. CAPABILITY TO RECOVER PLUTONIUM-238 IN H-CANYON/HB-LINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, K.; Smith, Robert H. Jr.; Goergen, Charles R.

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-238 is used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to generate electrical power and in Radioisotope Heater Units (RHUs) to produce heat for electronics and environmental control for deep space missions. The domestic supply of Pu-238 consists of scrap material from previous mission production or material purchased from Russia. Currently, the United States has no significant production scale operational capability to produce and separate new Pu-238 from irradiated neptunium-237 targets. The Department of Energy - Nuclear Energy is currently evaluating and developing plans to reconstitute the United States capability to produce Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets. The Savannah River Site had previously produced and/or processed all the Pu-238 utilized in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) for deep space missions up to and including the majority of the plutonium for the Cassini Mission. The previous full production cycle capabilities included: Np-237 target fabrication, target irradiation, target dissolution and Np-237 and Pu-238 separation and purification, conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide, scrap recovery, and Pu-238 encapsulation. The capability and equipment still exist and could be revitalized or put back into service to recover and purify Pu-238/Np-237 or broken General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) pellets utilizing existing process equipment in HB-Line Scrap Recovery, and H-anyon Frame Waste Recovery processes. The conversion of Np-237 and Pu-238 to oxide can be performed in the existing HB-Line Phase-2 and Phase-3 Processes. Dissolution of irradiated Np-237 target material, and separation and purification of Np-237 and Pu-238 product streams would be possible at production rates of ~ 2 kg/month of Pu-238 if the existing H-Canyon Frames Process spare equipment were re-installed. Previously, the primary H-Canyon Frames equipment was removed to be replaced: however, the replacement project was stopped. The spare equipment is stored and still available for installation. Out of specification Pu-238 scrap material can be purified and recovered by utilizing the HB-Line Phase-1 Scrap Recovery Line and the Phase-3 Pu-238 Oxide Conversion Line along with H-Canyon Frame Waste Recovery process. In addition, it also covers and describes utilizing the Phase-2 Np-237 Oxide Conversion Line, in conjunction with the H-Canyon Frames Process to restore the H-Canyon capability to process and recover Np-237 and Pu-238 from irradiated Np-237 targets and address potential synergies with other programs like recovery of Pu-244 and heavy isotopes of curium from other target material.

  4. Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS area Arizona: data report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, J.D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of ground water and stream/surface sediment reconnaissance (HSSR) in the National Topographic Map Series (NTMS) Marble Canyon 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ quadrangle are presented. The target sampling density for all media collected was one site per 12 square kilometers. This resulted in 884 sediment samples being collected; however, dry conditions and sparse population resulted in the collection of only 2 ground water samples. Grand Canyon National Park, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, and much Indian tribal land in the southern half of the quadrangle were not sampled. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) results are given for uranium and 16 other elements in sediments, and for uranium and 9 other elements in ground water. Mass spectrometry results are given for helium in ground water. Field measurements for sediment samples are presented in tables and maps. Statistical summaries of data and a brief description of results are given. A generalized geologic map and a summary of the geology of the area are included. Data from ground water include: water chemistry measurements (pH, conductivity, and alkalinity); physical measurements (water temperature, and scintillometer readings); and elemental analyses (U, Al, Br, Cl, Dy, F, He, Mg, Mn, Na, and V). Data from sediment sites include: water chemistry measurements (where available) for pH, conductivity, and alkalinity; and elemental analyses(U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Sc, Sm, Na, Ti, V, and Yb). Sample site descriptors (stream characteristics, vegetation, etc.) are also tabulated. Histograms, cumulative frequency, and areal distribution plots for most elements; Log U/Th, Log U/Hf, and Log U/(Th + Hf) ratios; and scintillometer readings are included.

  5. Unsaturated Groundwater Flow Beneath Upper Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dander, D.C.

    1998-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mortandad Canyon is a discharge site for treated industrial effluents containing radionuclides and other chemicals at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. This study was conducted to develop an understanding of the unsaturated hydrologic behavior below the canyon floor. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the hypothetical performance of the vadose zone above the water table. Numerical simulations of unsaturated groundwater flow at the site were conducted using the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer (FEHM) code. A two-dimensional cross-section along the canyon's axis was used to model flow between an alluvial groundwater system and the regional aquifer approximately 300 m below. Using recharge estimated from a water budget developed in 1967, the simulations showed waters from the perched water table reaching the regional aquifer in 13.8 years, much faster than previously thought. Additionally, simulations indicate that saturation is occurring in the Guaje pumice bed an d that the Tshirege Unit 1B is near saturation. Lithologic boundaries between the eight materials play an important role in flow and solute transport within the system. Horizontal flow is shown to occur in three thin zones above capillary barriers; however, vertical flow dominates the system. Other simulations were conducted to examine the effects of changing system parameters such as varying recharge inputs, varying the distribution of recharge, and bypassing fast-path fractured basalt of uncertain extent and properties. System sensitivity was also explored by changing model parameters with respect to size and types of grids and domains, and the presence of dipping stratigraphy.

  6. Distributed storage with communication costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Craig Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    5 Introduction to Coding for Distributed Storage The Repairflow graph for 1 repair with varying storage capac- itythe Capacity of Storage Nodes . . . 4.1 Characterizing

  7. Storage Space Request Aurora Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Storage Space Request Aurora Facility (1855 Marika) Department and Division: _______________________________________________________ Storage Contact: ____________________________________________________________ Name Phone and fax Fiscal Footage required: ______________ Brief Description of storage items

  8. Energy Storage | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Energy Storage The challenge of creating new advanced batteries and energy storage technologies is one of Argonne's key initiatives. By creating a multidisciplinary...

  9. Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics along the Sigsbee Escarpment, southeastern Green Canyon region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swiercz, Alan Mark

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Geophysics SEISItllC STRATIGHAPHY AND SALT TECTONICS ALONG THE 'ilGSHEL' L'SCARPMENT. SOI. THEASTERX GREEN CANYON RFGION A Thesis ALAN MARK SWIERCZ Approved as to style and content by: Earl... R. Hoskins (Chairman of Committee) Robert J. McCabe (Member) Gr M. arberg (Member) AVilliam R. Bryant ('Member) j~/ Earl R. Hoskins (Head of Department) December 1986 ABSTRAC'T Seismic Stratigraphy and Salt Tectonics along the Sigsbee...

  10. Geological control of springs and seeps in the Farmington Canyon Complex, Davis County, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, Robyn Kaye

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Precambrian (Eardley, 1939). Hintze (1982) divided the Phanerozoic into six phases as illustrated in Figure 7. By the end of the Precambrian, the Northern Utah Highland was uplifted north and northwest of present day Salt Lake City (Figure 8). According... Ho ro tt lbrook Canyon 4 esslons e? Gt e. bbte ci o \\ Creek City SALT LAKE COUNTY Mrs Mill Creek I 5 10 KILOMETERS Figure 1. Geography of Wasatch Mountains (from Bryant, 1988). of the snowpack to remain high. Once melting started, high...

  11. Storm Water Quality in Los Alamos Canyon following the Cerro Grande Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Johansen; B. Enz; B. Gallaher; K. Mullen; D. Kraig

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned about 7400 acres of forest on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and about 10,000 acres in watersheds above LANL on Santa Fe National Forest lands. The resulting burned landscapes raised concerns of increased storm water runoff and transport of contaminants by runoff in the canyons traversing LANL. On June 2 and 3, 2000, rain fell in the Los Alamos Canyon watershed generating storm water runoff in the canyon bottom. This event was important in that it was the first significant runoff on LANL following the fire and occurred in a canyon containing known legacy waste sites. Samples from this runoff were analyzed for radionuclide, metal, inorganic, and organic constituents. Results show radionuclide concentrations at or below previous (pre-fire) maximum levels at locations on LANL and downstream. However, greater concentrations of some fallout-associated radionuclides (cesium-137 and strontium-90) were seen arriving on LANL from upstream areas compared to pre-fire conditions. Tests indicate most of the radionuclides in the samples were bound to sediments, not dissolved in water. Most radionuclide concentrations in sediments were below LANL Screening Action Levels, with cesium-137 and strontium-90 as exceptions. Most radionuclide concentrations in samples taken at LANL's downstream boundary were greater than those taken upstream, indicating the presence of contributing sources on LANL. For comparison purposes, doses were calculated on a mrem per liter of unfiltered water basis for 11 radionuclides commonly associated with atmospheric fallout and with LANL operations. The maximum dose was 0.094 mrem per liter unfiltered water and was largely associated with plutonium-239/240. In contrast, all filtered samples had total doses less than 0.001 mrem per liter. Compared to past data, potential doses were not increased by the fire during this initial runoff event. Of the 25 metals tested for, seven were above pre-fire levels, including copper, lead, manganese, selenium, strontium, uranium, and zinc. However, dissolved metal concentrations did not exceed State livestock and wildlife standards. Of the 18 general chemistry parameters tested, eight exceeded historic norms, including calcium, potassium, total phosphorus, cyanide, and magnesium.

  12. Sediment transport in the Mississippi Canyon: the role of currents and storm events on optical variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burden, Cheryl A

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Louisiana continental shelf varied both spatially and temporally. Surface nepheloid layers (SNL) and bottom nepheloid layers (BNL) were observed on the shelf, slope, and within the canyon. Intermediate nepheloid layers (INL) were observed within..., for bottom waters were cooler and surface water warmer in October 1994 than in May 1998. I I l (@ 1' (l* 338 Q 1$ DkStSBM (kNt) 88 b b 9 460 In October 1994 (Figure 5), a SNL and BNL, both with c, values & 0. 5 m ', were observed...

  13. Toward Net Energy Buildings: Design, Construction, and Performance of the Grand Canyon House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Edward Hancock; Greg Barker; J. Douglas Balcomb.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grand Canyon house is a joint project of the DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. National Park Service and is part of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 13 (Advanced Solar Low-Energy Buildings). Energy consumption of the house, designed using a whole-building low-energy approach, was reduced by 75% compared to an equivalent house built in accordance with American Building Officials Model Energy Code and the Home Energy Rating System criteria.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageEnergy Storage Multimedia Gallery Energy Storage Multimedia Gallery Images Videos Energy Storage Image Gallery Energy Storage B-Roll Videos Battery Abuse Testing Laboratory...

  15. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M.B.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  16. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  17. Storage Ring Operation Modes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in...

  18. Underground Storage Tank Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Underground Storage Tank Regulations is relevant to all energy projects that will require the use and building of pipelines, underground storage of any sorts, and/or electrical equipment. The...

  19. Cool Storage Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

  20. Safe Home Food Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Laanen, Peggy

    2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper food storage can preserve food quality and prevent spoilage and food/borne illness. The specifics of pantry, refrigerator and freezer storage are given, along with helpful information on new packaging, label dates, etc. A comprehensive table...

  1. Energy Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conover, David R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Storage Systems – An Old Idea Doing New Things with New Technology article for the International Assoication of ELectrical Inspectors

  2. FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOREST CENTRE STORAGE BUILDING 3 4 5 6 7 8 UniversityDr. 2 1 G r e n f e l l D r i v e MULTI PURPOSE COURT STUDENT RESIDENCES GREEN HOUSE STUDENT RESIDENCES STUDENT RESIDENCES RECPLEX STORAGE BUILDING STORAGE BUILDING LIBRARY & COMPUTING FINE ARTS FOREST CENTRE ARTS &SCIENCE BUILDING ARTS &SCIENCE

  3. Source Characterization of the August 6, 2007 Crandall Canyon Mine Seismic Event in Central Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 6, 2007 a local magnitude 3.9 seismic event occurred at 08:48:40 UTC in central Utah. The epicenter is within the boundaries of the Crandall Canyon coal mine (c.f. Pechmann et al., this volume). We performed a moment tensor analysis with complete, three-component seismic recordings from stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah, and EarthScope. The analysis method inverts the seismic records to retrieve the full seismic moment tensor, which allows for interpretation of both shearing (e.g., earthquakes) and volume-changing (e.g., explosions and collapses) seismic events. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007. Our study does not address the actual cause of the mine collapse.

  4. Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall {number_sign}051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring.

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  6. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.Estimating ground water storage changes in the Mississippistorage..

  7. Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS Dploiement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collette. Sébastien

    CH8 Divers Agenda · Storage : DAS / SAN / NAS · Déploiement · VLAN ­ 802.1Q · Gestion d · Sécurisation de Windows · Sécurisation de UNIX · Qu'est-ce que... ­ Firewall, VPN, IDS/IPS, PKI Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN #12;Storage : DAS, NAS, SAN · Direct Attached Storage · Network Attached Storage · Storage

  8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Chapter 8. Storage Ring Revised March 1994 8.1. Introduction -- 107 -- #12; 108 Storage Ring 8.2. Magnetic Design and Field Calculations 8.2.1. Conceptual Approach #12; Storage Ring 109 #12; 110 Storage Ring 8.2.2. Computer Aided Refined Pole Designs #12; Storage Ring 111 #12; 112 Storage Ring #12

  9. THE TURBULENT EXCHANGE WITHIN AN URBAN STREET CANYON Ian N. Harman*, Janet F. Barlow*, Stephen E. Belcher*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    represents a complex challenge for both observational and modelling studies of the surface energy balance for a range of canyon geometries. The model incorporates ideas on the flow and turbulence both above energy balance of an urban area are relatively well understood. However, the influence of building

  10. Challenges When Predicting Reservoir Quality in the Subsalt K2/K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, Todd J.

    of Mexico Todd J. Greene1 , Brian E. O'Neill2 , Richard E. Drumheller2 , Todd Butaud2 , and Arnold Rodriguez in the K2/ K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico, presents many challenges for planning primary and secondary oil recovery. An overlying thick salt canopy prevents adequate seismic imaging at reservoir levels

  11. Vegetation patterns of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas, in relation to elevation and slope aspect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Bryan Joseph

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on the woody vegetation of Pine Canyon, Big Bend National Park, Texas was gathered on an elevational gradient from 1250 m to 2000 m elevation using the point-centered quarter method. Sampling was conducted at 12 sites at 1250 m, 1500 m, 1625 m...

  12. Habitat Suitability Model for Bighorn Sheep and Wild Horses in Bighorn Canyon and the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    1 Habitat Suitability Model for Bighorn Sheep and Wild Horses in Bighorn Canyon and the Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range October 6, 2003 Gary Wockner1 , Francis Singer2 , Kate Schoenecker2 1 Natural a tool that will help managers and other researchers better manage bighorn sheep and wild horses

  13. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

  14. Heat storage duration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

  15. Energy Storage Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Barriers HEV & PHEV Technology Roadmaps R&D Timeline Overview 3 Develop electrochemical energy storage technologies which support the commercialization of hybrid and electric...

  16. Hydrogen Storage Related Links

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following resources provide details about DOE-funded hydrogen storage activities, research plans and roadmaps, models and tools, and additional related links.

  17. Culex quinquefasciatus Storage Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and hemolymph proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus . A and B:of typical storage proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus.Fourth-instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and early pupae

  18. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  19. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. W . BOOIll, "Superconductive Energy Storage Inducand H. A. Peterson, "Superconductive E nergy S torage forMeeting, Janua ry N. Mohan, "Superconductive Energy S torage

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

  1. The Characterization of Biotic and Abiotic Media Upgradient and Downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon Weir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.R. Fresquez

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As per the Mitigation Action Plan for the Special Environmental Analysis of the actions taken in response to the Cerro Grande Fire, sediments, vegetation, and small mammals were collected directly up- and downgradient of the Los Alamos Canyon weir, a low-head sediment control structure located on the northeastern boundary of Los Alamos National Laboratory, to determine contaminant impacts, if any. All radionuclides ({sup 3}H, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U) and trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and Tl) in these media were low and most were below regional upper level background concentrations (mean plus three sigma). The very few constituents that were above regional background concentrations were far below screening levels (set from State and Federal standards) for the protection of the human food chain and the terrestrial environment.

  2. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  3. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: ? Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead ? Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 ? A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances ? a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons ? we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

  4. Simulating infiltration tests in fractured basalt at the Box Canyon Site, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, Andre J.A.; Faybishenko, Boris; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Simmons, Ardyth M.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a series of ponded infiltration tests in variably saturated fractured basalt at Box Canyon, Idaho, were used to build confidence in conceptual and numerical modeling approaches used to simulate infiltration in fractured rock. Specifically, we constructed a dual-permeability model using TOUGH2 to represent both the matrix and fracture continua of the upper basalt flow at the Box Canyon site. A consistent set of hydrogeological parameters was obtained by calibrating the model to infiltration front arrival times in the fracture continuum as inferred from bromide samples collected from fracture/borehole intersections observed during the infiltrating tests. These parameters included the permeability of the fracture and matrix continua, the interfacial area between the fracture and matrix continua, and the porosity of the fracture continuum. To calibrate the model, we multiplied the fracture-matrix interfacial area by a factor between 0.1 and 0.01 to reduce imbibition of water from the fracture continuum into the matrix continuum during the infiltration tests. Furthermore, the porosity of the fracture continuum, as calculated using the fracture aperture inferred from pneumatic-test permeabilities, was increased by a factor of 50 yielding porosity values for the upper basalt flow in the range of 0.01 to 0.02. The fracture-continuum porosity was a highly sensitive parameter controlling the arrival times of the simulated infiltration fronts. Porosity values are consistent with those determined during the Large-Scale Aquifer Pumping and Infiltration Test at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  5. Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Himanshu

    Secondary Storage Management Himanshu Gupta Storage­1 #12;Outline · Memory Hierarchy · Disk Records/Fields · Deletions and Insertions of Records Himanshu Gupta Storage­2 #12;Himanshu Gupta Storage­3 Memory Hierarchy Cache (1 MB; 1-5 nsec) Main Memory (GBs; 10-100 nsec) Secondary Storage

  6. Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiali, Uri

    Optimal Storage Allocation for Serial Haim Mendelson, Joseph S. Pliskin, and Uri Yechiali Tel Aviv reside on a direct-access storage device in which storage space is limited. Records are added allocating storage space to the files. Key Words and Phrases: serial files, storage allocation

  7. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage requires integration with current facility operations, and selection of equipment that will allow safe operation within the constraints of existing facility conditions. Examples of such constraints that are evaluated and addressed by the dry storage program include limited basin depth, varying fuel lengths up to 4 m, (13 ft), fissile loading limits, canister closure design, post-load drying and closure of the canisters, instrument selection and installation, and movement of the canisters to storage casks. The initial pilot phase restricts the fuels to shorter length fuels that can be loaded to the canister directly underwater; subsequent phases will require use of a shielded transfer system. Removal of the canister from the basin, followed by drying, inerting, closure of the canister, and transfer of the canister to the storage cask are completed with remotely operated equipment and appropriate shielding to reduce personnel radiation exposure. (authors)

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: implement energy storage projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implement energy storage projects Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Stationary Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageStationary Energy Storage Stationary Energy Storage The 1 MW Energy Storage Test Pad integrated with renewable energy generation at Sandia's Distributed Energy Technology...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Batteries & Energy Storage Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    StorageBatteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Publications Batteries & Energy Storage Fact Sheets Achieving Higher Energy Density in Flow Batteries at...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: evaluate energy storage opportunity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage opportunity Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration,...

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  13. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Home Energy Permalink Gallery Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy...

  14. Predicting spatial distribution of critical pore types and their influence on reservoir quality, Canyon (Pennsylvanian) Reef reservoir, Diamond M field, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Aaron Jay

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Predicting Spatial Distribution of Critical Pore Types and Their Influence on Reservoir Quality, Canyon (Pennsylvanian) Reef Reservoir, Diamond M Field, Texas... scale. Ultimately slice maps of reservoir quality at a 10 ft interval for a 150 ft section of the Canyon Reef reservoir were developed. These iv reservoir quality maps will provide a useful tool for the design and implementation of accurate...

  15. Energy storage capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

  16. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Electric Car Challenge Sparks Students' STEM Interest On January 9, 2015, in Energy, Energy Storage, News, News & Events, Partnership, Transportation Energy Aspiring...

  18. Improving energy storage devices | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage devices Improving energy storage devices Released: April 15, 2014 Lithium-sulfur batteries last longer with nanomaterial-packed cathode A new PNNL-developed...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture & Storage, Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC), Materials Science, News,...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaboration On May 28, 2014, in Biofuels, CRF, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  1. High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jolley, Casey

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, Michael C. Pope Committee Members, Ethan L. Grossman Debbie J. Thomas Head of Department, Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon..., and my committee members, Dr. Ethan Grossman and Dr. Debbie Thomas, for their time and guidance. Special thanks goes to my primary advisor, Dr. Pope, for his extra guidance and time away from family collecting samples. Additionally, I?d like to thank...

  2. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Grand Canyon National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort; Ian Nienhueser

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of PEVs into the agencies’ fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements.

  3. Genetic Pore Types and Their Relationship to Reservoir Quality: Canyon Formation (Pennsylvanian), Diamond M Field, Scurry County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, Travis

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of Committee, Wayne M. Ahr Committee Members, Michael Pope David S. Schechter Head of Department, John R. Giardino December 2011 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Genetic Pore Types and Their Relationship to Reservoir Quality: Canyon... units were established on the basis of combined porosity and permeability values from core analysis. A cut off criterion for iv porosity and permeability was established to separate good and poor flow units. Ultimately cross sections were created...

  4. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  7. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  9. Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, Bruce

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

  10. Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    Storage Exchange: A Global Trading Platform for Storage Services Martin Placek and Rajkumar Buyya,raj}@csse.unimelb.edu.au Abstract. The Storage Exchange (SX) is a new platform allowing stor- age to be treated as a tradeable resource. Organisations with varying storage requirements can use the SX platform to trade and exchange

  11. Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Building Trust in Storage Outsourcing: Secure Accounting of Utility Storage Vishal Kher Yongdae Kim are witnessing a revival of Storage Service Providers (SSP) in the form of new vendors as well as traditional players. While storage outsourcing is cost-effective, many companies are hesitating to outsource

  12. Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

  13. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Encrgy Storage Plant" , EPRI Report EM-3457, April 1984. [4521st century. REFERENCES The EPRI Regional Systems preparedby J. J. Mulvaney, EPRI Report EPRI P-19S0SR, (1981). [2J O.

  14. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field. The International Thermal Storage Advisory Council was formed to help meet this perceived need. This paper will review activities of EPRI and ITSAC to achieve widespread acceptance of the technology....

  15. Hydrogen storage compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH4- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  16. Hydrogen storage compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Wen; Vajo, John J.; Cumberland, Robert W.; Liu, Ping

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions for hydrogen storage and methods of making such compositions employ an alloy that exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The composition includes a ternary alloy including magnesium, boron and a metal and a metal hydride. The ternary alloy and the metal hydride are present in an amount sufficient to render the composition capable of hydrogen storage. The molar ratio of the metal to magnesium and boron in the alloy is such that the alloy exhibits reversible formation/deformation of BH.sub.4.sup.- anions. The hydrogen storage composition is prepared by combining magnesium, boron and a metal to prepare a ternary alloy and combining the ternary alloy with a metal hydride to form the hydrogen storage composition.

  17. APS Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Main Parameters APS Storage Ring Parameters M. Borland, G. Decker, L. Emery, W. Guo, K. Harkay, V. Sajaev, C.-Y. Yao Advanced Photon Source September 8, 2010 This document list the...

  18. Stasis: Flexible Transactional Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Russell C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He and Bowei Du implemented Oasys, and helped with my firstwas built on top of a C++ object persistence library, Oasys.Oasys uses plug-in storage modules that implement persistent

  19. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  20. SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassenzahl, W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World's First 290 MW Gas Turbine Air Storage Peaking Plant",hydro e lectric plants and gas turbines, are less effectedelectricity. For a gas turbine the conversion efficiency may

  1. Storage Tanks (Arkansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Storage Tanks regulations is a set of rules and permit requirements mandated by the Arkansas Pollution and Ecology Commission in order to protect the public health and the lands and the waters...

  2. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  3. Energy Storage 101

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the storage of heat or cold between opposing seasons in deep aquifers or bedrock. A wind-up clock stores potential energy, in this case mechanical, in the spring tension. ...

  4. Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage management solutions Buyer's guide: purchasing criteria Manage your storage to meet service storage environment cohesively As new guidelines or regulations surface, storage administrators receive increasing numbers of requests for change (RFCs) in storage provisioning. Simultaneously, routine changes

  5. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program defines a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  6. Storage In C Matt Bishop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Matt

    Storage In C Matt Bishop Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science NASA Ames Research Center. Intimately bound with the idea of scope is that of storage. When a program deŢnes a variable, the compiler storage (such as on a stack) or as more permanent storage (in data space.) Recall that the format of a C

  7. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  8. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  9. Effect of the open roof on low frequency acoustic propagation in street canyons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richoux, Olivier; Pelat, Adrien; Félix, Simon; Lihoreau, Bertrand

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an experimental, numerical and analytical study of the effect of open roof on acoustic propagation along a 3D urban canyon. The experimental study is led by means of a street scale model. The numerical results are performed with a 2D Finite Difference in Time Domain approach adapted to take into account the acoustic radiation losses due to the street open roof. An analytical model, based on the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a horizontal plane mixed with a 2D image sources model to describe the attenuation along the street, is also proposed. Results are given for several frequencies in the low frequency domain (1000-2500 Hz). The comparison of the three approaches shows a good agreement until f=100 Hz at full scale, the analytical model and the 2D numerical simulation adapted to 3D permit to modelize the acoustic propagation along a street. For higher frequency, experimental results show that the leakeage, due to the street open roof, is not anymore uniformly distributed on a...

  10. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

  11. POTENTIAL IMPACT OF TANK F FLUSH SOLUTION ON H-CANYON EVAPORATOR OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous chemical analysis of a sample from the liquid heel found in Tank F of the High Activity Drain (HAD) system in F/H laboratory revealed the presence of n-paraffin, tributyl phosphate (TBP), Modifier from the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) process and a vinyl ester resin that is very similar to the protective lining on Tank F. Subsequent analyses detected the presence of a small amount of diisopropylnaphthalene (DIN) (major component of Ultima Gold{trademark} AB liquid scintillation cocktail). Indications are that both vinyl ester resin and DIN are present in small amounts in the flush solution. The flush solution currently in the LR-56S trailer likely has an emulsion which is believed to contain a mixture of the reported organic species dominated by TBP. An acid treatment similar to that proposed to clear the HAD tank heel in F/H laboratory was found to allow separation of an organic phase from the cloudy sample tested by SRNL. Mixing of that clear sample did re-introduce some cloudiness that did not immediately clear but that cloudiness is attributed to the DIN in the matrix. An organic phase does quickly separate from the cloudy matrix allowing separation by a box decanter in H-Canyon prior to transfer to the evaporator feed tank. This separation should proceed normally as long as the emulsion is broken-up by acidification.

  12. A statistical comparison of impact and ambient testing results from the Alamosa Canyon Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doebling, S.W.; Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Cornwell, P. [Rose Hulman Inst. of Tech., Terre Haute, IN (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the modal properties of the Alamosa Canyon Bridge obtained using ambient data are compared to those obtained from impact hammer vibration tests. Using ambient sources of excitation to determine the modal characteristics of large civil engineering structures is desirable for several reasons. The forced vibration testing of such structures generally requires a large amount of specialized equipment and trained personnel making the tests quite expensive. Also, an automated health monitoring system for a large civil structure will most likely use ambient excitation. A modal identification procedure based on a statistical Monte Carlo analysis using the Eigensystem Realization Algorithm is used to compute the modal parameters and their statistics. The results show that for most of the measured modes, the differences between the modal frequencies of the ambient and hammer data sets are statistically significant. However, the differences between the corresponding damping ratio results are not statistically significant. Also, one of the modes identified from the hammer test data was not identifiable from the ambient data set.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  14. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  15. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  16. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  17. Energy storage connection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benedict, Eric L.; Borland, Nicholas P.; Dale, Magdelena; Freeman, Belvin; Kite, Kim A.; Petter, Jeffrey K.; Taylor, Brendan F.

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system for connecting a variable voltage power source, such as a power controller, with a plurality of energy storage devices, at least two of which have a different initial voltage than the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. The power system includes a controller that increases the output voltage of the variable voltage power source. When such output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a first one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the first one of the energy storage devices. The controller then causes the output voltage of the variable voltage power source to continue increasing. When the output voltage is substantially equal to the initial voltage of a second one of the energy storage devices, the controller sends a signal that causes a switch to connect the variable voltage power source with the second one of the energy storage devices.

  18. CHEMICAL STORAGE: MYTHS VERSUS REALITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, F

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of resources explaining proper chemical storage are available. These resources include books, databases/tables, and articles that explain various aspects of chemical storage including compatible chemical storage, signage, and regulatory requirements. Another source is the chemical manufacturer or distributor who provides storage information in the form of icons or color coding schemes on container labels. Despite the availability of these resources, chemical accidents stemming from improper storage, according to recent reports (1) (2), make up almost 25% of all chemical accidents. This relatively high percentage of chemical storage accidents suggests that these publications and color coding schemes although helpful, still provide incomplete information that may not completely mitigate storage risks. This manuscript will explore some ways published storage information may be incomplete, examine the associated risks, and suggest methods to help further eliminate chemical storage risks.

  19. Identification of source contributions to visibility-reducing organic aerosols in the vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hallock, K.A.; Leach, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mason-Jones, M.; Mason-Jones, H.; Salmon, L.G.; Winner, D.A.; Cass, G.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfates and carbonaceous aerosols are the largest contributors to the fine particle burden in the atmosphere near Grand Canyon National Park. While the effects of sulfate particles on visibility at the Grand Canyon has been extensively studied, much less is known about the nature and origin of the carbonaceous aerosols that are present. This disparity in understanding arises from at least two causes: aerosol carbon data for the region are less plentiful and many of the sources that could contribute to that organic aerosol are both diverse and not well characterized. The objective of this present study is to examine the origin of the carbonaceous aerosol at Grand Canyon National Park during the summer season based on molecular tracer techniques applied to source and ambient samples collected specifically for this purpose.

  20. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494StorageStorage

  1. Spent-fuel-storage alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

  2. Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

  3. Big Stick/Four Eyes fields: structural, stratigraphic, and hydrodynamic trapping within Mission Canyon Formation, Williston basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breig, J.J.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mississippian Mission Canyon formation of the Williston basin is the region's most prolific oil producing horizon. Big Stick/Four Eyes is among the most prolific of the Mission Canyon fields. Primary production from 87 wells is projected to reach 47 million bbl of oil. An additional 10-20 million bbl may be recovered through waterflooding. The complex was discovered in 1977 by the Tenneco 1-29 BN, a wildcat with primary objectives in the Devonian Duperow and Ordovician Red River Formations. A series of Mission Canyon discoveries followed in the Big Stick, Treetop, T-R, and Mystery Creek fields. Early pressure studies showed that these fields were part of an extensive common reservoir covering 44.75 mi/sup 2/ (115.91 km/sup 2/). The reservoir matrix is formed from restricted marine dolostones deposited on a low-relief ramp. Landward are algal-laminated peritidal limestones and saline and supratidal evaporites of a sabkhalike shoreline system. Open-marine limestones, rich in crinoids, brachiopods, and corals, mark the seaward limit of reservoir facies. Regressive deposition placed a blanket of anhydrite over the carbonate sequence providing a seal for the reservoir. Lateral trapping is accomplished through a combination of processes. Upper reservoir zones form belts of porosity that parallel the northeasterly trending shoreline. The trend is cut by the northward plunging Billings anticline, which provides structural closure to the north. Facies changes pinch out porosity to the south and east. Trapping along depositional strike to the southwest is only partially controlled by stratigraphic or structural factors. A gentle tilt of 25 ft per mi (5 m per km) occurs in the oil-water contact to the east-northeast, due to freshwater influx from Mississippian outcrop on the southern and southwestern basin margins.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandian Spoke at the New York Energy Storage Expo On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, News, News &...

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE International Energy Storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420 Energy Storage Projects Worldwide with 123 GW of Installed Capacity DOE International Energy Storage Database Has Logged 420...

  8. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Electricity Storage Handbook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  10. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured ElectrodesCells for Energy Storage and Generation . . . . . . . . . .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

  11. NERSC Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technology Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Storage R&D Frontiers in Advanced Storage Technologies (FAST) project Working with vendors to develop new functionality in storage technologies generally not yet available to...

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  13. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  14. Water Heaters (Storage Oil) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Oil) Water Heaters (Storage Oil) Water Heater, Storage Oil - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Storage Electric)...

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  16. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO EVALUATE CORROSION OF THE F-CANYON DISSOLVER DURING THEUNIRRADIATED MARK-42 CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J; Kerry Dunn, K

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes are to be dissolved in an upcoming campaign in F-canyon. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)/Chemical & Hydrogen Technology Section (CHTS) identified a flow sheet for the dissolution of these Mark 42 fuel tubes which required a more aggressive dissolver solution than previously required for irradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Subsequently, SRTC/MTS was requested to develop and perform a corrosion testing program to assess the impact of new flow sheets on corrosion of the dissolver wall. The two primary variables evaluated were the fluoride and aluminum concentrations of the dissolver solution. Fluoride was added as Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) while the aluminum was added either as metallic aluminum, which was subsequently dissolved, or as the chemical aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}). The dissolved aluminum metal was used to simulate the dissolution of the aluminum from the Mark 42 cladding and fuel matrix. Solution composition for the corrosion tests bracketed the flow sheet for the Mark 42. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni. The corrosion rates, which ranged between 2.7 and 32.5 mpy, were calculated from both the one day and the one week weight losses. These corrosion rates indicated a relatively mild corrosion on the dissolver vessel. The welded coupons consistently had a higher corrosion rate than the non-welded coupons. The difference between the two decreased as the solution aggressiveness decreased. In these test solutions, aggressiveness corresponded with the fluoride concentration. Based on the results of this study, any corrosion occurring during the Mark 42 Campaign is not expected to have a deleterious effect on the dissolver vessel.

  18. NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

  19. Stratigraphic and diagenetic controls on the occurrence of porosity in the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation in the Billings Nose Area, North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaber, Daniel Edward

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND INTERPRETATION. CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES CITED APPENDICES. 70 72 74 77 VITA 86 Figure 1 LIST OF FIGURES Index map of the Williston Basin showing structure on top of the Mission Canyon Formation. Also shown are the major oil fields and structures... DAKOTA I SOUTH DAKOTA A l I I I I I I I I Figure 1. Index map of the Williston Basin showing structure on top of the Mission Canyon Formation. Also shown are the major oil fields and structures in the basin. Contour interval is 500 feet (152 m...

  20. NGLW RCRA Storage Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

    2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

  1. Underground pumped hydroelectric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

  2. Hydrogen Storage CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    automotive start-up. · Air/Thermal/Water Management ­ improved air systems, high temperature membranes, heat to pump Hydrogen Fuel/ Storage/ Infrastructure $45/kW (2010) $30kW (2015) 325 W/kg 220 W/L 60% (hydrogen system Component Air management, sensors, MEA's, membranes, Bipolar Plates, fuel processor reactor zones

  3. Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

  4. Chit-based Remote Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paluska, Justin Mazzola

    We propose a model for reliable remote storage founded on contract law. Consumers submit their bits to storage providers in exchange for a chit. A chit is a cryptographically secure, verifiable contract between a consumer ...

  5. Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today's state of the art for hydrogen storage includes 5,000- and 10,000-psi compressed gas tanks and cryogenic liquid hydrogen tanks for on-board hydrogen storage.

  6. Silo Storage Preconceptual Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage option’s primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argon’s design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, “Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study” (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

  7. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  8. The Power of Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    The Power of Energy Storage How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas;1Berkeley Law \\ UCLA Law The Power of Energy Storage: How to Increase Deployment in California to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Executive Summary: Expanding Energy Storage in California Sunshine and wind, even

  9. HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobagi, Fouad

    HIERARCHICAL STORAGE SYSTEMS FOR INTERACTIVE VIDEO­ON­DEMAND Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A; Hierarchical Storage Systems for Interactive Video­On­Demand Shueng­Han Gary Chan and Fouad A. Tobagi Technical­9040 pubs@shasta.stanford.edu Abstract On­demand video servers based on hierarchical storage systems

  10. GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES TO MARKET BREAKING THE DEADLOCK Report of a Science: Carbon Capture and Storage © OECD/IEA 2009, fig. 1, p. 6 Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from `UK Carbon storage and capture, where is it?' by Stuart Haszeldine, Professor of Carbon Capture

  11. Normal matter storage of antiprotons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, L.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

  12. Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Above Ground Storage Tank (AST) Inspection Form Petroleum Bulk Storage Form Facility Name.ehs.cornell.edu/env/bulk-material-storage/petroleum-bulk-storage/Documents/AST_Inspection_Form.pdf #12;

  13. Panel 4, Hydrogen Energy Storage Policy Considerations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Storage Policy Considerations Hydrogen Storage Workshop Jeffrey Reed Southern California Gas Company May 15, 2014 0 Methane is a Great Storage Medium 1 SoCalGas' storage...

  14. Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Central Storage for Unsealed Radioactive Materials Radiation Safety Form PERMIT HOLDER NAME:______________________________ PHONE #: ____________________________ ADDRESS/DEPT.: _______________________________ Storage Location: Refrigerator Freezer Dry Storage List each item being transferred to storage separately: EH&S LAB WIPE SURVEY

  15. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reserve University On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, Materials Science,...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Center for Infrastructure Research and Innovation (CIRI), Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Facilities, Infrastructure Security, Materials...

  18. Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage with Anhydrous Ammonia: Optimizing the Synthesis Reactor for Direct Production of Supercritical Steam Project Profile: Thermochemical Storage with Anhydrous...

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975. Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test.1975. "Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test,"

  20. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional...

  1. Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

  2. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

  3. Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 1997 through 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B.; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. This paper examines the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a ''without experiments'' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP power plant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were $11.9 million.

  4. Nanoscale data storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Li

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of this article is to review the development of ultrahigh-density, nanoscale data storage, i.e., nanostorage. As a fundamentally new type of storage system, the recording mechanisms of nanostorage may be completely different to those of the traditional devices. Currently, two types of molecules are being studied for potential application in nanostorage. One is molecular electronic elements including molecular wires, rectifiers, switches, and transistors. The other approach employs nanostructured materials such as nanotubes, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The challenges for nanostorage are not only the materials, ultrahigh data-densities, fabrication-costs, device operating temperatures and large-scale integration, but also the development of the physical principles and models. There are already some breakthroughs obtained, but it is still unclear what kind of nanostorage systems can ultimately replace the current silicon based transistors. A promising candidate may be a molecular-nanostructure hybrid device with sub-5 nm dimensions.

  5. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassenzahl, W.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. HYDROGEN USAGE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is thought that it will be useful to inform society and people who are interested in hydrogen energy. The study below has been prepared due to this aim can be accepted as an article to exchange of information between people working on this subject. This study has been presented to reader to be utilized as a “technical note”. Main Energy sources coal, petroleum and natural gas are the fossil fuels we use today. They are going to be exhausted since careless usage in last decades through out the world, and human being is going to face the lack of energy sources in the near future. On the other hand as the fossil fuels pollute the environment makes the hydrogen important for an alternative energy source against to the fossil fuels. Due to the slow progress in hydrogen’s production, storage and converting into electrical energy experience, extensive usage of Hydrogen can not find chance for applications in wide technological practices. Hydrogen storage stands on an important point in the development of Hydrogen energy Technologies. Hydrogen is volumetrically low energy concentration fuel. Hydrogen energy, to meet the energy quantity necessary for the nowadays technologies and to be accepted economically and physically against fossil fuels, Hydrogen storage technologies have to be developed in this manner. Today the most common method in hydrogen storage may be accepted as the high pressurized composite tanks. Hydrogen is stored as liquid or gaseous phases. Liquid hydrogen phase can be stored by using composite tanks under very high pressure conditions. High technology composite material products which are durable to high pressures, which should not be affected by hydrogen embrittlement and chemical conditions.[1

  7. Maui energy storage study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

  8. EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE’s Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western’s Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona.

  9. Upper Plio-Pleistocene salt tectonics and seismic stratigraphy on the lower continental slope, Mississippi Canyon OCS Area, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jia-Yuh

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of sequence E, which represents the late Wisconsinan glacial. Salt generally occurs as tongues or sheets, and forms continuous masses in the basinward part of the canyon at water depths of about 1300 m (4300 ft). Areas without salt are near the "spur...

  10. Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avraham Gal

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino signals in electron-capture storage-ring experiments at GSI are reconsidered, with special emphasis placed on the quasi-circular motion of the daughter ions in two-body decays. Whereas parent-ion decay rates cannot exhibit modulation with the several-second period reported in these experiments, the time evolution of the detected daughter ions is shown to produce oscillations that under certain conditions may provide resolution of the `GSI Oscillations' puzzle. New dedicated storage-ring or trap experiments could look up for these oscillations.

  11. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  12. Entanglement Storage Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Caneva; T. Calarco; S. Montangero

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a protocol based on optimal control to drive many body quantum systems into long-lived entangled states, protected from decoherence by big energy gaps, without requiring any apriori knowledge of the system. With this approach it is possible to implement scalable entanglement-storage units. We test the protocol in the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model, a prototype many-body quantum system that describes different experimental setups, and in the ordered Ising chain, a model representing a possible implementation of a quantum bus.

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

  14. Interim storage study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawlins, J.K.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

  15. Multiported storage devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grande, Marcus Bryan

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of niultiported storage device 3 Linux file I/O subsystem 4 Windows NT layered I/O driver model 10 15 5 Location of multiported module in I/O stack 17 6 The bulfer cache . . . 20 7 Queuing of I/O requests 8 Processing of I/O requests by smart blkfiltcr 9... Registering of filter applet via Linux stacked module mechanism . 21 22 . . 26 10 Table of registered filter applets (functions) . . 27 11 Overhead due to presence of smart blkfilter alone . 12 Overhead of smart blkfilter using rot13 filter port 31 33...

  16. Storage | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNews & Solar Solar How much doStorage

  17. Warehouse and Storage Buildings

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58 810 0 0349,980Warehouse and Storage

  18. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Weekly DownloadRegionalStorage Ring

  19. Sandia Energy - Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-Voltage SiliconEnergy Council ExecutivegeochemStorage

  20. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage Ring

  1. Storage Ring Parameters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiralingSecurity217,354 217,814 218,494Storage

  2. NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1AllocationsNOVA Portal: Submit2014ftp ftp Storage Trends

  3. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  4. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  5. Underground caverns for hydrocarbon storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barron, T.F. [Exeter Energy Services, Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large, international gas processing projects and growing LPG imports in developing countries are driving the need to store large quantities of hydrocarbon liquids. Even though underground storage is common in the US, many people outside the domestic industry are not familiar with the technology and the benefits underground storage can offer. The latter include lower construction and operating costs than surface storage, added safety, security and greater environmental acceptance.

  6. Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runnels, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

  7. Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulations Reveal Ion Dynamics in Polymer Electrolyte On November 13, 2012, in Energy Storage, News, News & Events Improving battery electrolytes is highly desirable, particularly...

  9. Holographic Storage of Biphoton Entanglement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han-Ning Dai; Han Zhang; Sheng-Jun Yang; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jun Rui; You-Jin Deng; Li Li; Nai-Le Liu; Shuai Chen; Xiao-Hui Bao; Xian-Min Jin; Bo Zhao; Jian-Wei Pan

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent and reversible storage of multi-photon entanglement with a multimode quantum memory is essential for scalable all-optical quantum information processing. Although single photon has been successfully stored in different quantum systems, storage of multi-photon entanglement remains challenging because of the critical requirement for coherent control of photonic entanglement source, multimode quantum memory, and quantum interface between them. Here we demonstrate a coherent and reversible storage of biphoton Bell-type entanglement with a holographic multimode atomic-ensemble-based quantum memory. The retrieved biphoton entanglement violates Bell's inequality for 1 microsecond storage time and a memory-process fidelity of 98% is demonstrated by quantum state tomography.

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Joint SandiaUniversity of...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from improved climate models to performance models for underground waste storage to 3D printing and digital rock physics. Marianne Walck (Director ... Recent Sandia Secure,...

  12. Underground Storage Tanks (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule governs the construction, installation, upgrading, use, maintenance, testing, and closure of underground storage tanks, including certification requirements for individuals who install,...

  13. The Petascale Data Storage Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, Garth [Carnegie Mellon University; Long, Darrell [The Regents of the University of California, Santa Cruz; Honeyman, Peter [University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kramer, William [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Shalf, John [National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center; Roth, Philip [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Felix, Evan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Ward, Lee [Sandia National Laboratory

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petascale computing infrastructures for scientific discovery make petascale demands on information storage capacity, performance, concurrency, reliability, availability, and manageability. The Petascale Data Storage Institute focuses on the data storage problems found in petascale scientific computing environments, with special attention to community issues such as interoperability, community buy-in, and shared tools. The Petascale Data Storage Institute is a collaboration between researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Michigan, and the University of California at Santa Cruz.

  14. CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon...

  15. Underground Storage Tanks (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter constitutes rules for all underground storage tank facilities- including registration, reporting, permitting, certification, financial responsibility and to protect human health and...

  16. Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

  17. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  19. Flywheel energy storage workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  1. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not described in the previous literature for electrochemical reduction of spent fuels, have been attempted. A quantitative analytical method for measuring the concentration of sodium borohydride in alkaline aqueous solution has been developed as part of this work and is described herein. Finally, findings from stability tests for sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions of several different compositions are reported. For aminoborane, other research institutes have developed regeneration schemes involving tributyltin hydride. In this report, electrochemical reduction experiments attempting to regenerate tributyltin hydride from tributyltin chloride (a representative by-product of the regeneration scheme) are described. These experiments were performed in the non-aqueous solvents acetonitrile and 1,2-dimethoxyethane. A non-aqueous reference electrode for electrolysis experiments in acetonitrile was developed and is described. One class of boron hydrides, called polyhedral boranes, became of interest to the DOE due to their ability to contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to meet program goals and because of their physical and chemical safety attributes. Unfortunately, the research performed here has shown that polyhedral boranes do not react in such a way as to allow enough hydrogen to be released, nor do they appear to undergo hydrogenation from the spent fuel form back to the original hydride. After the polyhedral boranes were investigated, the project goals remained the same but the hydrogen storage material was switched by the DOE to ammonia borane. Ammonia borane was found to undergo an irreversible hydrogen release process, so a direct hydrogenation was not able to occur. To achieve the hydrogenation of the spent ammonia borane fuel, an indirect hydrogenation reaction is possible by using compounds called organotin hydrides. In this process, the organotin hydrides will hydrogenate the spent ammonia borane fuel at the cost of their own oxidation, which forms organotin halides. To enable a closed-loop cycle, our task was then to be able to hydrogenate the organotin halides back to th

  2. Savannah River Site’s H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions- Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation’s only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – The Savannah River Site (SRS) is breathing new life into the H Canyon, the only active nuclear chemical separations facility still operating in the U.S.

  3. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY Barriers Addressed #12;3 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center National

  4. Bike Storage on McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Bike Storage on Campus McMaster University BIKE STORAGE ON CAMPUS Secure Bike Storage on Campus Located on the west side of Chester New Hall, the Secure Bike Storage facility features video surveillance

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) Evaluating Powerful Batteries for Modular Electric Grid Energy Storage On December 12, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems,...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE Energy Storage Systems program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Energy Storage Systems program 2013 Electricity Storage Handbook Published On July 31, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety,...

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: NM Renewable Energy Storage Task...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Energy Storage Task Force New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security,...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    incentivize renewable-energy storage infrastructure development New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage...

  9. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trates a design load profile for a partial storage system.load management / full storage / ice storage / partialfor partial storage) because part of the cooling load is

  10. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  11. COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT By Charles Butler (Section 1), Joseph W. Slavin (Sections 1, 2, and 3), Max Patashnik

  12. Catalytically Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets (Key parameters: cost, specific energy, and energy density). #12;Objectives I. Determination of the chemical nature of the titanium species responsible that are compatible with the Freedom CAR hydrogen storage system targets. Key parameters: cost, specific energy

  13. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  14. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  15. Superconducting energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giese, R.F.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

  16. March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 1 Mass-Storage Structure Chapter 12 #12;March 29, 2008 OS: Mass Storage Structure 2 Objectives Describe the physical structure of secondary and tertiary storage of mass-storage devices Discuss operating-system services provided for mass storage, including RAID

  17. Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Cooperative Repair with Minimum-Storage Regenerating Codes for Distributed Storage Jun Li, Baochun--Distributed storage systems store redundant data to tolerate failures of storage nodes and lost data should be repaired when storage nodes fail. A class of MDS codes, called minimum- storage regenerating (MSR) codes

  18. March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam, Salah

    March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 1 Disk Storage, Basic File Structures, and Hashing. #12;March 24, 2008 ADBS: Storage 2 Chapter Outline The Storage Hierarchy How Far is Your Data Disk Storage Devices Records Blocking Files of Records Unordered Files Ordered Files Hashed Files RAID Technology Storage Area Network

  19. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  1. On Storage Rings for Short Wavelength FELs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a hypothetical 144 m long storage ring optimized for FELin the Proceedings On Storage Rings for Short WavelengthLBL-28483 ESG Note-92 ON STORAGE RINGS FOR SHORT WAVELENGTH

  2. Storage Viability and Optimization Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on MicrogridEPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for Transmission andLong- vs. Short-Term Energy Storage Technologies Analysis, A

  3. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  4. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

  5. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy generation and battery storage via the use ofenergy generation and battery storage via the use of nanos-and storage (e.g lithium-ion rechargeable battery)

  6. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  7. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must be if mal energy storage technologies as means for con-Robert Thorne. Energy Storage is more technology-orientedEnergy with Heat Storage Wells," Environmental Science and Technology,

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  9. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

  10. Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES), power electronics, and control systems, visit the Energy Storage page. Fact Sheet: Energy...

  11. DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Outages With New 'Smart Grid' System On June 20, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in Capabilities, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure...

  14. JCESR | Joint Center for Energy Storage Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    want. More Sandia: High Density Storage JCESR Partner Sandia discusses high density energy storage for electric vehicles and the grid More JCESR and NASA team up JCESR and...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address Flooding, Water, and Power Systems On June 11, 2013, in Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Energy Surety, Infrastructure Security, Microgrid,...

  17. Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012, Clean...

  18. Carbon Storage Atlas, Employee Newsletter Earn International...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV and FE's internal employee newsletter, inTouch, earned 2013 National Association of Government Communicators awards. NETL's Carbon Storage Atlas IV...

  19. Panel 3, Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolysis for Grid Energy Storage DOE-Industry Canada Workshop May 15, 2014 INTRODUCTION HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEMS FOR ENERGY STORAGE AND CLEAN FUEL PRODUCTION ITM POWER INC. ITM...

  20. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

  1. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Poster Session Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3: Poster Session The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking...

  2. Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop Proceedings Workshop, October 16th, 2002 A workshop on compressed and liquefied hydrogen storage was a...

  3. Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling Station Footprint: Separation Distances, Storage Options, and Pre-Cooling This presentation by Aaron...

  4. Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of...

  5. BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Metal Hydride Center of Excellence Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials EA-1321: Final Environmental Assessment...

  6. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  7. Underground Storage Tank Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New underground storage tank construction standards must include at least the following requirements: (1) That an underground storage tank will prevent releases of regulated substances stored...

  8. Georgia Underground Storage Tank Act (Georgia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Georgia Underground Storage Act (GUST) provides a comprehensive program to prevent, detect, and correct releases from underground storage tanks (“USTs”) of “regulated substances” other than...

  9. Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution Agenda: Natural Gas: Transmission, Storage and Distribution A Public Meeting on the Quadrennial Energy Review, Hosted by the...

  10. Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vrable, Michael Daniel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

  11. ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

  12. Storage containers for radioactive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

    1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

  13. Drying Rough Rice in Storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying. Rough Rice in Storage Ih AGRf""' TURP YPERIMENT STAT10 I. TEXAS SUMMARY Research was conducted at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station near Beaumont during 7 crop years (1952-53 through 1958-59) to determine the engineering problems... and the practicability of dry- ing rough rice in storage in Texas. Drying rice in storage means drying rice in the same bin in which it is to be stored. Rough rice, with initial moisture contents of 15.0 to 23.0 percent, was dried at depths of 4 to 10 feet...

  14. INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

  15. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming; Chung, Sung-Yoon; Bloking, Jason T; Andersson, Anna M

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries.

  16. Recombinant electric storage battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

    1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

  17. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

  18. Production, Storage, and FC Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Production, Storage, and FC Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  19. A Successful Cool Storage Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's ...

  20. Forecourt Storage and Compression Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure, capacity ­ Compressor output, power, electric demand ­ Station and dispenser load profiles Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results ­ Compressor-storage relationships ­ Vehicle fueling times ­ Temperature effects > Cost profiles > Considerations for 70 MPa > Next steps #12

  1. CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lü, James Jian-Qiang

    CFES RESEARCH THRUSTS: Energy Storage Wind Energy Solar Energy Smart Grids Smart Buildings For our with the student to finalize the project plan. To sponsor an Energy Scholar, a company agrees to: · Assign

  2. A Successful Cool Storage Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahrens, A. C.; Sobey, T. M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Houston Lighting & Power (HL&P) initiated design and development of its commercial cool storage program as part of an integrated resource planning process with a targeted 225 MW of demand reduction through DSM. Houston's extensive commercial air...

  3. Device-transparent personal storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

  4. Compressed air energy storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

  5. The Storage of Shelled Pecans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brison, Fred R. (Fred Robert)

    1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AGRIC - KPERIA .. -. STATIC t,4L EI rlENT ! C. H. MCUOSELL, Act~ng mrector Collegz Station. Texas 'LLETIN NO. 667 MARCH, THE STORAGE OF SHELLED PEC-4NS FRED R. BRISON Division of Horticulture . AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL COLLEGE OF TE... Gibb Gilchrist, President [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Shelled pecans may change in flavor, texture, and color, while in storage. They may also change as a result of insect or disease damage. Kernels change in flavor by becoming progressively...

  6. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  7. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  8. The High Performance Storage System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyne, R.A.; Hulen, H. [IBM Federal Systems Co., Houston, TX (United States); Watson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) was organized to develop, demonstrate and commercialize technology for the storage system that will be the future repositories for our national information assets. Within the NSL four Department of Energy laboratories and IBM Federal System Company have pooled their resources to develop an entirely new High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The HPSS project concentrates on scalable parallel storage system for highly parallel computers as well as traditional supercomputers and workstation clusters. Concentrating on meeting the high end of storage system and data management requirements, HPSS is designed using network-connected storage devices to transfer data at rates of 100 million bytes per second and beyond. The resulting products will be portable to many vendor`s platforms. The three year project is targeted to be complete in 1995. This paper provides an overview of the requirements, design issues, and architecture of HPSS, as well as a description of the distributed, multi-organization industry and national laboratory HPSS project.

  9. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  10. Presented by Robust Storage Management in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    , intermediate checkpoint storage or a staging ground ­ Job's own allocated nodes can contribute storage spacePresented by Robust Storage Management in the Machine Room and Beyond Sudharshan Vazhkudai Computer Problem space: HPC storage crisis · Data checkpointing, staging, and offloading are all affected by data

  11. Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Bulk Storage Program Compliance Written Program Cornell University 5/8/2013 #12;Bulk Storage.......................................................... 5 4.2.2 Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks­ University activities/operations designed to prevent releases of oil from Aboveground Petroleum Storage Tanks (ASTs) required to comply with following

  12. New York's Energy Storage System Gets Recharged

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jonathan Silver and Matt Rogers on a major breakthrough for New York state's energy storage capacity.

  13. Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qun

    of limited storage, communication capacity, and battery power is ameliorated. Placing storage nodesOptimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE, and Weizhen Mao Abstract--Data storage has become an important issue in sensor networks as a large amount

  14. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

  15. Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

  16. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  17. Radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in soil, vegetation, and fish collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, total U) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, Tl) contents were determined in soil, vegetation (overstory and understory), and fish (rainbow trout) collected around and within Tsicoma Lake in Santa Clara Canyon in 1995. All heavy metal and most radionuclide contents around or within the lake, except for U in soil, vegetation, and fish, were within or just above upper limit background. Detectable levels (where the analytical result was greater than two times counting uncertainty) of U in soils, vegetation, and fish were found in slightly higher concentrations than in background samples. Overall, however, maximum total committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE)(95% confidence level)--based on consumption of 46 lb of fish--from Tsicoma Lake (0.066 mrem/y) was within the maximum total CEDE from the ingestion of fish from the Mescalero National Fish Hatchery (background)(0.113 mrem/y).

  18. Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

  19. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.M. [4115 Allen Dr., Kingsville, TX (United States); Knight, P.J. [Marron and Associates, Inc., Corrales, NM (United States)

    1994-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  20. ONLINE STORAGE ON COMPUTERS AS DISTRIBUTED LONG-TERM STORAGE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Jörg

    ONLINE STORAGE ON COMPUTERS AS DISTRIBUTED LONG-TERM STORAGE SYSTEM Ralf Naues, Jörg Keller Dept.naues@fernuni-hagen.de joerg.keller@fernuni-hagen.de Keywords Long term storage, Distributed storage, preservation of data Abstract Long-term storage is a widely discussed problem. The amount of digital data is growing faster

  1. SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xubin "Ben"

    SPEK: A Storage Performance Evaluation Kernel Module for Block Level Storage Systems Ming Zhang Cookeville, TN 38505, USA hexb@tntech.edu Abstract In this paper we introduce SPEK (Storage Performance storage systems at block level. It can be used for both DAS (Direct Attached Storage) and block level

  2. Using MEMS-Based Storage in Computer Systems --MEMS Storage Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Ethan L.

    Using MEMS-Based Storage in Computer Systems -- MEMS Storage Architectures Bo Hong Feng Wang. E. Schwarz, S. J. Santa Clara University As an emerging non-volatile secondary storage technology, MEMS-based storage exhibits sev- eral desirable properties including high performance, high storage

  3. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  4. Conductive lithium storage electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

  5. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use in oceanography and ocean engineering. R. A. Geyer.seas. Volume 9B: Ocean engineering science,. B. Le Mehauteturbidity flows." Ocean Engineering 13(5): 435-447. A class

  6. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20%. Mining systems analyzed were clamshell dredging, bucketladder dredging andhydraulic suction dredging. Shepard, Francis P. (1979).

  7. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and O. H. e. J. and Pilkey. Tulsa, Oklahoma: 85-94. Shepard,a Symposium. P. D. Trask. Tulsa, Oklahoma: AmericanCalifornia." AAPG Repr Ser (Tulsa) 26: 370-400. Anon (

  8. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sea fan, California." Journal Sed. Petrology 39(2): 601-606.Journal of Sedimentary Petrology 38(4): Buffington, E. C.slope." Journal of Sedimentary Petrology 41(1): 307-309. The

  9. La Jolla Canyon and Scripps Canyon Bibliography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueggeman, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of five turbidity currents." Sedimentology 37(1): 1-5. Ancoastal geomorphology, and in sedimentology which he alwaysfilm. Developments in Sedimentology. 6th International

  10. Second thermal storage applications workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

  11. Underground storage of oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergman, S.M.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental and security advantages of underground storage of oil and gas are well documented. In many cases, underground storage methods such as storage in salt domes, abandoned mines, and mined rock caverns have proven to be cost effective when compared to storage in steel tanks constructed for that purpose on the surface. In good rock conditions, underground storage of large quantities of hydrocarbon products is normally less costly--up to 50-70% of the surface alternative. Under fair or weak rock conditions, economic comparisons between surface tanks and underground caverns must be evaluated on a case to case basis. The key to successful underground storage is enactment of a realistic geotechnical approach. In addition to construction cost, storage of petroleum products underground has operational advantages over similar storage above ground. These advantages include lower maintenance costs, less fire hazards, less land requirements, and a more even storage temperature.

  12. Catalyzed borohydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Au, Ming (Augusta, GA)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen storage material and process is provided in which alkali borohydride materials are created which contain effective amounts of catalyst(s) which include transition metal oxides, halides, and chlorides of titanium, zirconium, tin, and combinations of the various catalysts. When the catalysts are added to an alkali borodydride such as a lithium borohydride, the initial hydrogen release point of the resulting mixture is substantially lowered. Additionally, the hydrogen storage material may be rehydrided with weight percent values of hydrogen at least about 9 percent.

  13. Image Storage in Hot Vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Zhao; T. Wang; Y. Xiao; S. F. Yelin

    2007-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate image propagation and storage in hot atomic vapor. A $4f$ system is adopted for imaging and an atomic vapor cell is placed over the transform plane. The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of an object in the object plane can thus be transformed into atomic Raman coherence according to the idea of ``light storage''. We investigate how the stored diffraction pattern evolves under diffusion. Our result indicates, under appropriate conditions, that an image can be reconstructed with high fidelity. The main reason for this procedure to work is the fact that diffusion of opposite-phase components of the diffraction pattern interfere destructively.

  14. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  15. Carbon Capture and Storage, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy is researching the safe implementation of a technology called carbon sequestration, also known as carbon capture and storage, or CCS. Based on an oilfield practice, this approach stores carbon dioxide, or CO2 generated from human activities for millennia as a means to mitigate global climate change. In 2003, the Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory formed seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships to assess geologic formations suitable for storage and to determine the best approaches to implement carbon sequestration in each region. This video describes the work of these partnerships.

  16. Prestressed elastomer for energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoppie, Lyle O. (Birmingham, MI); Speranza, Donald (Canton, MI)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a regenerative braking device for an automotive vehicle. The device includes a power isolating assembly (14), an infinitely variable transmission (20) interconnecting an input shaft (16) with an output shaft (18), and an energy storage assembly (22). The storage assembly includes a plurality of elastomeric rods (44, 46) mounted for rotation and connected in series between the input and output shafts. The elastomeric rods are prestressed along their rotational or longitudinal axes to inhibit buckling of the rods due to torsional stressing of the rods in response to relative rotation of the input and output shafts.

  17. Advanced research in solar-energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luft, W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: incentivize renewable-energy storage...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technologies New Mexico Renewable Energy Storage Task Force On January 28, 2014, in Energy, Energy Storage, Energy Storage Systems, Infrastructure Security, News, News & Events,...

  20. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc....

  1. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," SeminarTHERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGS OF COMMERCIAL

  2. Modeling and simulations of electrical energy storage in electrochemical capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hainan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D nanoarchitec- tures for energy storage and conversion,”functionality in energy storage materials and devices byto electrochemical energy storage in TiO 2 (anatase)

  3. Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for electrochemical energy storage. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009,electrochemical capacitive energy storage. Angew. Chem. Int.for Electrochemical Energy Storage. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009,

  4. Estimating the Value of Electricity Storage Resources in Electricity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for understanding the role electricity storage resources (storage) can play in wholesale and retail electricity markets, 2) assessing the value of electricity storage in a...

  5. Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Lithium-Ion Batteries for Stationary Energy Storage (October 2012) DOE's Energy Storage...

  6. Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pumped Storage Hydropower (Detailed Analysis to Demonstrate Value)-Modeling and Analysis of Value of Advanced Pumped Storage Hydropower in the U.S. Pumped Storage Hydropower...

  7. Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Electrochemical Energy Storage. Science 334, (6058), 917-with supercapacitors storage energy system. Electr. Pow.energy conversion and storage devices. Nat. Mater. 2005,

  8. FY06 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review FY07 DOE Energy Storage Program PEER Review John D. Boyes Sandia National Laboratories Mission Mission Develop advanced electricity storage...

  9. US DRIVE Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap US DRIVE Electrochemical Energy Storage Technical Team Roadmap This U.S. DRIVE electrochemical energy storage roadmap...

  10. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  11. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of...

  12. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

  13. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

  14. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

  15. Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage Analysis Workshop Agenda for the Hydrogen Delivery and Onboard Storage...

  16. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

  17. The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) The U.S. National Hydrogen Storage Project Overview (presentation) Status of Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D...

  18. Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and their cryogenic hydrogen storage capacities. J. Phys.Hydrogen Spillover for Hydrogen Storage J. Am. Chem. Soc.electrostatic energy storage, hydrogen (H 2 )-based chemical

  19. Explorations of Novel Energy Conversion and Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffin, Andrew Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicular Hydrogen Storage http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/et al. , Reversible hydrogen storage in calcium borohydridereversible hydrogen storage. Chemical Communications, 2010.

  20. Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Virtual Center of Excellence for Hydrogen Storage - Chemical Hydrides Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage...

  1. Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012) The Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (TSP) Battery Energy...

  2. assembly storage facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Temporary (mobile) storage testing facilities Renewable Energy Websites Summary: Temporary (mobile) storage testing facilities Permanent storage...

  3. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

  4. Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Electrochemical Energy Storage. Science 334, (6058), 917-for electrochemical energy storage. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2009,electrochemical capacitive energy storage. Angew. Chem. Int.

  5. Modeling and simulations of electrical energy storage in electrochemical capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hainan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrochemical capacitor energy storage systems. 1.2 Energyto electrochemical energy storage in TiO 2 (anatase)3D nanoarchitec- tures for energy storage and conversion,”

  6. Rational Material Architecture Design for Better Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Energy Storage Technologies………………………………………..… 1.3Among all energy storage technologies, electrochemicalsociety. 1.2 Energy Storage Technologies Our ancestors used

  7. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials - Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Recommended...

  8. Radionuclides and heavy metals in rainbow trout from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De Lakes in Santa Clara Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.; Naranjo, L. Jr.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide ({sup 3}H, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total uranium) and heavy metal (Ag, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, Se, and TI) concentrations were determined in rainbow trout collected from Tsichomo, Nana Ka, Wen Povi, and Pin De lakes in Santa Clara Canyon in 1997. Most radionuclide and heavy metal concentrations in fish collected from these four lakes were within or just above upper limit background concentrations (Abiquiu reservoir), and as a group were statistically (p < 0.05) similar in most parameters to background.

  9. Breakthrough materials for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breakthrough materials for energy storage November 4, 2009 #12;#12;This revolution is happening;Electronics: our early market 5 hours #12;Progress on energy density... #12;Has reached a limit #12;Battery basics Anode Cathode #12;Battery basics Anode Cathode #12;Silicon leads in energy density

  10. Flashing up the storage hierarchy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koltsidas, Ioannis

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this thesis is on systems that employ both flash and magnetic disks as storage media. Considering the widely disparate I/O costs of flash disks currently on the market, our approach is a cost-aware one: we ...

  11. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  12. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Ann Arbor, MI); Li, Yingwel (Ann Arbor, MI); Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  13. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This). The Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team is one of 12 U.S. DRIVE technical teams ("tech teams") whose mission and clean advanced lightduty vehicles, as well as related energy infrastructure. For more information about

  14. November 2007 USING STORAGE ENCRYPTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    user devices, such as personal computers, portable electronic devices, and removable storage media in disruption, identity theft, and other fraud. End user devices, such as personal computers, portable the confidentiality of the information stored on the devices and enable unauthorized persons to gain access

  15. Cloud-integrated Storage What & Why 2StoreSimple White Pages: Shoring Up Infrastructure Weaknesses with Cloud Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Surajit

    Cloud-integrated Storage ­ What & Why #12;2StoreSimple White Pages: Shoring Up Infrastructure Weaknesses with Cloud Storage Overview..........................................................................................................3 Enterprise-class storage platform

  16. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 4 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  17. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  18. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  19. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 1 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  20. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 2, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  1. Short seed extractors against quantum storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amnon Ta-Shma

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Some, but not all, extractors resist adversaries with limited quantum storage. In this paper we show that Trevisan's extractor has this property, thereby showing an extractor against quantum storage with logarithmic seed length.

  2. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  3. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 3, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  4. NERSC HPSS Storage Trends and Summaries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summaries Storage Trends and Summaries Total Bytes Utilized The growth in NERSC's storage systems amounts to roughly 1.7x per year. Total Bytes Utilized Number of Files Stored The...

  5. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    chaired by DOE's Imre Gyuk, are below. ESS 2010 Update Conference - UltraBattery Grid Storage - John Wood, Ecoult.pdf ESS 2010 Update Conference - PV Plus Storage for Simultaneous...

  6. Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 3 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) conducted a record-breaking Update Conference at...

  7. Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The collaborative Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) conducts engineering research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) activities to address the engineering challenges posed by various storage technologies.

  8. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  9. Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

  10. Prince George's County Underground Storage Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas storage company may invoke eminent domain to acquire property in Prince George's County for underground gas storage purposes. The area acquired must lie not less than 800 feet below the...

  11. Post regulation circuit with energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ball, Don G. (Livermore, CA); Birx, Daniel L. (Oakley, CA); Cook, Edward G. (Livermore, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply and provides energy storage. The charge regulation circuit according to the present invention provides energy storage without unnecessary dissipation of energy through a resistor as in prior art approaches.

  12. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  13. Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Cost Analysis of Hydrogen Storage Systems Storage Systems TIAX LLC 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2390 Tel. 617- 498-5000 Fax 617-498-7200...

  14. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

  15. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

  16. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar, Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration, originally presented on December 13, 2011.

  17. Commercial Storage and Handling of Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Charles W.; Moore, Clarence A.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary Three areas that provide a cross section of physical and economic conditions under which sorghum grain is produced, handled and stored were selected for study of storage and handling facilities and practices by commercial grain storage...-60. Grain stocks in storage increased even more rapidly. Storage space in 1955 was 71 percent occupied on January 1, whereas the much greater space in 1960 was 82 percent occupied. Grain sorghum increased from less than half to almost three...

  18. TIMING-ACCURATE STORAGE EMULATION: EVALUATING HYPOTHETICAL STORAGE COMPONENTS IN REAL COMPUTER SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TIMING-ACCURATE STORAGE EMULATION: EVALUATING HYPOTHETICAL STORAGE COMPONENTS IN REAL COMPUTER;ABSTRACT Timing-accurate storage emulation offers a unique performance evaluation capability to experiment with not-yet-existing storage components in the context of real systems executing real

  19. Secure Pesticide Storage: Essential Structural Features of a Storage Building1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    PI30 Secure Pesticide Storage: Essential Structural Features of a Storage Building1 Thomas W. Dean2 be present in any building constructed for pesticide storage. Introduction The main job of a pesticide storage facility is to suitably house and protect packages of pesticide. To do this in Florida

  20. Secure Pesticide Storage: Security and Safety-promoting Features of Pesticide Storage Facilities1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    PI32 Secure Pesticide Storage: Security and Safety-promoting Features of Pesticide Storage pesticide storage facility security and safety. Introduction In actual practice, the fundamental goal of "security" is always the same: effective safeguard. Therefore, certain features of a pesticide storage