Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Aliso Viejo, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aliso Viejo, California: Energy Resources Aliso Viejo, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.567541°, -117.725305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.567541,"lon":-117.725305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Glen Canyon Dam Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon LTEMP EIS Glen Canyon Dam, a 1,300-MW water-storage and hydroelectric facility is located on the Colorado River upstream of the Grand Canyon. EVS is evaluating the effects of dam operations on the Colorado River. A comprehensive evaluation of Glen Canyon Dam operations and their effects on the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon is being conducted by the Department of the Interior with EVS assistance. The Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan (LTEMP) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) - the first such evaluation in over 15 years - will examine flow regimes to meet the goals of supplying water for communities, agriculture, and industry and will protect the resources of the Grand Canyon, while providing clean hydropower. The LTEMP EIS, which is expected to be completed by the end of 2013, will

3

Natural gas network resiliency to a %22shakeout scenario%22 earthquake.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A natural gas network model was used to assess the likely impact of a scenario San Andreas Fault earthquake on the natural gas network. Two disruption scenarios were examined. The more extensive damage scenario assumes the disruption of all three major corridors bringing gas into southern California. If withdrawals from the Aliso Canyon storage facility are limited to keep the amount of stored gas within historical levels, the disruption reduces Los Angeles Basin gas supplies by 50%. If Aliso Canyon withdrawals are only constrained by the physical capacity of the storage system to withdraw gas, the shortfall is reduced to 25%. This result suggests that it is important for stakeholders to put agreements in place facilitating the withdrawal of Aliso Canyon gas in the event of an emergency.

Ellison, James F.; Corbet, Thomas Frank,; Brooks, Robert E. [RBAC, Inc., Sherman Oaks, CA

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup The Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves cleaning up hazardous materials left over from some of the Laboratory's earliest activities. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Located along Los Alamos Canyon from 7th Street to the Pajarito Ski Hill, the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project involves examining sites in present and former Laboratory technical areas to see if any further environmental cleanup actions are needed. If not, the Laboratory can apply to have these sites removed permanently from LANL's Hazardous Waste Permit, meaning that no further actions are needed at those sites. Among the 115 sites included in the Upper LA Canyon Project, 54 have been

5

Upper Los Alamos Canyon Cleanup  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

septic tanks, sanitary and industrial waste lines, storm drains, incinerators, transformer sites, and areas in which soil has been contaminated. The Upper Los Alamos Canyon...

6

California Nuclear Profile - Diablo Canyon  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diablo Canyon" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

7

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

8

Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

9

New York Canyon Stimulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New York Canyon Stimulation Project was to demonstrate the commercial application of Enhanced Geothermal System techniques in Buena Vista Valley area of Pershing County, Nevada. From October 2009 to early 2012, TGP Development Company aggressively implemented Phase I of Pre-Stimulation and Site/Wellbore readiness. This included: geological studies; water studies and analyses and procurement of initial permits for drilling. Oversubscription of water rights and lack of water needed for implementation of EGS were identified and remained primary obstacles. Despite extended efforts to find alternative solutions, the water supply circumstances could not be overcome and led TGP to determine a "????No Go"??? decision and initiate project termination in April 2012.

Raemy, B. Principal Investigator, TGP Development Company, LLC

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

Post-project appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek restoration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Haltiner, Jeffery. 1997. Martin Canyon Stream Stabilization:Williams & Associates, Ltd. 1999. Martin Canyon Creek StreamPost-Project Appraisal of Martin Canyon Creek Restoration

Wagner, Wayne; Roseman, Jesse

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hudson Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Hudson Canyon Facility Hudson Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Owner Deepwater Wind Long Island Developer Deepwater Wind Location Atlantic Ocean NY Coordinates 40.151°, -73.53° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.151,"lon":-73.53,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

Juniper Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Juniper Canyon Juniper Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Juniper Canyon Facility Juniper Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Developer Iberdrola Energy Purchaser Merchant Location In Klickitat County 4.6 miles Southeast of Goldendale Coordinates 45.910223°, -120.224317° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.910223,"lon":-120.224317,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant. NVLAP Lab Code: 100537-0. Address and Contact Information: ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Internal Tides in Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The M2 internal tide in Monterey Submarine Canyon is simulated using a modified version of the Princeton Ocean Model. Most of the internal tide energy entering the canyon is generated to the south, on Sur Slope and at the head of Carmel Canyon. ...

Rob A. Hall; Glenn S. Carter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Intense, Variable Mixing near the Head of Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microstructure survey near the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon, the first in a canyon, confirmed earlier inferences that coastal submarine canyons are sites of intense mixing. The data collected during two weeks in August 1997 showed ...

Glenn S. Carter; Michael C. Gregg

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

18

Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility" Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to:...

19

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Burro Canyon Disposal Cell (007) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

20

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bodo Canyon Cell - 006  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Bodo Canyon Cell - 006 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Bodo Canyon Cell (006) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIS-0219: F-Canyon Plutonium Solutions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Plutonium Solutions Stored in the F-Canyon Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC December 1, 1994 EIS-0219: Final Environmental Impact Statement F-Canyon Plutonium...

22

ACCELERATED PILOT PROJECT FOR U CANYON DEMOLITION  

SciTech Connect

At the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) is underway on a first-of-a-kind project with the decommissioning and demolition of the U Canyon. Following the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) Record of Decision for the final remediation of the canyon, CH2M HILL is combining old and new technology and techniques to prepare U Canyon for demolition. The selected remedial action called first for consolidating and grouting equipment currently in the canyon into lower levels of the plant (openings called cells), after which the cell galleries, hot pipe trench, ventilation tunnel, drains and other voids below the operating deck and crane-way deck levels will be filled with approximately 20,000 cubic yards of grout and the canyon roof and walls demolished down to the approximate level of the canyon deck. The remaining canyon structure will then be buried beneath an engineered barrier designed to control potential contaminant migration for a 500-year life. Methods and lessons learned from this project will set the stage for the future demolition of Hanford's four other canyon-type processing facilities.

KEHLER KL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Geothermal Facility Canyon Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility General Information Name Bear Canyon Geothermal Facility Facility Bear Canyon Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Location Clear Lake, California, Coordinates 38.762851116528°, -122.69217967987° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.762851116528,"lon":-122.69217967987,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station - UT 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: White Canyon AEC Ore Buying Station (UT.04) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: The history of domestic uranium procurement under U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contracts identifies a number of ore buying stations (sampling and storage sites) that were operated during the period late-1949 through the mid-1960s. During this period the AEC established ore-buying stations in new uranium producing areas where it appeared that ore production would be sufficient to support a uranium milling operation. The

25

Hay Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hay Canyon Wind Farm Hay Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hay Canyon Wind Farm Facility Hay Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Snohomish Public Utility District Location Near Moro OR Coordinates 45.479548°, -120.741491° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.479548,"lon":-120.741491,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Spring Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spring Canyon Wind Farm Spring Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Spring Canyon Wind Farm Facility Spring Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Near Peetz CO Coordinates 40.95366°, -103.166993° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.95366,"lon":-103.166993,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Threemile Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Threemile Canyon Wind Farm Facility Threemile Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer John Deere Wind Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Morrow County OR Coordinates 45.837861°, -119.701286° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.837861,"lon":-119.701286,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Three Mile Canyon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mile Canyon Mile Canyon Jump to: navigation, search Name Three Mile Canyon Facility Three Mile Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Developer Momentum RE Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Morrow County OR Coordinates 45.717419°, -119.502258° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.717419,"lon":-119.502258,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Turbulent Kinetic Energy Dissipation in Barrow Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Water flows across the shallow Chukchi Sea before reaching the Arctic Ocean, where it is a source of heat, freshwater, nutrients, and carbon. A substantial portion of Pacific Water is routed through Barrow Canyon, located in the northeast ...

E. L. Shroyer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Internal Waves in Monterey Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity, temperature, and salinity profile surveying in Monterey Submarine Canyon during spring tide reveals an internal wave field almost an order of magnitude more energetic than that in the open ocean. Semidiurnal fluctuations and their ...

Eric Kunze; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Glenn S. Carter; Michael C. Gregg

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Rectified Barotropic Flow over a Submarine Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of an isolated canyon interrupting a long continental shelf of constant cross section on the along-isobath, oscillatory motion of a homogeneous, incompressible fluid is considered by employing laboratory experiments (physical models) ...

Nicolas Pernne; Jacques Verron; Dominique Renouard; Don L. Boyer; Xiuzhang Zhang

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Physical Modeling of Flow Field inside Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow characteristics inside urban street canyons were studied in a laboratory water channel. The approaching flow direction was horizontal and perpendicular to the street axis. The street width was adjusted to form street canyons of aspect ...

Xian-Xiang Li; Dennis Y. C. Leung; Chun-Ho Liu; K. M. Lam

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Wintertime Boundary Layer Structure in the Grand Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime temperature profiles in the Grand Canyon exhibit a neutral to isothermal stratification during both daytime and nighttime, with only rare instances of actual temperature inversions. The canyon warms during daytime and cools during ...

C. David Whiteman; Shiyuan Zhong; Xindi Bian

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 39.723055555556°, -118.08027777778° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.723055555556,"lon":-118.08027777778,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Red Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Red Canyon Wind Farm Red Canyon Wind Farm Facility Red Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Florida Power & Light Co. Location Borden TX Coordinates 32.95326011°, -101.215539° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.95326011,"lon":-101.215539,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Devil's Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.938333333333°, -117.53916666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.938333333333,"lon":-117.53916666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Biglow Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion/Portland General Electric Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.629003°, -120.605607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.629003,"lon":-120.605607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

A Laboratory Model of Urban Street-Canyon Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A circulating water channel is constructed to examine urban street-canyon flow. In the cases of an even-notch street canyon in which model buildings on both sides of the street have equal heights, one vortex is observed in model canyons with ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Rae-Seol Park; Hye-Yeong Chun; Jae-Jin Kim

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microsoft Word - Badger Canyon CXWEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEC-4 KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum David Tripp Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Badger Canyon Substation Radio Communication Tower Project Budget Information: Work Order 00253262 Task 03 Categorical Exclusions Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021: B1.7 "Acquisition, installation, operation, and removal of communication systems..." B1.19 "Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities..." Location: Badger Canyon Substation, Benton County, Washington - Township 8 North, Range 28 East, Section 1 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace a 40-foot monopole communication

40

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Coyote Canyon Geothermal Resource Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Trail Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trail Canyon Geothermal Project Trail Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 38.325555555556°, -114.29388888889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.325555555556,"lon":-114.29388888889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Panther Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panther Canyon Geothermal Project Panther Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.549444444444°, -117.57666666667° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.549444444444,"lon":-117.57666666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Blue Canyon VI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VI VI Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon VI Facility Blue Canyon VI Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 Acid Pueblo Canyon - NM 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Acid/Pueblo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Plant (TA-45) Acid/Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon NM.03-3 Location: Canyons in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.03-3 Historical Operations: Late 1943 or early 1944, head of the south fork of Acid Canyon received untreated liquid waste containing tritium and isotopes of strontium, cesium, uranium, plutonium, and americium discharged from main acid sewer lines and subsequently from the TA-3 plutonium treatment plant. NM.03-3 Eligibility Determination: Radiological Survey(s): Verification Surveys NM.03-5 NM.03-6 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis and Federal Register Notice NM.03-2

47

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Coyote Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.927105,"lon":-117.927225,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Annotated bibliography for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) with emphasis on the Grand Canyon population.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Glen Canyon Dam is a hydroelectric facility located on the Colorado River in Arizona that is operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) for multiple purposes including water storage, flood control, power generation, recreation, and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Glen Canyon Dam operations have been managed for the last several years to improve conditions for the humpback chub (Gila cypha) and other ecosystem components. An extensive amount of literature has been produced on the humpback chub. We developed this annotated bibliography to assist managers and researchers in the Grand Canyon as they perform assessments, refine management strategies, and develop new studies to examine the factors affecting humpback chub. The U.S. Geological Survey recently created a multispecies bibliography (including references on the humpback chub) entitled Bibliography of Native Colorado River Big Fishes (available at www.fort.usgs.gov/Products/data/COFishBib). That bibliography, while quite extensive and broader in scope than ours, is not annotated, and, therefore, does not provide any of the information in the original literature. In developing this annotated bibliography, we have attempted to assemble abstracts from relevant published literature. We present here abstracts taken unmodified from individual reports and articles except where noted. The bibliography spans references from 1976 to 2009 and is organized in five broad topical areas, including: (1) biology, (2) ecology, (3) impacts of dam operations, (4) other impacts, and (5) conservation and management, and includes twenty subcategories. Within each subcategory, we present abstracts alphabetically by author and chronologically by year. We present relevant articles not specific to either the humpback chub or Glen Canyon Dam, but cited in other included reports, under the Supporting Articles subcategory. We provide all citations in alphabetical order in Section 7.

Goulet, C. T.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

49

EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

27: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona 27: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona EIS-0427: Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County, Arizona Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposed wind energy generation project in Coconino County, Arizona, on privately owned ranch lands and trust lands administered by the Arizona State Land Department. The proposed project includes a new transmission tie-line that would cross lands administered by Coconino National Forest and interconnect with DOE's Western Area Power Administration's existing Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak transmission lines. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download September 11, 2012 EIS-0427: Record of Decision Interconnection of the Grapevine Canyon Wind Project, Coconino County,

50

Klondike III / Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-3 Figure 1 Proposed 230-kV Towers and Rights-of-Way Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Bonneville Power Administration Proposed Action and Alternatives 2-4 Figure 1, continued CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ANALYSIS, PROPOSED WIND PROJECTS, SHERMAN COUNTY, WASHINGTON March 2006 WEST, Inc. 32 Figure 1. Region map of wind projects proposed for Sherman County. D e s c h u t e s Ri ver C a n y o n C o l u m b ia R i v e r Hwy 19 H w y 2 0 6 H w y 9 7 I 8 4 Grass Valley Moro Wasco Biggs Arlington Condon Fourmile Canyon McDonald Ferry Biggs Junction Deschutes River Crossing The Dalles Complex RM 15.9-16.8 RM 40 Sherman Co Wasco Co G i l l i a m C o Gilliam Co Morrow Co Rowena Plateau Historic Columbia River Highway John D a y R i v e r C a n y o n P:\B\BPAX00000324\0600INFO\GS\arcmap\figures\visiblity_tech_report\fig2_visual_resources_or.mxd January 9, 2006

51

Nine Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Location Benton County Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

Blue Canyon Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Babcock & Brown/Horizon Developer Zilkha Renewable/Kirmart Corp. Energy Purchaser Western Farmers' Electric Cooperative Location North of Lawton OK Coordinates 34.852678°, -98.551807° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.852678,"lon":-98.551807,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Services » Environmental Justice » Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site Feasibility and Community Support for Photovoltaic Array May 2012 The George Washington University Environmental Resource Policy Graduate Program Capstone Project was an analysis of LM's efforts to support the installation of a commercial solar photovoltaic system at the former uranium mill site near Durango, Colorado. Beneficial Reuse at Bodo Canyon Site More Documents & Publications EA-1770: Final Environmental Assessment Performance of a Permeable Reactive Barrier Using Granular Zero-Valent Iron: FY 2004 Annual Report Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site

54

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

55

Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Canyon Bloomers, Inc Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Canyon Bloomers, Inc Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Buhl, Idaho Coordinates 42.5990714°, -114.7594946° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

56

Tidal Motion in Submarine CanyonsA Laboratory Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reasons for the large-amplitude tidal motion observed in oceanic submarine canyons have been explored with a laboratory experiment. A barotropic tide was forced in a stratified tank, containing continental shelf-slope topography into which a ...

Peter G. Baines

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Observations of the Internal Tide in Monterey Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from two shipboard experiments in 1994, designed to observe the semidiurnal internal tide in Monterey Canyon, reveal semidiurnal currents of about 20 cm s?1, which is an order of magnitude larger than the estimated barotropic tidal currents. ...

Emil T. Petruncio; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; Jeffrey D. Paduan

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Flow Variability in a North American Downtown Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous field and laboratory studies have indicated that flow and turbulence inside urban areas and, in particular, in street canyons, is very complex and is associated with wakes and vortices developing near buildings. However, a number of open ...

Petra Klein; James V. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

H CANYON PROCESSING IN CORRELATION WITH FH ANALYTICAL LABS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Management of radioactive chemical waste can be a complicated business. H Canyon and F/H Analytical Labs are two facilities present at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, SC that are at the forefront. In fact H Canyon is the only large-scale radiochemical processing facility in the United States and this processing is only enhanced by the aid given from F/H Analytical Labs. As H Canyon processes incoming materials, F/H Labs provide support through a variety of chemical analyses. Necessary checks of the chemical makeup, processing, and accountability of the samples taken from H Canyon process tanks are performed at the labs along with further checks on waste leaving the canyon after processing. Used nuclear material taken in by the canyon is actually not waste. Only a small portion of the radioactive material itself is actually consumed in nuclear reactors. As a result various radioactive elements such as Uranium, Plutonium and Neptunium are commonly found in waste and may be useful to recover. Specific processing is needed to allow for separation of these products from the waste. This is H Canyon's specialty. Furthermore, H Canyon has the capacity to initiate the process for weapons-grade nuclear material to be converted into nuclear fuel. This is one of the main campaigns being set up for the fall of 2012. Once usable material is separated and purified of impurities such as fission products, it can be converted to an oxide and ultimately turned into commercial fuel. The processing of weapons-grade material for commercial fuel is important in the necessary disposition of plutonium. Another processing campaign to start in the fall in H Canyon involves the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel for disposal in improved containment units. The importance of this campaign involves the proper disposal of nuclear waste in order to ensure the safety and well-being of future generations and the environment. As processing proceeds in the fall, H Canyon will have a substantial number of samples being sent to F/H Labs. All analyses of these samples are imperative to safe and efficient processing. The important campaigns to occur would be impossible without feedback from analyses such as chemical makeup of solutions, concentrations of dissolution acids and nuclear material, as well as nuclear isotopic data. The necessity of analysis for radiochemical processing is evident. Processing devoid of F/H Lab's feedback would go against the ideals of a safety-conscious and highly accomplished processing facility such as H Canyon.

Weinheimer, E.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Nine Canyon III Wind Farm Facility Nine Canyon III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest/RES Americas Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

62

Microsoft Word - Final_NineCanyon_CommunicationTowerInstall_CX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2013 1, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kelly Gardner, PMP Project Manager, TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Nine Canyon Substation Communication Tower Addition: 331800 McNary Sub Bus Tie Relay Replacements and 310427 McNary-Badger Canyon Transfer Trip Install Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 - Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Kennewick, Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a 60-foot communications tower and associated communication equipment at the Benton County Public Utility District's Nine Canyon Substation in Benton County, Washington. The upgrade would involve replacing the

63

Review of the Diablo Canyon probabilistic risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This report details the review of the Diablo Canyon Probabilistic Risk Assessment (DCPRA). The study was performed under contract from the Probabilistic Risk Analysis Branch, Office of Nuclear Reactor Research, USNRC by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The DCPRA is a full scope Level I effort and although the review touched on all aspects of the PRA, the internal events and seismic events received the vast majority of the review effort. The report includes a number of independent systems analyses sensitivity studies, importance analyses as well as conclusions on the adequacy of the DCPRA for use in the Diablo Canyon Long Term Seismic Program.

Bozoki, G.E.; Fitzpatrick, R.G.; Bohn, M.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sabek, M.G. [Atomic Energy Authority, Nuclear Regulatory and Safety Center, Cairo (Egypt); Ravindra, M.K.; Johnson, J.J. [EQE Engineering, San Francisco, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Blue Canyon II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon II Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser American Electric Power Location North of Lawton OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase III Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Thirty-five years at Pajarito Canyon Site  

SciTech Connect

A history of the research activities performed at the Pajarito Canyon Site from 1946 to 1981 is presented. Critical assemblies described include: the Topsy assembly; Lady Godiva; Godiva 2; Jezebel; Flattop; the Honeycomb assembly for Rover studies; Kiwi-TNT; PARKA reactor; Big Ten; and Plasma Cavity Assembly.

Paxton, H.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Properties of Saltstone Prepared Containing H-Canyon Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saltstone slurries were prepared from solutions made from H-Canyon waste and evaluated for processing properties. Salt solutions prepared with a 1:1 ratio of Tank 50H simulant and H-Canyon blended waste produced slurries that met the processing requirements in Table 2 of the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). Additions of set retarder and antifoam were necessary to meet these processing requirements. The water to premix ratio used to achieve acceptable processing properties was 0.63. Slurries prepared solely with H-Canyon blended waste as the salt solution met the gel time and bleed water requirements, but did not set in the allotted time. Compressive strength samples prepared from the mix with acceptable processing properties had an average compressive strength of 814 psi (Samples with a compressive strength value of >200 psi are acceptable.). Analysis for mercury of the leachate of samples analyzed by the Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) indicated a concentration of mercury in the leachate <0.11 mg/L (The limit set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) for mercury to require treatment is 0.2 mg/L.). It is recommended that without further testing; Tank 50H be limited to no more than 50 wt% H-Canyon material. It is also recommended that prior to the transfer of Tank 50H to the Saltstone Processing Facility; a sample of the Tank 50H waste be evaluated for processing properties.

Cozzi, A

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 10, 2012 ... Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications: Hydrogen Storage Program Organizers: Zhenguo "Gary" Yang, Pacific Northwest...

69

Ex post power economic analysis of record of decision operational restrictions at Glen Canyon Dam.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On October 9, 1996, Bruce Babbitt, then-Secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior signed the Record of Decision (ROD) on operating criteria for the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD). Criteria selected were based on the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF) Alternative as described in the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona, Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (Reclamation 1995). These restrictions reduced the operating flexibility of the hydroelectric power plant and therefore its economic value. The EIS provided impact information to support the ROD, including an analysis of operating criteria alternatives on power system economics. This ex post study reevaluates ROD power economic impacts and compares these results to the economic analysis performed prior (ex ante) to the ROD for the MLFF Alternative. On the basis of the methodology used in the ex ante analysis, anticipated annual economic impacts of the ROD were estimated to range from approximately $15.1 million to $44.2 million in terms of 1991 dollars ($1991). This ex post analysis incorporates historical events that took place between 1997 and 2005, including the evolution of power markets in the Western Electricity Coordinating Council as reflected in market prices for capacity and energy. Prompted by ROD operational restrictions, this analysis also incorporates a decision made by the Western Area Power Administration to modify commitments that it made to its customers. Simulated operations of GCD were based on the premise that hourly production patterns would maximize the economic value of the hydropower resource. On the basis of this assumption, it was estimated that economic impacts were on average $26.3 million in $1991, or $39 million in $2009.

Veselka, T. D.; Poch, L. A.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B; Decision and Information Sciences; Western Area Power Administration

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

New York Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New York Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New York Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Lovelock, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

71

American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility Facility American Canyon Power Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Napa County, California Coordinates 38.5024689°, -122.2653887° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.5024689,"lon":-122.2653887,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steam Plant Biomass Facility Steam Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Biomass Facility Facility Coyote Canyon Steam Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Orange County, California Coordinates 33.7174708°, -117.8311428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7174708,"lon":-117.8311428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

New York Canyon Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York Canyon Geothermal Project New York Canyon Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates 40.056111111111°, -118.01083333333° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.056111111111,"lon":-118.01083333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Blue Canyon V Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

V Wind Farm V Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Canyon V Wind Farm Facility Blue Canyon V Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon-EDPR Developer Horizon-EDPR Energy Purchaser Public Service of Oklahoma Location Caddo & Comanche Counties OK Coordinates 34.8582°, -98.54752° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.8582,"lon":-98.54752,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

New York Canyon Stimulation Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stimulation Geothermal Project Stimulation Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title New York Canyon Stimulation Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal System Demonstrations Project Type / Topic 2 EGS Demonstration Project Description The projects expected outcomes and benefits are; - Demonstrated commercial viability of the EGS-stimulated reservoir by generating electricity using fluids produced from the reservoir at economic costs. - Significant job creation and preservation and economic development in support of the Recovery Act of 2009. State Nevada Objectives Demonstrate the commercial application of EGS techniques at the New York Canyon (NYC) site in a way that minimizes cost and maximizes opportunities for repeat applications elsewhere.

76

Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Box Canyon Motel Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Box Canyon Motel Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ouray, Colorado Coordinates 38.0227716°, -107.6714487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

77

Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources Harbison Canyon, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8203296°, -116.8300236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.8203296,"lon":-116.8300236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

The Dissolution of Desicooler Residues in H-Canyon Dissolvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of dissolution and characterization studies has been performed to determine if FB-Line residues stored in desicooler containers will dissolve using a modified H-Canyon processing flowsheet. Samples of desicooler materials were used to evaluate dissolving characteristics in the low-molar nitric acid solutions used in H-Canyon dissolvers. The selection for the H-Canyon dissolution of desicooler residues was based on their high-enriched uranium content and trace levels of plutonium. Test results showed that almost all of the enriched uranium will dissolve from the desicooler materials after extended boiling in one molar nitric acid solutions. The residue that contained uranium after completion of the extended boiling cycle consisted of brown solids that had agglomerated into large pieces and were floating on top of the dissolver solution. Addition of tenth molar fluoride to a three molar nitric acid solution containing boron did not dissolve remaining uranium from the brown solids. Only after boiling in an eight molar nitric acid-tenth molar fluoride solution without boron did remaining uranium and aluminum dissolve from the brown solids. The amount of uranium associated with brown solids would be approximately 1.4 percent of the total uranium content of the desicooler materials. The brown solids that remain in the First Uranium Cycle feed will accumulate at the organic/aqueous interface during solvent extraction operations. Most of the undissolved white residue that remained after extended boiling was aluminum oxide containing additional trace quantities of impurities. However, the presence of mercury used in H-Canyon dissolvers should complete the dissolution of these aluminum compounds.

Gray, J.H.

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

79

A review of proposed Glen Canyon Dam interim operating criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three sets of interim operating criteria for Glen Canyon Dam on the Colorado River have been proposed for the period of November 1991, to the completion of the record of decision for the Glen Canyon Dam environmental impact statement (about 1993). These criteria set specific limits on dam releases, including maximum and minimum flows, up-ramp and down-ramp rates, and maximum daily fluctuation. Under the proposed interim criteria, all of these parameters would be reduced relative to historical operating criteria to protect downstream natural resources, including sediment deposits, threatened and endangered fishes, trout, the aquatic food base, and riparian plant communities. The scientific bases of the three sets of proposed operating criteria are evaluated in the present report:(1) criteria proposed by the Research/Scientific Group, associated with the Glen Canyon Environmental Studies (GCES); (2) criteria proposed state and federal officials charged with managing downstream resources; and (3) test criteria imposed from July 1991, to November 1991. Data from Phase 1 of the GCES and other sources established that the targeted natural resources are affected by dam operations, but the specific interim criteria chosen were not supported by any existing studies. It is unlikely that irreversible changes to any of the resources would occur over the interim period if historical operating criteria remained in place. It is likely that adoption of any of the sets of proposed interim operating criteria would reduce the levels of sediment transport and erosion below Glen Canyon Dam; however, these interim criteria could result in some adverse effects, including the accumulation of debris at tributary mouths, a shift of new high-water-zone vegetation into more flood-prone areas, and further declines in vegetation in the old high water zone.

LaGory, K.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Tomasko, D.; Hayse, J.; Durham, L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 Bayo Canyon NM Site - NM 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Bayo Canyon, NM Alternate Name(s): Bayo Canyon Area Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site NM.01-2 Location: Canyon in the Pajarito Plateau Region in Los Alamos County, Los Alamos, NM NM.01-3 Historical Operations: Used in 1944-1961 by the MED and later AEC at Los Alamos National Laboratory as a firing site for conventional and high-explosives experiments involving natural and depleted uranium, strontium, and lanthanum as a radiation source for blast diagnosis. NM.01-3 NM.01-5 Eligibility Determination: Eligible NM.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Survey NM.01-3 Site Status: Certified- Certification Basis NM.01-5 NM.01-6 Long-term Care Requirements: Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites S07566_FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Facility Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Energy Northwest Developer Energy Northwest Energy Purchaser Energy Northwest Location Benton County Coordinates 46.286065°, -119.425532° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.286065,"lon":-119.425532,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Simulating infiltration tests in fractured basalt at the Box Canyon Site, Idaho  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the unsaturated zone at the Idaho National Engineeringzone: Box Canyon Site, Idaho. , Rep. LBNL-42925, Lawrencethe U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, DOE

Unger, Andre J.A.; Faybishenko, Boris; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Simmons, Ardyth M.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Removal plan for Shippingport pressurized water reactor core 2 blanket fuel assemblies form T plant to the canister storage building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the current strategy and path forward for removal of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies from their existing storage configuration (wet storage within the T Plant canyon) and transport to the Canister Storage Building (designed and managed by the Spent Nuclear Fuel. Division). The removal plan identifies all processes, equipment, facility interfaces, and documentation (safety, permitting, procedures, etc.) required to facilitate the PWR Core 2 assembly removal (from T Plant), transport (to the Canister storage Building), and storage to the Canister Storage Building. The plan also provides schedules, associated milestones, and cost estimates for all handling activities.

Lata

1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon wasmeters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitableThe Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant site in San Luis

Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Small mammal study of Sandia Canyon, 1994 and 1995  

SciTech Connect

A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilize water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to gather baseline data of small mammal populations and compare small mammal characteristics within three areas of Sandia Canyon, which receives outfall effluents from multiple sources. Three small mammal trapping webs were placed in the upper portion of Sandia Canyon, the first two were centered in a cattail-dominated marsh with a ponderosa pine overstory and the third web was placed in a much drier transition area with a ponderosa pine overstory. Webs 1 and 2 had the highest species diversity indices with deer mice the most commonly captured species in all webs. However, at Web 1, voles, shrews, and harvest mice, species more commonly found in moist habitats, made up a much greater overall percentage (65.6%) than did deer mice and brush mice (34.5%). The highest densities and biomass of animals were found in Web 1 with a continual decrease in density estimates in each web downstream. There is no statistical difference between the mean body weights of deer mice and brush mice between sites. Mean body length was also determined not to be statistically different between the webs (GLM [deer mouse], F = 0.89, p = 0.4117; GLM [brush mouse], F = 2.49, p = 0.0999). Furthermore, no statistical difference between webs was found for the mean lean body masses of deer and brush mice (GLM [deer mouse], F = 2.54, p = 0.0838; GLM [brush mouse], F = 1.60, p = 0.2229). Additional monitoring studies should be conducted in Sandia Canyon so comparisons over time can be made. In addition, rodent tissues should be sampled for contaminants and then compared to background or control populations elsewhere at the Laboratory or at an off-site location.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE/EA-1521; Environmental Assessment for Spring Canyon Wind Project, Logan County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA, Spring Canyon Wind Project ix EA, Spring Canyon Wind Project ix TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED......................................................................................................... 1 1.1 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................... 1 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED............................................................................................. 3 1.2.1 Federal Agency Action ............................................................................... 3 1.2.2 Applicant's Purpose and Need .................................................................... 3 1.3 SCOPING .................................................................................................................. 3

87

Wind-Flow Patterns in the Grand Canyon as Revealed by Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many interesting flow patterns were found in the Grand Canyon by a scanning Doppler lidar deployed to the south rim during the 1990 Wintertime Visibility Study. Three are analyzed in this study: 1) flow reversal in the canyon, where the flow in ...

Robert M. Banta; Lisa S. Darby; Pirmin Kaufmann; David H. Levinson; Cui-Juan Zhu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Debris flow deposition and reworking by the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Debris flow deposition and reworking by the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona Brian J Canyon, Arizona, transport coarse-grained sediment onto debris fans adjacent to the Colorado River and Monument Creeks using photogrammetry of aerial photography taken from 1965 to 2000 and supplemented

89

Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice Climbing in Clear Creek Canyon A climbing trip report by Glenn Murray SUMMARY: I climb ice in to ask about local climbing. The guys there told me there was ice nearby, in Clear Creek Canyon. I. Four pitches? Five? It was time to find a partner. The only ice climber I knew in Denver was a friend

90

Green Canyon Hot Springs Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Greenhouse Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Greenhouse Location Newdale, Idaho Coordinates 43.8832463°, -111.6063483° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

91

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys indicated that a few minor -nomalies might be present. However, the extreme topographic relief in the area did not permit sufficient coverage of the

92

Patterns in biodiversity and distribution of benthic Polychaeta in the Mississippi Canyon, Northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The distribution of benthic polychaetes in the Mississippi Canyon was examined to evaluate impacts of environmental variables on species assemblages. Environmental variables considered included depth, bathymetric slope, hydrographic features, sediment grain size, food availability and sediment contamination. Samples were collected using GOMEX boxcorer. Density decreased with increasing depth exponentially. Diversity exhibited a unimodal pattern with depth with a maximum value in the intermediate depth range (about 1269 m). Deposit feeders were the most abundant feeding guild. Both the feeding guilds and faunal composition could be divided into three groups along the depth gradient: shallow (300 ? 800 m), intermediate (800 ? 1500 m) and deep (> 1500 m). Results of statistical analyses revealed that depth was the most important determinant in organizing polychaete assemblages in the study area. The Mississippi Canyon and the Central Transect (a non-canyon area) were found not contaminated by trace metals or Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in sediments, although the highest PAHs concentration occurred at the head of the Canyon, MT1. The mean density was higher in the Mississippi Canyon (1668 N/m2) than in the Central Transect (979 N/m2), while the mean diversity in the Canyon (ES(100) = 26.9 ) was lower than the Central Transect (ES(100) = 33.1). Large amounts of terrigenous input from the Mississippi River to the Canyon could enhance polychaete density and accelerate competitive exclusion, and thus lead to lower diversity. The faunal composition was significantly different between the two transects, with higher species richness in the Mississippi Canyon (301 species). This could be attributed to structure complexity in the Mississippi Canyon. The distribution of feeding guilds was similar between two transects. The differences observed in polychaete assemblages between two transects may be largely due to high terrigenous sediment and organic matter input to the Mississippi Canyon by the Mississippi River.

Wang, Yuning

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sediment transport in the Mississippi Canyon: the role of currents and storm events on optical variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two modes of sediment transport were found to exist in the Mississippi Canyon: the offshelf transport of material in intermediate nepheloid layers originating at depths of 50-175 m and the resuspension and transport of material within the canyon. Large- and small-particle intermediate nepheloid layers were consistently present in the canyon axis and were not observed on the slope to either side of the canyon. The temporal variability in currents, temperature, and particulate matter was measured at a station located at 300 m depth in the canyon axis during consecutive deployments in May-July and August-November 1998. Two moored current meters, one at 3.5 mab and one at 50 mab, recorded flow, while thermographs, a light-scattering sensor, and sediment traps gathered information about the characteristics of the flow and movement of particulate matter. Currents in the upper Mississippi Canyon were oscillatory, with alternating periods of up-canyon and down-canyon flow. Harmonic analysis revealed that the diurnal tidal signal was the dominant component of the flow. Currents were most intense at 3.5 mab. Mean current speed at this depth was approximately 8 cm s? during both deployments, reaching maximum speeds of over 50 cm s?. Current velocities generated sufficient shear stress to resuspend canyon floor sediments about 30% of the time during both deployments. During the second mooring deployment, Hurricane Georges passed 150 km NE of the study site. Near-bottom current velocities and temperature fluctuations were intensified. As the hurricane passed, maximum current speed reached 68 cm s? and a temperature decrease of approximately 7 degrees C occurred in less than 2 hours. Conditions were favorable for sediment resuspension approximately 50% of the time during the five days of hurricane influence. Further evidence for sediment resuspension was provided by similarities between canyon floor core samples and sediment trap collections.

Burden, Cheryl A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Hydrogen fuel closer to reality because of storage advances Advances made in rechargeable solid hydrogen fuel storage tanks. March 21, 2012 Field experiments on the Alamosa Canyon How best to achieve the benchmark of 300 miles of travel without refueling? It may be to use the lightweight compound ammonia-borane to carry the hydrogen. With hydrogen accounting for almost 20 percent of its weight, this stable, non-flammable compound is one of the highest-capacity materials for storing hydrogen. In a car, the introduction of a chemical catalyst would release the hydrogen as needed, thus avoiding on-board storage of large quantities of flammable hydrogen gas. When the ammonia-borane fuel is depleted of hydrogen, it would be regenerated at a

95

Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase II Wind Farm Phase II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm Facility Biglow Canyon Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Portland General Electric Developer Orion Energy Group Energy Purchaser Portland General Electric Location Sherman County OR Coordinates 45.6375°, -120.605278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6375,"lon":-120.605278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

96

Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applied Neutron Scattering in Engineering and Materials Science Research: Hydrogen Storage Sponsored by: Metallurgical Society of the Canadian Institute of...

97

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

98

Fish Passage Assessment: Big Canyon Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the fish passage assessment as outlined as part of the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project as detailed in the CY2003 Statement of Work (SOW). As part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP), this project is one of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) many efforts at off-site mitigation for damage to salmon and steelhead runs, their migration, and wildlife habitat caused by the construction and operation of federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The proposed restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed follow the watershed restoration approach mandated by the Fisheries and Watershed Program. Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program vision focuses on protecting, restoring, and enhancing watersheds and treaty resources within the ceded territory of the Nez Perce Tribe under the Treaty of 1855 with the United States Federal Government. The program uses a holistic approach, which encompasses entire watersheds, ridge top to ridge top, emphasizing all cultural aspects. We strive toward maximizing historic ecosystem productive health, for the restoration of anadromous and resident fish populations. The Nez Perce Tribal Fisheries/Watershed Program (NPTFWP) sponsors the Protect and Restore the Big Canyon Creek Watershed project. The NPTFWP has the authority to allocate funds under the provisions set forth in their contract with BPA. In the state of Idaho vast numbers of relatively small obstructions, such as road culverts, block thousands of miles of habitat suitable for a variety of fish species. To date, most agencies and land managers have not had sufficient, quantifiable data to adequately address these barrier sites. The ultimate objective of this comprehensive inventory and assessment was to identify all barrier crossings within the watershed. The barriers were then prioritized according to the amount of habitat blocked at each site and the fish life history stages impacted. This assessment protocol will hopefully prove useful to other agencies and become a model for use in other watersheds.

Christian, Richard

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Microsoft Word - canyon disposition rpt 2 01 05.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Efforts to Department of Energy Efforts to Dispose of Hanford's Chemical Separation Facilities DOE/IG-0672 February 2005 -2- benefits of using the facility as a disposal site. Instead, the study focused on characterizing and performing technical analysis on the structural integrity of the facility. In studying the merits of the Initiative, the Department did not ensure that the cost study was sufficient in scope, and once completed, never reviewed the study to determine whether it was accurate and complete or adequately supported the preferred alternative. As a result of not thoroughly evaluating the feasibility of using canyon facilities for waste disposal, the Department may not realize savings ranging up to $500 million. This report highlights the importance of the Department's oversight of its contractors' activities to

100

RECALIBRATION OF H CANYON ONLINE SPECTROPHOTOMETER AT EXTENDED URANIUM CONCENTRATION  

SciTech Connect

The H Canyon online spectrophotometers are calibrated for measurement of the uranium and nitric acid concentrations of several tanks in the 2nd Uranium Cycle.[1] The spectrometers, flow cells, and prediction models are currently optimized for a process in which uranium concentrations are expected to range from 0-15 g/L and nitric acid concentrations from 0.05-6 M. However, an upcoming processing campaign will involve 'Super Kukla' material, which has a lower than usual enrichment of fissionable uranium. Total uranium concentrations will be higher, spanning approximately 0-30 g/L U, with no change in the nitric acid concentrations. The new processing conditions require the installation of new flow cells with shorter path lengths. As the process solutions have a higher uranium concentration, the shorter path length is required to decrease the absorptivity to values closer to the optimal range for the instrument. Also, new uranium and nitric acid prediction models are required to span the extended uranium concentration range. The models will be developed for the 17.5 and 15.4 tanks, for which nitric acid concentrations will not exceed 1 M. The restricted acid range compared to the original models is anticipated to reduce the measurement uncertainty for both uranium and nitric acid. The online spectrophotometers in H Canyon Second Uranium Cycle were modified to allow measurement of uranium and nitric acid for the Super Kukla processing campaign. The expected uranium concentrations, which are higher than those that have been recently processed, required new flow cells with one-third the optical path length of the existing cells. Also, new uranium and nitric acid calibrations were made. The estimated reading uncertainties (2{sigma}) for Tanks 15.4 and 17.5 are {approx}5% for uranium and {approx}25% for nitric acid.

Lascola, R

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Record of Decision - Klondike III/ Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project - 10-25-06  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project DECISION The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE) 1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects,

102

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon Recovery Act Begins Box Remediation Operations at F Canyon May 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Jim Giusti, DOE (803) 952-7697 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS (803) 646-6075 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov AIKEN, S.C. - The F Canyon box remediation program, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project at Savannah River Site (SRS), has come online to process legacy transuranic (TRU) waste for off-site shipment and permanent disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a geological repository in New Mexico. The $40-million facility will process approximately 330 boxes containing TRU waste with a radiological risk higher than seen in the rest of the Site's original 5,000-cubic-meter

103

On Line Spectrophotometric Measurement of Uranium and Nitrate in H Canyon  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the on-line instrumentation developed by the Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center in support of Highly Enriched Uranium Blend Down processing in H Canyon.

Lascola, R.J.

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Impulsively Started Flow in a Submarine Canyon: Comparison of Results from Laboratory and Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intercomparisons have been made of results from laboratory experiments and a numerical model for the flow in the vicinity of an idealized submarine canyon located along an otherwise continuous shelf. Motion in the rotating and continuously ...

Nicolas Prenne; J. William Lavelle; David C. Smith IV; Don L. Boyer

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Mercury Vapor At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Mercury Vapor Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys

106

Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geologic mapping (Diller, 1982) in this area has identified several trachitic and alkalic dikes, plugs, and vents within the area bounded by the canyons (Fig. 21). The frequency distribution of those dikes in the two

107

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 63: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

108

Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 Savannah River Site's H Canyon Begins 2012 with New and Continuing Missions - Transuranic waste remediation, new mission work are the focus of the nation's only active nuclear chemical separations facility in 2012 January 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis H Canyon, above, and HB-Line are scheduled to soon begin dissolving and purifying plutonium currently stored at the Savannah River Site to demonstrate the capability to produce oxide material that meets the Mixed Oxide Facility (MOX) feedstock specifications. The production process at MOX, which is now under construction, will eventually create fuel pellets for U.S. commercial reactor fuel assemblies.

109

EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak 3: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona EA-1863: Vegetation Management on the Glen Canyon-Pinnacle Peak Transmission Lines Spanning the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona Summary DOE's Western Area Power Administration is preparing this EA to evaluate the environmental impacts of updating the vegetation management and right-of-way maintenance program for Western's Glen Canyon to Pinnacle Peak 345-kV transmission lines, which cross the Coconino National Forest, Coconino County, Arizona. For more information on this EA, contact: Ms. Linette King at: lking@wapa.gov. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

110

Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Micro-Earthquake At New York Canyon Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location New York Canyon Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Micro-Earthquake Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine seismicity before and after reservoir stimulation for EGS Notes The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality seismic data for improved processing and interpretation methodologies. This will allow the development and testing

111

Internal Tides and Mixing in a Submarine Canyon with Time-Varying Stratification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time variability of the energetics and turbulent dissipation of internal tides in the upper Monterey Submarine Canyon (MSC) is examined with three moored profilers and five ADCP moorings spanning FebruaryApril 2009. Highly resolved time ...

Zhongxiang Zhao; Matthew H. Alford; Ren-Chieh Lien; Michael C. Gregg; Glenn S. Carter

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fire modeling for Building 221-T - T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by Hughes Associates, Inc. to document the results of fire models for building 221-T Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel. Backup data is contained in document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-010, Rev. 0.

Oar, D.L.

1994-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Transport of a Power Plant Tracer Plume over Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and air-quality data, as well as surface tracer concentration values, were collected during 1990 to assess the impacts of Navajo Generating Station (NGS) emissions on Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) air quality. These data have ...

Jun Chen; Robert Bornstein; Charles G. Lindsey

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

MSHA issues Crandall Canyon investigation report, fines owners $1.6 million  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper summarises the findings of the Mine Safety and Health Administration report (available at www.msha.gov) into the death of six people at the Crandall Canyon Mine on 6 August 2007.

NONE

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

A Numerical Study of Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Characteristics in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons are investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model with the k? turbulent closure scheme. It is shown that the flow field is characterized mainly by the number and intensity of ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Jae-Jin Kim

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aspects of the Load Circulation at the Grand Canyon during the Fall Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmosphere and circulation of air within, above, and around the Grand Canyon of the Colorado River was studied from an instrumented aircraft and from ground-based instruments in September and October 1984. Several patterns were identified. ...

L. P. Stearns

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Numerical Study of Thermal Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates thermal effects on the flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons. A two-dimensional numerical model with a k? turbulent closure scheme is developed, and the heat transfer between the air and the building wall ...

Jae-Jin Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Sediment-Driven Downslope Flow in Submarine Canyons and Channels: Three-Dimensional Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of submarine canyons and channels in sediment-driven downslope flow (sediment plumes) is examined, using a three-dimensional, rotational numerical model that couples the hydrodynamics and sediment transport. The model domain consists of ...

Jochen Kmpf; Hermann Fohrmann

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cross-Shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents at an Idealized Coastal Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are used to study on-shelf transport of dense water by oscillatory barotropic currents incident upon an isolated coastal canyon. The physical system is a laboratory-scale annulus in which forcing is provided by an ...

D. B. Haidvogel

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

LaboratoryNumerical Model Comparisons of Canyon Flows: A Parameter Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated set of laboratory and numerical-model experiments has been conducted to understand the development of residual circulation surrounding a coastal canyon and to explore further the degree to which laboratory experiments can provide ...

Don L. Boyer; Dale B. Haidvogel; Nicolas Prenne

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by...

122

EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

123

Tertiary oxidation in Westwater Canyon member of Morrison formation  

SciTech Connect

Hematitic oxidation in the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation extends along the outcrop from the Pipeline fault northeast of Gallup, New Mexico, to the San Mateo fault north of Grants, New Mexico. The hematitic sandstone forms a broad lobe in the subsurface to a depth of 2,400 ft (730 m). The downdip edge of this sandstone arcs eastward from northeast Church Rock through Crownpoint, and southeastward to the west edge of the Ambrosia Lake district. The red sandstone is bordered on the downdip side by a band of limonitic oxidation, which interfingers with reduced sandstones basinward. The limonitic oxidation forms a relatively narrow band along the north and west sides of the hematitic lobe but expands progressively in an east and southeast direction. Weak limonitic oxidation, as indicated by the absence of pyrite and by a bleached to faint yellowish-gray color, appears to extend from the San Mateo fault eastward under Mount Taylor to the Rio Puerco of the east. The hematitic oxidation is epigenetic and is believed to be of early Miocene to late Pliocene age. The limonitic oxidation follows the present ground-water flow pattern and probably dates from late Pliocene to the Holocene. The oxidation patterns are important in uranium exploration because the hematitic area is essentially barren, whereas the limonitic areas contain ore deposits that are in the process of being destroyed by oxidation.

Saucier, A.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Explaining the relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment at Chaco Canyon, New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chaco Canyon, the Pueblo settlement of New Mexico, represents one of the major cultural developments in the prehistoric Southwest. Between A.D. 900 and A.D. 1100 Chaco reached its peak of cultural florescence. This period was characterized by considerable building activities, appearance of Chaco outliers, and the construction of an extensive road system. After this period a dramatic decline in population and a cessation of building activity took place. Archaeologists call this phenomenon abandonment. In general, development and abandonment of Chaco Canyon coincided with changes in climatic conditions. Between A.D. 900 and A.D. 1100 there was a gradual increase in effective moisture and warmer temperature which proved favorable for agriculture there. With these optimal climatic conditions,development of Chaco Canyon witnessed a great increase in population. However, the Chaco Canyon region could not support a large population indefinitely because of its agricultural marginality. To solve this population-resource imbalance, Chacoan farmers of this period intensified their agricultural activities by constructing water control systems such as check dams, contour terraces, canals, and ditches. These measures worked for a while and the influence of Chaco Canyon was felt in the political, economic, and religious life of a broad geographic region. However, summer moisture began to decrease in the years between A.D. 1130 and A.D. 1180. This decrease became a full scale drought from A.D. 1157 to A.D. 1179 that seems to have severely affected agriculture and wild food resources available for the Chacoans. In addition, the Chacoan water control system designed to capture runoff probably proved to be inadequate as a buffering mechanism. Consequently, population at Chaco Canyon began to decrease and the region was abandoned after A.D. 1140. In an attempt at explaining the specific abandonment of Chaco Canyon, this thesis focuses on relationship between prehistoric agriculture and environment.

Gang, G-Young

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

126

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

127

DUF6 Storage Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Safety Depleted UF6 Storage line line How DUF6 is Stored Where DUF6 is Stored DUF6 Storage Safety Cylinder Leakage Depleted UF6 Storage Safety Continued cylinder storage is...

128

Flow Patterns at the Ends of a Street Canyon: Measurements from the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Joint Urban 2003 experiment held in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, an eastwest-running street canyon was heavily instrumented with wind sensors. In this paper, the flow patterns at the street canyon ends are investigated by looking at sonic ...

Suhas U. Pol; Michael J. Brown

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Green Canyon Hot Springs Sector Geothermal energy Type Pool and Spa Location Newdale, Idaho Coordinates 43.8832463°, -111.6063483° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

130

Microsoft Word - CX-BadgerCanyon-RichlandNo1_WoodPoles_FY13.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2013 7, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR/Pasco SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Walker Miller Electrical Engineer - TPCF-W RICHLAND Proposed Action: Wood pole replacements on the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 transmission line PP&A Project No.: 2670 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance activities. Location: City of Richland, Benton County, WA Transmission Line/ROW Structure # Township Range Section County, State Badger Canyon-Richland #1 4/9 and 4/10 9N 28E 26 Benton, WA Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA, at the expense of the City of Richland, proposes to raise structures 4/9 and 4/10 of the Badger Canyon-Richland #1 115-kilovolt transmission line to

131

Attachments for fire modeling for Building 221-T, T Plant canyon deck and railroad tunnel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this attachment is to provide historical information and documentation for Document No. WHC-SD-CP-ANAL-008 Rev 0, ``Fire Modeling for Building 221-T--T Plant Canyon Deck and Railroad Tunnel``, dated September 29, 1994. This data compilation contains the following: Resumes of the Technical Director, Senior Engineer and Junior Engineer; Review and Comment Record; Software Files; CFAST Input and Output Files; Calculation Control Sheets; and Estimating Sprinkler Actuation Time in the Canyon and Railroad Tunnel. The T Plant was originally a fuel reprocessing facility. It was modified later to decontaminate and repair PuRex process equipment.

Oar, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Objectives - Develop and verify: On-board hydrogen storage systems achieving: 1.5 kWhkg (4.5 wt%), 1.2 kWhL, and 6kWh by 2005 2 kWhkg (6 wt%), 1.5 kWhL, and 4kWh by...

133

Canyon dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alternative to the FB-Line scrap recovery dissolver was desired for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) residues from the plutonium reduction process due to the potential generation of hydrogen gas concentrations above the lower flammability limit. To address this concern, a flowsheet was developed for the F-Canyon dissolvers. The dissolvers are continually purged with nominally 33 SCFM of air; therefore the generation of flammable gas concentrations should not be a concern. Following removal of crucible fragments, small batches of the remaining sand fines or slag chunks containing less than approximately 350 grams of plutonium can be dissolved using the center insert in each of the four annular dissolver ports to address nuclear criticality safety concerns. Complete dissolution of the sand fines and slag chunks was achieved in laboratory experiments by heating between 75 and 85 degrees Celsius in a 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M (hydrogen) fluoride solution. Under these conditions, the sand and slag samples dissolved between 1 and 3 hours. Complete dissolution of plutonium and calcium fluorides in the slag required adjusting the dissolver solution to 7.5 wt% aluminum nitrate nonahydrate (ANN). Once ANN was added to a dissolver solution, further dissolution of any plutonium oxide (PuO2) in successive charges was not practical due to complexation of the fluoride by aluminum. During the laboratory experiments, well mixed solutions were necessary to achieve rapid dissolution rates. When agitation was not provided, sand fines dissolved very slowly. Measurement of the hydrogen gas generation rate during dissolution of slag samples was used to estimate the amount of metal in the chunks. Depending upon the yield of the reduction, the values ranged between approximately 1 (good yield) and 20% (poor yield). Aging of the slag will reduce the potential for hydrogen generation as calcium metal oxidizes over time. The potential for excessive corrosion in the dissolvers was evaluated using experimental data reported in the literature. Corrosion data at the exact flowsheet conditions were not available; however, the corrosion rate for 304L stainless steel (wrought material) corrosion coupons in 10M nitric acid/0.01M hydrofluoric acid at 95 degrees Celsius was reported as 21 mils per year. If the fluoride in the dissolver is complexed with aluminum, the corrosion rate will decrease to approximately 5 mils per year.

Rudisill, T.S.; Gray, J.H.; Karraker, D.G.; Chandler, G.T.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEEfor SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", inSuperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant, Advances in

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Usage Storage Storage Energy storage isnt just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research...

138

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Contacts on...

140

The Influence of Canyon Winds on Flow Fields near Colorado's Front Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of sodars was operated in the late summer and fall of 1993 to monitor the occurrence of nocturnal winds from a canyon in Colorado's Front Range near the Rocky Flats Plant and to determine the influence of those winds on the flow fields ...

J. C. Doran

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Functional design criteria, Project W-059, B Plant Canyon ventilation upgrade  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the essential functions and requirements to be included in the design of the proposed B Plant canyon exhaust system upgrade. The project will provide a new exhaust air filter system and isolate the old filters from the airstream.

Roege, P.E.

1995-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Observations of Thermally Driven Wind Jets at the Exit of Weber Canyon, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermally driven valley-exit jets were investigated at Utahs Weber Canyon, a main tributary of the Great Salt Lake basin. An intensive measurement campaign during JulySeptember 2010 supplemented longer-term measurements to characterize the wind ...

Morgan F. Chrust; C. David Whiteman; Sebastian W. Hoch

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The Dependence of Canyon Winds on Surface Cooling and External Forcing in Colorado's Front Range  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric katabatic flow in the foothills of the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains has been monitored by a network of towers and sodars for several years as part of the ASCOT program. The dependence of the outflow from Coal Creek Canyon on ...

Richard L. Coulter; Paul Gudiksen

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daniel R. Borneo, PE Daniel R. Borneo, PE Sandia National Laboratories September 27, 2007 San Francisco, CA PEER REVIEW 2007 DOE(SNL)/CEC Energy Storage Program FYO7 Projects Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Presentation Outline * DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration - FY07 Project Review * Zinc Bromine Battery (ZBB) Demonstration * Palmdale Super capacitor Demonstration * Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Regional Transit (RT) Super capacitor demonstration * Beacon Flywheel Energy Storage System (FESS) 3 Background of DOE(SNL)/CEC Collaboration * Memorandum of Understanding Between CEC and DOE (SNL). - In Place since 2004

145

Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Concept Development Concept Nitrogen-Air Battery F.M. Delnick, D. Ingersoll, K.Waldrip Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, NM presented to U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Research Program Washington, DC November 2-4, 2010 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Funded by the Energy Storage Systems Program of the U.S. Department Of Energy through Sandia National Laboratories Full Air Breathing Battery Concept * Concept is to use O 2 and N 2 as the electrodes in a battery * Novel because N 2 is considered inert * Our group routinely reacts N 2 electrochemically

146

Amphipods of the deep Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico: ecology and bioaccumulation of organic contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In five summer cruises during the period 2000-2004, seventy-four box cores were collected from eleven locations from the Mississippi Canyon (480- 2750m, northern Gulf of Mexico), and an adjacent transect (336-2920) to understand the community structure and trophic function of amphipods and for measuring the bioaccumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, (PAHs). Amphipods were discovered to be an important component of the macrofauna of the Mississippi Canyon (40 % of the total faunal abundance). Seventy two species, belonging to nineteen families, were collected from the study area with 61 species from the canyon and only 38 species from the non-Canyon transect. The head of the canyon (480m) was dominated by dense mats (15,880 ind/m2) of a new amphipod (Ampelisca mississippiana). The logarithm of the amphipod abundance decreased linearly with depth. The species diversity (H`) exhibited a parabolic pattern with a maximum at 1100m. The differences in amphipod abundances and biodiversities were correlated with the variation in the amount of available organic matter. The depression in diversity in the canyon head is thought to be competitive exclusion resulting from the dominance by A.mississippiana, but the high species richness is presumed to be a function of the structural complexity of the canyon. Annual secondary production of A. mississippiana was 6.93 g dry wt m-2, based on size-frequency method and corresponding to an estimated univoltine generation from a regression model. The production/biomass ratio (P/B) was 3.11. Production of this magnitude is comparable to shallow marine ampeliscids but are high for the depauperate northern Gulf of Mexico. The effect of the organic contaminants and the bioavailability to the amphipods was determined through measuring the bioaccumulation of the PAHs. The distribution of PAHs in sediments was different from the distribution in the organisms suggesting preferential uptake/depuration or uptake from pore or bottom waters. The average bioaccumulation factor (4.36 2.55) and the biota sediment accumulation factor (0.240.13) for the total PAHs by the ampeliscids were within the range reported for other benthic invertebrates. The average bioaccumulation factors were highest for dibenzothiophenes (up to 132) and alkylated PAHs and lowest for parent high molecular weight PAHs.

Soliman, Yousria Soliman

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

148

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biology Team of ESH-20 (the Ecology Group) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies measure water quality parameters and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from sampling sites within the upper canyon stream. Reports by Bennett and Cross discuss previous aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands the previous findings. The Biology Team collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates monthly at three sampling stations within Sandia Canyon in 1995. The two upstream stations occur near a cattail (Typha latifolia) dominated marsh downstream from outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. The third station is approximately 1.5 miles downstream from the outfalls within a mixed conifer forest. All water chemistry parameters measured in Sandia Canyon during 1995 fell within acceptable State limits and scored in the {open_quotes}good{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}excellent{close_quotes} ranges when compared to an Environmental Quality Index. However, aquatic macroinvertebrates habitats have been degraded by widespread erosion, channelization, loss of wetlands due to deposition and stream lowering, scour, limited acceptable substrates, LANL releases and spills, and other stressors. Macroinvertebrate communities at all the stations had low diversities, low densities, and erratic numbers of individuals. These results indicate that although the stream possesses acceptable water chemistry, it has reduced biotic potential. The best developed aquatic community occurs at the sampling station with the best habitat and whose downstream location partially mitigates the effects of upstream impairments.

Cross, S.; Nottelman, H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application-storage discovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discovering application dependency on data and storage is a key prerequisite for many storage optimization tasks such as data assignment to storage tiers, storage consolidation, virtualization, and handling unused data. However, in the real world these ... Keywords: enterprise storage, experimental evaluation, storage discovery

Nikolai Joukov; Birgit Pfitzmann; HariGovind V. Ramasamy; Murthy V. Devarakonda

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

151

Properties of the Wind Field within the Oklahoma City Park Avenue Street Canyon. Part I: Mean Flow and Turbulence Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Velocity data were obtained from sonic anemometer measurements within an eastwest-running street canyon located in the urban core of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, during the Joint Urban 2003 field campaign. These data were used to explore the ...

M. A. Nelson; E. R. Pardyjak; J. C. Klewicki; S. U. Pol; M. J. Brown

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Characterization of the Thermal Structure inside an Urban Canyon: Field Measurements and Validation of a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of measurement campaigns are analyzed to investigate the thermal structure in an urban canyon and to validate a simplified model simulating the air and surface temperatures from surface energy budgets. Starting from measurements at ...

Lorenzo Giovannini; Dino Zardi; Massimiliano de Franceschi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Observations of a Terrain-Forced Mesoscale Vortex and Canyon Drainage Flows along the Front Range of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations taken during the February 1991 Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) Winter Validation Study are used to describe the wind field associated with a terrain-forced mesoscale vortex and thermally forced canyon drainage flows ...

David H. Levinson; Robert M. Banta

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Meteorological Processes Affecting the Transport of Emissions from the Navajo Generating Station to Grand Canyon National Park  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the 1990 Navajo Generating Station (NGS) Winter Visibility Study, a network of surface and upper-air meteorological measurement systems was operated in and around Grand Canyon National Park to investigate atmospheric processes in complex ...

Charles G. Lindsey; Jun Chen; Timothy S. Dye; L. Willard Richards; Donald L. Blumenthal

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulent Flow and Dispersion in and above a Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow and dispersion in and above an idealized street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1 are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Each of upwind building wall, street ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Siegfried Raasch; Marcus Oliver Letzel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: The 'National Hydrogen Storage Project' on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: The...

157

Microsoft Word - CX-Franklin-BadgerCanyonGrandview-RedMtnsDisconnectSwitch_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2012 8, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Franklin-Badger Canyon and Grandview-Red Mountain switch replacements PP&A Project No.: 2,349 / 2,350 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Location: Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace disconnect switches and related equipment on the Franklin-Badger Canyon No.2 and Grandview-Red Mountain No.1 115- kilovolt transmission lines. The switch stands will be replaced in the same locations as the existing structures, and related load break equipment will be upgraded in-kind to existing. Both

158

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Record of Decision, October 25, 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action identified in the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) (DOE/EIS-0374, September 2006). Under the Proposed Action, BPA will offer PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) contract terms for interconnection of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project, located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). BPA will also offer Portland General Electric (PGE)1 contract terms for interconnection of its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, also located in Sherman County, Oregon, with the FCRTS, as proposed in the FEIS. To interconnect these wind projects, BPA will build and operate a 12-mile long, 230-kilovolt (kV) double-circuit transmission line between the wind projects and BPA's new 230-kV John Day Substation in Sherman County, Oregon. BPA will also expand its existing 500-kV John Day Substation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

159

Potential of breccia pipes in the Mohawk Canyon Area, Hualapai Indian Reservation, Arizona  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hualapai Indian Reservation is on the southwestern corner of the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona. Hundreds of solution-collapse breccia pipes crop out in the canyons and on the plateaus of northern Arizona. The pipes originated in the Mississippian Redwall Limestone and stoped their way upward through the upper Paleozoic strata, locally extending into the Triassic Moenkopi and Chinle Formations. The occurrence of high-grade U ore, associated with potentially economic concentrations of Cu, Ag, Pb, Zn, V, Co, and Ni in some of these pipes, has stimulated mining activity in northern Arizona despite the depressed market for most of these metals. Two breccia pipes, 241, and 242, have significant mineralized rock exposed on the Esplanade erosion surface; unfortunately, their economic potential is questionable because of their inaccessibility at the bottom of Mohawk Canyon. All warrant further exploration.

Wenrich, K.J.; Billingsley, G.H.; Van Gosen, B.S.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary S-1 Summary S-1 Summary In this Summary: * Purpose and Need for Action * Alternatives * Affected Environment * Impacts This summary covers the major points of the draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared for the Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project proposed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project includes constructing a new double-circuit 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in northern Sherman County, Oregon. The new line would connect the Klondike III Wind Project and the Biglow Canyon Wind Farm to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. The project would also require expansion of BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation and a new 230-kV substation to integrate the two wind projects. As a federal agency, BPA is required by the National Environmental Policy Act

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DISSOLUTION OF FB-LINE METAL RESIDUES CONTAINING BERYLLIUM IN H-CANYON  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scrap materials containing plutonium (Pu) metal from FB-Line vaults are currently being dissolved in HB-Line for subsequent disposition through the H-Canyon facility. However, milestone and schedule commitments may require the dissolution of material containing Pu and beryllium (Be) metals in H-Canyon. To support this option, a flowsheet for dissolving Pu and Be metals in H-Canyon was demonstrated using a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.3 M fluoride (F{sup -}). The F{sup -} was added as calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The dissolving solution also contained 2.5 g/L boron (B), a nuclear safety contingency for the H-Canyon dissolver, and 3.9 g/L iron (Fe) to represent the dissolution of carbon steel cans. The solution was heated to 90-95 C during the 8 h dissolution cycle. Dissolution of the Be metal appeared to begin as soon as the samples were added to the dissolver. Clear, colorless bubbles generated on the surface were observed and were attributed primarily to the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas. The generation of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) gas was also evident from the color of the solution. Essentially all of the Pu and Be dissolved during the first hour of the dissolution as the solution was heated to 90-95 C. The amount of residual solids collected following the dissolution was < 2% of the total metal charged to the dissolver. Examination of residual solids by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the largest dimension of the particles was less than 50 {micro}m with particles of smaller dimensions being more abundant. Energy dispersive spectra from spots on some of the particles showed the solids consisted of a small amount of undissolved material, corrosion products from the glassware, and dried salts from the dissolving solution.

Rudisill, T; Mark Crowder, M; Michael Bronikowski, M

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Steam Generator Tube Integrity Risk Assessment: Volume 2: Application to Diablo Canyon Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Damage to steam generator tubing can impair its ability to adequately perform the required safety functions in terms of structural stability and leakage. This report describes the Diablo Canyon Power Plant application of a method for calculating risk for severe accidents involving steam generator tube failure. The method helps utilities determine risks associated with application of alternate repair criteria and/or operation with degraded tubing.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dissolution of Plutonium Scrub Alloy and Anode Heel Materials in H-Canyon  

SciTech Connect

H-Canyon has a ''gap'' in dissolver operations during the last three months of FY03. One group of material to be processed during the gap is pre-existing scrub alloy material. There are 14 cans of material containing approximately 3.8 kilograms of plutonium. Of the 14 cans, it was anticipated that four cans contain salts, two cans contain anode heel materials, and eight cans contain scrub alloy buttons. H-Canyon desires to process the materials using a flowsheet similar to the SS and C (sand, slag and crucible) dissolution flowsheet used in F-Canyon. The materials will be loaded into carbon steel cans and then placed into aluminum metal charging bundles. Samples were sent to Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for characterization and flowsheet testing -- four MSE salts, two anode heels, and seven scrub alloy buttons. SRTC dissolved and characterized each of the samples. Two of them, originally thought to be MSE salts, were found to be graphite mold materials and were unsuitable for processing in H-Canyon. Characterization studies confirmed that the identification of the remaining items as MSE salts, scrub alloy buttons, and anode heel materials was correct. The MSE salts and anode heels solids are comprised primarily of plutonium, potassium, sodium and chloride. Both the MSE salts and anode heels left behind small amounts of residual solids. The scrub alloy buttons are comprised primarily of plutonium and aluminum. The solids dissolve readily with light, effervescent gas generation at the material surface and only trace amounts of NOx generation. Of the seven button samples, four dissolved completely. Two button samples contained small amounts of tantalum that did not dissolve. The last of the seven scrub alloy samples left a trace amount of residual plutonium solids. It is anticipated that the presence of undissolved fissile material is a function of where the sample was located relative to the button surface.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of Zinc Addition During Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies have shown that zinc addition to primary coolant can mitigate primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Alloy 600 and reduce radiation fields in PWRs. This report documents experience with zinc addition during Cycle 9 at Diablo Canyon Power Plant Unit 1 (DCPP-1), operated by Pacific Gas & Electric. This project evaluated the effect of zinc addition on PWSCC initiation and propagation. It also examined the impact of zinc addition on radiation fields and fuel cladding deposition...

1999-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Aquatic macroinvertebrates and water quality of Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory, November 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Studies Team (EST) of ESH-20 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has collected samples from the stream within Sandia Canyon since the summer of 1990. These field studies gather water quality measurements and collect aquatic macroinvertebrates from permanent sampling sites. Reports by Bennett (1994) and Cross (1994) discuss previous EST aquatic studies in Sandia Canyon. This report updates and expands those findings. EST collected water quality data and aquatic macroinvertebrates at five permanent stations within the canyon from November 1993 through October 1994. The two upstream stations are located below outfalls that discharge industrial and sanitary waste effluent into the stream, thereby maintaining year-round flow. Some water quality parameters are different at the first three stations from those expected of natural streams in the area, indicating degraded water quality due to effluent discharges. The aquatic habitat at the upper stations has also been degraded by sedimentation and channelization. The macroinvertebrate communities at these stations are characterized by low diversities and unstable communities. In contrast, the two downstream stations appear to be in a zone of recovery, where water quality parameters more closely resemble those found in natural streams of the area. The two lower stations have increased macroinvertebrate diversity and stable communities, further indications of downstream water quality improvement.

Cross, S.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Operational Readiness Review Final Report For F-Canyon Restart. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

An independent WSRC Operational Readiness Review was performed for the restart of Phase 1 processing in F-Canyon, Building 221-F. Readiness to restart the Second Plutonium Cycle process and solvent recovery was assessed. The ORR was conducted by an ORR board of ten members with the support of a subject matter expert. The chairman and four members were drawn from the Operational Safety Evaluation Department, ESH& QA Division; additional members were drawn from other WSRC divisions, independent of the F-Canyon operating division (NMPD). Based on the results of the readiness verification assessments performed according to the ORR plan and the validation of pre-restart corrective actions, the WSRC independent ORR Board has concluded that the facility has achieved the state of readiness committed to in the Restart Plan. Also, based on the scope of the ORR, it is the opinion of the board that F-Canyon Phase 1 processes can be restarted without undue risk to the safety of the public and onsite workers and without undue risk to the environment.

McFarlane, A.F.; Spangler, J.B.

1995-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Environmenal analysis of the Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site, Los Alamos, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The radiological survey of the old TA-10 site in Bayo Canyon found low levels of surface contamination in the vicinity of the firing sites and subsurface contamination in the old waste disposal area. The three alternatives proposed for the site are: (1) to take no action; (2) to restrict usage of the area of subsurface contamination to activities that cause no subsurface disturbance (minimal action); and (3) to remove the subsurface conamination to levels below the working criteria. Dose calculations indicate that doses from surface contamination for recreational users of the canyon, permanent residents, and construction workers and doses for workers involved in excavation of contaminated soil under the clean up alternative are only small percentages of applicable guidelines. No environmental impacts are associated with either the no-action or minimal action alternatives. The impact associated with the cleanup alternative is small, especially considering that the area already has been affected by the original TA-10 decommissioning action, but nevertheless, the preferred alternative is the minimal action alternative, where 0.6 hectare of land is restricted to surface activities. This leaves the rest of the canyon available for development with up to 400 homes. The restricted area can be used for a park, tennis courts, etc., and the /sup 90/Sr activity will decay to levels permitting unrestricted usage in about 160 y.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Buhl, T.E.; Stoker, A.K.; Hansen, W.R.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Occult Trucking and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At least we used to. We are Occult Trucking and Storage andNOTHING. FLASHBACK -- OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT --I saw him. FLASHBACK - OCCULT TRUCKING AND STORAGE DEPOT -

Eyres, Jeffrey Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Sorption Storage Technology Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Technology Summary DOE H2 Storage Workshop, Feb 14-15, 2011, Washington, DC 1 Compressed & Cryo-Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop February 14 - 15, 2011, Washington, DC...

170

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adki ns, "Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant- Ten Years2J O. D. Johnson, "Worldwide Pumped-Storage Projects", PowerUnderground Pumped Hydro Storage", Proc. 1976 Eng.

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Basics on Google...

173

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A new technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Erik, Almen John

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energys Vehicle Technology Program to conduct various types of energy storage...

175

NERSC HPSS Storage Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Trends and Summaries Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix...

176

Underground Natural Gas Storage  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Underground Natural Gas Storage. Measured By. Disseminated Through. Monthly Survey of Storage Field Operators -- asking injections, withdrawals, base gas, working gas.

177

Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Storage Storage Energy storage isn’t just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more. Energy storage isn't just for AA batteries. Thanks to investments from the Energy Department's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), energy storage may soon play a bigger part in our electricity grid, making it possible to generate more renewable electricity. Learn more.

178

Internal structure of the Kern Canyon Fault, California: a deeply exhumed strike-slip fault  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deformation and mineral alteration adjacent to a 2 km long segment of the Kern Canyon fault near Lake Isabella, California are studied to characterize the internal structure of the fault zone and to understand the development of fault structure and constitution and the mechanical and chemical processes responsible for them. The 140 km long Kern Canyon fault (KCF) is a fault of 15 km right-lateral separation exhumed from seismogenic depth that cuts batholithic and metamorphic rocks of the southern Sierra Nevada. The fault consists of at least three distinct phases: an early phase of lower-greenschist-grade ductile shear with an S-C' phyllonite, a subsequent, dominant phase of brittle faulting characterized by a through-going zone of cataclastic rock, and a late stage of minor faulting along discontinuous, thin, hematitic gouge zones. The S-C' fabric and subsidiary fault-slip data indicate that both the phyllonitic and cataclastic zones are approximately vertical and strike-slip; slip lineations within the hematitic gouge suggest oblique-slip. The phyllonite zone trends N20-40E and accommodated ~175 m of separation. The cataclastic zone cuts the phyllonite, trends N21E, and consists of foliated and non-foliated cataclasites; it accommodates the majority of displacement along the fault. Abundant veins and fluid-assisted alteration in the rock surrounding the fault zone attest to the presence of fluids of evolving chemistry during both ductile and brittle faulting. Mass balance calculations indicate quartz loss during phyllonite faulting and imply that the fault system was open and experienced a negative change in volume during phyllonite faulting. Mesoscale and microscale fracture intensities decrease with log distance from the foliated cataclasites and approach a relatively low level at approximately 500 m. The internal structure of the Kern Canyon fault is similar to other large displacement faults in that it consists of a broad zone of fractured and altered rock and a narrow zone of intense cataclasis.

Neal, Leslie Ann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Seismic stratigraphy and salt tectonics of the Alaminos Canyon area, Gulf of Mexico.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alaminos Canyon region is located at the change in the bathymetric trend between the slope and rise. Over 6,435 km of migrated seismic reflection profiles were analyzed to produce two structure and two isopach maps. Maps of the seafloor morphology, salt structure, and suprasalt sediments indicate the majority of the slope is covered by a shallow salt canopy. The salt structure map indicates that the Alaminos Canyon study area represents a transition from a semi-continuous salt sheet in the east to a less continuous salt sheet in the western margin. Salt lobe canopies are located within the eastern and western margins of the study area, while the central region represents a transition zone between the two lobate canopies. The sediment isochron maps show that the salt has played an important role in the sediment deposition and the formation of intraslope basins. The salt sheet interacted with slope sediment deposition by acting as a barrier to downslope sediment transport and by influencing the direction of mass transport. The uplift of the salt has formed topographic lows in which sediment is transported from the shelf beyond the slope. Within the study area, intraslope basins consist of remnants of submarine canyons blocked by diapiric uplift and closed depressions formed by subsidence in response to salt withdrawal. These intraslope basins have trapped thick deposits of sediment, thereby reducing the sediment transport beyond the slope region. Pleistocene sealevel fluctuations appear to be the dominant force in the depostional record. As the lowering of relative sealevel ended, the transport of sandy material decreased and hemipelagic sedimentation increased. Eustatic sealevel fluctuations during the Pleistocene led to cyclic seismic depostional sequences throughout the study area.

Mechler, Suzanne Marie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYON FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AND RADIOASSAY TESTS RUN ON SEWER-WATER SAMPLES AND WATER AND SOIL SAMPLES TAKEN FROM LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

Chemical sewers and sanitary lines draining the Tech Area, D. P. Site, CMR-12 Laundry, and surrounding residential areas flow into Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon streams. In order to determine the extent and sources of radioactive contamination in these localities, fluid samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from the ground surrounding the sewer exits, and water and soil samples from selected spots in or near each of the two canyon streams were collected and analyzed for polonium and . plutonium. (W.D.M.)

Kingsley, W.H.; Fox, A.; Tribby, J.F.

1947-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Toward Net Energy Buildings: Design, Construction, and Performance of the Grand Canyon House  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grand Canyon house is a joint project of the DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the U.S. National Park Service and is part of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 13 (Advanced Solar Low-Energy Buildings). Energy consumption of the house, designed using a whole-building low-energy approach, was reduced by 75% compared to an equivalent house built in accordance with American Building Officials Model Energy Code and the Home Energy Rating System criteria.

Balcomb, J. D.; Hancock, C. E.; Barker, G.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

B Plant canyon sample TK-21-1 analytical results for the final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the analytical laboratory report for the TK-21-1 sample collected from the B Plant Canyon on February 18, 1998. The sample was analyzed in accordance with the Sampling and Analysis Plan for B Plant Solutions (SAP) (Simmons, 1997) in support of the B Plant decommissioning project. Samples were analyzed to provide data both to describe the material which would remain in the tanks after the B Plant transition is complete and to determine Tank Farm compatibility. The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1).

Steen, F.H.

1998-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

184

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Detection of Gas Hydrates in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon from Seismic Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas hydrate is a potential energy source that has recently been the subject of much academic and industrial research. The search for deep-water gas hydrate involves many challenges that are especially apparent in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, where the sub-seafloor is a complex structure of shallow salt diapirs and sheets underlying heavily deformed shallow sediments and surrounding diverse minibasins. Here, we consider the effect these structural factors have on gas hydrate occurrence in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon blocks of the Gulf of Mexico. This was accomplished by first mapping the salt and shallow deformation structures throughout the region using a 2D grid of seismic reflection data. In addition, major deep-rooted faults and shallow-rooted faults were mapped throughout the area. A shallow sediment deformation map was generated that defined areas of significant faulting. We then quantified the thermal impact of shallow salt to better estimate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) thickness. The predicted base of the GHSZ was compared to the seismic data, which showed evidence for bottom simulating reflectors and gas chimneys. These BSRs and gas chimneys were used to ground-truth the calculated depth of the base of GHSZ. Finally, the calculated GHSZ thickness was used to estimate the volume of the gas hydrate reservoir in the area after determining the most reasonable gas hydrate concentrations in sediments within the GHSZ. An estimate of 5.5 trillion cubic meters of pure hydrate methane in Garden Banks and Keathley Canyon was obtained.

Murad, Idris

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Source Characterization of the August 6, 2007 Crandall Canyon Mine Seismic Event in Central Utah  

SciTech Connect

On August 6, 2007 a local magnitude 3.9 seismic event occurred at 08:48:40 UTC in central Utah. The epicenter is within the boundaries of the Crandall Canyon coal mine (c.f. Pechmann et al., this volume). We performed a moment tensor analysis with complete, three-component seismic recordings from stations operated by the USGS, the University of Utah, and EarthScope. The analysis method inverts the seismic records to retrieve the full seismic moment tensor, which allows for interpretation of both shearing (e.g., earthquakes) and volume-changing (e.g., explosions and collapses) seismic events. The results show that most of the recorded seismic wave energy is consistent with an underground collapse in the mine. We contrast the waveforms and moment tensor results of the Crandall Canyon Mine seismic event to a similar sized tectonic earthquake about 200 km away near Tremonton, Utah, that occurred on September 1, 2007. Our study does not address the actual cause of the mine collapse.

Ford, S R; Dreger, D S; Walter, W R

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Carbon Steel and Magnesium Oxide Dissolution for H-Canyon Process Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

H Area Operations is planning to process plutonium-contaminated uranium metal scrap in its efforts to de-inventory excess nuclear materials. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) performed flowsheet development to support the decision to process the scrap in H-Canyon using 2M nitric acid (HNO3) / 0.025M potassium fluoride (KF) and 2 g/L boron. The scrap will be charged to the H-Canyon dissolver via a stainless steel charging bundle with a carbon steel end cap that must dissolve in an appropriate time frame. Experimental work was performed with a range of potential materials to be used to fabricate the bundle end cap. Testing was conducted with samples of metal plate, wire, cans, rods, and rivets to assess their dissolution characteristics in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. Experiments also measured the amount of hydrogen gas generated during carbon steel dissolution using the above dissolver solution. Each material type and its associated dissolution characteristic relate to specific bundle end cap designs being considered. Supplemental studies were conducted to evaluate the behavior and effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) sand on dissolution of uranium metal in 2M HNO3/ 0.025M KF and 2 g/L boron. The potential exists for a small quantity of MgO to be introduced into the dissolution flowsheet due to the use of MgO sand to extinguish uranium metal fires.

PIERCE, RA

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radionuclide contaminant analysis of small mammels, plants and sediments within Mortandad Canyon, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Small mammals, plants and sediments were sampled at one upstream location (Site 1) and two downstream locations (Site 2 and Site 3) from the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System outfall {number_sign}051-051 in Mortandad Canyon, Los Alamos County, New Mexico. The purpose of the sampling was to identify radionuclides potentially present, to quantitatively estimate and compare the amount of radionuclide uptake at specific locations (Site 2 and Site 3) within Mortandad Canyon to an upstream site (Site 1), and to identify the primary mode (inhalation ingestion, or surface contact) of contamination to small mammals. Three composite samples of at least five animals per sample were collected at each site. Pelts and carcasses of each animal were separated and analyzed independently. In addition, three composite samples were also collected for plants and sediments at each site. Samples were analyzed for {sup 241}Am, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, and total U. With the exception of total U, all mean radionuclide concentrations in small mammal carcasses and sediments were significantly higher at Site 2 than Site 1 or Site 3. No differences were detected in the mean radionuclide concentration of plant samples between sites. However, some radionuclide concentrations found at all three sites were higher than regional background. No differences were found between mean carcass radionuclide concentrations and mean pelt radionuclide concentrations, indicating that the two primary modes of contamination may be equally occurring.

Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Upcoming Natural Gas Storage Facilities.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Energy Hub Project Orbit Gas Storage Inc KY Leader One Gas Storage Project Peregrine Midstream Partners WY Tricor Ten Section Storage Project

191

Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Energy Storage on Twitter Bookmark...

192

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

193

NREL: Energy Storage - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage News Below are news stories related to NREL's energy storage research. August 28, 2013 NREL Battery Calorimeters Win R&D 100 Award The award-wining Isothermal...

194

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

195

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pumped hydro, compressed air, and battery energy storage areto other energy storage sys tem s suc h as pumped hydro andenergy would be $50/MJ whereas the cost of the pumped hydro

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy Storage & Delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage & Delivery. Summary: Schematic of Membrane Molecular Structure The goal of the project is to develop ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conventional Storage Water Heaters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Conventional storage water heaters remain the most popular type of water heating system for homes and buildings.

198

Numerical model to characterize the thermal comfort in new ecodistricts: methodology and validation through the canyon street case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In built-up areas, the urban structures affect the radiative and thermal environment. The numerical simulation models provide informations about urban thermal performance for many ranges of urban configurations. This paper presents a validation of a ... Keywords: CFD model, building heat transfers, coupling model, street canyon, thermo-radiative model

Khaled Athamena; Jean Francois Sini; Julien Guilhot; Jerome Vinet; Maeva Sabre; Jean-Michel Rosant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Numerical model to characterize the thermal comfort in new eco-districts: methodology and validation through the canyon street case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In built-up areas, the urban structures affect the radiative and thermal environment. The numerical simulation models provide informations about urban thermal performance for many ranges of urban configurations. This paper presents a validation of a ... Keywords: CFD model, building heat transfers, coupling model, street canyon, thermo-radiative model

Khaled Athamena; Jean Francois Sini; Julien Guilhot; Jerome Vinet; Maeva Sabre; Jean-Michel Rosant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Challenges When Predicting Reservoir Quality in the Subsalt K2/K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the K2/ K2-North Field, Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico, presents many challenges for planning primary for seismi- cally better-imaged deepwater reservoirs in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, we utilize well- log, we used depositional mod- els based on Gulf of Mexico shallow-seismic analogs of distributary channel

Greene, Todd J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Sub-committee Storage Sub-committee 2012 Work Plan Confidential 1 2012 Storage Subcommittee Work Plan * Report to Congress. (legislative requirement) - Review existing and projected research and funding - Review existing DOE, Arpa-e projects and the OE 5 year plan - Identify gaps and recommend additional topics - Outline distributed (review as group) * Develop and analysis of the need for large scale storage deployment (outline distributed again) * Develop analysis on regulatory issues especially valuation and cost recovery Confidential 2 Large Scale Storage * Problem Statement * Situation Today * Benefits Analysis * Policy Issues * Technology Gaps * Recommendations * Renewables Variability - Reserves and capacity requirements - Financial impacts - IRC Response to FERC NOI and update

202

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Hydrogen Storage R&D Activities on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities National Hydrogen Storage Compressed/Liquid Hydrogen Tanks Testing and Analysis Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards

203

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

204

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

205

Grande Ronde Model Watershed Project; Dark Canyon Riparian Exclosure, Completion Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Baker Field Office, Vale District Bureau of Land Management (BLM) submitted a project proposal for funding in 2002 through the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (GRMWP). The project consisted of constructing two riparian exclosures to prevent livestock grazing in the riparian areas of Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek. The BLM completed the NEPA documentation and supplied the fencing materials. Funding from BPA through the GRMWP was used to complete the construction of the two exclosures. This project was completed in the fall of 2002. The project area is located in Union County, Oregon on BLM managed land adjacent to Dark Canyon and Meadow Creek, T. 3. S., R. 35 E., Section 24 and 25. Section 24 is along Dark Canyon Creek and section 25 is along Meadow Creek. Approximately 0.4 miles of stream would be protected from grazing with the construction of the two exclosures. A two person crew was hired to construct a four-strand barbed wire fence. The fence enclosed the riparian area on both sides of each creek so that no grazing would occur within the riparian area on BLM managed land. Total fence length is approximately 1.25 miles. Materials consisted of metal fence posts, barbed wire, rockjacks, fence stays, and 2 x 4's. The fence was constructed in the fall of 2002. The riparian area is effectively excluded from livestock grazing at this time. The construction of the exclosures should enhance riparian vegetation, increase bank stability, and improve riparian and in-stream habitat by exclusion of livestock in the riparian areas. Monitoring will ensure that the exclosures continues to be effective. Annual monitoring will include photo-points and compliance checks during the grazing season by BLM personnel. The BLM will submit a monitoring report, which includes the results of the annual monitoring, to the GRMWP in years 2005 and 2007. The exclosures do cross the creeks so maintenance may be needed on occasion, especially after high flow events in the creeks. Material such as logs which are mobilized during high stream flows may damage the exclosures requiring maintenance to keep cattle from grazing in the riparian areas. The BLM spent approximately $4,000 on fencing materials and $1,375 on NEPA compliance. In addition, the estimated cost of the monitoring over five years is expected to be approximately $1,600. The $5,050 that the BLM received from the BPA for the project was used to hire two temporary employees to construct the exclosures.

Kuck, Todd

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, were located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, was located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2003, a total of 2,138,391 fish weighing 66,201 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 437,633 yearling fish weighing 44,330 pounds and 1,700,758 sub-yearling fish weighing 21,871 pounds.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fall Chinook Aclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, and will ultimately work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Complete returns for all three acclimation facilities will not occur until the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish protected under the Endangered Species Act) from those returns will be returning for the next five years. In 2001, a total of 2,051,099 fish weighing 59,647 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 318,932 yearling fish weighing 31,128 pounds and 1,732,167 sub-yearling fish weighing 28,519 pounds. Yearling fish numbers were reduced by Bacterial Kidney Disease (BKD) and sub-yearling acclimation time was limited by record low river water flows.

McLeod, Bruce

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA

209

Uranium ore rolls in Westwater Canyon sandstone, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Recent relatively deep uranium-exploration drilling in the Nose Rock area, San Juan Basin, McKinley County, New Mexico, has resulted in the discovery of previously unrecognized uranium ore rolls in gray, unoxidized Westwater Canyon Sandstone of the Morrison Formation. Both the Nose Rock ores and the primary Ambrosia Lake uranium ores were emplaced during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous erosional interval under the same geologic conditions by the same geochemical-cell process. The red, altered interior ground resulting from the geochemical-cell process has been re-reduced by the subsequent entry of reductants into the formation. The original roll form of the Ambrosia Lake orebodies has been obscured and modified by redistribution related to the present-day active redox interface interweaving with the Ambrosia Lake ores.

Clark, D.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CHARACTERIZATION OF H CANYON CONDUCTIVITY METER INDICATIONS WITH ELEVATED URANIUM IN NITRIC ACID  

SciTech Connect

Solution conductivity data from the 1CU conductivity meter in H-Canyon shows that uranium concentration in the 0 to 30 gram per liter (g/L) range has no statistically significant effect on the calibration of free nitric acid measurement. Based on these results, no additional actions are needed on the 1CU Conductivity Meter prior to or during the processing of uranium solutions in the 0 to 30 g/L range. A model based only on free nitric acid concentration is shown to be appropriate for explaining the data. Data uncertainties for the free acid measurement of uranium-bearing solutions are 8.5% or less at 95% confidence. The analytical uncertainty for calibrating solutions is an order of magnitude smaller only when uranium is not present, allowing use of a more accurate analytical procedure. Literature work shows that at a free nitric acid level of 0.33 M, uranium concentration of 30 g/L and 25 C, solution conductivity is 96.4% of that of a uranium-free solution. The level of uncertainties in the literature data and its fitting equation do not justify calibration changes based on this small depression in solution conductivity. This work supports preparation of H-Canyon processing of Super Kukla fuel; however, the results will be applicable to the processing of any similar concentration uranium and nitric acid solution. Super Kukla fuel processing will increase the uranium concentration above the nominal zero to 10 g/L level, though not above 30 g/L. This work examined free nitric acid levels ranging from 0.18 to 0.52 molar. Temperature ranged from 27.9 to 28.3 C during conductivity testing. The data indicates that sequential order of measurement is not a significant factor. The conductivity meter was thus flushed effectively between measurements as desired.

Nash, C

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Early Channel Evolution in the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation, West Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Submarine channels are important conduits for sediment in deep marine environments, and understanding their formation is critical to modeling basin fill processes. Most models describing channel evolution focus on turbidity currents as the erosive and constructive force in channel initiation. However, slope failure and slumping can be significant drivers of channelization, particularly in upper slope and ramp environments. Determining the relative roles of slumping and erosion by turbidity currents can provide important insight into the timing of channelization and the geometries of subsequent deposits. Samples were collected from Guadalupe Mountains National Park from two primary localities at Salt Flat Bench (Figure 2). Three vertical sections were measured at both locations. A total of 16 samples were collected for petrographic analysis and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging. Spectacular outcrop quality makes the Middle Permian Brushy Canyon Formation in Guadalupe Mountains National Park an ideal location for the study of early channel evolution. A detailed facies analysis of fine-grained channel deposits was conducted in the Upper Brushy Canyon Formation in the Salt Flat Bench outcrops. After channelization, an interval of relative condensation dominated by hemipelagic settling of organic matter and silt was followed by an interval of incomplete sediment bypass by turbidity currents. This sequence of events suggests that sea level was at a relative highstand at the time of channel inception, whereas channel inception by turbidity currents is expected during a lowstand. Slumping rather than erosion by turbidity currents is the most likely mechanism to have initiated a channel at the study area. There is no evidence for the existence for high energy currents until after the interval of condensation. However, the action of weak contour currents during early channel evolution is observed in outcrop and microtextural features. Early carbonate cementation of channel-lining silts may have stabilized the slump surface with respect to erosion by later turbidity currents.

Gunderson, Spencer

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: AVOIDING WRONG TURNS, ROACH MOTELS, AND BOX CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. In this paper, we provide one example each of our judgments on what constitutes a box canyon, a roach motel, and a wrong turn: ? Wrong Turn: The Reliable Replacement Warhead ? Roach Motel: SRAM T vs the B61 ? A Possible Box Canyon: A Low-Yield Version of the W76 SLBM Warhead Recognizing that new nuclear missions or weapons are not demanded by current circumstances ? a development path that yields future capabilities similar to those of today, which are adequate if not always ideal, and a broader national-security strategy that supports nonproliferation and arms control by reducing the role for, and numbers, of nuclear weapons ? we briefly consider alternate, less desirable futures, and their possible effect on the complex problem of regional deterrence. In this regard, we discuss the issues posed by, and possible responses to, three example regional deterrence challenges: in-country defensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary; reassurance of U.S. allies with limited strategic depth threatened by an emergent nuclear power; and extraterritorial, non-strategic offensive use of nuclear weapons by an adversary in support of limited military objectives against a U.S. ally.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

214

Heat storage duration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both the amount and duration of heat storage in massive elements of a passive building are investigated. Data taken for one full winter in the Balcomb solar home are analyzed with the aid of sub-system simulation models. Heat storage duration is tallied into one-day intervals. Heat storage location is discussed and related to overall energy flows. The results are interpreted and conclusions drawn.

Balcomb, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

216

Other Innovative Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Efficiency Electrical Energy Storage Using Reversible Solid Oxide Cells: Scott Barnett1; Gareth Hughes1; Kyle Yakal-Kremski1; Zhan Gao1; 1 Northwestern...

217

NREL: Energy Storage - Webmaster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to reply. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Energy Storage Home About the Project Technology Basics Research & Development Awards &...

218

NREL: Energy Storage - Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Energy Storage team and partners work within a variety of programs that have created test manuals to establish standard...

219

Advanced Energy Storage Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Energy Storage Publications Reports: Advanced Technology Development Program For Lithium-Ion Batteries: Gen 2 Performance Evaluation Final Report Advanced Technology...

220

Storage Sub-committee  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gaps - Existing R&D and pilot programs - CAES - Controllable pumping - Off shore (energy island, etc) - Gravity systems - Thermal storage Confidential 3 Report to DOE ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Carbon Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

222

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

H 2 Storage Projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 10. Titanium-decorated carbon nanotubes: a potential high-capacity hydrogen storage madium. ... 3. Exohydrogenated single-wall carbon nanotubes. ...

224

Natural Gas Storage Valuation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, one methodology for natural gas storage valuation is developed and two methodologies are improved. Then all of the three methodologies are applied (more)

Li, Yun

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

226

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program (ESS) held an annual peer review on September 27, 2007 in San Francisco, CA. Eighteen presentations were divided into categories; those related to international energy storage programs are below. Other presentation categories were: Economics - Benefit Studies and Environment Benefit Studies Utility & Commercial Applications of Advanced Energy Storage Systems Power Electronics Innovations in Energy Storage Systems ESS 2007 Peer Review - DOE-CEC Energy Storage Program FY07 Projects - Daniel Borneo, SNL.pdf ESS 2007 Peer Review - Joint NYSERDA-DOE Energy Storage Initiative Projects

227

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

228

Cool Storage Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is a fact that avoiding load growth is cheaper than constructing new power plants. Cool storage technologies offer one method for strategically stemming the impact of future peak demand growth. This guide provides a comprehensive resource for understanding and evaluating cool storage technologies.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy storage capacitors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of capacitors are reviewed in general, including dielectrics, induced polarization, and permanent polarization. Then capacitance characteristics are discussed and modelled. These include temperature range, voltage, equivalent series resistance, capacitive reactance, impedance, dissipation factor, humidity and frequency effects, storage temperature and time, and lifetime. Applications of energy storage capacitors are then discussed. (LEW)

Sarjeant, W.J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Warehouse and Storage Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and Storage Characteristics by Activity... Warehouse and Storage Warehouse and storage buildings are those used to store goods, manufactured products, merchandise, raw materials, or personal belongings. Basic Characteristics [ See also: Equipment | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use ] Warehouse and Storage Buildings... While the idea of a warehouse may bring to mind a large building, in reality most warehouses were relatively small. Forty-four percent were between 1,001 and 5,000 square feet, and seventy percent were less than 10,000 square feet. Many warehouses were newer buildings. Twenty-five percent were built in the 1990s and almost fifty percent were constructed since 1980. Tables: Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics Establishment, Employment, and Age Data by Characteristics

231

Addendum 1 to CSER 78-001 PWR Core 2 Blanket Fuel Storage Cell 4 221T building  

SciTech Connect

Irradiated pressurized water reactor (PWR) Core 2 (PWR-2) blanket fuel assemblies from the Shippingport PWR have been stored in the 221-T canyon water pool for twenty years. The fuel is in the form of small wafers of UO{sub 2}, which were initially natural enriched uranium (0.72% {sup 235}U). The uranium oxide wafers have a pyrolytic carbon coating, which prevents the fuel from reacting with a zircaloy-4 grid which provides structural strength and holds the wafers in place to form fuel plates. Thirty fuel plates comprise a sub-assembly which are held together by zircaloy-4 end plates. Two identical oxide fuel plate sub-assemblies are welded together to form a square structure with two zircaloy-4 extensions welded to the ends. Seventy-two PWR-2 assemblies are stored in the 221-T canyon water pool. Eight of these assemblies were irradiated in the center of the reactor core to an average burnup of 24,538 Mwd/MTU. The remaining assemblies had a burnup of 16,200 Mwd/MTU. These assemblies were placed in the canyon in 1978 and 1979 (WHC 1996). The original Criticality Safety Analysis Report (CSAR) (WHC 1990) analyzed the criticality safety of their storage and concluded that they were safe from a criticality standpoint. It was also mentioned in this CSAR that the assemblies were scheduled to be stored for twenty years. The Criticality Prevention Specification (CPS) for this storage configuration (RHO 1978), included in (WHC 1990), specifies that the fuel ''will be stored in Cell 4 up to 20 years'', and that ''no special handling or storage requirements for criticality control during interim storage up to 20 years'' were necessary. The purpose of this addendum is to extend the period of coverage for this material. The analysis examines zircaloy-clad fuel degradation and extends the permitted storage time by ten years for Shippingport Core 2 blanket fuel assemblies in the 221-T, Cell 4 storage pool.

GOLDBERG, H.J.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

232

,"Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sourcekey","N5030US2","N5010US2","N5020US2","N5070US2","N5050US2","N5060US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)","U.S. Total Natural Gas in Underground...

233

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Feb-13 Mar-13 Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 View History All Operators Natural Gas in Storage 6,482,603 6,102,063 6,235,751 6,653,184 7,027,708 7,302,556 1973-2013 Base Gas 4,379,494...

234

Prognostic Prediction of Tracer Dispersion for the Diablo Canyon Experiments on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

COAMPS/LODI simulations of the tracer experiments at Diablo Canyon on August 31, September 2, and September 4, 1986 had mixed results. Simulated tracer concentrations on August 31 differed significantly from the measured concentrations. The model transported SF{sub 6} too far south and did not predict transport of SF{sub 6} north along highway 101 or into See Canyon. Early in the day the model rapidly transported SF{sub 6} away from the release point while observations suggested the tracer stayed close to Diablo Canyon for 1-2 hours. For September 2, simulations agreed very well with the measurements. The model accurately predicted the change of wind direction from north northwest to east northeast at the release point. It also predicted the advection of tracer over Mot-r-0 Bay and through the Los Osos Valley toward San Luis Obispo in excellent agreement with the observations. On September 4, the calculated transport of SF{sub 6} from Diablo Canyon had defects similar to those on August 31, a trajectory too far south and limited intrusion of tracer north along highway 101. Conversely, simulations of the Freon release from Los Osos Cemetery on September 4 corresponded well with observations. Since the simulations used only global meteorological data and no local winds for input, even the limited success of COAMPS/LODI is a favorable result. COAMPS's inability to generate southerly winds through the highway 101 corridor on August 31 and September 4 is a symptom of its underestimate of the sea breeze. The weak sea breeze correlates with a small diurnal range of air temperature possibly associated with underestimates of surface solar heating and/or overestimates of surface wetness. Improvement of COAMPS/LODI simulations requires development of new data assimilation techniques to use the local surface and low altitude wind and temperature measurements. Also, quantitative methods are needed to assess the accuracy of the models.

Molenkamp, C.R.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fall Chinook Acclimation Project; Pittsburg Landing, Captain John Rapids, and Big Canyon, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fisheries co-managers of U.S. v Oregon supported and directed the construction and operation of acclimation and release facilities for Snake River fall Chinook from Lyons Ferry Hatchery at three sites above Lower Granite Dam. In 1996, Congress instructed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USCOE) to construct, under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP), final rearing and acclimation facilities for fall Chinook in the Snake River basin to complement their activities and efforts in compensating for fish lost due to construction of the lower Snake River dams. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) played a key role in securing funding and selecting acclimation sites, then assumed responsibility for operation and maintenance of the facilities. In 1997, Bonneville Power Administrative (BPA) was directed to fund operations and maintenance (O&M) for the facilities. Two acclimation facilities, Captain John Rapids and Pittsburg Landing, are located on the Snake River between Asotin, WA and Hells Canyon Dam and one facility, Big Canyon, is located on the Clearwater River at Peck. The Capt. John Rapids facility is a single pond while the Pittsburg Landing and Big Canyon sites consist of portable fish rearing tanks assembled and disassembled each year. Acclimation of 450,000 yearling smolts (150,000 each facility) begins in March and ends 6 weeks later. When available, an additional 2,400,000 fall Chinook sub-yearlings may be acclimated for 6 weeks, following the smolt release. The project goal is to increase the naturally spawning population of Snake River fall Chinook salmon upstream of Lower Granite Dam. This is a supplementation project; in that hatchery produced fish are acclimated and released into the natural spawning habitat for the purpose of returning a greater number of spawners to increase natural production. Only Snake River stock is used and production of juveniles occurs at Lyons Ferry Hatchery. This is a long-term project, targeted to work towards achieving delisting goals established by National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS or NOAA Fisheries) and ultimately to provide fall Chinook adults through the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan program as mitigation for construction and operation of the four lower Snake River dams. Complete adult returns (all age classes) for all three acclimation facilities occurred in the year 2002. Progeny (which would then be natural origin fish) would be counted towards achieving Endangered Species Act delisting criteria. In 2002, a total of 2,877,437 fish weighing 47,347 pounds were released from the three acclimation facilities. The total includes 479,358 yearling fish weighing 33,930 pounds and 2,398,079 sub-yearling fish weighing 19,115 pounds. This is the largest number of fish ever released in one year from the acclimation facilities.

McLeod, Bruce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Hydrogen-based electrochemical energy storage - Energy ...  

An energy storage device (100) providing high storage densities via hydrogen storage. The device (100) includes a counter electrode (110), a storage ...

237

PETROPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF THE SECONDARY RECOVERY POTENTIAL IN THE CHERRY CANYON FORMATION NE LEA FIELD LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Read and Stevens has proposed the evaluation of the waterflood potential from the Cherry Canyon formation in the NE Lea Field in lea County, New Mexico. Much of the development in this area is approaching primary recovery limitations; additional recovery of remaining oil reserves by waterflood needs to be evaluated. The Cherry Canyon formation is composed of fine grained sandstone, containing clay material which results in high water saturation, and also has the tendency to swell and reduce reservoir permeability--the ability of fluid to flow through the rock pores and fractures. There are also abundant organic materials that interfere with obtaining reliable well logs. These complications have limited oil in place calculations and identification of net pay zones, presenting a challenge to the planned waterflood. Core analysis of the Cherry Canyon should improve the understanding of existing well logs and possibly indicate secondary recovery measures, such as waterflood, to enhance field recovery. Lacking truly representative core to provide accurate analyses, Read and Stevens will obtain and preserve fresh core. The consulting firm of T. Scott Hickman and Associates will then collaborate on special core analyses and obtain additional well logs for a more detailed analysis of reservoir properties. The log interpretation will be compared to the core analysis results, and the entire collected data set will be used to assess the potential and economic viability of successfully waterflooding the identified oil zones. Successful results from the project will improve accuracy of log interpretation and establish a methodology for evaluating secondary recovery by waterflood.

T. Scott Hickman

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

Joel Morrison

2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

243

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

SERI Solar Energy Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program provides research on advanced technologies, system analyses, and assessments of thermal energy storage for solar applications in support of the Thermal and Chemical Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems. Currently, research is in progress on direct contact latent heat storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Systems analyses are being performed of thermal energy storage for solar thermal applications, and surveys and assessments are being prepared of thermal energy storage in solar applications.

Copeland, R. J.; Wright, J. D.; Wyman, C. E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NREL: Energy Storage - Industry Participants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Participants NREL's energy storage project is funded by the DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office. We work closely with automobile manufacturers, energy storage developers,...

246

Cooling thermal storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article gives some overall guidelines for successful operation of cooling thermal storage installations. Electric utilities use rates and other incentives to encourage thermal storage, which not only reduces their system peaks but also transfers a portion of their load from expensive daytime inefficient peaking plants to less expensive nighttime base load high efficiency coal and nuclear plants. There are hundreds of thermal storage installations around the country. Some of these are very successful; others have failed to achieve all of their predicted benefits because application considerations were not properly addressed.

Gatley, D.P.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Collector: storage wall systems  

SciTech Connect

Passive Trombe wall systems require massive masonry walls to minimize large temperature swings and movable night insulation to prevent excessive night heat losses. As a solar energy collection system, Trombe wall systems have low efficiencies because of the nature of the wall and, if auxiliary heat is needed, because of absorption of this heat. Separation of collector and storage functions markedly improves the efficiency. A simple fiberglass absorber can provide high efficiency while phase change storage provides a compact storage unit. The need for movable insulation is obviated.

Boardman, H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: RECOVERY AND DOWN BLEND URANIUM FOR BENEFICIAL USE  

SciTech Connect

For over fifty years, the H Canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has performed remotely operated radiochemical separations of irradiated targets to produce materials for national defense. Although the materials production mission has ended, the facility continues to play an important role in the stabilization and safe disposition of proliferable nuclear materials. As part of the US HEU Disposition Program, SRS has been down blending off-specification (off-spec) HEU to produce LEU since 2003. Off-spec HEU contains fission products not amenable to meeting the American Society for Testing and Material (ASTM) commercial fuel standards prior to purification. This down blended HEU material produced 301 MT of ~5% enriched LEU which has been fabricated into light water reactor fuel being utilized in Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) reactors in Tennessee and Alabama producing economic power. There is still in excess of ~10 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for beneficial use as either ~5% enriched LEU, or for use in subsequent LEU reactors requiring ~19.75% enriched LEU fuel.

Magoulas, V.

2013-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.

Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G.; Graham, F.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electromagnetic (EM-60) survey in the Panther Canyon Area, Grass Valley, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight frequency domain electromagnetic soundings were measured over the Panther Canyon thermal anomaly in Grass Valley, Nevada. The data were collected with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's large moment horizontal loop system (EM-60). At the transmitter site located near the center of the thermal anomaly, square wave currents of up to 70 A were impressed into a fourturn 50 m radius coil at frequencies from 0.033 to 500 Hz. At the eight receiver sites, 0.5 to 1.5 km from the loop, magnetic fields were detected with a three-component SQUID magnetometer and vertical and radial magnetic field spectra were calculated. Data were interpreted with a computer program which fit filled spectra and associated ellipse polarization data to one-dimensional resistivity models and results were compared to interpretations from earlier dipole-dipole resistivity measurements. Comparison of these interpretations indicates fairly close agreement between the two, with both models clearly indicating the presence and dimensions of the conductivity anomaly associated with the thermal zone. Although the dc data was better able to resolve the high resistivity bedrock, the EM-data were able to resolve all major features without distortion at shorter transmitter receiver separations and in about one-third of the field time.

Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.; Stark, M.; Haught, R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Treating high pressure zones in one trip in Canyon Reef area of Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Canyon Reef area near Snyder, Texas, Chevron U.S.A. Inc. is employing ratchet operated, packer type retrievable bridge plugs which have allowed operators to test, treat, or squeeze high pressure zones over a 35-day period on a single trip of the workstring. More zones could have been treated if necessary. The bridge plug was moved and set 31 times while treating the zones. Elapsed time is shown in days starting with T-date being the day tools were first run in for the treatment. The job was run with an average treating pressure of 1,000 psi, and a differential pressure of 2,500 psi that alternated from above the bridge plug to below and back each time the plug was moved to a new zone. The bridge plug used for the job seals by the action of a patented ratcheting mechanism which requires relatively light weight to set. Design of the ratchet enables the sealing elements to hold a seal against the casing wall while the hold-down slips are being set.

Cooley, G.; Mccowen, D.; Fore, M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hydrogen Storage- Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- - Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL * and Jay Keller, Hydrogen Program Manager Sandia National Laboratories H 2 Delivery and Infrastructure Workshop May 7-8, 2003 * Most of this presentation has been extracted from George Thomas' invited BES Hydrogen Workshop presentation (May 13-14, 2003) Sandia National Laboratories 4/14/03 2 Sandia National Laboratories From George Thomas, BES workshop 5/13/03 H 2 storage is a critical enabling technology for H 2 use as an energy carrier The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which compacts the fuel. Hence, hydrogen storage systems are inherently more complex than liquid fuels. Storage technologies are needed in all aspects of hydrogen utilization. production distribution utilization

253

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Where is CO2 storage happening today? Where is CO2 storage happening today? Sleipner Project (Norway) Sleipner Project (Norway) Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage is currently happening across the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway, the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, and the In Salah project in Algeria, have been injecting CO2 for many years. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, too. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. Additionally, a multitude of pilot efforts are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future

254

storage technology barriers. The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summit Power to build a 400-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant with carbon capture and storage (CCS) in Britain. The companies will submit the Caledonia Clean Energy Project to...

255

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 18 cost KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft Hub (which limits surface speed)...

256

DUF6 Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of depleted UF6 is stored in steel cylinders at three sites in the U.S. Depleted UF6 Inventory and Storage Locations U.S. DOE's inventory of depleted UF6 consists of approximately...

257

Storage Ring Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Source Parameters Storage Ring Parameters Print General Parameters Parameter Value Beam particle electron Beam energy 1.9 GeV (1.0-1.9 GeV possible) Injection energy 1.9 GeV...

258

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks.

Walker, J. T. (Palo Alto, CA); Larsen, R. S. (Menlo Park, CA); Shapiro, S. L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Analog storage integrated circuit  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed data storage array is defined utilizing a unique cell design for high speed sampling of a rapidly changing signal. Each cell of the array includes two input gates between the signal input and a storage capacitor. The gates are controlled by a high speed row clock and low speed column clock so that the instantaneous analog value of the signal is only sampled and stored by each cell on coincidence of the two clocks. 6 figs.

Walker, J.T.; Larsen, R.S.; Shapiro, S.L.

1989-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

different options for CO2 storage? different options for CO2 storage? Oil and gas reservoirs, many containing carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as natural deposits of almost pure CO2, can be found in many places in the United States and around the world. These are examples of long-term storage of CO2 by nature, where "long term" means millions of years. Their existence demonstrates that naturally occurring geologic formations and structures of various kinds are capable of securely storing CO2 deep in the subsurface for very long periods of time. Because of the economic importance of oil and gas, scientists and engineers have studied these natural deposits for many decades in order to understand the physical and chemical processes which led to their formation. There are also many decades of engineering experience in subsurface operations similar to those needed for CO2 storage. The most directly applicable experience comes from the oil industry, which, for 40 years, has injected CO2 in depleted oil reservoirs for the recovery of additional product through enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Additional experience comes from natural gas storage operations, which have utilized depleted gas reservoirs, as well as reservoirs containing only water. Scientists and engineers are now combining the knowledge obtained from study of natural deposits with experience from analogous operations as a basis for studying the potential for large-scale storage of CO2 in the deep subsurface.

263

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport News. (showing ...

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Energy Conversion, Storage, and Transport Portal. Programs ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements for Hydrogen Storage Materials. Summary: ... Hydrogen is promoted as petroleum replacement in the Hydrogen Economy. ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dry Cask Storage Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities have developed independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSIs) as a means of expanding their spent-fuel storage capacity on an interim basis until a geologic repository is available to accept the fuel for permanent storage. This report provides a technical basis for demonstrating the feasibility of extended spent-fuel storage in ISFSIs.

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

267

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Current Technology to someone Current Technology to someone by E-mail Share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Facebook Tweet about FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Twitter Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Google Bookmark FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Delicious Rank FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on Digg Find More places to share FCT Hydrogen Storage: Current Technology on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage Challenges Status of Hydrogen Storage Technologies DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Current Technology

270

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO EVALUATE CORROSION OF THE F-CANYON DISSOLVER DURING THEUNIRRADIATED MARK-42 CAMPAIGN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes are to be dissolved in an upcoming campaign in F-canyon. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)/Chemical & Hydrogen Technology Section (CHTS) identified a flow sheet for the dissolution of these Mark 42 fuel tubes which required a more aggressive dissolver solution than previously required for irradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Subsequently, SRTC/MTS was requested to develop and perform a corrosion testing program to assess the impact of new flow sheets on corrosion of the dissolver wall. The two primary variables evaluated were the fluoride and aluminum concentrations of the dissolver solution. Fluoride was added as Calcium Fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) while the aluminum was added either as metallic aluminum, which was subsequently dissolved, or as the chemical aluminum nitrate (Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}). The dissolved aluminum metal was used to simulate the dissolution of the aluminum from the Mark 42 cladding and fuel matrix. Solution composition for the corrosion tests bracketed the flow sheet for the Mark 42. Corrosion rates of AISI Type 304 stainless steel coupons, both welded and non-welded coupons, were calculated from measured weight losses and post-test concentrations of soluble Fe, Cr and Ni. The corrosion rates, which ranged between 2.7 and 32.5 mpy, were calculated from both the one day and the one week weight losses. These corrosion rates indicated a relatively mild corrosion on the dissolver vessel. The welded coupons consistently had a higher corrosion rate than the non-welded coupons. The difference between the two decreased as the solution aggressiveness decreased. In these test solutions, aggressiveness corresponded with the fluoride concentration. Based on the results of this study, any corrosion occurring during the Mark 42 Campaign is not expected to have a deleterious effect on the dissolver vessel.

Mickalonis, J; Kerry Dunn, K

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water year 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report examines the financial implications of experimental flows conducted at the Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) in water year 2011. It is the third report in a series examining financial implications of experimental flows conducted since the Record of Decision (ROD) was adopted in February 1997 (Reclamation 1996). A report released in January 2011 examined water years 1997 to 2005 (Veselka et al. 2011), and a report released in August 2011 examined water years 2006 to 2010 (Poch et al. 2011). An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases conducted in water year 2011 resulted only in financial costs; the total cost of all experimental releases was about $622,000.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration)

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Radioactive waste storage issues  

SciTech Connect

In the United States we generate greater than 500 million tons of toxic waste per year which pose a threat to human health and the environment. Some of the most toxic of these wastes are those that are radioactively contaminated. This thesis explores the need for permanent disposal facilities to isolate radioactive waste materials that are being stored temporarily, and therefore potentially unsafely, at generating facilities. Because of current controversies involving the interstate transfer of toxic waste, more states are restricting the flow of wastes into - their borders with the resultant outcome of requiring the management (storage and disposal) of wastes generated solely within a state`s boundary to remain there. The purpose of this project is to study nuclear waste storage issues and public perceptions of this important matter. Temporary storage at generating facilities is a cause for safety concerns and underscores, the need for the opening of permanent disposal sites. Political controversies and public concern are forcing states to look within their own borders to find solutions to this difficult problem. Permanent disposal or retrievable storage for radioactive waste may become a necessity in the near future in Colorado. Suitable areas that could support - a nuclear storage/disposal site need to be explored to make certain the health, safety and environment of our citizens now, and that of future generations, will be protected.

Kunz, D.E.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Long-time varying-daily, weekly, and seasonal-power demands require the electric utility industry to have installed generating capacity in excess of the average load. Energy storage can reduce the requirement for less efficient excess generating capacity used to meet peak load demands. Short-time fluctuations in electric power can occur as negatively damped oscillations in complex power systems with generators connected by long transmission lines. Superconducting inductors with their associated converter systems are under development for both load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) is based upon the phenomenon of the nearly lossless behavior of superconductors. Application is, in principal, efficient since the electromagnetic energy can be transferred to and from the storage coils without any intermediate conversion to other energy forms. Results from a reference design for a 10-GWh SMES unit for load leveling are presented. The conceptual engineering design of a 30-MJ, 10-MW energy storage coil is discussed with regard to system stabilization, and tests of a small scale, 100-KJ SMES system are presented. Some results of experiments are provided from a related technology based program which uses superconducting inductive energy storage to drive fusion plasmas.

Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Schermer, R.I.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

277

Underground Natural Gas Storage by Storage Type  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History All Operators Net Withdrawals 192,093 33,973 -348,719 -17,009 -347,562 -7,279 1967-2012 Injections 3,132,920 3,340,365 3,314,990 3,291,395 3,421,813 2,825,427 1935-2012 Withdrawals 3,325,013 3,374,338 2,966,180 3,274,385 3,074,251 2,818,148 1944-2012 Salt Cavern Storage Fields Net Withdrawals 20,001 -42,044 -56,010 -58,295 -92,413 -19,528 1994-2012 Injections 400,244 440,262 459,330 510,691 532,893 465,005 1994-2012 Withdrawals 420,245 398,217 403,321 452,396 440,480 445,477 1994-2012 Nonsalt Cavern Storage Net Withdrawals 172,092 76,017 -292,710 41,286 -255,148 12,249 1994-2012 Injections 2,732,676 2,900,103 2,855,667 2,780,703 2,888,920 2,360,422 1994-2012 Withdrawals

278

NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage On the one hand, hydrogen's great asset as a renewable energy carrier is that it is storable and transportable. On the other hand, its very low natural density requires storage volumes that are impractical for vehicles and many other uses. Current practice is to compress the gas in pressurized tanks, but this still provides only limited driving range for vehicles and is bulkier than desirable for other uses as well. Liquefying the hydrogen more than doubles the fuel density, but uses up substantial amounts of energy to lower the temperature sufficiently (-253°C at atmospheric pressure), requires expensive insulated tanks to maintain that temperature, and still falls short of desired driving range. One possible way to store hydrogen at higher density is in the spaces within the crystalline

279

Storage Ring Operation Modes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Longitudinal bunch profile and Up: APS Storage Ring Parameters Previous: Source Parameter Table Storage Ring Operation Modes Standard Operating Mode, top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 24 singlets (single bunches) with a nominal current of 4.25 mA and a spacing of 153 nanoseconds between singlets. Lattice configuration: Low emittance lattice with effective emittance of 3.1 nm-rad and coupling of 1%. Bunch length (rms): 33.5 ps. Refill schedule: Continuous top-up with single injection pulses occurring at a minimum of two minute intervals, or a multiple of two minute intervals. Special Operating Mode - 324 bunches, non top-up Fill pattern: 102 mA in 324 uniformly spaced singlets with a nominal single bunch current of 0.31 mA and a spacing of 11.37 nanoseconds between singlets.

280

Flywheel Energy Storage Module  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

kWh/100 kW kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module * 100KWh - 1/8 cost / KWh vs. current State of the Art * Bonded Magnetic Bearings on Rim ID * No Shaft / Hub (which limits surface speed) * Flexible Motor Magnets on Rim ID * Develop Touch-down System for Earthquake Flying Rim Eliminate Shaft and Hub Levitate on Passive Magnetic Bearings Increase Rim Tip Speed Larger Diameter Thinner Rim Stores More Energy 4 X increase in Stored Energy with only 60% Increase in Weight Development of a 100 kWh/100 kW Flywheel Energy Storage Module High Speed, Low Cost, Composite Ring with Bore-Mounted Magnetics Current State of the Art Flywheel Limitations of Existing Flywheel * 15 Minutes of storage * Limited to Frequency Regulation Application * Rim Speed (Stored Energy) Limited by Hub Strain and Shaft Dynamics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Inertial energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The inertial energy storage device of the present invention comprises a composite ring formed of circumferentially wound resin-impregnated filament material, a flanged hollow metal hub concentrically disposed in the ring, and a plurality of discrete filament bandsets coupling the hub to the ring. Each bandset is formed of a pair of parallel bands affixed to the hub in a spaced apart relationship with the axis of rotation of the hub being disposed between the bands and with each band being in the configuration of a hoop extending about the ring along a chordal plane thereof. The bandsets are disposed in an angular relationship with one another so as to encircle the ring at spaced-apart circumferential locations while being disposed in an overlapping relationship on the flanges of the hub. The energy storage device of the present invention has the capability of substantial energy storage due to the relationship of the filament bands to the ring and the flanged hub.

Knight, Jr., Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Kelly, James J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Pollard, Roy E. (Powell, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Storage Business Model White Paper  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Business Model White Paper Storage Business Model White Paper Summary June 11 2013 Storage Business Model White Paper - Purpose  Identify existing business models for investors/operators, utilities, end users  Discuss alignment of storage "value proposition" with existing market designs and regulatory paradigms  Difficulties in realizing wholesale market product revenue streams for distributed storage - the "bundled applications" problem  Discuss risks/barriers to storage adoption and where existing risk mitigation measures fall down  Recommendations for policy/research steps - Alternative business models - Accelerated research into life span and failure modes

284

Spent-fuel-storage alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Storage Alternatives meeting was a technical forum in which 37 experts from 12 states discussed storage alternatives that are available or are under development. The subject matter was divided into the following five areas: techniques for increasing fuel storage density; dry storage of spent fuel; fuel characterization and conditioning; fuel storage operating experience; and storage and transport economics. Nineteen of the 21 papers which were presented at this meeting are included in this Proceedings. These have been abstracted and indexed. (ATT)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

NGLW RCRA Storage Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory contains radioactive liquid waste in underground storage tanks at the INTEC Tank Farm Facility (TFF). INTEC is currently treating the waste by evaporation to reduce the liquid volume for continued storage, and by calcination to reduce and convert the liquid to a dry waste form for long-term storage in calcine bins. Both treatment methods and activities in support of those treatment operations result in Newly Generated Liquid Waste (NGLW) being sent to TFF. The storage tanks in the TFF are underground, contained in concrete vaults with instrumentation, piping, transfer jets, and managed sumps in case of any liquid accumulation in the vault. The configuration of these tanks is such that Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations apply. The TFF tanks were assessed several years ago with respect to the RCRA regulations and they were found to be deficient. This study considers the configuration of the current tanks and the RCRA deficiencies identified for each. The study identifies four potential methods and proposes a means of correcting the deficiencies. The cost estimates included in the study account for construction cost; construction methods to minimize work exposure to chemical hazards, radioactive contamination, and ionizing radiation hazards; project logistics; and project schedule. The study also estimates the tank volumes benefit associated with each corrective action to support TFF liquid waste management planning.

R. J. Waters; R. Ochoa; K. D. Fritz; D. W. Craig

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electrical Energy Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrochemical Flow Storage System Typical Cell Power Density (Wcm 2 ) 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 UTRC Conventional Conventional flow battery cell UTRC flow battery...

287

Flash Storage Today  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Can flash memory become the foundation for a new tier in the storage hierarchy? The past few years have been an exciting time for flash memory. The cost has fallen dramatically as fabrication has become more efficient and the market has grown; the density ...

Adam Leventhal

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Alkaline storage battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An alkaline storage battery having located in a battery container a battery element comprising a positive electrode, a negative electrode, a separator and a gas ionizing auxiliary electrode, in which the gas ionizing electrode is contained in a bag of microporous film, is described.

Suzuki, S.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

Flywheel Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flywheels are under consideration as an alternative for electrochemical batteries in a variety of applications This summary report provides a discussion of the mechanics of flywheels and magnetic bearings, the general characteristics of inertial energy storage systems, design considerations for flywheel systems, materials for advanced flywheels, and cost considerations.

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

290

Underground pumped hydroelectric storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Underground pumped hydroelectric energy storage was conceived as a modification of surface pumped storage to eliminate dependence upon fortuitous topography, provide higher hydraulic heads, and reduce environmental concerns. A UPHS plant offers substantial savings in investment cost over coal-fired cycling plants and savings in system production costs over gas turbines. Potential location near load centers lowers transmission costs and line losses. Environmental impact is less than that for a coal-fired cycling plant. The inherent benefits include those of all pumped storage (i.e., rapid load response, emergency capacity, improvement in efficiency as pumps improve, and capacity for voltage regulation). A UPHS plant would be powered by either a coal-fired or nuclear baseload plant. The economic capacity of a UPHS plant would be in the range of 1000 to 3000 MW. This storage level is compatible with the load-leveling requirements of a greater metropolitan area with population of 1 million or more. The technical feasibility of UPHS depends upon excavation of a subterranean powerhouse cavern and reservoir caverns within a competent, impervious rock formation, and upon selection of reliable and efficient turbomachinery - pump-turbines and motor-generators - all remotely operable.

Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Kannberg, L.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Cryptographic cloud storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and ...

Seny Kamara; Kristin Lauter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Pneumatic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An essential component to hybrid electric and electric vehicles is energy storage. A power assist device could also be important to many vehicle applications. This discussion focuses on the use of compressed gas as a system for energy storage and power in vehicle systems. Three possible vehicular applications for which these system could be used are discussed in this paper. These applications are pneumatically driven vehicles, series hybrid electric vehicles, and power boost for electric and conventional vehicles. One option for a compressed gas system is as a long duration power output device for purely pneumatic and hybrid cars. This system must provide enough power and energy to drive under normal conditions for a specified time or distance. The energy storage system for this use has the requirement that it will be highly efficient, compact, and have low mass. Use of a compressed gas energy storage as a short duration, high power output system for conventional motor vehicles could reduce engine size or reduce transient emissions. For electric vehicles this kind of system could lengthen battery life by providing battery load leveling during accelerations. The system requirements for this application are that it be compact and have low mass. The efficiency of the system is a secondary consideration in this application.

Flowers, D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

NV Energy Electricity Storage Valuation  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how grid-level electricity storage may benet the operations of NV Energy in 2020, and assesses whether those benets justify the cost of the storage system. In order to determine how grid-level storage might impact NV Energy, an hourly production cost model of the Nevada Balancing Authority (\\BA") as projected for 2020 was built and used for the study. Storage facilities were found to add value primarily by providing reserve. Value provided by the provision of time-of-day shifting was found to be limited. If regulating reserve from storage is valued the same as that from slower ramp rate resources, then it appears that a reciprocating engine generator could provide additional capacity at a lower cost than a pumped storage hydro plant or large storage capacity battery system. In addition, a 25-MW battery storage facility would need to cost $650/kW or less in order to produce a positive Net Present Value (NPV). However, if regulating reserve provided by storage is considered to be more useful to the grid than that from slower ramp rate resources, then a grid-level storage facility may have a positive NPV even at today's storage system capital costs. The value of having storage provide services beyond reserve and time-of-day shifting was not assessed in this study, and was therefore not included in storage cost-benefit calculations.

Ellison, James F.; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Samaan, Nader A.; Jin, Chunlian

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

294

C:\ANNUAL\VENTCHAP.V8\NGA.VP  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Southern Southern California Gas Company's gas well storage field in Aliso Canyon, California. Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1997 68 New England .................................... 181,610 1,971,242 173,994 201,742 178,011 15,354 Middle Atlantic .................................. 855,061 8,723,538 633,706 756,384 746,158 47,242 East North Central ............................ 1,536,570 12,293,628 749,428 1,261,311 1,438,604 63,756 West North Central ........................... 479,287 4,693,375 308,633 503,066 469,979 26,759 South Atlantic ................................... 418,316 5,579,544 313,730 522,757 743,408 14,323 East South Central ........................... 206,285 2,786,410 148,174 296,848 519,808 7,787 West South Central .......................... 401,887 5,922,727 316,473 553,044 3,417,784 13,515

295

Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices are of greatstrategy to fabricate flexible energy-storage devices.Flexible, lightweight energy-storage devices (batteries and

Rice, Lynn Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Storage/Handling | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

StorageHandling StorageHandling Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer & Retrieval of Records from the Washington National Records Center (WNRC) or Legacy Management...

298

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Electrochemical Energy Storage Nanostructured Electrodesof Electrode Design for Energy Storage and Generation .batteries and their energy storage efficiency. vii Contents

Khan, Javed Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects...

300

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown...

304

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Storage  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Consumer Information Hydrogen Storage Search Search Help Hydrogen Storage EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Storage Printable Version Share this resource Send...

305

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: therecovery and storage) utility electricity and natural gasbut no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

307

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Engineered Erosion Controls at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement engineering controls in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to rehabilitate the degraded channel in lower Sandia Canyon where it crosses through the outdoor firing range at TA-72 to limit the loss of sediment and dissipate floodwater leaving LANL property (Figure 1). The proposed construction of these engineered controls is part of the New Mexico Environment Department's (NMED) approved LANL Individual Storm Water Permit. The purpose of this project is to install storm water controls at Sandia Watershed Site Monitoring Area 6 (S-SMA-6). Storm water controls will be designed and installed to meet the requirements of NPDES Permit No. NM0030759, commonly referred to as the LANL Individual Storm Water Permit (IP). The storm water control measures address storm water mitigation for the area within the boundary of Area of Concern (AOC) 72-001. This action meets the requirements of the IP for S-SMA-6 for storm water controls by a combination of: preventing exposure of upstream storm water and storm water generated within the channel to the AOC and totally retaining storm water falling outside the channel but within the AOC.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Effects of hydropower operations on recreational use and nonuse values at Glen Canyon and Flaming Gorge Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increases in streamflows are generally positively related to the use values of angling and white-water boating, and constant flows tend to increase the use values more than fluctuating flows. In most instances, however, increases in streamflows beyond some threshold level cause the use values to decrease. Expenditures related to angling and white-water boating account for about $24 million of activity in the local economy around Glen Canyon Dam and $24.8 million in the local economy around flaming Gorge Dam. The range of operational scenarios being considered in the Western Area Power Administration`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, when use rates are held constant, could change the combined use value of angling and white-water boating below Glen Canyon Dam, increasing it by as much as 50%, depending on prevailing hydrological conditions. Changes in the combined use value below Flaming Gorge Dam could range from a decrease of 9% to an increase of 26%. Nonuse values, such as existence and bequest values, could also make a significant contribution to the total value of each site included in this study; however, methodological and data limitations prevented estimating how each operational scenario could change nonuse values.

Carlson, J.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Silo Storage Preconceptual Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has a need to develop and field a low-cost option for the long-term storage of a variety of radiological material. The storage options primary requirement is to provide both environmental and physical protection of the materials. Design criteria for this effort require a low initial cost and minimum maintenance over a 50-year design life. In 1999, Argonne National Laboratory-West was tasked with developing a dry silo storage option for the BN-350 Spent Fuel in Aktau Kazakhstan. Argons design consisted of a carbon steel cylinder approximately 16 ft long, 18 in. outside diameter and 0.375 in. wall thickness. The carbon steel silo was protected from corrosion by a duplex coating system consisting of zinc and epoxy. Although the study indicated that the duplex coating design would provide a design life well in excess of the required 50 years, the review board was concerned because of the novelty of the design and the lack of historical use. In 2012, NNSA tasked Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with reinvestigating the silo storage concept and development of alternative corrosion protection strategies. The 2012 study, Silo Storage Concepts, Cathodic Protection Options Study (INL/EST-12-26627), concludes that the option which best fits the design criterion is a passive cathotic protection scheme, consisting of a carbon steel tube coated with zinc or a zinc-aluminum alloy encapsulated in either concrete or a cement grout. The hot dipped zinc coating option was considered most efficient, but the flame-sprayed option could be used if a thicker zinc coating was determined to be necessary.

Stephanie L. Austad; Patrick W. Bragassa; Kevin M Croft; David S Ferguson; Scott C Gladson; Annette L Shafer; John H Weathersby

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Financial analysis of experimental releases conducted at Glen Canyon Dam during water years 2006 through 2010.  

SciTech Connect

Because of concerns about the impact that Glen Canyon Dam (GCD) operations were having on downstream ecosystems and endangered species, the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) conducted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on dam operations (DOE 1996). New operating rules and management goals for GCD that had been specified in the Record of Decision (ROD) (Reclamation 1996) were adopted in February 1997. In addition to issuing new operating criteria, the ROD mandated experimental releases for the purpose of conducting scientific studies. A report released in January 2011 examined the financial implications of the experimental flows that were conducted at the GCD from 1997 to 2005. This report continues the analysis and examines the financial implications of the experimental flows conducted at the GCD from 2006 to 2010. An experimental release may have either a positive or negative impact on the financial value of energy production. This study estimates the financial costs of experimental releases, identifies the main factors that contribute to these costs, and compares the interdependencies among these factors. An integrated set of tools was used to compute the financial impacts of the experimental releases by simulating the operation of the GCD under two scenarios, namely, (1) a baseline scenario that assumes both that operations comply with the ROD operating criteria and the experimental releases that actually took place during the study period, and (2) a 'without experiments' scenario that is identical to the baseline scenario of operations that comply with the GCD ROD, except it assumes that experimental releases did not occur. The Generation and Transmission Maximization (GTMax) model was the main simulation tool used to dispatch GCD and other hydropower plants that comprise the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP). Extensive data sets and historical information on SLCA/IP powerplant characteristics, hydrologic conditions, and Western Area Power Administration's (Western's) power purchase prices were used for the simulation. In addition to estimating the financial impact of experimental releases, the GTMax model was also used to gain insights into the interplay among ROD operating criteria, exceptions that were made to criteria to accommodate the experimental releases, and Western operating practices. Experimental releases in some water years resulted in financial benefits to Western while others resulted in financial costs. During the study period, the total financial costs of all experimental releases were more than $4.8 million.

Poch, L. A.; Veselka, T. D.; Palmer, C. S.; Loftin, S.; Osiek, B. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Western Area Power Administration, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center)

2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

Structural fabric of the Palisades Monocline: a study of positive inversion, Grand Canyon, Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A field study of positive inversion is conducted to describe associated structural fabrics and to infer kinematic development of the Palisades Monocline, Grand Canyon, Arizona. These features are then compared to sand, clay and solid rock models of positive inversion to test model results and improve understanding of inversion processes. The N40W 90 oriented Palisades fault underlying the monocline has experienced northeast-southwest Precambrian extension and subsequent northeastsouthwest Laramide contraction. The magnitude of inversion is estimated to be 25% based on vertical offset across the fault, although this does not account for flexure or horizontal shortening. The preferred N50W 90 joint and vein orientation and N50W 68 NE and SW conjugate normal faults are consistent with the Palisades fault and northeastsouthwest extension. The N45E 90 joint orientation and approximately N40W 28 NE and SW conjugate thrust faults are consistent with northeast-southwest contraction. The deformation is characterized by three domains across the fault zone: 1) the hanging wall, 2) the footwall, and 3) an interior, fault-bounded zone between the hanging wall and footwall. Extensional features are preserved and dominate the hanging wall, contractional features define footwall deformation, and the interior, fault-bounded zone is marked by the co-existence of extensional and contractional features. Extension caused a master normal fault and hanging wall roll-over with distributed joints, veinsand normal faults. During inversion, contraction induced reverse reactivation of existing hanging wall faults, footwall folding and footwall thrust-faulting. Precambrian normal slip along the master normal fault and subsequent Laramide reverse slip along the new footwall bounding fault created an uplifted domain of relatively oldest strata between the hanging wall and footwall. Physical models of co-axial inversion suggest consistent development of the three domains of deformation described at the Palisades fault, however the models often require magnitudes of inversion greater than 50%. Although vertical block motion during horizontal compression is not predicted directly by the Mohr-Coulomb criterion, physical models and analytical solutions (incorporating Mohr- Coulomb criterion) suggest maximum stress trajectories and near vertical failure above high angle basement faults that compare favorably with the Palisades fault zone.

Orofino, James Cory

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Integrated reservoir study of the 8 reservoir of the Green Canyon 18 field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The move into deeper waters in the Gulf of Mexico has produced new opportunities for petroleum production, but it also has produced new challenges as different reservoir problems are encountered. This integrated reservoir characterization effort has provided useful information about the behavior and characteristics of a typical unconsolidated, overpressured, fine-grained, turbidite reservoir, which constitutes the majority of the reservoirs present in the Outer Continental Shelf of the Gulf of Mexico. Reservoirs in the Green Canyon 18 (GC 18) field constitute part of a turbidite package with reservoir quality typically increasing with depth. Characterization of the relatively shallow 8 reservoir had hitherto been hindered by the difficulty in resolving its complex architecture and stratigraphy. Furthermore, the combination of its unconsolidated rock matrix and abnormal pore pressure has resulted in severe production-induced compaction. The reservoir's complex geology had previously obfuscated the delineation of its hydrocarbon accumulation and determination of its different resource volumes. Geological and architectural alterations caused by post-accumulation salt tectonic activities had previously undermined the determination of the reservoir's active drive mechanisms and their chronology. Seismic interpretation has provided the reservoir geometry and topography. The reservoir stratigraphy has been defined using log, core and seismic data. With well data as pilot points, the spatial distribution of the reservoir properties has been defined using geostatistics. The resulting geological model was used to construct a dynamic flow model that matched historical production and pressure data.. The reservoir's pressure and production behavior indicates a dominant compaction drive mechanism. The results of this work show that the reservoir performance is influenced not only by the available drive energy, but also by the spatial distribution of the different facies relative to well locations. The study has delineated the hydrocarbon bearing reservoir, quantified the different resource categories as STOIIP/GIIP = 19.8/26.2 mmstb/Bscf, ultimate recovery = 9.92/16.01 mmstb/Bscf, and reserves (as of 9/2001) = 1.74/5.99 mmstb/Bscf of oil and gas, respectively. There does not appear to be significant benefit to infill drilling or enhanced recovery operations.

Aniekwena, Anthony Udegbunam

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Storage Ring | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Electron Storage Ring The 7-GeV electrons are injected into the 1104-m-circumference storage ring, a circle of more than 1,000 electromagnets and associated equipment, located...

314

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Hydrogen Delivery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap Hydrogen Delivery Technical Team Roadmap June 2013 #12;This.................................................................................. 13 6. Hydrogen Storage and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability) is a voluntary, nonbinding, and nonlegal

315

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

317

Normal matter storage of antiprotons  

SciTech Connect

Various simple issues connected with the possible storage of anti p in relative proximity to normal matter are discussed. Although equilibrium storage looks to be impossible, condensed matter systems are sufficiently rich and controllable that nonequilibrium storage is well worth pursuing. Experiments to elucidate the anti p interactions with normal matter are suggested. 32 refs.

Campbell, L.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Transportable Energy Storage Systems Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project will define the requirements and specification for a transportable energy storage system and then screen various energy storage options and assess their capability to meet that specification. The application will be designed to meet peak electrical loads (3-4 hours of storage) on the electrical distribution system.

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

319

COSBench: cloud object storage benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With object storage systems being increasingly recognized as a preferred way to expose one's storage infrastructure to the web, the past few years have witnessed an explosion in the acceptance of these systems. Unfortunately, the proliferation of available ... Keywords: benchmark tool, object storage

Qing Zheng; Haopeng Chen; Yaguang Wang; Jian Zhang; Jiangang Duan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Hybrid electrical energy storage systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrical energy is a high quality form of energy that can be easily converted to other forms of energy with high efficiency and, even more importantly, it can be used to control lower grades of energy quality with ease. However, building a cost-effective ... Keywords: charge, electrical storage, energy, energy storage, hybrid storage, management

Massoud Pedram; Naehyuck Chang; Younghyun Kim; Yanzhi Wang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Energy Storage Systems (ESS) Presentations The 2008 Peer Review Meeting for the DOE Energy Storage and Power Electronics Program (ESPE) was held in Washington DC on Sept. 29-30, 2008. Current and completed program projects were presented and reviewed by a group of industry professionals. The 2008 agenda was composed of 28 projects that covered a broad range of new and ongoing, state-of-the-art, energy storage and power electronics technologies, including updates on the collaborations among DOE/ESPE, CEC in California, and NYSERDA in New York. Energy Storage Systems (ESS) presentations are available below. ESPE 2008 Peer Review - EAC Energy Storage Subcommittee - Brad Roberts, S&C

322

Large-Eddy Simulation of Flow and Pollutant Transport in Street Canyons of Different Building-Height-to-Street-Width Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study employs a large-eddy simulation technique to investigate the flow, turbulence structure, and pollutant transport in street canyons of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 at a Reynolds number of 12 000 ...

Chun-Ho Liu; Mary C. Barth; Dennis Y. C. Leung

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Near-Surface Currents in DeSoto Canyon (199799): Comparison of Current Meters, Satellite Observation, and Model Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a data-assimilated model simulation of near-surface circulation in DeSoto Canyon (DSC), Gulf of Mexico, with emphasis on analyzing moored current-meter observations and comparing them with satellite data and model results. ...

Dong-Ping Wang; Lie-Yauw Oey; Tal Ezer; Peter Hamilton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

325

gas cylinder storage guidelines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines Compressed Gas Cylinder Storage Guidelines All cylinders must be stored vertical, top up across the upper half the cylinder but below the shoulder. Small cylinder stands or other methods may be appropriate to ensure that the cylinders are secured from movement. Boxes, cartons, and other items used to support small cylinders must not allow water to accumulate and possible cause corrosion. Avoid corrosive chemicals including salt and fumes - keep away from direct sunlight and keep objects away that could fall on them. Use Gas pressure regulators that have been inspected in the last 5 years. Cylinders that contain fuel gases whether full or empty must be stored away from oxidizer cylinders at a minimum of 20 feet. In the event they are stored together, they must be separated by a wall 5 feet high with

326

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin - Phase III DE-FC26-05NT42588 Robert J. Finley and the MGSC Project Team Illinois State Geological Survey (University of Illinois) and Schlumberger Carbon Services U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23, 2012 * The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) via the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program (contract number DE-FC26-05NT42588) and by a cost share agreement with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity, Office of Coal Development through the Illinois Clean Coal

327

NSLS VUV Storage Ring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VUV Storage Ring VUV Storage Ring VUV Normal Operations Operating Parameters (pdf) Insertion Devices Flux & Brightness Orbit Stability Lattice Information (pdf) Lattice : MAD Dataset Mechanical Drawing (pdf) VUV Operating Schedule Introduction & History The VUV Ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source was one of the first of the 2nd generation light sources to operate in the world. Initially designed in 1976 the final lattice design was completed in 1978 shortly after funding was approved. Construction started at the beginning of FY 1979 and installation of the magnets was well underway by the end of FY 1980. The first stored beam was achieved in December of 1981 at 600 MeV and the first photons were delivered to beamlines in May 1982, with routine beam line operations underway by the start of FY 1983. The number of beam

328

Solar panel with storage  

SciTech Connect

A self contained, fully automatic, vertical wall panel, solar energy system characterized by having no moving parts in the panel. The panel is substantially a shallow rectangular box having a closed perimeter, an outer insulating chamber which is substantially a double glazed window, and an inner energy storage chamber which is provided with containers of phase change materials. The energy storage chamber is provided with air entrance and exit passages which communicate with the space to be heated. Thermostatically controlled blowers serve to move air from the space to be heated across the containers of phase change material and back to the space to be heated. Thermostatically controlled blowers also serve to move insulating material into and out of the insulating chamber at appropriate times.

Zilisch, K.P.

1984-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

329

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hassenzahl, W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented.

Rogers, J.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory Chapters Glossary Bibliography Biographical Sketch Summary Underground storage of natural gas

Mohaghegh, Shahab

332

Maui energy storage study.  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates strategies to mitigate anticipated wind energy curtailment on Maui, with a focus on grid-level energy storage technology. The study team developed an hourly production cost model of the Maui Electric Company (MECO) system, with an expected 72 MW of wind generation and 15 MW of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation in 2015, and used this model to investigate strategies that mitigate wind energy curtailment. It was found that storage projects can reduce both wind curtailment and the annual cost of producing power, and can do so in a cost-effective manner. Most of the savings achieved in these scenarios are not from replacing constant-cost diesel-fired generation with wind generation. Instead, the savings are achieved by the more efficient operation of the conventional units of the system. Using additional storage for spinning reserve enables the system to decrease the amount of spinning reserve provided by single-cycle units. This decreases the amount of generation from these units, which are often operated at their least efficient point (at minimum load). At the same time, the amount of spinning reserve from the efficient combined-cycle units also decreases, allowing these units to operate at higher, more efficient levels.

Ellison, James; Bhatnagar, Dhruv; Karlson, Benjamin

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Energy Storage Technology Advancement Partnership (October 2012) More Documents & Publications Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November...

334

Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing ...  

Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research institutions have energy storage ...

335

Energy Storage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Storage Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Source information Contents 1 Introduction 2 Benefits 3 Technologies 4 References Introduction Energy storage is a tool that can be used by grid operators to help regulate the electrical grid and help meet demand. In its most basic form, energy storage "stores" excess energy that would otherwise be wasted so that it can be used later when demand is higher. Energy Storage can be used to balance microgrids, perform frequency regulation, and provide more reliable power for high tech industrial facilities.[1] Energy storage will also allow for the expansion of intermittent renewable energy, like wind and solar, to provide electricity around the clock. Some of the major issues concerning energy storage include cost, efficiency, and size.

336

Grid Applications for Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications for Energy Storage Applications for Energy Storage Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Washington DC 7-8 March 2012 Joe Eto jheto@lbl.gov (510) 486-7284 Referencing a Recent Sandia Study,* This Talk Will: Describe and illustrate selected grid applications for energy storage Time-of-use energy cost management Demand charge management Load following Area Regulation Renewables energy time shift Renewables capacity firming Compare Sandia's estimates of the economic value of these applications to the Electricity Storage Association's estimates of the capital costs of energy storage technologies *Eyer, J. and G. Corey. Energy Storage for the Electricity Grid: Benefits and Market Potential Assessment Guide. February 2010. SAND2010-0815 A Recent Sandia Study Estimates the Economic

337

High-Resolution Carbon Isotope Stratigraphy, Pennsylvanian Snaky Canyon Formation, East-Central Idaho: Implications for Regional and Global Correlations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nearly 550 samples of fine grained carbonates, collected every 0.5 to 1.0 m from the Bloom Member of the Snaky Canyon Formation at Gallagher Peak, Idaho, were analyzed to determine the high-resolution carbon isotope stratigraphy. To constrain for diagenesis, thin sections were petrographically analyzed and viewed using cathodoluminescence microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using an electron microprobe. Average delta18O and delta13C values from the Bloom Member are -4.5% +/- 1.6% (1 sigma) and 2.1% +/- 1.1%, respectively. Maximum delta13C values are about 1% higher for the Desmoinesian and Missourian than the Morrowan and Atokan, similar to results from the Yukon Territory. delta18O and delta13C values are lowest for crystalline mosaic limestones and siltstones, moderate for packstones, wackestones, and mudstones, and highest for boundstones and grainstones. The delta13C profile from Gallagher Peak consists of high frequency 1% oscillations with several larger excursions. No large delta13C increase at the base of the section suggests the Mid-Carboniferous boundary is in the underlying Bluebird Mountain formation. delta13C of Gallagher Peak and Arrow Canyon, NV, correlate well from 318 to 310 Ma, but correlation becomes more difficult around 310 Ma. This may result from increased restriction of the Snaky Canyon platform beginning in the Desmoinesian. Most of the short term (<1 Ma) isotopic excursions are the result of diagenesis. Two of the largest negative excursions at Gallagher Peak correlate with two large negative excursions at Big Hatchet Peak, NM, possibly due to sea level lowstands of the Desmoinesian. Phylloid algal mounds at Gallagher Peak are associated with positive excursions because of original aragonite composition and increased open marine influence. Positive excursions related to other facies characteristics also result from increased marine influence. The delta13C curve for the upper half of Gallagher Peak contains three repeated cycles of increasing delta13C over 1-1.5 Ma, which are possibly related to long-term sea level fluctuations. Given the complexity of each local environment, without detailed biostratigraphy, detailed rock descriptions, and analysis of the various rock components, delta13C stratigraphy of whole rocks can be misinterpreted.

Jolley, Casey

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Underground Infrastructure Impacts Due to a Surface Burst Nuclear Device in an Urban Canyon Environment  

SciTech Connect

Investigation of the effects of a nuclear device exploded in a urban environment such as the Chicago studied for this particular report have shown the importance on the effects from the urban canyons so typical of today's urban environment as compared to nuclear test event effects observed at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Pacific Testing Area on which many of the typical legacy empirical codes are based on. This report first looks at the some of the data from nuclear testing that can give an indication of the damage levels that might be experienced due to a nuclear event. While it is well known that a above ground blast, even a ground burst, very poorly transmits energy into the ground ( < 1%) and the experimental results discussed here are for fully coupled detonations, these results do indicate a useful measure of the damage that might be expected. The second part of the report looks at effects of layering of different materials that typically would make up the near ground below surface environment that a shock would propagate through. As these simulations support and is widely known in the community, the effects of different material compositions in these layers modify the shock behavior and especially modify the energy dispersal and coupling into the basement structures. The third part of the report looks at the modification of the underground shock effects from a surface burst 1 KT device due to the presence of basements under the Chicago buildings. Without direct knowledge of the basement structure, a simulated footprint of a uniform 20m depth was assumed underneath each of the NGI defined buildings in the above ground environment. In the above ground case, the underground basement structures channel the energy along the line of site streets keeping the shock levels from falling off as rapidly as has been observed in unobstructed detonations. These simulations indicate a falloff of factors of 2 per scaled length as compared to 10 for the unobstructed case. Again, as in the above ground case, the basements create significant shielding causing the shock profile to become more square and reducing the potential for damage diagonal to the line of sight streets. The results for a 1KT device is that the heavily damaged zone (complete destruction) will extend out to 50m from the detonation ({approx}100m for 10KT). The heavily to moderately damaged zone will extend out to 100m ({approx}200m for 10KT). Since the destruction will depend on geometric angle from the detonation and also the variability of response for various critical infrastructure, for planning purposes the area out to 100m from the detonation should be assumed to be non-operational. Specifically for subway tunnels, while not operational, they could be human passable for human egress in the moderately damaged area. The results of the simulations presented in this report indicate only the general underground infrastructure impact. Simulations done with the actual basement geometry would be an important improvement. Equally as important or even more so, knowing the actual underground material configurations and material composition would be critical information to refine the calculations. Coupling of the shock data into structural codes would help inform the emergency planning and first response communities on the impact to underground structures and the state of buildings after the detonation.

Bos, Randall J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dey, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Runnels, Scott R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These 123 agreements are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NETL: Carbon Storage - NETL Carbon Capture and Storage Database  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CCS Database CCS Database Carbon Storage NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage Database - Version 4 Welcome to NETL's Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) Database. The database includes active, proposed, canceled, and terminated CCUS projects worldwide. Information in the database regarding technologies being developed for capture, evaluation of sites for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, estimation of project costs, and anticipated dates of completion is sourced from publically available information. The CCUS Database provides the public with information regarding efforts by various industries, public groups, and governments towards development and eventual deployment of CCUS technology. As of November 2012, the database contained 268 CCUS projects worldwide. The 268 projects include 68 capture, 61 storage, and 139 for capture and storage in more than 30 countries across 6 continents. While most of the projects are still in the planning and development stage, or have recently been proposed, 37 are actively capturing and injecting CO2

342

Decreasing Slip Rates From12.8 Ma to Present on the Solitario Canyon Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solitario Canyon fault, which bounds the west side of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is the closest fault with Quaternary offset adjacent to the proposed spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste repository. Dip-slip offset between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma is determined from lithostratigraphic displacement in boreholes USW H-3 and USW WT-7, drilled in the footwall and hanging wall, respectively. The base of the 12.8-Ma Topopah Spring Tuff is interpreted to have 463.3 m of separation across the fault, an average dip slip rate of 0.036 mm/yr. Previous researchers identified a geothermal system active from 11.5 to 10.0 Ma with peak activity at 10.7 Ma that resulted in pervasive alteration of vitric rock to zeolitic minerals where the rocks were in the ground-water saturated zone. The contact between vitric (V) and pervasively zeolitic (Z) rocks cuts across the lithostratigraphic section and offset of this V-Z boundary can be used to measure slip rates between 12.8 and 10.7 Ma. In H-3, the V-Z boundary is 138.4 m below the base of the vitric, densely welded subzone of the Topopah Spring Tuff (Tptpv3). In WT-7, although the V-Z boundary is identified at the base of the Tptpv3, borehole video, cuttings, and geophysical log data indicate the Tptpv3 has well-developed zeolitic alteration along fractures, and this implies 19.5 m of the total thickness of Tptpv3 (and probably additional overlying crystallized rocks) also were in the saturated zone by 10.7 Ma. The V-Z relations across the Solitario Canyon fault in H-3 and WT-7 indicate a minimum of 157.9 m of separation before 10.7 Ma, which is 34.1 percent of the total slip of the Topopah Spring Tuff, and a minimum dip slip rate of 0.075 mm/yr from 12.8 to 10.7 Ma. These data are consistent with the broader structural history of the area near Yucca Mountain. Previous workers used angular unconformities, tilting of structural blocks, and paleomagnetic data to constrain the main period of extensional faulting between 12.7 and 8.5 Ma. Paleoseismic studies in Quaternary deposits documented slip rates on the Solitario Canyon fault from 0.01 to 0.02 mm/yr since 0.077 and 0.20 Ma. The decrease of extensional activity slip rates data on the Solitario Canyon fault provide evidence of decreasing tectonic activity from the middle Miocene to present.

D. Buesch

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Interim storage study report  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste (HLW) stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) in the form of calcine and liquid and liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW) will be processed to provide a stable waste form and prepare the waste to be transported to a permanent repository. Because a permanent repository will not be available when the waste is processed, the waste must be stored at ICPP in an Interim Storage Facility (ISF). This report documents consideration of an ISF for each of the waste processing options under consideration.

Rawlins, J.K.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EMS Energy Institute at The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) has managed the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC) since its inception in 2003. The GSTC infrastructure provided a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. The GSTC received base funding from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Oil & Natural Gas Supply Program. The GSTC base funds were highly leveraged with industry funding for individual projects. Since its inception, the GSTC has engaged 67 members. The GSTC membership base was diverse, coming from 19 states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. The membership was comprised of natural gas storage field operators, service companies, industry consultants, industry trade organizations, and academia. The GSTC organized and hosted a total of 18 meetings since 2003. Of these, 8 meetings were held to review, discuss, and select proposals submitted for funding consideration. The GSTC reviewed a total of 75 proposals and committed co-funding to support 31 industry-driven projects. The GSTC committed co-funding to 41.3% of the proposals that it received and reviewed. The 31 projects had a total project value of $6,203,071 of which the GSTC committed $3,205,978 in co-funding. The committed GSTC project funding represented an average program cost share of 51.7%. Project applicants provided an average program cost share of 48.3%. In addition to the GSTC co-funding, the consortium provided the domestic natural gas storage industry with a technology transfer and outreach infrastructure. The technology transfer and outreach were conducted by having project mentoring teams and a GSTC website, and by working closely with the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI) to jointly host technology transfer meetings and occasional field excursions. A total of 15 technology transfer/strategic planning workshops were held.

Joel Morrison; Elizabeth Wood; Barbara Robuck

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/25/2011 eere.energy.gov Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Ned Stetson Storage Tech Team Lead Fuel Cell Technologies Program U.S. Department of Energy 12/13/2011 Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Marni Lenahan December 13, 2011 Database Background * The Hydrogen Storage Materials Database was built to retain information from DOE Hydrogen Storage funded research and make these data more accessible. * Data includes properties of hydrogen storage materials investigated such as synthesis conditions, sorption and release conditions, capacities, thermodynamics, etc. http://hydrogenmaterialssearch.govtools.us Current Status * Data continues to be collected from DOE funded research.

347

Magnetic energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fusion program embraces low loss superconductor strand development with integration into cables capable of carrying 50 kA in pulsed mode at high fields. This evolvement has been paralleled with pulsed energy storage coil development and testing from tens of kJ at low fields to a 20 MJ prototype tokamak induction coil at 7.5 T. Energy transfer times have ranged from 0.7 ms to several seconds. Electric utility magnetic storage for prospective application is for diurnal load leveling with massive systems to store 10 GWh at 1.8 K in a dewar structure supported on bedrock underground. An immediate utility application is a 30 MJ system to be used to damp power oscillations on the Bonneville Power Administration electric transmission lines. An off-shoot of this last work is a new program for electric utility VAR control with the potential for use to suppress subsynchronous resonance. This paper presents work in progress, work planned, and recently completed unusual work.

Rogers, J.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Flywheel energy storage workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the November 1993 Flywheel Workshop, there has been a major surge of interest in Flywheel Energy Storage. Numerous flywheel programs have been funded by the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA), by the Department of Energy (DOE) through the Hybrid Vehicle Program, and by private investment. Several new prototype systems have been built and are being tested. The operational performance characteristics of flywheel energy storage are being recognized as attractive for a number of potential applications. Programs are underway to develop flywheels for cars, buses, boats, trains, satellites, and for electric utility applications such as power quality, uninterruptible power supplies, and load leveling. With the tremendous amount of flywheel activity during the last two years, this workshop should again provide an excellent opportunity for presentation of new information. This workshop is jointly sponsored by ARPA and DOE to provide a review of the status of current flywheel programs and to provide a forum for presentation of new flywheel technology. Technology areas of interest include flywheel applications, flywheel systems, design, materials, fabrication, assembly, safety & containment, ball bearings, magnetic bearings, motor/generators, power electronics, mounting systems, test procedures, and systems integration. Information from the workshop will help guide ARPA & DOE planning for future flywheel programs. This document is comprised of detailed viewgraphs.

O`Kain, D.; Carmack, J. [comps.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

350

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Electric storage cell or battery  

SciTech Connect

A lead storage cell comprises a storage jar, an electrolyte contained in the storage jar, negative and positive electrodes within the electrolyte and respectively having a negative electrode metal or active material and a positive electrode active material which are placed in contact with each other preferably a large-meshed woven or non-woven fabric having resistance to the electrolyte and inserted between the negative and positive electrodes.

Kosuga, J.

1981-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Electricity Energy Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers8212including increased deployment of renewable generation, the high capital cost of managing grid peak demands, and large capital investments in grid infrastructure for reliability8212is creating new interest in electric energy storage systems. New EPRI research offers a current snapshot of the storage landscape and an analytical framework for estimating the benefits of applications and life-cycle costs of energy storage systems. This paper describes in detail 10 key appl...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

353

Enabling Utility-Scale Electrical Energy Storage through Underground Hydrogen-Natural Gas Co-Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Energy storage technology is needed for the storage of surplus baseload generation and the storage of intermittent wind power, because it can increase the flexibility (more)

Peng, Dan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Underground Storage Tank Program (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules are intended to protect public health and the environment by establishing standards for the design, installation, operation, maintenance, monitoring, and closure of underground storage...

355

SGDP Storage System Performance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (ESS) November 3, 2010 Presenter: Jacquelyn Bean Organization: DOE-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Funded in part by the Energy Storage Systems Program...

356

Breakthrough Materials for Energy Storage  

Title: Breakthrough Materials for Energy Storage Subject: A presentation at the 22nd NREL Industry Growth Forum by Amprius about its lithium ion battery technology

357

NREL: Energy Storage - Technology Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Basics Photo of an ultracapacitor. Electrochemical energy storage devices provide the power for many everyday devices-from cars, trains, and laptops to personal digital...

358

Nanoarchitecture Electrodes for Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New materials such as Si nanowires anodes and high-energy layered-layered composite cathode materials have increased the energy storage, but are low in...

359

LPG storage vessel cracking experience  

SciTech Connect

In order to evaluate liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) handling and storage hazards, Caltex Petroleum Corp. (Dallas) surveyed several installations for storage vessel cracking problems. Cracking was found in approximately one-third of the storage vessels. In most cases, the cracking appeared to be due to original fabrication problems and could be removed without compromising the pressure containment. Several in-service cracking problems found were due to exposure to wet hydrogen sulfide. Various procedures were tried in order to minimize the in-service cracking potential. One sphere was condemned because of extensive subsurface cracking. This article's recommendations concern minimizing cracking on new and existing LPG storage vessels.

Cantwell, J.E. (Caltex Petroleum Corp., P.O. Box 619500, Dallas, TX (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

LPG storage vessel cracking experience  

SciTech Connect

As part of an overall company program to evaluate LPG handling and storage hazards the authors surveyed several installations for storage vessel cracking problems. Cracking was found in approximately one third of the storage vessels. In most cases the cracking appeared due to original fabrication problems and could be removed without compromising the pressure containment. Several in-service cracking problems due to exposure to wet hydrogen sulfide were found. Various procedures were tried in order to minimize the in-service cracking potential. One sphere was condemned because of extensive subsurface cracking. Recommendations are made to minimize cracking on new and existing LPG storage vessels.

Cantwell, J.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Heat storage materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of various alloys, eutectics, and salts in respect to their usefulness for latent and sensible heat storage are surveyed and reported. (TFD)

Birchenall, C.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Energy storage in carbon nanoparticles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) are clean energy sources, and their storage in carbonaceous materials is a promising technology for safe and cost effective usage (more)

Guan, Cong.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Advanced Concepts for Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Framework", Nature, 402, 276-279 (1999). Mesoporous Organosilica Material benzene-silica hybrid material Hydrogen storage behavior? S. Inagaki, S. Guan, T. Ohsuna, and...

364

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STORAGE IN CARBON NANOTUBES JOHN E. FISCHER UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA * SOME BASIC NOTIONS * BINDING SITES AND ENERGIES * PROCESSING TO ENHANCE CAPACITY: EX: ELECTROCHEMICAL Li...

366

The Fermilab data storage infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab, in collaboration with the DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Germany, has created a petabyte scale data storage infrastructure to meet the requirements of experiments to store and access large data sets. The Fermilab data storage infrastructure consists of the following major storage and data transfer components: Enstore mass storage system, DCache distributed data cache, ftp and Grid ftp for primarily external data transfers. This infrastructure provides a data throughput sufficient for transferring data from experiments' data acquisition systems. It also allows access to data in the Grid framework.

Jon A Bakken et al.

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

367

HTGR spent fuel storage study  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of alternate methods of storing high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) spent fuel. General requirements and design considerations are defined for a storage facility integral to a fuel recycle plant. Requirements for stand-alone storage are briefly considered. Three alternate water-cooled storage conceptual designs (plug well, portable well, and monolith) are considered and compared to a previous air-cooled design. A concept using portable storage wells in racks appears to be the most favorable, subject to seismic analysis and economic evaluation verification.

Burgoyne, R.M.; Holder, N.D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Carbon Capture & Storage in Canada  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Canada - Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting Pittsburgh, PA November 16, 2011 Dr. Frank Mourits Office of Energy Research and Development Natural...

369

Powertech: Hydrogen Expertise Storage Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Stations 700 bar Retail Stations 700 bar Retail Stations (Shell Newport Beach) Hydrogen Energy Storage Projects (BC Hydro Renewable Power - HARP) Lightweight Transport Trailers...

370

NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

:i" :i" _,, ' _~" ORISE 95/C-70 :E : i:; :' l,J : i.: RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY Op BUILDINGS 401, ' 403, AND ' m HITTMAN BUILDING $ <,' 2:. NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE I .~~ ; " LEWISTON, ' NEW YORK : f? j:,:i I ,.J- ;b f" /: Li _e.*. ~,, I ,,~, ,:,,;:, Prepared by T. .I. Vitkus i,c Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division ;>::; Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education .,:, "Oak Ridge, Temressee 37831-0117 .F P ., ? :_ &,d ,,,, ;<:x,, Prepared for the 3 I. Office of Environmental Restoration I, U.S. Department of Energy i gy i. ~: ,,, "! ? ' :' : "' ,//, FINAL REPORT ".$ :,a ,,, MARCH 1995 ; m L ,, ,, ,,,. ., ,,. ' 1 jq ,Ij:,., .,~ _,I_ 1 This report is based on work performed under contract number DE-AC05-760R00033 with the

371

Superconducting energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the status of energy storage involving superconductors and assesses what impact the recently discovered ceramic superconductors may have on the design of these devices. Our description is intended for R&D managers in government, electric utilities, firms, and national laboratories who wish an overview of what has been done and what remains to be done. It is assumed that the reader is acquainted with superconductivity, but not an expert on the topics discussed here. Indeed, it is the author`s aim to enable the reader to better understand the experts who may ask for the reader`s attention, support, or funding. This report may also inform scientists and engineers who, though expert in related areas, wish to have an introduction to our topic.

Giese, R.F.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Silver Bullet: Storage!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

West Philly High X-prize PHEV The Silver Bullet... Storage! Terry Boston President & CEO PJM Interconnection July 12, 2011 PJM©2011 2 United States PJM Eastern Interconnection PJM as Part of the Eastern Interconnection KEY STATISTICS PJM member companies 700+ millions of people served 58 peak load in megawatts 158,448 MWs of generating capacity 180,400 miles of transmission lines 61,200 GWh of annual energy 794,335 generation sources 1,365 square miles of territory 211,000 area served 13 states + DC Internal/external tie lines 142 * 24% of generation in Eastern Interconnection * 27% of load in Eastern Interconnection * 19% of transmission assets in Eastern Interconnection 20% of U.S. GDP produced in PJM www.pjm.com As of 6/1/2011 PJM©2011 3 43,623 0 5,000 10,000 15,000

373

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Source Hydrogen H2 storage Hydrogen Stored Energy Point-of-use Chemical hydrogen storage #12;5 ChemicalChemical Hydrogen Storage Center Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage William Tumas proprietary or confidential information #12;2 Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center Overview Project Start Date: FY

Carver, Jeffrey C.

374

Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

375

Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Commercial Cool Storage Design Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art handbook provides comprehensive guidance for designing ice and chilled-water storage systems for commercial buildings. HVAC engineers can take advantage of attractive rates and incentives offered by utilities to increase the market for cool storage systems.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Forecourt Storage and Compression Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure, capacity ­ Compressor output, power, electric demand ­ Station and dispenser load profiles Pro > Station demand profiles > Operational analysis results ­ Compressor-storage relationships and On-Board Storage Analysis Workshop DOE Headquarters 25 January 2006 Mark E. Richards Gas Technology

378

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage and Recovery in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Storage III: Materials, Systems and Applications Symposium ... storage (LHTES) devices, particularly for solar energy storage applications.

379

U.S. Weekly Natural Gas Storage Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Production and Net Imports Natural Gas Storage Storage Reservoirs by Type Underground Natural Gas Storage Facilities in the ... (written copies ...

380

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrides for Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage George Thomas, Consultant Sandia National Laboratories G. J. Thomas Efficient onboard hydrogen storage is a critical enabling technology for the use of hydrogen in vehicles * The low volumetric density of gaseous fuels requires a storage method which densifies the fuel. - This is particularly true for hydrogen because of its lower energy density relative to hydrocarbon fuels. * Storage methods result in additional weight and volume above that of the fuel. How do we achieve adequate stored energy in an efficient, safe and cost-effective system? G. J. Thomas However, the storage media must meet certain requirements: - reversible hydrogen uptake/release - lightweight - low cost - cyclic stability - rapid kinetic properties - equilibrium properties (P,T) consistent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NETL: Carbon Storage - Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Overview Program Overview Carbon Storage Program Overview The Carbon Storage Program involves three key elements for technology development: Core Research and Development (Core R&D), Infrastructure, and Global Collaborations. The image below displays the relationship among the three elements and provides a means for navigation throughout NETL's Storage Program Website. Click on Image to Navigate Storage Website Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player NETL's Carbon Storage Program Structure CORE R&D Core R&D is driven by industry's technology needs and segregates those needs into focus areas to more efficiently obtain solutions that can then be tested and deployed in the field. The Core R&D Element contains four

382

Transphase cool storage test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial cool storage systems. Transphase, Inc. provided a prototype of a new storage tank design equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system and filled with a eutectic designed to freeze at 41{degree}F. The Transphase cool storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank with relatively constant brine temperatures over most of the charging cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was governed mainly by the brine flow rate and the tank`s remaining charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. This prototype unit experienced several operational problems, not unexpected for the first full-size execution of a new design. Such prototype testing was one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

Stovall, T.K.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Overview of Carbon Storage Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Overview of Carbon Storage Research Overview of Carbon Storage Research The Carbon Storage Program is focused on ensuring the safe and permanent storage andor utilization of CO2...

384

Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid Electrochemical Energy Storage for the Grid More...

385

Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers DOE: Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research Centers Grid Storage...

386

Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Energy Storage Program Presentations Energy Storage Systems 2007 Peer Review - International Energy Storage Program Presentations The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems...

387

Carbon Capture and Storage Research | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Capture and Storage Research Carbon Capture and Storage Research Clean Coal Carbon Capture and Storage Capture Storage Utilization MVA Regional Partnerships Oil & Gas Atlas...

388

INCREASING OIL RECOVERY THROUGH ADVANCED REPROCESSING OF 3D SEISMIC, GRANT CANYON AND BACON FLAT FIELDS, NYE COUNTY, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Makoil, Inc., of Orange, California, with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy has reprocessed and reinterpreted the 3D seismic survey of the Grant Canyon area, Railroad Valley, Nye County, Nevada. The project was supported by Dept. of Energy Grant DE-FG26-00BC15257. The Grant Canyon survey covers an area of 11 square miles, and includes Grant Canyon and Bacon Flat oil fields. These fields have produced over 20 million barrels of oil since 1981, from debris slides of Devonian rocks that are beneath 3,500 to 5,000 ft of Tertiary syntectonic deposits that fill the basin of Railroad Valley. High-angle and low-angle normal faults complicate the trap geometry of the fields, and there is great variability in the acoustic characteristics of the overlying valley fill. These factors combine to create an area that is challenging to interpret from seismic reflection data. A 3D seismic survey acquired in 1992-93 by the operator of the fields has been used to identify development and wildcat locations with mixed success. Makoil believed that improved techniques of processing seismic data and additional well control could enhance the interpretation enough to improve the chances of success in the survey area. The project involved the acquisition of hardware and software for survey interpretation, survey reprocessing, and reinterpretation of the survey. SeisX, published by Paradigm Geophysical Ltd., was chosen as the interpretation software, and it was installed on a Dell Precision 610 computer work station with the Windows NT operating system. The hardware and software were selected based on cost, possible addition of compatible modeling software in the future, and the experience of consulting geophysicists in the Billings area. Installation of the software and integration of the hardware into the local office network was difficult at times but was accomplished with some technical support from Paradigm and Hewlett Packard, manufacturer of some of the network equipment. A number of improvements in the processing of the survey were made compared to the original work. Pre-stack migration was employed, and some errors in muting in the original processing were found and corrected. In addition, improvements in computer hardware allowed interactive monitoring of the processing steps, so that parameters could be adjusted before completion of each step. The reprocessed survey was then loaded into SeisX, v. 3.5, for interpretation work. Interpretation was done on 2, 21-inch monitors connected to the work station. SeisX was prone to crashing, but little work was lost because of this. The program was developed for use under the Unix operating system, and some aspects of the design of the user interface betray that heritage. For example, printing is a 2-stage operation that involves creation of a graphic file using SeisX and printing the file with printer utility software. Because of problems inherent in using graphics files with different software, a significant amount of trial and error is introduced in getting printed output. Most of the interpretation work was done using vertical profiles. The interpretation tools used with time slices are limited and hard to use, but a number to tools and techniques are available to use with vertical profiles. Although this project encountered a number of delays and difficulties, some unavoidable and some self-inflicted, the result is an improved 3D survey and greater confidence in the interpretation. The experiences described in this report will be useful to those that are embarking on a 3D seismic interpretation project.

Eric H. Johnson; Don E. French

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between heat storage costs and capacity can be determineda given kWh of heat storage capacity is worth to a typicalequation (22) sets the heat storage capacity to the maximum

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon Capture and Storage | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Capture and Storage Carbon Capture and Storage Through Office of Fossil Energy R&D the United States has become a world leader in carbon capture and storage science and...

391

The Solar Storage Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Company Place Palo Alto, California Zip 1704 Product US-based start-up developing energy production and storage systems. References The Solar Storage Company1 LinkedIn...

392

Conventional Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heaters Conventional Storage Water Heaters July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the...

393

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground water was pumped into the storage tank from the well,be withdrawn from storage, HTW is pumped from the hot well,storage well. However, both wells are capable of being pumped and

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electricity and natural gas DER No Heat Storage: thefired natural gas AC (a) Capacity of heat storage unit (but no heat storage, a 200 kW natural gas reciprocating

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Late Pleistocene to Recent sediment transport pathways of the Green Canyon OCS area, northern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study addresses some of the complexities of sediment transport systems on the continental slope of the Green Canyon OCS area south of the Louisiana coast. Five Late Pleistocene to Recent sedimentary sequences are identified using a combination of seismic and well data. Sediments are transported through pathways characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous channels which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. Pathway margins are constricted by physiographic highs. Several processes are identified as means of carrying fine-grained sediments to and across the continental slope. The most important of these are mass movements (slumps and slides), debris flows, and turbidity currents. Faulting and/or slumping at the shelf edge remobilizes sediments which are then carried further downslope. These remobilized sediments may be transported as debris flows or other undifferentiated high-density flows, or may develop into turbidity currents which deposit graded sediments in response to decreases in slope gradient. Slumps and slides off salt uplifts also deposit large volumes of sediments into adjacent intraslope basins and sediment transport pathways, where they may contribute significant amounts of material to the downslope transport of sediments. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways due to multiple episodes of channel formation and erosion which occurred during a single sea level lowstand. These multiple episodes tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features. Sedimentation is cyclic. During one sea level lowstand a sequence is deposited in and along narrow pathways which successively fill intraslope basins from the shelf edge downslope. As each basin is filled, sediments spill over and continue downslope to a lower basin. Sedimentation during the next sea level lowstand occurs in broader pathways. Less sediments are deposited in the intraslope basin areas because they remain filled from the previous sequence. By the time of deposition of the next sequence, movement of underlying salt sheets has changed the shape of the pathway. The sedimentation pattern repeats as lower depressions fill and sediments spill over. Pathways transport slope sediments in the Green canyon area. Discrete channels are not often observed in the pathways. This is a result of two mechanisms: 1) multiple episodes of erosion during a sea level lowstand tend to remove or obscure prominent channel features, and 2) most sediments deposited within the pathways are mass transport deposits which do not often become channelized. The pathways are characterized by erosional surfaces and numerous conduits which form as sediments remobilize and become transported downslope. They are laterally relatively persistent, being constricted by structural highs,

Swanson, John Patrick

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Analyzing the connectivity potential of landscape geomorphic systems: a radar remote sensing and GIS approach, Estufa Canyon, Texas, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connectivity is considered one of the fundamental aspects that influences the rate of mass movement in the landscape. The connectivity aspect has been acknowledged from various conceptual geomorphic frameworks. None of these provided a developmental methodology for studying the connectivity of geomorphic systems, especially at the scale of the fluvial system. The emphasis in this research is placed on defining variables of the geomorphic systems that influence the connectivity potential of these systems. The landscape gradient, which is extracted from the Digital Elevation Model (DEM), and the surface roughness, which is extracted from radar images, are used to analyze the connectivity potential of geomorphic systems in the landscape. Integration of these variables produces a connectivity potential index of the various geomorphic systems that compose the fluvial system. High values of the connectivity potential index indicate high potential of the geomorphic system to transport mass whereas the low values indicate low potential of the geomorphic system to transport mass in the landscape. Using the mean values of the connectivity potential index, the geomorphic systems in the landscape can be classified into geomorphic systems of low connectivity potential, geomorphic systems of intermediate connectivity potential and geomorphic systems of high connectivity potential. In addition to the determination of the relative connectivity potential of various geomorphic systems, the connectivity potential index is used to analyze the system-wide connectivity. The ratios between the connectivity potential index of the upstream geomorphic systems and the connectivity potential index of the downstream geomorphic systems define system-wide connectivity in the landscape. High ratios reflect the high potential of the upstream geomorphic systems to transport mass in the downstream direction. Low ratios indicate the influence of the downstream geomorphic systems in maximizing mass movement in the upstream geomorphic systems. The presence of high and low ratios suggests the presence of a high system-wide connectivity. As the ratio approaches unity, mass movement is minimized in the landscape indicating low system-wide connectivity. Applying the above approach to Estufa Canyon, Texas, illustrated that Estufa Canyon is a dynamic fluvial system with high system-wide connectivity.

Ibrahim, ElSayed Ali Hermas

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

398

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facilty Location Evaluation for Franklin-Badger Canyon 230-kV Line and Badger Canyon Substation Study Area 74-6B.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is the construction of a 15-mile, 230-kV double-circuit transmission line from Franklin Substation near Pasco, Washington, to a proposed new Badger Canyon Substation to be constructed 5 miles west of Kennewick, Washington. Depending on the final route location chosen, approximately 15 miles of 230-kV double circuit transmission line requiring 5.6 miles of new and 9.4 miles of existing right-of-way would be needed as well as approximately 2500 feet of new access road. Land use affected includes crossing Sacajawea State Park and passig through irrigated cropland and grassland on existing right-of-way, and depending on the alternative route chosen, could cross land proposed for residential development and a proposed interstate highway. An additional 10 to 11 acres of potential cropland would be required for the proposed substation. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur and habitat associated with the above land uses would be eliminated. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would affect Sacajawea State Park, a proposed highway, and potential residential development land. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Energy Storage Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. At NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), research focuses on the integration of energy storage systems (both stationary and vehicle-mounted) and interconnection with the utility grid. Focusing on battery technologies, but also hosting ultra-capacitors and other electrical energy storage technologies, the laboratory will provide all resources necessary to develop, test, and prove energy storage system performance and compatibility with distributed energy systems. The laboratory will also provide robust vehicle testing capability, including a drive-in environmental chamber, which can accommodate commercial-sized hybrid, electric, biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fueled vehicles. The Energy Storage Laboratory is designed to ensure personnel and equipment safety when testing hazardous battery systems or other energy storage technologies. Closely coupled with the research electrical distribution bus at ESIF, the Energy Storage Laboratory will offer megawatt-scale power testing capability as well as advanced hardware-in-the-loop and model-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. Some application scenarios are: The following types of tests - Performance, Efficiency, Safety, Model validation, and Long duration reliability. (2) Performed on the following equipment types - (a) Vehicle batteries (both charging and discharging V2G); (b) Stationary batteries; (c) power conversion equipment for energy storage; (d) ultra- and super-capacitor systems; and (e) DC systems, such as commercial microgrids.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Energy Storage Computational Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Storage Computational Tool Energy Storage Computational Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Storage Computational Tool Agency/Company /Organization: Navigant Consulting Sector: Energy Focus Area: Grid Assessment and Integration Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.smartgrid.gov/recovery_act/program_impacts/energy_storage_computat Country: United States Web Application Link: www.smartgrid.gov/recovery_act/program_impacts/energy_storage_computat Cost: Free Northern America Language: English Energy Storage Computational Tool Screenshot References: Energy Storage Computational Tool[1] SmartGrid.gov[2] Logo: Energy Storage Computational Tool This tool is used for identifying, quantifying, and monetizing the benefits

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Policy Questions on Energy Storage Technologies | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy Questions on Energy Storage Technologies Policy Questions on Energy Storage Technologies Memorandum from the Electricity Advisory Committee to Secretary Chu and Assistant...

402

Underground Natural Gas Working Storage Capacity - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... (see Table 1), and why any given week's storage ... Demonstrated maximum working gas volume is the sum of the highest storage inventory levels of ...

403

NETL: Carbon Storage - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MVA Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Focus Area An MVA program is designed to confirm permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations...

404

Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage -A Technology Assessment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A novel technology for energy storage called Subsea Pumped Hydro Storage (SPHS) has been evaluated from a techno-economical point of view. Intermittent renewable energy sources (more)

Falk, Johan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demonstration Project Locations Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations Map of the United States showing the location of Energy Storage Demonstration projects created with...

406

DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report: Revision 2 DRAFT "Energy Advisory Committee" - Energy Storage Subcommittee Report: Revision 2 Energy storage plays a vital role in all forms of business and affects the...

407

Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 Energy Storage Systems 2010 Update Conference Presentations - Day 1, Session 2 The U.S. DOE Energy Storage Systems Program...

408

Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders - Energy Innovation Portal  

A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage ...

409

Smart Storage Pty Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

"Smart Storage Pty Ltd" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSmartStoragePtyLtd&oldid351195" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies...

410

High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite - Energy ...  

Energy Storage Advanced Materials High Capacity Hydrogen Storage Nanocomposite Processes to add metal hydrideds to nanocarbon structures to yield high capacity ...

411

Ultrafine Hydrogen Storage Powders - Energy Innovation Portal  

Patent 6,074,453: Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the ...

412

NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archival Storage at NERSC Nick Balthaser NERSC Storage Systems Group nabalthaser@lbl.gov NERSC User Training March 8, 2011 * NERSC Archive Technologies Overview * Use Cases for the...

413

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy...

414

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Energy Storage Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Testing The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is tasked by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office to conduct various types of energy storage...

415

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) Webinar Presentation: Energy Storage Solutions for Microgrids (November 2012) On November 7, 2012,...

416

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Materials. Storage Respondents submitted additional needs for R&D in the area of hydrogen storage: Advanced metal alloys in order to lower the cost of hydrogen...

417

Hydrogen Storage II - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 3, 2010 ... Symposium L: Energy Generation, Harvesting and Storage Materials: Hydrogen Storage II Program Organizers: Jian-Feng Nie, Monash...

418

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Compression, Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost...

419

Energy Storage Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Storage Technology Marketing Summaries Here youll find marketing summaries of energy storage technologies available for licensing from U.S. Department of ...

420

Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy ...  

Energy Storage Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research institutions have energy storage technologies ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Storage Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Storage Technology Marketing Summaries Here youll find marketing summaries of energy storage technologies available for licensing from U.S. ...

422

Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Massachusetts Natural Gas Underground Storage Injections All Operators (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

423

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.R. Tek. 1970. Storage of Natural Gas in Saline Aquifers.petroleum, underground storage of natural gas, large scale

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) California Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

425

Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

426

Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

427

Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

428

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

429

Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

430

Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

431

Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Washington Working Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

432

Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov...

433

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. electric utility industry transmits power to customers at a rate equivalent to only 60% of generating capacity because, on an annual basis, the demand for power is not constant. Load leveling and peak shaving units of various types are being used to increase the utilization of the base load nuclear and fossil power plants. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems which will store and deliver electrical energy for the purpose of load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. This technology may prove to be an effective means of storing energy for the electric utilities because (1) it has a high efficiency (approximately 90%), (2) it may improve system stability through the fast response of the converter, and (3) there should be fewer siting restrictions than for other load leveling systems. A general SMES system and a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling are described; and the results of some recent converter tests are presented.

Hassenzahl, W.V.; Boenig, H.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Recombinant electric storage battery  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a recombinant storage battery. It comprises: a plurality of positive plates containing about 2 to 4 percent of antimony based upon the total weight of the alloy and positive active material, and essentially antimony free negative plates in a closed case; a fibrous sheet plate separator between adjacent ones of the plates, and a body of an electrolyte to which the sheet separators are inert absorbed by each of the separators and maintained in contact with each of the adjacent ones of the plates. Each of the separator sheets comprising first fibers which impart to the sheet a given absorbency greater than 90 percent relative to the electrolyte and second fibers which impart to the sheet a different absorbency less than 80 percent relative to the electrolyte. The first and second fibers being present in such proportions that each of the sheet separators has an absorbency with respect to the electrolyte of from 75 to 95 percent and the second fibers being present in such proportions that the battery has a recombination rate adequate to compensate for gassing.

Flicker, R.P.; Fenstermacher, S.

1989-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

435

ADVANCED UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Limited demand and high cost has prevented the construction of hard rock caverns in this country for a number of years. The storage of natural gas in mined caverns may prove technically feasible if the geology of the targeted market area is suitable; and economically feasible if the cost and convenience of service is competitive with alternative available storage methods for peak supply requirements. It is believed that mined cavern storage can provide the advantages of high delivery rates and multiple fill-withdrawal cycles in areas where salt cavern storage is not possible. In this research project, PB-KBB merged advanced mining technologies and gas refrigeration techniques to develop conceptual designs and cost estimates to demonstrate the commercialization potential of the storage of refrigerated natural gas in hard rock caverns. Five regions of the U.S.A. were studied for underground storage development and PB-KBB reviewed the literature to determine if the geology of these regions was suitable for siting hard rock storage caverns. Area gas market conditions in these regions were also studied to determine the need for such storage. Based on an analysis of many factors, a possible site was determined to be in Howard and Montgomery Counties, Maryland. The area has compatible geology and a gas industry infrastructure for the nearby market populous of Baltimore and Washington D.C.. As Gas temperature is lowered, the compressibility of the gas reaches an optimum value. The compressibility of the gas, and the resultant gas density, is a function of temperature and pressure. This relationship can be used to commercial advantage by reducing the size of a storage cavern for a given working volume of natural gas. This study looks at this relationship and and the potential for commercialization of the process in a storage application. A conceptual process design, and cavern design were developed for various operating conditions. Potential site locations were considered and a typical plant layout was developed. In addition a geomechanical review of the proposed cavern design was performed, evaluating the stability of the mine rooms and shafts, and the effects of the refrigerated gas temperatures on the stability of the cavern. Capital and operating cost estimates were also developed for the various temperature cases considered. The cost estimates developed were used to perform a comparative market analysis of this type of gas storage system to other systems that are commercially used in the region of the study.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

437

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (8220the Handbook8221) addresses the relevant aspects of at-reactor spent (or used) nuclear fuel (SNF) storage in the United States. With the prospect of SNF being stored at reactor sites for the foreseeable future, it is expected that all U.S. nuclear power plants will have to implement at-reactor dry storage by 2025 or shortly thereafter. The Handbook provides a broad overview of recent developments for storing SNF at U.S. reactor sites, focusing primarily on at...

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

439

Use of Modeling for Prevention of Solids Formation During Canyon Processing of Legacy Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) Environmental Management (EM) nuclear material stabilization program includes the dissolution and processing of legacy materials from various DOE sites. The SRS canyon facilities were designed to dissolve and process spent nuclear fuel and targets. As the processing of typical materials is completed, unusual and exotic nuclear materials are being targeted for stabilization. These unusual materials are often difficult to dissolve using historical flowsheet conditions and require more aggressive dissolver solutions. Solids must be prevented in the dissolver to avoid expensive delays associated with the build-up of insoluble material in downstream process equipment. Moreover, it is vital to prevent precipitation of all solids, especially plutonium-bearing solids, since their presence in dissolver solutions raises criticality safety issues. To prevent precipitation of undesirable solids in aqueous process solutions, the accuracy of computer models to predict precipitate formation requires incorporation of plant specific fundamental data. These data are incorporated into a previously developed thermodynamic computer program that applies the Pitzer correlation to derive activity coefficient parameters. This improved predictive model will reduce unwanted precipitation in process solutions at DOE sites working with EM nuclear materials in aqueous solutions.

Rhodes, W. D.; Crooks III, W. J.; Christian, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Floodplain Assessment for the Proposed Outdoor Fire Range Upgrades at TA-72 in Lower Sandia Canyon, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is preparing to implement actions in Sandia Canyon at Technical Area (TA) 72. Los Alamos National Security (LANS) biologists conducted a floodplain determination and this project is partially located within a 100-year floodplain. The proposed project is to upgrade the existing outdoor shooting range facilities at TA-72. These upgrades will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel. In order to remain current on training requirements, the firing ranges at TA-72 will be upgraded which will result in increased safety and efficiencies in the training for Protective Force personnel (Figure 1). These upgrades will allow for an increase in class size and more people to be qualified at the ranges. Some of these upgrades will be built within the 100-year floodplain. The upgrades include: concrete pads for turning target systems and shooting positions, new lighting to illuminate the firing range for night fire, a new speaker system for range operations, canopies at two locations, an impact berm at the far end of the 300-yard mark, and a block wall for road protection.

Hathcock, Charles D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Structural restoration of Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continental margin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico is suited for seismic stratigraphic analysis and salt tectonism analysis. Jurassic strata include the Louann Salt on the continental shelf and upper slope of the Destin Dome OCS area, northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sediments were deposited in a slowly subsiding, stable tectonic environment. Two-dimensional (2-D) seismic data, supplemented with well log, paleontologic and velocity information were used to infer structural and stratigraphic features, especially small faults in the deep part of the De Soto Canyon Salt Basin area. Six sequence boundaries or correlative paleohorizons were interpreted on Landmark seismic interpretation workstation. They are Base of Salt or Equivalent, Top of Salt, Top of Smackover Formation, Top of Cotton Valley Group, Middle Cretaceous sequence boundary, and Top of Upper Cretaceous. Information generated from structural and stratigraphic analysis are used to analyze the evolution of salt movement and salt mechanism in this area. I used a software package Restore (Dan Schultz-Ela and Ken Duncan, 1991) for structural restoration. This program is suitable for extensional terrane. The restoration of one depth section was achieved through steps introduced by Restore. Regional extension, gravity spreading, and gliding are the most important mechanism of salt flow, buoyancy and differential loading mainly contribute to the vertical development of salt structure in this area.

Guo, Mengdong

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

443

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

444

NREL: Learning - Energy Storage Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Basics Energy Storage Basics The demand for electricity is seldom constant over time. Excess generating capacity available during periods of low demand can be used to energize an energy storage device. The stored energy can then be used to provide electricity during periods of high demand, helping to reduce power system loads during these times. Energy storage can improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric utility system by reducing the requirements for spinning reserves to meet peak power demands, making better use of efficient baseload generation, and allowing greater use of renewable energy technologies. A "spinning reserve" is a generator that is spinning and synchronized with the grid, ready for immediate power generation - like a car engine running with the gearbox

445

Energy Storage | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Energy Storage Energy Storage One of the distinctive characteristics of the electric power sector is that the amount of electricity that can be generated is relatively fixed over short periods of time, although demand for electricity fluctuates throughout the day. Developing technology to store electrical energy so it can be available to meet demand whenever needed would represent a major breakthrough in electricity distribution. Helping to try and meet this goal, electricity storage devices can manage the amount of power required to supply customers at times when need is greatest, which is during peak load. These devices can also help make renewable energy, whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators, smooth and dispatchable. They can also balance microgrids to achieve a good match between generation

446

Energy Storage and Distributed Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagram of molecular structure, spectrocscopic data, low-swirl flame diagram of molecular structure, spectrocscopic data, low-swirl flame Energy Storage and Distributed Resources Energy Storage and Distributed Resources application/pdf icon esdr-org-chart-03-2013.pdf EETD researchers in the energy storage and distributed resources area conduct R&D and develops technologies that provide the electricity grid with significant storage capability for energy generated from renewable sources; real-time monitoring and response technologies for the "smart grid" to optimize energy use and communication between electricity providers and consumers; and technologies for improved electricity distribution reliability. Their goal is to identify and develop technologies, policies and strategies to enable a shift to renewable energy sources at $1 per watt for a

447

Device-transparent personal storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users increasingly store data collections such as digital photographs on multiple personal devices, each of which typically presents the user with a storage management interface isolated from the contents of all other ...

Strauss, Jacob A. (Jacob Alo), 1979-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Power of Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

including composite materials, mechanical energy storage, nondestructive evaluation, and synchrotronNSEL NuclearScienceandEngineeringLaboratory Nanoscale Science Nano-Bio Interface Sustainable Energy. It draws the expertise of faculty members from different disciplines and promotes nuclear education

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

449

Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

450

Integrating portable and distributed storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a technique called lookaside caching that combines the strengths of distributed file systems and portable storage devices, while negating their weaknesses. In spite of its simplicity, this technique proves to be powerful and versatile. By ...

Niraj Tolia; Jan Harkes; Michael Kozuch; M. Satyanarayanan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Integrating Portable and Distributed Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a technique called lookaside caching that combines the strengths of distributed file systems and portable storage devices, while negating their weaknesses. In spite of its simplicity, this technique proves to be powerful and versatile. By ...

Niraj Tolia; Jan Harkes; Michael Kozuch; M. Satyanarayanan

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Underground Storage Technology Consortium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U U U N N D D E E R R G G R R O O U U N N D D G G A A S S S S T T O O R R A A G G E E T T E E C C H H N N O O L L O O G G Y Y C C O O N N S S O O R R T T I I U U M M R R & & D D P P R R I I O O R R I I T T Y Y R R E E S S E E A A R R C C H H N N E E E E D D S S WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS February 3, 2004 Atlanta, Georgia U U n n d d e e r r g g r r o o u u n n d d G G a a s s S S t t o o r r a a g g e e T T e e c c h h n n o o l l o o g g y y C C o o n n s s o o r r t t i i u u m m R R & & D D P P r r i i o o r r i i t t y y R R e e s s e e a a r r c c h h N N e e e e d d s s OVERVIEW As a follow up to the development of the new U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Underground Gas Storage Technology Consortium through Penn State University (PSU), DOE's National Energy Technology Center (NETL) and PSU held a workshop on February 3, 2004 in Atlanta, GA to identify priority research needs to assist the consortium in developing Requests for Proposal (RFPs). Thirty-seven

453

Substation Energy Storage Product Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This substation energy storage specification is intended to facilitate utility procurement of large grid-connected electrical energy storage systems that would typically be connected at medium voltage at distribution substations. Few utilities have experience with devices of this type, and industry practices are not extensively developed. Therefore, this update report may be used as a guide to suppliers of these devices (who may be unfamiliar with utility practices) as well as distribution utilities ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

454

Compressed air energy storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An internal combustion reciprocating engine is operable as a compressor during slack demand periods utilizing excess power from a power grid to charge air into an air storage reservoir and as an expander during peak demand periods to feed power into the power grid utilizing air obtained from the air storage reservoir together with combustible fuel. Preferably the internal combustion reciprocating engine is operated at high pressure and a low pressure turbine and compressor are also employed for air compression and power generation.

Ahrens, Frederick W. (Naperville, IL); Kartsounes, George T. (Naperville, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

COLD STORAGE DESIGN REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLD STORAGE DESIGN AND REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART 1 \\ "..\\- ,,, T I Fishery Leaflet 427 Washington 25, D. C. June 1956 REFRIGERATION OF FISH - PART em; COlD STORAGE DESIGN · · · · · 18 Specific design features 0 0 · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 19 Refrigerated surfaces 0 · · 0 0 0 · 0

457

Calmac Ice Storage Test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. Calmac provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The Calmac ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging was similar to that reported by the manufacturer. Both the measured average and minimum brine temperatures were in close agreement with Calmac's literature values, and the ability to fully charge the tank was relatively unaffected by charging rate and brine flow rate. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend most strongly on the discharge conditions required to serve the load. This report describes Calmac system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. Companion reports describe ISTF test procedures and ice-making efficiency test results that are common to many of the units tested. 11 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

Stovall, T.K.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Gossiping over storage systems is practical  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gossip-based mechanisms are touted for their simplicity, limited resource usage, robustness to failures, and tunable system behavior. These qualities make gossiping an ideal mechanism for storage systems that are responsible for maintaining and updating ... Keywords: distributed storage, durability, gossip-based storage, gossiping, mobile ad hoc networks, persistent storage, update propagation, wide-area networks, wireless sensor networks

Hakim Weatherspoon; Hugo Miranda; Konrad Iwanicki; Ali Ghodsi; Yann Busnel

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Addressing the Grand Challenges in Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

The editorial summarizes the contents of the special issue for energy storage in Advanced Functional Materials.

Liu, Jun

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "aliso canyon storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Hydrogen Storage Technologies Roadmap, November 2005  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen storage technology for transportation applications.

462

Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Storage: Current landscape for alternative energy storage technologies and what the future may hold for multi-scale storage applications Presented by: Dave Lucero, Director Alternative Energy · Industry initiatives · Technology · Energy Storage Market · EaglePicher initiatives · Summary #12

463

Layered Graphene Sheets Could Solve Hydrogen Storage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Layered Graphene Sheets Could Solve Hydrogen Storage Issues. For Immediate Release: March 16, 2010. ...

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Storage Management for VG Integration (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes how you economically manage integration costs of storage and variable generation.

Kirby, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

466

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Incheon, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Mountain View, CA); Andersson, Anna M. (Vasteras, SE)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Conductive lithium storage electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound comprising a composition A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z, or A.sub.x(M'.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z, and have values such that x, plus y(1-a) times a formal valence or valences of M', plus ya times a formal valence or valence of M'', is equal to z times a formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7, or DXD.sub.4 group; or a compound comprising a composition (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(XD.sub.4).sub.z, (A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).sub.xM'.sub.y(DXD.sub.4).sub.z(A.sub.1-aM''.sub.a).s- ub.xM'.sub.y(X.sub.2D.sub.7).sub.z and have values such that (1-a).sub.x plus the quantity ax times the formal valence or valences of M'' plus y times the formal valence or valences of M' is equal to z times the formal valence of the XD.sub.4, X.sub.2D.sub.7 or DXD.sub.4 group. In the compound, A is at least one of an alkali metal and hydrogen, M' is a first-row transition metal, X is at least one of phosphorus, sulfur, arsenic, molybdenum, and tungsten, M'' any of a Group IIA, IIIA, IVA, VA, VIA, VIIA, VIIIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, IVB, VB, and VIB metal, D is at least one of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, or a halogen, 0.0001storage batteries and can have a gravimetric capacity of at least about 80 mAh/g while being charged/discharged at greater than about C rate of the compound.

Chiang, Yet-Ming (Framingham, MA); Chung, Sung-Yoon (Seoul, KR); Bloking, Jason T. (Cambridge, MA); Andersson, Anna M. (Uppsala, SE)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

Base Natural Gas in Underground Storage (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Electric Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Gas in Underground Storage Base Gas in Underground Storage Working Gas in Underground Storage Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

469

SERI Solar-Energy-Storage Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SERI Solar Energy Storage Program is summarized. The program provides research, systems analysis, and assessments of thermal energy storage and transport in support of the Thermal Energy Storage Program of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Technology; emphasis is on thermal energy storage for solar thermal power and process heat applications and on thermal energy transport. Currently, research is in progress on direct-contact thermal energy storage and thermochemical energy storage and transport. In addition, SERI is directing the definition of new concepts for thermal energy storage and supporting research on thermal energy transport by sensible and latent heat media. SERI is performing systems analyses of thermal energy storage for solar thermal application and coordinating thermal energy storage activities for solar applications.

Wyman, C.E.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Storage Biodiesel Storage Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Storage Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Storage Regulations Underground storage tank regulations apply to all biodiesel blends with the exception of 100% biodiesel (B100). An owner changing the use of an

471

Hydrogen Storage atHydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen Storage atHydrogen Storage at Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Presentation at thePresentation at the Hydrogen Storage Grand ChallengeHydrogen Storage expertise to hydrogen storage, fuel cells, and system integration issues ­Novel membranes and other

472

Advanced Underground Gas Storage Concepts Refrigerated-Mined Cavern Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS UNDERGROUND GAS STORAGE CONCEPTS REFRIGERATED-MINED CAVERN STORAGE FINAL REPORT DOE CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC26-97FT34349 SUBMITTED BY: PB-KBB INC. 11757 KATY FREEWAY, SUITE 600 HOUSTON, TX 77079 SEPTEMBER 1998 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

473

Improved accountability method for measuring enriched uranium in H-Canyon dissolver solution at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), accountability measurement of enriched uranium dissolved in H-Canyon is performed using isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS). In the IDMS analytical method, a known quantity of uranium{sup 233} is added to the sample solution containing enriched uranium and fission products. The resulting uranium mixture must first be purified using a separation technique in the shielded analytical(``hot``) cells to lower radioactivity levels by removing fission products. Following this purification, the sample is analyzed by mass spectrometry to determine the total uranium content and isotopic abundance. The magnitud