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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa medicago sativa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

medicago sativa Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alfalfa medicago sativa Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Persistence and Yield Stability...

2

A rapid analytical pyrolysis method - Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increase in 4-coumaryl alcohol (H) units during lignification in Increase in 4-coumaryl alcohol (H) units during lignification in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) alters extractability and molecular weight of lignin Angela Ziebell 1,2 , Kristen Gracom ,1,2 , Rui Katahira 1 , Fang Chen 3,4 , Yunqiao Pu 5,6 , Art Ragauskas 5,6 , Richard A. Dixon 3,4 and Mark Davis 1,2 1-National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401-3393; 2-Bioenergy Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Golden, CO 80401-3393; 3-Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK 73401; 4-Bioenergy Science Center, Ardmore, OK 73401; 5-Institute of Paper Science and Technology at Georgia Tech., Atlanta, GA 30318; 6-Bioenergy Science Center, Georgia Tech., Atlanta, GA 30318 Running head: Increase in coumaryl alcohol units alters lignin molecular weight

3

Detection of QTL for forage yield, lodging resistance and spring vigor traits in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is an internationally significant forage crop. Forage yield, lodging resistance and spring vigor are important agronomic traits conditioned by quantitative genetic and environmental e...

Per McCord; Vanessa Gordon; Gopesh Saha; Jacqueline Hellinga; George Vandemark…

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tolerance to manganese toxicity among cultivars of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two sand culture experiments were carried out to identify commercial cultivars of lucerne or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) which contain elite, Mn-tolerant plants for use in a selection programme to increase the a...

P. W. G. Sale; D. I. Couper; P. L. Cachia…

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Tolerance to manganese toxicity among cultivars of lucerne (Medicago sativa L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two sand culture experiments were carried out to identify commercial cultivars of lucerne or alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) which contain elite, Mn-tolerant plants for use in a selection programme to increase the a...

P. W. G. Sale; D. I. Couper; P. L. Cachia; P. J. Larkin

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Production and field performance of transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) expressing alpha-amylase and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transgenic alfalfa plants expressing Bacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (Mn-P...Phanerochaete chrysosporium were produced using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens...transfor...

S. Austin; E. T. Bingham; D. E. Mathews…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Production and field performance of transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) expressing alpha-amylase and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transgenic alfalfa plants expressinBacillus licheniformis alpha-amylase and mangaese-dependent lignin peroxidase (Mn-P...Phanerochaete chrysosporium were produced using the Agrobacterium tumefaciens...transformat...

S. Austin; E. T. Bingham; D. E. Mathews; M. N. Shahan; J. Will; R. R. Burgess

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa cultivars medicago Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cultivars medicago Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alfalfa cultivars medicago Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 REACTION OF MEDICAGO...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfafa medicago sativa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

alfafa medicago sativa Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alfafa medicago sativa Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Electronic Appendix A....

10

Phosphorus fertilization of alfalfa on Coastal Plain soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Grazing tolerant varieties of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) are being introduced to improve the quality of pastures in the southern Coastal Plain. 'Alfagraze' alfalfa was planted on eight soils near Overton, Texas to determine the P requirement...

Beedy, Tracy Lyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

The role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in alleviating salt stress in Medicago sativa L. var. icon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Medicago sativa L. is the most important forage crop in arid and semi-arid areas, where increased salinity is a major factor limiting plant growth and crop productivity. The role of arbuscular my...

Angela Campanelli; Claudia Ruta; Giuseppe De Mastro; Irene Morone-Fortunato

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Alfalfa Seed Testing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................... 4 Goocl Alfalfa Seed ...................................... 4 Method of Examining for Purity ........................ 6 Weed Seeds Often Found in Alfalfa ...................... 6 Russian Thistles .................................. 7 Ribdrass.... - MELILOTUS ALBA. MELILOTUS INDICA MEDICAGO DENTICULATA. S. PLANTAIN. TUMBLE WEED. LANCEOLATA. AMARANTHUS GRACILARIS. CARELESS WEED. AMARANTHUS HYBRIDUS. SPECIALLY NOXIOUS WEED SEEDS FREQUENTLY FOUND IN k ,' ALFALFA SEED. RUSSIAN THISTLE. , :? I...

Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

1905-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Frequency distribution of mineral elements in samples of alfalfa and sugar beet leaves obtained from a common field in Imperial Valley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Baseline measurements were made of mineral composition of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and sugar beets (Beta vulgaris L.) from one field each in the Imperial Valley of California. The fields are in a geothermal area being developed for energy production, and the purpose of the investigation was to ascertain variablility within a relatively large number of samples from a common area, so that subsequent samplings could be made to satisfactorily detect whether there were changes resulting from the geothermal activity. Means, standard deviations, frequency distribution, correlations, cluster trees, and other statistics were examined for over 20 elements at each site.Most elements were normally distributed, but there was three- to fourfold range in the concentration for each.

Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Kinnear, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Alfalfa for Forage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. :lvoid soils inrestet1 with cotton root rot and those with a high population of root knot nematodes. Highly saline soils (those with excessive soluble salts) pre~ent satisfactory alfalfa protluction unless proper internal soil drainage is maintained.... Estab- lished alfalfa plants are moderately salt tolerant, but seedlings often are killed by medium-to-high salt concentrations in the soil. Some stantls are obtained on saline soils by frequent irrigation un- til the plants are well established...

Metzer, Robert B.; Lindsay, Kenneth E.; Pratt, J. Neal; Novosad, Albert C.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa root nodules1 Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 2 Spring Fever Alfalfa The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West Texas Summary: Spring Fever Alfalfa- The Pitfalls of Spring Seeding Alfalfa in West...

16

Medicago truncatula EST-SSRs reveal cross-species genetic markers for Medicago spp.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are important resources for gene discovery and molecular marker development. From over 147,000 ESTs of Medicago truncatula, we have identified 4,384 ESTs containing perfect simple s...

I. Eujayl; M. K. Sledge; L. Wang; G. D. May…

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alfalfa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. -/' (Board of Directors A. & M. College.) K. K. LEGETT, President. ..................................... Abilene .............................. T. D. ROWELL, Vice President.. Jefferson A. HAIDUSEK ............................................... La...Grange ................................................... J. M. GREEN Yoakum .............................................. WALTON PETEET Dallas .................................................... R. T. MILNER. Austin L. L. McINNINS ................................................. .Bryan W. B...

Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Mihaljev, Z. [Scientific Veterinary Institute, Rumenacki put 20, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Cupic, Z. [Research Institute for Reproduction, A.I. and Embryo Transfer Temerin, 21235 Temerin, Industrijska zona bb. (Serbia)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

19

Variation in Preference for Rhizobium meliloti Within and Between Medicago sativa Cultivars Grown in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cultivars was assessed in the greenhouse with plants grown in Leonard...23). After emergence in a greenhouse at 22 5 C (day) and 17 2...with supplemental fluorescent lighting for a 16-h photoperiod...Glycine max L. Merrill. I. Greenhouse studies. Agron. J. 66...

E. S. P. Bromfield

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic luster, but show bright colors which range from red, violet or blue, depending upon the size of the nanoparticles (2,3). Colloidal gold has traditionally been used to color materials such as glass (e.g. gold ruby glass and cranberry glass) and enamels (e.g. famille rose enamels) since the 16th century. The earliest report of a colloidal gold preparation may be in the Bible. The book of Exodus reports that Moses destroyed the golden calf in a manner that may have resulted in an aqueous (water-based) gold colloid, which he then forced the Israelites to drink. In modern times gold colloids are imbibed for a variety of ailments (despite little or no evidence of any health-related benefits), but the most important applications may be in the field of nano-technology (see 1, and refs therein).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa root nodules Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Biology and Medicine 9 Alfalfa Production Texas High PlainsFar West Texas Summary: Nitrogen Fertilizer and Alfalfa? Is your current crop well...

22

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa western metadata Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Texas High PlainsFar West Texas Summary: testing Also, limited testing in western Oklahoma 12;Alfalfa Variety Trial Data For Texas Panhandle... Alfalfa Production Texas...

23

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa weevil hypera Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are alfalfa weevil, blue alfalfa aphid, and pea aphid. Second cutting pests include potato leafhopper, spotted... weevil ... Source: Rutgers University, Department of...

24

The market for alfalfa seed in the country of Mexico.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study develops a knowledge base of the market for alfalfa seed in the country of Mexico. The research findings and results of the study… (more)

Berentsen, Roberto, Jr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The market for alfalfa seed in the country of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990 & 1991 were:' 1) Guanajuato 2) Chihuahua 3) Hidalgo 4) Baja California 5) Sonora 1990 32, 412 46, 864 7 112 18, 928 19, 697 1991 53, 984 47, 215 32, 423 21, 216 20, 744 Also of importance, with over 10, 000 hectares planted... to further alfalfa production in Mexico. FIGURE 3: CURRENT MARKET 1991 ALFALFA HECTARES IN PRODUCTION IN MEXICO HIDALGO 32, 423 11% CHIHUAHUA 47, 215 16% GUANAJUATO 53, 984 19% BAJA CA. 21, 216 7% SON ORA 20, 744 7% OTHERS 115, 018 40% ALFALFA...

Berentsen, Roberto, Jr

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Forage Crops: Alfalfa, Peanuts, Velvet Beans, Millet, Rape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contact with the seed, and rolling after planting compacts the surface and serves to hold the moisture around the seed. Alfalfa seed being small, demand favorable conditions for successful germina- Germinating Description Years Old. Power. Prime seed...

Pittuck, B. C.

1903-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Use of 14C-Labeled Alfalfa Saponins for Monitoring Their Fate in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alfalfa saponins are known to exhibit allelopathic activity, reducing yields of succeeding plants following alfalfa cultivation [1–3], and decreasing growth and/or activity of soil microorganisms [4, 5]. The f...

M. Okumura; A. B. Filonow…

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Use of 14C-Labeled Alfalfa Saponins for Monitoring Their Fate in Soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alfalfa seedlings (cv. Cimmaron) were aseptically grown in a glass test...14C-labeled sodium acetate into which filtered air was pumped. After five days of exposure to fluorescent light at 22°C, the alfalfa seedl...

M. Okumura; A. B. Filonow; G. R. Waller

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

PLANT RESISTANCE Glandular-Haired Alfalfa Resistance to Potato Leafhopper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANT RESISTANCE Glandular-Haired Alfalfa Resistance to Potato Leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadellidae for the degree and types of resistance to the potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), and hopperburn. A tube resistance indices for potato leafhopper resistance, hopperburn resistance, and an overall glandular

Mathis, Wayne N.

31

Drought Strategies for Alfalfa Cooperative Extension Service Circular 581  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Home Economics #12;1 Drought Strategies for Alfalfa With continued dry conditions throughout New Mexico produced under dry conditions will be higher in crude protein and digestible dry matter than under wet Extension agronomist, Department of Extension Plant Sciences, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New

Mukhtar, Saqib

32

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa seed-growing region Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by overseeding periodically or at specific locations... in a field where plants have been lost. Numerous studies have shown that alfalfa seedlings grow very slowly Source:...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering ; Renewable Energy 76 Agricultural Economic Impacts of Climate Change in Yolo County (Preliminary) Study objective Summary: alfalfa, rice and wheat, almost 90% of...

36

A Nuclear-Targeted Cameleon Demonstrates Intranuclear Spiking in Medicago truncatula Root Hairs in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Nuclear-Targeted Cameleon Demonstrates Intranuclear Ca2+ Spiking in Medicago truncatula Root use of a nucleoplasmin-tagged cameleon (NupYC2.1). Confocal microscopy using this nuclear-specific calcium reporter has revealed sustained and regular Ca2+ spiking within the nuclear compartment

Monin, André

37

Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Instructions for Authors ( www.plantcell.org ) is: Ton Bisseling ( ton.bisseling@wur.nl ). [W] Online version contains Web-only data. The Medicago truncatula Nod factor receptors LYK3 and NFP accumulate in a narrow zone of approximately two cell...

Sjef Moling; Anna Pietraszewska-Bogiel; Marten Postma; Elena Fedorova; Mark A. Hink; Erik Limpens; Theodorus W.J. Gadella; Ton Bisseling

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

38

Production of Bio-oil from Alfalfa Stems by Fluidized-Bed Fast Pyrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Findings included a lower-than-average yield of bio-oil and a higher-than-average yield of charcoal from alfalfa stems, compared to previous results for other biomass feedstocks. ...

Akwasi A. Boateng; Charles A. Mullen; Neil Goldberg; Kevin B. Hicks; Hans-Joachim G. Jung; JoAnn F. S. Lamb

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

39

Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

40

Fattening Lambs on Corn, Milo, Hegari, Wheat, and Oats, with Cottonseed Cake and Alfalfa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. **In cooperation with U. S. Department of Agriculture. ??On leave. $In cooperation with Texas Extension Service. Four feeding trials were conducted to compare lamb-fatten- ng rations using different common grains with alfalfa hay .s the roughage.... - - Year of Trial 1 1927-28 1 1928-19 1928-29 I 1929-30 1929-in - ,,. - -- -- lg.1; 1 Milo 49.4 Leligth of feeding 'period (days) Grain fed with cottonseed cake and alfalfa --I Average initial weight of lambs, Ibs. Increased daily gain due...

Mackey, A. K. (Arthur Kapp); Jones, J. M. (John McKinley)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - alface lactuca sativa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

63 Molecular Ecology (2001) 10, 947964 2001 Blackwell Science Ltd Summary: , 1994 3 (potato) Norway Slagen, Tonsberg, 1994 2 Norway S. minor Lactuca sativa Palumbo farm, 1998...

42

Genetic characterization of red rice (Oryza sativa L.) and control in imidazolinone tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

85 X BC14 BC~10 BC I P) QBCI 5' B 1 C09 AR4 AR3 LA5 BC03 ~ BC08 MS4 hBC02 LA3~ h BC 07 TX1 ~ ~ 590408 90407 59040 ~ 590406 5904$ 90426 Otyza ni vara 1 0. 3 X O. satwa ssp indica XO. sativa sspfaponrca ~ Oryxa nivara + Oryza... and sequential postemergence applications of imazethapyr near Eagle Lake, TX in 2000. . 102 X lit LIST OF TABLES (CONTINUED) TABLE Page 29 Broadleaf signalgrass control with single and sequential postemergence applications of imazethapyr near Eagle Lake...

Ottis, Brian Vance

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Comparative feeding value of a cubed alfalfa:corn plant product as an exclusive diet for exercising horses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARATIVE FEEDING VALUE OF A CUBED ALFALFA:CORN PLANT PRODUCT AS AN EXCLUSIVE DIET FOR EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by GEORGIA ANN YOUNGLOVE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Animal Science COMPARATIVE FEEDING VALUE OF A CUBED ALFALFA:CORN PLANT PRODUCT AS AN EXCLUSIVE DIET FOR EXERCISING HORSES A Thesis by GEORGIA ANN YOUNGLOVE Approved as to style...

Younglove, Georgia Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

44

Impact of Light Variation on Development of Photoprotection, Antioxidants, and Nutritional Value in Lactuca sativa L.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Light Variation on Development of Photoprotection, Antioxidants, and Nutritional Value in Lactuca sativa L. ... † Department of Horticulture, Zhejiang University, Kaixuan Road 268, Hangzhou 310029, China ... § Department of Horticultural Sciences, University of Florida, 1235 Fifield Hall, P.O. ...

Yan-Hong Zhou; Ying-Yun Zhang; Xin Zhao; Hai-Jing Yu; Kai Shi; Jing-Quan Yu

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phytoextraction of Zinc by Oat (Avena sativa), Barley (Hordeum vulgare), and Indian Mustard (Brassica juncea) ... When the point is reached where barley fails to maintain a high rate of Zn removal, chelate addition could then be used with B. juncea to solubilize residual Zn that had previously been unavailable for uptake. ...

Stephen D. Ebbs; Leon V. Kochian

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

46

Studies on a brittle stem mutant of rice, Oryza sativa L. ; characterization of lignin fractions,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies on a brittle stem mutant of rice, Oryza sativa L. ; characterization of lignin fractions 78850 Thiverva!-Grignon SUMMARY Lignin fractions, associated p-coumaric and ferulic acids and polysaccharides have been characterized in the straw and in three lignin fractions isolated from the rice cultivar

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

47

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

48

ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. I. H I OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The discovery of a previously unknown 21 cm H I line source identified as an ultra-compact high velocity cloud in the ALFALFA survey is reported. The H I detection is barely resolved by the Arecibo 305 m telescope {approx}4' beam and has a narrow H I linewidth (half-power full width of 24 km s{sup -1}). Further H I observations at Arecibo and with the Very Large Array corroborate the ALFALFA H I detection, provide an estimate of the H I radius, {approx}1' at the 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} isophote, and show the cloud to exhibit a velocity field which, if interpreted as disk rotation, has an amplitude of {approx_equal}9.0 {+-} 1.5 km s{sup -1}. In other papers, Rhode et al. show the H I source to have a resolved stellar counterpart and ongoing star forming activity, while Skillman et al. reveal it as having extremely low metallicity: 12 + log (O/H) = 7.16 {+-} 0.04. The H I mass to stellar mass ratio of the object is found to be 2.6. We use the Tully-Fisher template relation in its baryonic form to obtain a distance estimate D{sub Mpc}=1.3{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5}. Additional constraints on the distance are also provided by the optical data of Rhode et al. and McQuinn et al., both indicating a distance in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 Mpc. The three estimates are compatible within their errors. The object appears to be located beyond the dynamical boundaries of, but still in close proximity to the Local Group. Its pristine properties are consistent with the sedate environment of its location. At a nominal distance of 1.75 Mpc, it would have an H I mass of {approx_equal} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M {sub Sun }, a stellar mass of {approx_equal} 3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M {sub Sun }, and a dynamical mass within the H I radius of {approx_equal} 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} M {sub Sun }. This discovery supports the idea that optically faint-or altogether dark-low mass halos may be detectable through their non-stellar baryons.

Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Adams, Elizabeth A. K. [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cannon, John M.; Bernstein-Cooper, Elijah Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Skillman, Evan D.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: betsey@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: ebernste@macalester.edu, E-mail: rhode@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Evaluation of Aerated Steam Treatment of Alfalfa and Mung Bean Seeds To Eliminate High Levels of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and O178:H12, Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Food Microbiology Evaluation of Aerated Steam Treatment of Alfalfa and Mung Bean Seeds...potential of hot humid air, i.e., aerated steam, to treat alfalfa and mung bean seeds...eliminated by a 300-s treatment with steam at 70 1C as revealed by enrichment studies...

Patrick Studer; Werner E. Heller; Jörg Hummerjohann; David Drissner

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

The isolation and characterization of plastid DNA from rice (Oryza sativa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Clint W. Magill Plastid DNA was isolated from rice (Oryze sativa). The DNA was digested with the restriction enzymes Pstl, Sall, Pvull, Sstl, and Sstll individually and in 32 combination. The resulting fragments were... end-labelled with c- P dNTPs using the Klenow fragment, separated by electrophoresis on agarose gels, and visualized by autoradiography. Digestion with the various enzymes gave the following number of bands: Pstl, 14; Sall, 7; PvuII, 9; Sstl, 9...

Scheuring, Chantel Fougeron

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Jet Fuel from Camelina: Jet Fuel From Camelina Sativa: A Systems Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PETRO Project: NC State will genetically modify the oil-crop plant Camelina sativa to produce high quantities of both modified oils and terpenes. These components are optimized for thermocatalytic conversion into energy-dense drop-in transportation fuels. The genetically engineered Camelina will capture more carbon than current varieties and have higher oil yields. The Camelina will be more tolerant to drought and heat, which makes it suitable for farming in warmer and drier climate zones in the US. The increased productivity of NC State’s-enhanced Camelina and the development of energy-effective harvesting, extraction, and conversion technology could provide an alternative non-petrochemical source of fuel.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

THE VELOCITY WIDTH FUNCTION OF GALAXIES FROM THE 40% ALFALFA SURVEY: SHEDDING LIGHT ON THE COLD DARK MATTER OVERABUNDANCE PROBLEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey is a wide-area, extragalactic HI-line survey conducted at the Arecibo Observatory. Sources have so far been extracted over {approx}3000 deg{sup 2} of sky (40% of its final area), resulting in the largest HI-selected sample to date. We measure the space density of HI-bearing galaxies as a function of their observed velocity width (uncorrected for inclination) down to w = 20 km s{sup -1}, a factor of two lower than the previous generation HI Parkes All-Sky Survey. We confirm previous results that indicate a substantial discrepancy between the observational distribution and the theoretical one expected in a cold dark matter (CDM) universe, at low widths. In particular, a comparison with synthetic galaxy samples populating state-of-the-art CDM simulations imply a factor of {approx}8 difference in the abundance of galaxies with w = 50 km s{sup -1} (increasing to a factor of {approx}100 when extrapolated to the ALFALFA limit of w = 20 km s{sup -1}). We furthermore identify possible solutions, including a keV warm dark matter scenario and the fact that HI disks in low-mass galaxies are usually not extended enough to probe the full amplitude of the galactic rotation curve. In this latter case, we can statistically infer the relationship between the measured HI rotational velocity of a galaxy and the mass of its host CDM halo. Observational verification of the presented relationship at low velocities would provide an important test of the validity of the established dark matter model.

Papastergis, Emmanouil; Martin, Ann M.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P., E-mail: papastergis@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: amartin@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: riccardo@astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: haynes@astro.cornell.edu [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

53

Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States) [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)] [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States)] [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

ALFALFA DISCOVERY OF THE NEARBY GAS-RICH DWARF GALAXY LEO P. III. AN EXTREMELY METAL DEFICIENT GALAXY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present KPNO 4 m and LBT/MODS spectroscopic observations of an H II region in the nearby dwarf irregular galaxy Leo P discovered recently in the Arecibo ALFALFA survey. In both observations, we are able to accurately measure the temperature sensitive [O III] {lambda}4363 line and determine a ''direct'' oxygen abundance of 12 + log(O/H) = 7.17 {+-} 0.04. Thus, Leo P is an extremely metal deficient (XMD) galaxy, and, indeed, one of the most metal deficient star-forming galaxies ever observed. For its estimated luminosity, Leo P is consistent with the relationship between luminosity and oxygen abundance seen in nearby dwarf galaxies. Leo P shows normal {alpha} element abundance ratios (Ne/O, S/O, and Ar/O) when compared to other XMD galaxies, but elevated N/O, consistent with the ''delayed release'' hypothesis for N/O abundances. We derive a helium mass fraction of 0.2509{sup +0.0184}{sub -0.0123}, which compares well with the WMAP + BBN prediction of 0.2483 {+-} 0.0002 for the primordial helium abundance. We suggest that surveys of very low mass galaxies compete well with emission line galaxy surveys for finding XMD galaxies. It is possible that XMD galaxies may be divided into two classes: the relatively rare XMD emission line galaxies which are associated with starbursts triggered by infall of low-metallicity gas and the more common, relatively quiescent XMD galaxies like Leo P, with very low chemical abundances due to their intrinsically small masses.

Skillman, Evan D.; Berg, Danielle A.; Olive, Keith A.; McQuinn, Kristen B. W., E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: berg@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: kmcquinn@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); and others

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effects of iron and manganese in culture solution on their concentrations in roots and shoots of rice plants (Oryza sativa L.) grown under anaerobic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(~Or za sativa L. ) GROWN UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by RICHARD E. BACHA Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of Department 0 ember em er December 1976 g+g TO, I ABSTRACT Effects of Iron and Manganese... EFFECTS OF IRON AND MANGANESE IN CULTURE SOLUTION ON THEIR CONCENTRATIONS IN ROOTS AND SHOOTS OF RICE PLANTS (~Or za sativa L. ) GROWN UNDER ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS A Thesis by RICHARD E. BACHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Un...

Bacha, Richard E

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Influence de l'aluminium sur l'absorption du phosphore par le riz (Oryza sativa L.) et sur celle de l'azote en prsence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence de l'aluminium sur l'absorption du phosphore par le riz (Oryza sativa L.) et sur celle de l'absorption de l'azote et du phosphore en fonction de doses croissantes d'alu- minium par des 35 pM d'aluminium, la diminution de l'absorption du phosphore est très marquée, ainsi que celle de l

Boyer, Edmond

57

Bio-energy feedstock yields and their water quality benefits in Mississippi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulosic and agricultural bio-energy crops can, under careful management, be harvested as feedstock for bio-fuels production and provide environmental benefits. However, it is required to quantify their relative advantages in feedstock production and water quality. The primary objective of this research was to evaluate potential feedstock yield and water quality benefit scenarios of bioenergy crops: Miscanthus (Miscanthus-giganteus), Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), Soybean {Glycine max (L.) Merr.}, and Corn (Lea mays) in the Upper Pearl River watershed (UPRW), Mississippi using a Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The SWAT model was calibrated (January 1981 to December 1994) and validated (January 1995 to September 2008) using monthly measured stream flow data. The calibrated and validated model determined good to very good performance for stream flow prediction (R2 and E from 0.60 to 0.86). The RMSE values (from 14 m3 s-1 to 37 m3 s-1) were estimated at similar levels of errors during model calibration and validation. The long-term average annual potential feedstock yield as an alternative energy source was determined the greatest when growing Miscanthus grass (373,849 Mg) as followed by Alfalfa (206,077 Mg), Switchgrass (132,077 Mg), Johnsongrass (47,576 Mg), Soybean (37,814 Mg), and Corn (22,069 Mg) in the pastureland and cropland of the watershed. Model results determined that average annual sediment yield from the Miscanthus grass scenario determined the least (1.16 Mg/ha) and corn scenario the greatest (12.04 Mg/ha). The SWAT model simulated results suggested that growing Miscanthus grass in the UPRW would have the greatest potential feedstock yield and water quality benefits.

Parajuli, Prem B.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

Alfalfa saponins — the allelopathic agents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The legume—grain crop sequences were commonly used throughout the beginning of this century. The practice of including forage legumes in crop rotations declined due to the increased availability and relatively...

W. Oleszek; M. Jurzysta; P. M. Górski

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Growth Reduction Associated with Repressed Lignin Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana Is Independent of Flavonoids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...negative impacts on forage quality, pulping efficiency, and...been employed to identify or engineer plants with low lignin content...cytochrome P450 enzymes for forage quality improvement in alfalfa (Medicago...lignification, development and forage quality. Phytochemistry 68 : 1521-1529...

Xu Li; Nicholas D. Bonawitz; Jing-Ke Weng; Clint Chapple

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Stress-Induced GSK3 Regulates the Redox Stress Response by Phosphorylating Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...physiological responses (Jonak and Hirt, 2002; Saidi et al., 2012). In alfalfa (Medicago...diverse functions (Jonak and Hirt, 2002; Saidi et al., 2012). In addition to ASKalpha...signalling pathway. Plant J. 62 : 215-223. Saidi, Y. , Hearn, T.J., and Coates...

Silvia Dal Santo; Hansjörg Stampfl; Julia Krasensky; Stefan Kempa; Yves Gibon; Elena Petutschnig; Wilfried Rozhon; Alexander Heuck; Tim Clausen; Claudia Jonak

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GIS based assessment of rice (Oryza sativa) straw biomass as an alternative fuel for tea (Camellia sinensis L.) drying in Sonitpur district of Assam, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a study on spatial distribution of rice (Oryza sativa) straw and its potential demand as a renewable energy fuel for tea (Camellia sinensis L.) drying. Rice straw availability and its demand in tea gardens are estimated using IRS-P6 LISS III remote sensing data in GIS environment. Shortest road transportation network is designed to ascertain that rice straw is delivered in the tea gardens with minimum transportation cost. Costs of production and harvesting of rice straw are also assessed and incorporated in the overall procurement cost of rice straw biomass. It is observed that the degree of fulfilment of thermal energy demand for tea drying through rice straw is spatially varying. It is also found that straw biomass can economically compete with coal as a source of thermal energy in tea drying and contribute to the farmers earning from otherwise waste straw, if coal equivalent price is fixed for straw. The coal equivalent cost of straw could be raised up to 37.04 $ t?1 which would enhance farmers profit upto 18.26 $ t?1.

Moonmoon Hiloidhari; Dipal Baruah; Haradip Mahilary; D.C. Baruah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Syringyl Lignin Is Unaltered by Severe Sinapyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Suppression in Tobacco  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...lignification-related CAD genes showing large increases in sinapaldehyde in lignin...Medicago sativa]). To increase the chances of ultimately amplifying...Manipulation of lignin quality by down-regulation of cinnamyl...plants with antisense CAD gene: Wine-red lignin from coniferyl...

Abdellah Barakate; Jennifer Stephens; Alison Goldie; William N. Hunter; David Marshall; Robert D. Hancock; Catherine Lapierre; Kris Morreel; Wout Boerjan; Claire Halpin

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

63

Acidic soil amendment with a magnesium-containing fluidized bed combustion by-product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Removal of SO{sub 2} from the emissions of coal-fired boilers produces by-products that often consist of CaSO{sub 4}, residual alkalinity, and coal ash. These by-products could be beneficial to acidic soils because of their alkalinity and the ability of gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center{underscore}dot}2H{sub 2}O) to reduce Al toxicity in acidic subsoils. A 3-yr field experiment was conducted to determine the liming efficacy of a fluidized bed combustion boiler by-product (FBC) that contained 129 g Mg kg{sup {minus}1} as CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} and MgO and its effects on surface and subsurface soil chemistry. The FBC was mixed in the surface 10 cm of two acidic soils (Wooster silt loam, an Oxyaquic Fragiudalf, and Coshocton silt loam, an Aquultic Hapludalf) at rates of 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 times each soil's lime requirement (LR). Soils were sampled in 10-cm increments to depths ranging from 20 to 110 cm, and corn (Zea mays L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) were grown. Application of Mg-FBC increased alfalfa yields in all six site-years, whereas it had no effect on corn grain yield in five site-years and decreased grain yield in one site-year. Plant tissue concentrations of Mg, S, and Mo were increased by Mg-FBC, while most trace elements were either unaffected or decreased. Application of Mg-FBC at one or two times LR increased surface soil pH to near 7 within 1 wk. Although surface soil pH remained near 7 for 2 yr, there was minimal effect on subjacent soil pH. Application of Mg-FBC increased surface soil concentrations of Ca, Mg, and S, which promoted downward movement of Mg and SO{sub 4}. This had different effects on subsoil chemistry in the two soils: in the high-Ca-status Wooster subsoil, exchangeable Ca was decreased and exchangeable Al was increased, whereas in the high-Al-status Coshocton subsoil, exchangeable Al was decreased and exchangeable Mg was increased. The Mg-FBC was an effective liming material and, because of the presence of both Mg and SO{sub 4}, may be more effective than gypsum in ameliorating subsoil Al phytotoxicity.

Stehouwer, R.C.; Dick, W.A.; Sutton, P.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop, Inc Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 296 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Single Phase Commercial Commercial General Service Three Phase Commercial General Service- Single Phase Farm, Public Halls, Domestic Commercial Large Power Industrial Large Power LP-200 Industrial Residential Service Residential Yard Light Service- (7,000 Lumen Mercury vapor or 9,500 Lumen HPS) Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0879/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh

65

Alfalfa Production Under Irrigation in Western Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

smoothing harrow, or spring tooth harrow, should be run over the ground to roughen the surface slightly and bring a few 12 BULLETIN NO. 472, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION clods to the surface. One-half of the seed is sown lengthwise of the border... smoothing harrow, or spring tooth harrow, should be run over the ground to roughen the surface slightly and bring a few 12 BULLETIN NO. 472, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION clods to the surface. One-half of the seed is sown lengthwise of the border...

Bayles, John J. (John Jasper)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Effects of supplemental UV-B radiation on the growth and yield of two cultivars of Japanese lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.) under the field in a cool rice-growing region of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An investigation was made of the variations in growth and grain yield in response to increased exposure to UV-B radiation of Japanese lowland rice (Oryza sativa L.) in a cool rice-growing region. Two cultivars, UV-resistant cv. ‘Sasanishiki’ and UV-sensitive cv. ‘Norin 1’, were examined in a lowland field at Kashimadai (37°28?E, 141°06?E) in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, for four cropping seasons from 1994 to 1997. The two cultivars were grown in a lowland field with or without supplemental UV-B radiation, which was provided by UV-B-emitting fluorescent lamps, with a 0.1-mm-thick cellulose diacetate film as a filter. In both cultivars, significant decreases in tiller number as the result of supplemental UV-B radiation were observed during the tillering stage in 1994, 1995 and 1997. Furthermore, decreases in grain size from supplemental UV-B radiation were recorded in all seasons. The trend towards small grain size was pronounced in 1996. In that year, the mean daily middle temperatures were lower throughout most of the cropping season and the mean daily hours of sunshine during the tillering stage and between the end of the panicle differentiation stage and the beginning of the ripening stage were shorter. In 1993 when the temperature and the amount of sunshine were both lower, the tiller number, the dry mass of aboveground parts and the panicle number were significantly reduced by supplemental unfiltered UV-B radiation. There was a cultivar difference in the inhibitory effects of supplemental UV-B radiation on growth between the sensitive cultivar Norin 1 and the resistant cultivar Sasanishiki. These results indicate that supplemental UV-B radiation has a positive effect on the growth and grain development of rice, which may be enhanced by unusual climatic conditions such as lower temperature and less sunshine, in cool rice-growing regions.

Tadashi Kumagai; Jun Hidema; Hye-Sook Kang; Tadashi Sato

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Enlightening Medicago truncatula transformation and shading GFP fluorescence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transgenic shoots of this line has proven difficult, but media and culture procedures are described that yielded an average frequency of 39% for root induction from 419 phosphinothricin-resistant shoots. Fertile M. truncatula A17 plants transgenic for 35S...

Zhou, Xin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cannabis sativa : an optimization study for ROI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite hemp's multifarious uses in over 30 countries ranging from the manufacture of paper to specialty textiles, construction, animal feed, and fuel, its acceptance in the US has been shunned because of its association ...

Esmail, Adnan M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

435919°, -98.3964938° 435919°, -98.3964938° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7435919,"lon":-98.3964938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

70

Multiwalled carbon nanotubes in alfalfa and wheat: toxicology and uptake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...not affect the germination of lettuce, corn, cucumber, rape, radish or ryegrass...search for CNTs in plant tissues using Fe energy-filter mapping. 1 TEM characterization...revealed tube-like features whose Fe energy-filter maps (figures 8 d,f) highlighted...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Biology and chemical control of the spotted alfalfa aphid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

idantigiad'aa Peaxoei'LUdiiiia"ap. P' by Or, 'Louis's N. Ieieoll, Mat~'~eo Oeya~t of Agtteeleore, 1 I, I 1 ' 8'' (d 1 t 1 I V J . ;A 9 I '. :, ; . ::;: . ';::. :. '' ':-", : '::aivisr;ot-L~TQNt ' ~-appyaxwnca og a' dawtwgiag infewtagion af... 1955, ' 51okwon-an4 RaynsoMw (1055) oot'wd that, :thtw' , aphid ma nO? identioak tO the gellm C~Vecsj aph14f: ~a~emphia. -. " 0))goo~st ts tt offal tt: X)eajali), shish, haf 'hea ~ arri)esse hjj , OXOVWta i'. -the aaate&"ac4 W44iieWCewn United...

Downing, Douglas Holland

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evaluation of glufosinate for the control of red rice (Oryza sativa) in commercial rice (Oryza sativa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(WAT), however, was greater than that of alachlor but equal to metolochlor (Griffin and Harger 1986). A posternergence (POST) tank mix of bentazon [3-(l-methylethyl)-(1H)-2, 1, 3-benzothiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2, 2-dioxide] and mefluidide (N-[2, 4... environinent, with the predominant ones being microbial degradation, volatilization, photodegradation, and chemical hydrolysis (Faber et al. 1997). For glufosinate, microbial degradation is the most important with the degradation rate being dependent on soil...

Hessler, Melanie Dawn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) control in herbicide tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlling this weed. More recently, advances in plant breeding and genetic engineering have led to commercial rice tolerant of several herbicides that control red rice. Two recent advances include glufosinate and imazethapyr tolerant rice. This technology...

Steele, Gregory Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inheritance of some characters in red rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of different F, 's found in one cross a 3 pubescent : 1 glabrous ratio and a 119 pubescent : 137 non-pubescent in the other cross. Sastry and Seetharaman (1980) studying 8 morphological characters in seven cross combinations reported that glabrous condition... expression in wild rices in which the grain is often shed while it is green and immature. Shattering or early detachment of grain from the panicle is still retained by a few of the cultivated types (Sastry and Seetharaman, 1978). Takenouchi (1924) showed...

Livore, Alberto Blas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

75

Two Direct Targets of Cytokinin Signaling Regulate Symbiotic Nodulation in Medicago truncatula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...5 min at room temperature twice, and water at room temperature for 1 min. All washes...2004). WebLogo: A sequence logo generator. Genome Res. 14 : 1188-1190. DAgostino...organogenesis, allowing them to fix atmospheric nitrogen. To identify direct links between...

Federico Ariel; Marianne Brault-Hernandez; Carole Laffont; Emeline Huault; Mathias Brault; Julie Plet; Michael Moison; Sandrine Blanchet; Jean Laurent Ichanté; Mireille Chabaud; Sébastien Carrere; Martin Crespi; Raquel L. Chan; Florian Frugier

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dissection of defense responses of skl, an ethylene insensitive mutant of Medicago truncatula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the ethylene signal. To complement the study, expression analyses of defense response genes in this interaction were studied by real time RTPCR of Phytophthora-infected and mock- infected roots. The genes analyzed were PAL, CHS, IFR, ACC oxidase, GST...........................................................112 22 In silica analysis of PAL gene expression........................................................114 23 In silica analysis of CHS gene expression .......................................................117 24 In silica analysis of IFR...

Pedro, Uribe Mejia

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Crystal Structures of a Multifunctional Triterpene/Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase from Medicago truncatula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...genistein and biochanin A. For assessment of in vivo function, therefore...Duke (Structural Biology Center) and I. Koshelev (Industrial Macromolecular Crystallography...Consortium beamline of the Center for Advanced Microstructures...

Hui Shao; Xianzhi He; Lahoucine Achnine; Jack W. Blount; Richard A. Dixon; Xiaoqiang Wang

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

Crystal Structures of a Multifunctional Triterpene/Flavonoid Glycosyltransferase from Medicago truncatula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...direct future attempts to engineer bioactive compounds...via improved forage quality), and humans (through...check the stereochemical quality of protein structures...sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic...direct future attempts to engineer bioactive compounds...

Hui Shao; Xianzhi He; Lahoucine Achnine; Jack W. Blount; Richard A. Dixon; Xiaoqiang Wang

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...we observed colocalization of green and red or cyan and yellow fluorescence...and used a Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-FLIM technique...the accumulation of yellow/green deposits (Figure 7). Although the identity of the yellow/green deposits is unknown, they might...

Sjef Moling; Anna Pietraszewska-Bogiel; Marten Postma; Elena Fedorova; Mark A. Hink; Erik Limpens; Theodorus W.J. Gadella; Ton Bisseling

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

Two Direct Targets of Cytokinin Signaling Regulate Symbiotic Nodulation in Medicago truncatula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...independent transgenic roots). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to assess...transgenic roots/construct), and a Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to assess...transgenic roots/genotype), and a Kruskal-Wallis (A) or Mann-Whitney [(C...

Federico Ariel; Marianne Brault-Hernandez; Carole Laffont; Emeline Huault; Mathias Brault; Julie Plet; Michael Moison; Sandrine Blanchet; Jean Laurent Ichanté; Mireille Chabaud; Sébastien Carrere; Martin Crespi; Raquel L. Chan; Florian Frugier

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...accumulate in the same cell layers. To test this, we introduced pNFP:NFP-mCherry...are localized at the plasma membrane. To test this, the receptors were immunolocalized...or at the infection thread membrane. To test this, we analyzed confocal z-stacks...

Sjef Moling; Anna Pietraszewska-Bogiel; Marten Postma; Elena Fedorova; Mark A. Hink; Erik Limpens; Theodorus W.J. Gadella; Ton Bisseling

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Multilocus Sequence Typing as an Approach for Population Analysis of Medicago-Nodulating Rhizobia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...replications, and three jars without inoculated bacteria served as controls. The plants were grown in a greenhouse without supplemental lighting in two duplicate experiments for 30 and 42 days. The plants were uprooted, and the tops were cut off...

Peter van Berkum; Patrick Elia; Bertrand D. Eardly

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leeuwenhoek Centre for Advanced Microscopy, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, 1090 GE Amsterdam, The Netherlands c College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia www.plantcell.org...

Sjef Moling; Anna Pietraszewska-Bogiel; Marten Postma; Elena Fedorova; Mark A. Hink; Erik Limpens; Theodorus W.J. Gadella; Ton Bisseling

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nod Factor Receptors Form Heteromeric Complexes and Are Essential for Intracellular Infection in Medicago Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of symbiotic interface. Furthermore, our Forster resonance energy transfer-fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis...microscopy|ROI, region of interest|FRET, Forster resonance energy transfer|RNAi, RNA interference|Supplemental Data Supplemental...

Sjef Moling; Anna Pietraszewska-Bogiel; Marten Postma; Elena Fedorova; Mark A. Hink; Erik Limpens; Theodorus W.J. Gadella; Ton Bisseling

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

The biology and control of the three-cornered alfalfa hopper Spissistilus festinus (Say)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Mortality Curve for Toxaphene- DDT (2-1) Mixture.................................................................... ^9 Page Discussion of Results 53 COHTENTS (CON'T.) Field Tests Procedure.................... Discussion of Results Summary.................... Bibliography........................... Addendum.................................. FIGURES 1. Male and Female Adults on. Girdled Soybean Seedling.............. 16 2. Graph Showing the Percentage of the Total Nymphs Hatching on Various Days After...

Jordan, Cedric Roy

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Alfalfa water use pinpointed in saline, shallow water tables of Imperial Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shallow water tables of Imperial Valley Khaled M. Bali Qin water user in the Imperial Valley several western states.shallow, use in the Imperial Valley, where it moderately

Bali, Khaled M.; Grismer, Mark E.; Snyder, Richard L.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa haylage harvesting Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

yrs) a Cash crop rotation... ... Source: Wisconsin at Madison, University of - Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (SAGE) Collection: Environmental Sciences and...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa mosaic virus Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the Brome Mosaic Virus Movement Protein Expressed in E. coli Kitty A. J. Jansen,* Cor J. A. M. Wolfs, Hendrikus Lohuis,* Rob W. Goldbach,* and Benedictus J. M....

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa silage ad Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A&M University Collection: Engineering ; Renewable Energy 8 APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, 0099-22400004.00 0 Summary: of Silage Additives by Using Genetic...

90

Economics and Energy of Ethanol Production from Alfalfa, Corn, and Switchgrass in the Upper Midwest, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the USA, biomass crop systems will be needed to meet future ethanol production goals. We estimated production costs, profits, and energy budgets for three potential crop systems for ... . Production costs, pro...

P. A. Vadas; K. H. Barnett; D. J. Undersander

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Evaluation of the effectiveness of using alfalfa and buffalo grass for remediation of trichloroethylene from groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and Reporting) . 20 26 Statistical Methods. 30 ANOVA MANOVA. 30 31 va Scheffe's Test. . Page 31 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION . . . . . . 32 Bias. . . 32 Lighting. . . . . . . . 3 3 TCE Stress Tests . . . . . . . . . . 33 Air Sample... . . . FIGURE 10. Recovered TCE (Itg) from Water FIGURE 11. Recovered TCE (ljg) from Soil . FIGURE 12. Recovered TCE (Itg) from Air. . . . . 46 . . . . . 47 . . . . 47 . . . 47 LIST OF TABLES Page TABLE 1. Soil Characterization Data . . . . . 17 TABLE...

Caravello, Victor

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - alfalfa cultivar crioula Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, Texas A&M University Collection: Engineering ; Renewable Energy 55 1904 CROP SCIENCE, VOL. 44, NOVEMBERDECEMBER 2004 of natural variation in Arabidopsis flowering...

93

Adjustment of Host Cells for Accommodation of Symbiotic Bacteria: Vacuole Defunctionalization, HOPS Suppression, and TIP1g Retargeting in Medicago  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 2006, Australia. 2 Current address: Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5064, Australia. The author responsible for distribution of...

Aleksandr Gavrin; Brent N. Kaiser; Dietmar Geiger; Stephen D. Tyerman; Zhengyu Wen; Ton Bisseling; Elena E. Fedorova

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

A Novel Plant Leucine-Rich Repeat Receptor Kinase Regulates the Response of Medicago truncatula Roots to Salt Stress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of transfer, and root growth from this point was measured after 6 d. Three biological...Roots were collected at the indicated time points and immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen...and stress signaling in plants. Proc. Indian Nat. Sci. Acad. 72: 63-78. Mahajan...

Laura de Lorenzo; Francisco Merchan; Philippe Laporte; Richard Thompson; Jonathan Clarke; Carolina Sousa; Martín Crespi

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

Adjustment of Host Cells for Accommodation of Symbiotic Bacteria: Vacuole Defunctionalization, HOPS Suppression, and TIP1g Retargeting in Medicago  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...software to image transgenic roots expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged SYP22...Symbiosomes were counterstained by Sytox Green. inf, infected cells; R, bacteria release...were contrasted by staining with SYTO 16 (green). 3D Reconstruction and Volume-Surface...

Aleksandr Gavrin; Brent N. Kaiser; Dietmar Geiger; Stephen D. Tyerman; Zhengyu Wen; Ton Bisseling; Elena E. Fedorova

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Environmental Regulation of Lateral Root Emergence in Medicago truncatula Requires the HD-Zip I Transcription Factor HB1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly different between groups (Kruskal-Wallis test P 0.05, n 20 in every...and 10 wild-type siblings; Kruskal-Wallis test, P 0.05). Letters indicate...similar (n 20 per experiment; Kruskal-Wallis test, P 0.05). The letters...

Federico Ariel; Anouck Diet; Marion Verdenaud; Véronique Gruber; Florian Frugier; Raquel Chan; Martin Crespi

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Application of Multilocus Sequence Typing To Study the Genetic Structure of Megaplasmids in Medicago-Nodulating Rhizobia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in each jar, and 18 jars without inoculated bacteria served as controls. The plants were grown in a greenhouse without supplemental lighting for 32 days. The plants were visually scored for color of the plant tops and nodulation. The plant...

Peter van Berkum; Patrick Elia; Bertrand D. Eardly

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Characterization of Medicago truncatula mutants defective in infection persistence and defense response during Rhizobium-legume symbiosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pathway activated during organogenesis and differentiation. Other signals, critical for symbiosis are the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) (Gray and Rolfe, 1990). Rhizobium mutants with altered LPS structure form ineffective...

Prabhu, Radhika

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Bioassay of toxaphene, parathion and DDT residues on alfalfa by use of mosquito larvae, Aedes aegypti (L.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+) was abls to roduoo the effective toxicity of toxaphono by 41 por cent by exposing the deposit to 2b hours / sf elwulated rind. Hopkins Q IL), i (1 l$2b) tooted several chlorinated hydrocarbons to study tho offsets ef weathering and plant growth... satisfactory for extracting the lnsoetlel dos use4 la this works Shell Devolspaont Csapsny anoni (1953b) l l sted al falfs as a astor lal ?h leh yields s high percentage sf nsn-sapsai f labia extracts 1axes and Cata way bo partially rensved by freeslag tho...

Cheves, Rondal Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Digestibility of reconstituted sorghum grain and alfalfa hay mixtures as determined by the total collection and chromic oxide methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no effect on protein digestibility from feeding different mixtures of hays and concentrates. Phillips et al. (1951) reported that the ap- parent digestibility of nutrients, as well as intake of energy, usually increased as the percent grain in the ration... that the portal blood leaving the rumen contained a greater concentration of volatile fatty acids than did the arterial blood (Hungate, 1966). Experiments on the effect of various levels and proportions of VFA on heat increment have been conducted by Armstrong...

Ayala, Horacio Joaquin

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

High fiber low energy diet for molt induction in laying hens: the impact of alfalfa on physiology, immunology and behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approved by: Co-Chairs of Committee, Steve C. Ricke Luc R. Berghman Committee Members, Ted Friend Leon F. Kubena Jackson L. McReynolds Head of Department, Alan Sams December 2006 Major... on Physiology, Immunology and Behavior. (December 2006) Claudia Sharene Dunkley, B.S. Prairie View A&M University; M.S., Prairie View A&M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven C. Ricke Dr. Luc R. Berghman Feed withdrawal...

Dunkley, Claudia Sharene

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fertility-Based Herbicide Injury Recovery from Clomazone in Hybrid Rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of clomazone in Texas rice production is Command 3ME?. The label recommends a single PRE application rate of 0.28 kg a.i./ha on coarse-textured soils and up to 0.67 kg ha-1 on fine-textured soils. A split application may also be administered, where the first... application is made PRE followed by a second application EPOST. Rates for the first PRE application range from 0.28 kg/ha on coarse-textured soils to 0.56 kg ha-1 on fine-textured soils. For the second EPOST application, recommended rates range from 0.11 kg...

McKnight, Benjamin 1985-

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Physiological and Molecular Responses of Lactuca sativa to Colonization by Salmonella enterica Serovar Dublin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...movement of Salmonella cells from the soil or medium to the aerial portions of the plant was allowed via capillary forces to retain...787-796. 33 Nakashima, T., T. Sekiguchi, A. Kuraoka, K. Fukushima, Y. Shibata, S. Komiyama, and T. Nishimoto. 1993. Molecular...

M. M. Klerks; M. van Gent-Pelzer; E. Franz; C. Zijlstra; A. H. C. van Bruggen

2007-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

Responses of High Biomass Rice (Oryza sativa L.) to Various Abiotic Stresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rice produces a lot of biomass which is an important trait in increasing grain yield and it is a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. High biomass rice is important to meet the growing demands of grains and biomass for food, fodder and bio...

Kondhia, Aditi Nitinkumar

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - arroz-vermelho oryza sativa Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Jackson, Scott A. - Department of Agronomy, Purdue University Collection: Biotechnology 2 Paleogenomic Analysis of the Short Arm of Chromosome 3 Reveals the History of...

106

E-Print Network 3.0 - arroz oryza sativa Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Jackson, Scott A. - Department of Agronomy, Purdue University Collection: Biotechnology 2 SYSTEMATICS Discovery of the South American Rice Miner (Diptera: Ephydridae) in...

107

Influence of environmental parameters on penoxsulam control of alligatorweed (alternanthera philoxeroides) in rice (oryza sativa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

obtained with such herbicides as bentazon, bifenox, dicamba, fenoprop, pendimethalin, propanil, and triclopyr without serious damage to the crop (Julien and Broadbent 1980). Bispyribac-sodium has provided at least 85% control of small alligatorweed all... graminicides mixed with broadleaf herbicides (Holshouser and Coble 1990; Vidrine et al. 1995). Efficacy of fenoxaprop was reduced when mixed with 8 bentazon and triclopyr on grasses as well as when mixed with propanil and halosulfuron on barnyardgrass...

Willingham, Samuel Duane

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - avena sativa intake Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Medicine Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 Curriculum Vitae Barroso Judit Summary: . Maxwell 1999-2002 Generacin de mapas de riesgos para el control de...

109

The origin and evolution of fragrance in rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...factor in determining market price and is related to both local and national...The fragrance (fgr) gene in natural populations of wild rice (Oryza rufipogon Griff.) Genet...52 Bergman CJ ( 2000 ) Rapid gas chromatographic technique for...150 CIor 1658 RA 7286 Sultani Egypt tropical japonica WT <0.05...

Michael J. Kovach; Mariafe N. Calingacion; Melissa A. Fitzgerald; Susan R. McCouch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Variability of Grain Arsenic Concentration and Speciation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study was to evaluate a set of diverse rice cultivars, including both indica and japonica subspecies, for total grain-As (TGAs) and As-species concentrations in 2004, 2005, and 2007, on a native (moderate As-concentration) paddy soil and an adjacent...) and As-species concentrations, and their relationships with plant growth parameters, e.g., heading date, plant height, and yield were assessed. The cultivars exhibited a considerable range in both TGAs and grain-As species concentrations. In 2004...

Pillai, Tushara Raghvan

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

111

Characterization and genetic analysis of a very high tillering and dwarf rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?????????????????.. 12 2.4.4 Growth regulators??????????????...... 12 2.5 Factors affecting plant height, panicle density and grain yield????????????????????... 13 2.5.1 Nitrogen... the grain yield by 0.88 t ha-1 in aromatic rice (Ghosh et al., 2004)), however, high planting density can compensate for the yield loss caused by the late planting (Baloch et al., 2006). 2.4.4 Growth regulators: The activity of axillary buds is controlled...

Mani, Dhananjay

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Reaction of North American Oats (Avena sativa L.) to Crown Rust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found to be repeatable. Repeatability ranged from 0.56 to 0.88 at Castroville, TX in 2011 and 2010, respectively in spring oats and from 0.79 at St. Paul, MN in 2011 to 0.96 at Castroville, TX in 2010 in winter oats. Oat lines contributed by states...

Lange, Carol Jeannine 1986-

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) response to clomazone as influenced by rate, soil type, and planting date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ____________________________ ____________________________ James M. Chandler Scott A. Senseman (Chair of Committee) (Member) ____________________________ ____________________________ Garry N. McCauley Rodney W. Bovey (Member) (Member.... If bleaching is severe, it can lead to necrosis and eventual plant death. Clomazone is taken up by plant roots and shoots and moves primarily in the xylem to plant leaves (Duke and Paul 1986). Clomazone indirectly inhibits 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate...

O'Barr, John Houston

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

114

Total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity of lettuce were evaluated using the Folin–Ciocalteu method and DPPH assay, respectively, on 25 cultivars of lettuce, including leaf, romaine, crisphead, and butterhead types, cultivated over two harvest periods. Leaf lettuce possessed the highest TPC and highest DPPH scavenging ability, followed by romaine, butterhead and Batavia (crisphead subtype). Within a lettuce type, red pigmented lettuce cultivars had higher TPC and antioxidant capacity than did green cultivars grown under the same conditions. In addition, lettuce harvested in July possessed higher TPC and antioxidant capacity than did lettuce harvested in September, suggesting that environmental conditions could influence the phenolic content and antioxidant activity of lettuce. These results suggest that Colorado grown lettuce may serve as potential dietary sources of natural phenolic antioxidants.

Xiangfei Liu; Shane Ardo; Marisa Bunning; John Parry; Kequan Zhou; Cecil Stushnoff; Frank Stoniker; Liangli Yu; Patricia Kendall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Red rice (Oryza sativa L.) ecotype tolerance to herbicides and winter weed management practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BC 86 B 80 DE 83 DE 65 B fb glyphsate (S) 1.1 Glyphosate (S) 1.1 98 AB 100 A 93 AB 75 E 88 CD 53 BC Glufosinate (W) 0.6 93 BC 78 E 75 C 54 G 55 F 50 C Glufosinate (W) 0.6 100 A 98 AB 85 BC 75 E 78 E 58 BC fb glyphosate (S) 1.1 27.../ha -----------------------------%------------------------------ Glufosinate (S) 0.6 93 AB 95 AB 80 BC 58 BC 63 C Glyphosate+flumioxazin (W) 1.1 + 0.2 55 DE 45 H 95 AB 83 AB 88 B Glyphosate+flumioxazin (W) 1.1 + 0.2 89 AB 80 C 35 FG 75 ABC 100 A fb glyphosate (S) 1.1 Glyphosate (W) 1.1 85 ABC 58 EFG 43 EFG 75 ABC 98...

Nanson, Weldon Duane

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Genetic analysis and QTL mapping for grain chalkiness characteristics of brown rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grain chalkiness is one of the important appearance qualities in rice marketing. But it is a complex trait, controlled by polygenes and easily influenced by the environment. Genetic analysis and QTL detection ...

Yang Qin; Suk-Man Kim; Jae-Keun Sohn

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The H+-ATPase HA1 of Medicago truncatula Is Essential for Phosphate Transport and Plant Growth during Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...type suggests that HA1 is crucial for building a proton gradient across the PAM and therefore...by epifluorescence microscopy using a multi-zoom microscope AZ-100 (Nikon) equipped...members of the phosphate transporter1 gene family. Plant Cell 24 : 4236-4251. Zhang...

Franziska Krajinski; Pierre-Emmanuel Courty; Daniela Sieh; Philipp Franken; Haoqiang Zhang; Marcel Bucher; Nina Gerlach; Igor Kryvoruchko; Daniela Zoeller; Michael Udvardi; Bettina Hause

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Genome-Wide Medicago truncatula Small RNA Analysis Revealed Novel MicroRNAs and Isoforms Differentially Regulated in Roots and Nodules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...proteins HYL1 and SE promote accurate in vitro processing of pri-miRNA by DCL1. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 105: 9970-9975. Dunoyer, P., Lecellier, C.H., Parizotto, E.A., Himber, C., and Voinnet, O. (2004). Probing the microRNA...

Christine Lelandais-Brière; Loreto Naya; Erika Sallet; Fanny Calenge; Florian Frugier; Caroline Hartmann; Jérome Gouzy; Martin Crespi

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Agricultural Water Management 109 (2012) 8193 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irrigation design and management parameters for alfalfa Maziar M. Kandelousa, , Tamir Kamaia , Jasper A

Vrugt, Jasper A.

120

Morphological stability and metabolic activity of rice (Oryza sativa L.) protoplasts in media supplemented with polyamines and divalent cations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-linear regression analyses. All the three levels (lmM, 10mM and 20mM) of putrescine showed earlier times for maximum uptake rate and higher maximum values, whereas, in general, all the treatments had earlier times for maximum uptake rate but lower maximum values.... The "universal" solvent, which was used also as the wash solution and for preparing different chemical treatments and simply as a control, consisted of 0. 5M mannitol as osmotic buffer (Maeda and Hagiwara, 12 1974), lmM phosphate at pH 5. 7 as pH buffer...

Adhikary, Bharat Raj

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Attachment and survival of viruses on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L.): role of physicochemical and biotic factors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Salads and salad crops are the principal vector for transmission of enteric viruses. The objective of this study was to determine if viruses are able to attach non-specifically to the surface of lettuce and to determine the forces responsible for non...

Vega, Everardo

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

122

Metabolic engineering for production of complex lipids in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and rice (Oryza sativa) endosperm.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??World chemical and energy supplies for industry are today highly dependent on unsustainable fossil reserves. Vegetable lipids with similar chemical structures to fossil oil could… (more)

Aslan, Selcuk

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Genomic organization of chromosomal centromeres in the cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., and its wild progenitor, O. rufipogon Griff.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-insert BIBAC library for the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice, O. rufipogon. The library contains 24,192 clones, has an average insert size of 163 kb, and covers 5 x haploid genome of wild rice. We screened the wild rice library with two centromere 8...

Uhm, Taesik

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Productive Energy of Corn Meal, Alfalfa Leaf Meal, Dried Buttermilk, Casein, Cottonseed Meal, and Tankage as Measured by Production of Fat and Flesh by Growing Chickens.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LTBRARY, ' A 8c M COLLEGE, TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER. DIRECTOR. College Station. Texas BULLETIN NO. 600 PRODUCTIVE ENERGY OF CORN MEAL, ALFALF LEAF MEAL, DRIED BUTTERMILK, CASEIN, COT- TONSEED... reported, it was found that the productive energy of a primary mixed ration for production of fat and flesh on growing chicks was 278 calories per 100 grams of effec- tive digestible nutrients. The ration used was composed of 51 per cent yellow corn...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Mineral interactions and absorption in the equine digestive tract: calcium, phosphorus, and magnesium interaction with aluminum, and calcium digestibility of alfalfa in ponies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Chromic oxide (. 2%) was used as an indicator to measure flow through the digestive tract. There was a significant decrease in Ca, P, and Ng intake (P&. 05) with the addition of . 25/o Al due to a reduction in feed intake. Increased dietary Al resulted... in lower fecal excretions for both Ca and Mg. Quantity of Ca and Mg absorbed was slightly greater when Al was added to the diet, however, only Mg absorption was statistically significant. A significantly greater net loss of P (P&. 05) was observed...

Kapusniak, Linda J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7 from Alfalfa Seeds through a Combination of High Hydrostatic Pressure and Mild Heat  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...temperature. At 40C, the process was adequate in eliminating...of the selected optimum HHP process. The pressure treatment developed...seeds would be needed before commercialization of this process. Although it is anticipated...

Hudaa Neetoo; Thompson Pizzolato; Haiqiang Chen

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluation of the use of alfalfa diets as an alternative to feed deprivation for the induction of molt in commercial laying chickens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: ______________________________ _________________________ Steven C. Ricke Sarah G. Birkhold (Chair of Committee) (Member) ______________________________ _________________________ Jimmy T. Keeton...: Dr. Steven C. Ricke Induced molting is process used by commercial producers to extend the reproductive life of a laying hen. Typically, producers deprive...

Landers, Kristin Lynn

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

The in vivo and in vitro effect of a fructooligosaccharide prebiotic combined with alfalfa molt diets on egg production and salmonella in laying hens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: ______________________________ _________________________ Steven C. Ricke Leon Kubena (Chair of Committee... University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Steven Ricke Salmonellosis affects an estimated 1.4 million people a year with a great majority of cases never being reported. Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) can be found in a variety of foods including...

Donalson, Lisa Michelle

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Managing Soybean Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. However, these treatments 'may not be economica~ particularly for broodcast-planted or drill-planted soybean field<;. MID- TO LA TE-SEASON PESTS Threecornered Alfalfa Hopper: Petiole girdling by adult and nymphal threecomered alfalfa hoppers during...

Drees, Bastiaan M.; Way, Michael O.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Commercial Feeding Stuffs, from September 1, 1949 to August 31, 1950.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of manufacturer or importer, brand name tein , extract A. A. A. Alfalfa Milling Company Roswell, New Mexico, and Branches ....... 17% Protcin Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal. Analys~s ". ............................. cme Flour Mills Co., The Oklahoma City... of manufacturer or importer, brand name tein , extract A. A. A. Alfalfa Milling Company Roswell, New Mexico, and Branches ....... 17% Protcin Dehydrated Alfalfa Meal. Analys~s ". ............................. cme Flour Mills Co., The Oklahoma City...

Holleman, M. P.; Brock, F. D.

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Purdue Extension 1-888-EXT-INFO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a burndown before planting; used in-crop on Roundup Ready® soybeans, corn, alfalfa, cotton, and canola

132

Digestibility and Production Coefficients of Poultry Feeds.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ........... Alfalfa leaf meal, Av.. ............... . Alfalfa meal, Av.. ........ Alfalfa meal or hay, Min. Barley,Min .................... .............. Barlev v;hole, Av. ............... ~ean"&eal, Min.. 13lood meal, Av. ................ .............. Blood..., dried, Min. ............... Bone meal, Min.. ............. Bone (poultrv), Av. ................ Ruckwheat, Av. ........ Bu~liwhcat, whole, Min.. Bur clover, young, dried, Av.. .... Buttermilk, dried, Av.. .......... Buttermilk, driecl, Min...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimization of ammonium acquisition and metabolism by potassium in rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. IR-72)pce_2046 23..34  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)pce_2046 23..34 KONSTANTINE D. BALKOS, DEV T. BRITTO & HERBERT J. KRONZUCKER Department of Biological

Britto, Dev T.

135

The regulation of ethylene biosynthesis and its apparent mode of action in germinating seeds of Latuca sativa, var. Premier Great Lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the oxidation of various growth inhibitors or, possibly, competitive uptake of 02 through a seed coat-based peroxidase system (17, 45). Per- oxidase, citric acid oxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity increased in lettuce seeds at about the 24th hour... Thesis by JAMES RANDOLPH DUNLAP Approved as to style and content by: C airman of Co ittee (Head o D artment) Member Member) August 19'75 ABSTRACT The Regulation of Ethylene Biosynthesis and its Apparent Mode of Action in Germinating Seeds...

Dunlap, James Randolph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

136

The effect of nitrogen and date of seeding upon certain morphological and agronomic characters of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) variety Belle Patna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be used but after basic seed formation the cycle turned to starch formation qnd nitrogen assimila- tion in the seed was decreased. Other studies by Hall (14, 16) sug- gested that a delay of fertilization and initial flooding increased the seed yield... be used but after basic seed formation the cycle turned to starch formation qnd nitrogen assimila- tion in the seed was decreased. Other studies by Hall (14, 16) sug- gested that a delay of fertilization and initial flooding increased the seed yield...

Siwi, Bernard Hendrik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

A THREE-STAGE MODEL FOR THE DOMESTICATION OF ORYZA SATIVA AND THE EMERGENCE OF RICE AGRICULTURE IN CHINA, 12,000 - 7,000 BP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agriculture emerged through a long-term process between 12,000 and 7,000 years ago. It identifies three independent centers for the origins of rice agriculture in China: the Middle Yangzi Valley, the Lower Yangzi Valley, and the Huai Valley....

Huang, Hai

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

138

Damage assessment and sampling of the rice stink bug, Oebalus pugnax (Fabricius) (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), in rice, Oryza sativa L., in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field and greenhouse experiments were conducted from 2003 to 2006 at the Texas A&M University Agricultural Research and Extension Center at Beaumont and commercial rice fields throughout the Texas Rice Belt with the objectives of characterizing...

Vargas, Luis Espino

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

Purification and Characterization of Serine Proteases That Exhibit Caspase-Like Activity and Are Associated with Programmed Cell Death in Avena sativa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...only in the presence of the Snake protease and into two distinct...proteases are stable at room temperature in biological buffers for...described as necessary for stomata development and brassinosteroid signaling...15 min each in TBST before development with SuperSignal West Pico...

Warren C. Coffeen; Thomas J. Wolpert

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

140

Commercial Feeding Stuffs, September 1, 1924 to August 31, 1925.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the most reliable data available. Definitions not from A. F. C. 0. are marked with an asterisk (*). COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFFS 13 and C eno Alfalfa Products Llfalfa Meal is the entire alfalfa hay ground and does not contain an ad- %ure of ground... the most reliable data available. Definitions not from A. F. C. 0. are marked with an asterisk (*). COMMERCIAL FEEDING STUFFS 13 and C eno Alfalfa Products Llfalfa Meal is the entire alfalfa hay ground and does not contain an ad- %ure of ground...

Youngblood, B. (Bonney); Fuller, F. D. (Frederick Driggs); Pearce, S. D.

1925-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CX-012195: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alfalfa Substation Control House Replacement CX(s) Applied: B4.11 Date: 05/02/2014 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

142

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, sugarbeets, alfalfa, papaya,processed products such as canola oil, produced with GMing. In contrast, the same canola oil would have to bear a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Microsoft Word - BPA-2010-01660-FTransfDocBIA.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

services where such power or transmission services are delivered out of the BPA's Alfalfa Substation on, or near, the Yakama Indian Reservation. BPA performed a reasonable search...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - apple orchards treated Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science 64 ARTHROPODS IN RELATION TO PLANT DISEASE Aphid (Hemiptera: Aphididae) Species Composition and Potential Summary: to small grain, maize, and alfalfa eld crops and...

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - amv cucumber mosaic Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: including alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and Potato virus Y (PVY). At this time... fields of pumpkin, melon, or cucumber consider using...

146

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting lateral suboccipital Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

like corn, soybeans, alfalfa? Would Summary: 1 Crops Would the heat of an oil pipeline buried 4 feet underground affect ground or surface water... be affected? Response by...

147

EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

facility, known as the Minnesota Agri- Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities. After careful review of this proposed biopower...

148

To find more resources for your business, home, or family, visit the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences on the World Wide Web at aces.nmsu.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

continuous energy to sustain plant functions without depleting root reserves, so that the alfalfa can survive production in New Mexico, and lack of rainfall over extended periods reduces water available for irrigation. When prolonged dry conditions occur in New Mexico and water for irrigation is in short supply, alfalfa

Johnson, Eric E.

149

The Vitamin A Requirements of Hens for Egg Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ogether, the data would show a Icw egg production f e no-alfalfa group, a, larger egg production for the group receivii l'able 12. Average feed consumption and egg production by months per hen in batter rls fa. ns 'or ng I No alfalfa lot ( 2ck...

Sherwood, R. M., (Ross Madison); Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1935-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

EIS-0300: Minnesota Agri-Power Project: Biomass for Rural Development, Granite Falls, Minnesota  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Boards' [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] decision to support a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75–103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

151

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Repellency to the Potato Leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CHEMICAL ECOLOGY Repellency to the Potato Leafhopper (Homoptera: Cicadellidae to gain insights into the mechanism of resistance of glandular-haired alfalfa to the potato leafhopper of repellency to potato leafhoppers by glandular-haired alfalfa, but that such compounds cannot strongly prevent

Mathis, Wayne N.

152

Nutrient Management in TexasNutrient Management in Texas Sam FeagleySam Feagley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

·· Waste Utilization PlanWaste Utilization Plan ­­ Nutrient Utilization PlanNutrient Utilization Plan, clovers, ryegrass, alfalfa, sweet potatoes,clovers, ryegrass, alfalfa, sweet potatoes, petunia, roses, K, S, Zn, Fe, B, Mg, Ca, ClCl ·· SalinitySalinity ·· Animal manures, wastes and effluents

153

Suppression of mRNAs for lipoxygenase (LOX), allene oxide synthase (AOS), allene oxide cyclase (AOC) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid reductase (OPR) in pea reduces sensitivity to the phytotoxin coronatine and disease development by Mycosphaerella pinodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a recently developed model pathosystem involving Medicago truncatula and Mycosphaerella pinodes, causal agent of Mycosphaerella blight on pea to understand host molecular response to a fungal suppressor, we...

Kazuhiro Toyoda; Yuriko Kawanishi; Yuriko Kawamoto…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Transcript Profiling Coupled with Spatial Expression Analyses Reveals Genes Involved in Distinct Developmental Stages of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...156-159. Church, G.M., and Gilbert, W. (1984). Genomic sequencing...Medicago genetics growth & development microbiology Molecular Sequence Data Mycorrhizae...Roots genetics growth & development microbiology Reproducibility of Results Signal Transduction...

Jinyuan Liu; Laura A. Blaylock; Gabriella Endre; Jennifer Cho; Christopher D. Town; Kathryn A. VandenBosch; Maria J. Harrison

2003-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

155

Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, April--June 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) propose to build an alfalfa processing plant integrated with an advanced power plant system at the Granite Falls, Minnesota Industrial Park to provide 75 MW of base load electric power and a competitively priced source of value added alfalfa based products. This project will utilize air blown fluidized bed gasification technology to process alfalfa stems and another biomass to produce a hot, clean, low heating value gas that will be used in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the gas turbine will be used to generate steam to power a steam turbine and provide steam for the processing of the alfalfa leaf into a wide range of products including alfalfa leaf meal, a protein source for livestock. The plant will demonstrate high efficiency and environmentally compatible electric power production, as well as increased economic yield from farm operations in the region. The initial phase of the Minnesota Agripower Project (MAP) will be to perform alfalfa feedstock testing, prepare preliminary designs, and develop detailed plans with estimated costs for project implementation. The second phase of MAP will include detailed engineering, construction, and startup. Full commercial operation will start in 2001.

Baloun, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hydrogen Storage on Metal-Doped Ordered Mesoporous Carbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.; Gude, V.; Deng, S."Transesterification of Camelina Sativa Oil using Supercritical and Subcritical, S. "Low Temperature Process to Recover Impaired Waters" Desalination and Water Treatment, accepted

Johnson, Eric E.

157

When crop transgenes wander in California, should we worry?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

unlikely — the exception being canola. However, other trans-radish (Oryza sativa), canola (Brassica napus) and pearletc. ) Brown mustard Canola Carrot Chicory Chrysanthemum

Ellstrand, Norman C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

An efficient method for visualization and growth of fluorescent Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in planta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains, plants and growth conditions Xanthomonas oryzae pv.Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. Mol Plant Microbe InteractOryzae sativa L. ) plants. X. oryzae pv. oryzae infection

Han, Sang-Wook; Park, Chang-Jin; Lee, Sang-Won; Ronald, Pamela C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

225Agron. Sustain. Dev. 25 (2005) 225236 INRA, EDP Sciences, 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exclusively for rice (Oryza sativa L.). Potential rice grain yields (limited by solar radiation through collective loans, paid back after harvest. Moreover, previous loans have to be reimbursed

Boyer, Edmond

160

NMR Characterization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NMR NMR Characterization of C3H and HCT Down-Regulated Alfalfa Lignin Yunqiao Pu & Fang Chen & Angela Ziebell & Brian H. Davison & Arthur J. Ragauskas Published online: 20 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Independent down-regulation of genes encoding p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) and hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) has been previously shown to reduce the recalcitrance of alfalfa and thereby improve the release of fermentable sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, ball-milled lignins were isolated from wild-type control, C3H, and HCT gene down-regulated alfalfa plants. One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were utilized to determine structural changes in the ball-milled alfalfa lignins resulting from this genetic engineering.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Influence of Modified Atmosphere Storage on Aflatoxin Production in High Moisture Corn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmos- phere (CA) generators have been used for many...alfalfa pellets. These generators consume either natural...bottled gas and remove the water vapor caused by combustion...field tests with large CA generators, adult confused flour...

David M. Wilson; Edward Jay

1975-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

GMOs in animal agriculture: time to consider both costs and benefits in regulatory evaluations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

81%), corn (35%), and canola (30%) crops grown globally areGE corn, soybean, cotton, canola, wheat, potato, alfalfa,Soybeans Maize (Corn) Cotton Canola Page 9 of 14 animal feed

Van Eenennaam, Alison L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2012 Professional Development Meeting; Ames, IA Research update: Bee health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pumpkins · Cantaloupes, watermelons · Carrots, canola, alfalfa · Almonds, macadamia and other nut crops #12+ million ac), most wheat (24 million ac), canola, cotton, etc. · Rates range from 0.25-1.25 mg

Jurenka, Russell A.

164

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Petroleum and natural gas in Oklahoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...probable future oil fields of the state. These will include the three Pan- handlecountiesin northwesternOklahoma,namely: Cimmaron, Texas, and Beavercounties,as well as I-Iarper, Woods,Alfalfa, Ellis, Woodward, Major, Roger Mills, Dewey, Custer...

Charles Newton Gould

166

Zombie Water Projects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it makes no difference to the corn and the alfalfa whether it gets Colorado River water or Mississippi water or Missouri ... which have been severely impaired this year by flood conditions, and at the same tim...

Peter H. Gleick; Matthew Heberger; Kristina Donnelly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The R2R3-MYB Transcription Factors MYB14 and MYB15 Regulate Stilbene Biosynthesis in Vitis vinifera  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...development. Aust. J. Grape Wine Res. 9 : 15-27. Downey...Aust. J. Grape Wine Res. 9 : 110-121...in transgenic alfalfa increases resistance to Phoma medicaginis...subfamily reveals expanded wine quality-related clades and conserved...

Janine Höll; Alessandro Vannozzi; Stefan Czemmel; Claudio D'Onofrio; Amanda R. Walker; Thomas Rausch; Margherita Lucchin; Paul K. Boss; Ian B. Dry; Jochen Bogs

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Nesting Biology of the Leafcutting Bee Megachile minutissima (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in Central Saudi Arabia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leafcutting bee Megachile (Eutricharaea) minutissima Radoszkowski is a widely distributed species in the Middle East and a promising pollinator of alfalfa. We provide information on the nest architecture, foraging behavior, phenology, and host...

Alqarni, Abdulaziz S.; Hannan, Mohammed A.; Gonzalez, Victor H.; Engel, Michael S.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Minnesota agri-power project. Quarterly report, January--March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involves the growing of trial quantities of alfalfa for gasification pilot plant tests and the use of by-products of alfalfa plants as animal feeds for beef and dairy cattle and turkeys. The various tasks under this project are described. Tasks are: design; review and confirm feedstock supply plan; performance guarantees and warranties; sales contracts; site plan construction and environmental permits report; environmental monitoring plan; and project management, engineering, and administration.

Baloun, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Received: 29 August 2008 Revised: 2 October 2008 Accepted: 3 October 2008 Published online in Wiley Interscience: 23 February 2009 (www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI 10.1002/ps.1696  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, rice, Medicago and maize. Four of the five Triphysaria species have a gametophytic self-incompatibility, indicating that a mutation from self-incompatibility to self-compatibility oc- curred s system that precludes self-pollination.11 Tri- physaria pusilla is the sole self-pollinator in this group

Yoder, John I.

172

Detection of Novel Human MiRNAs Responding to X-ray Irradiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......sequences cloned from total small RNA pools. Novel miRNA candidates were iden- tified...expression) plus the third criterion (conservation), are regarded as adequate. The expression...miR408 are up-regulated in response to water deficit in Medicago truncatula. Planta......

Nan Ding; Xin Wu; Jinpeng He; Lei Chang; Wentao Hu; Wenjian Li; Jufang Wang; Tieshan Wang; Guangming Zhou

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Manipulation of Auxin Transport in Plant Roots during Rhizobium Symbiosis and Nematode Parasitism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mt-PIN1 and Mt-PIN2 is upregulated in the ethylene insensitive M. truncatula sickle mutant...and Mathesius, U. (2006). The ethylene-insensitive sickle mutant of Medicago...Wiggers, R.J., Starr, J.L., and Price, H.J. (1990). DNA content and variation...

Wim Grunewald; Giel van Noorden; Gert Van Isterdael; Tom Beeckman; Godelieve Gheysen; Ulrike Mathesius

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

SLAC1-related signal transduction pathway involved in ABA- induced stomatal closure and K? selective transport by the OsHKT2;4 transporter from rice (Oryza sativa) with atypical Na? transport properties and competition in permeation of K? over Mg²? and Ca²? ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of K + over Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ ions Figure 2.1. OsHKT2;4protein kinases with distinct Ca 2+ affinities. Proc. Natl.Abscisic Acid, CO 2 , and Ca 2 + Signaling. Annu. Rev. Plant

Brodsky, Dennis E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effects of supplemental fats on intake, production, and heat stress in lactating Holstein cows in summer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-LCFA Ingredient (Diet 1) (Diet 2) (Diet 3) Ground corn Soybean Meal Corn gluten meal Molasses Corn silage Alfalfa hay Cottonseed hulls Whole cottonseed Ca-LCFA Limestone Plain salt 33. 90 14. 94 5. 64 1. 62 16. 00 16. 00 8. 00 . 84 . 24 (0...-LCFA Ingredient (Diet 1) (Diet 2) (Diet 3) Ground corn Soybean Meal Corn gluten meal Molasses Corn silage Alfalfa hay Cottonseed hulls Whole cottonseed Ca-LCFA Limestone Plain salt 33. 90 14. 94 5. 64 1. 62 16. 00 16. 00 8. 00 . 84 . 24 (0...

Saunders, Richard Glynn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Grasses and Forage Plants: a Study of Composition and Value; Texas Grains: Composition ; Ash Analyses, Grasses and Grains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but it is not frequently saved as such. There are many others almost equally common, that if properly cared for, would prove useful and valuable. I am not disposed to join the great army of complainers against farmers and their present system of farming. The condition... at the expiration of that timd." Hon. J. M. Carson, who left the fertile black maxey prairies of Ellis county for the plains and valleys of Tom Green county, has this to say of alfalfa, in reply to my inquiry: "To plant alfalfa, prepare the land nicely and sow...

Harrington, H. H. (Henry Hill)

1892-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Phosphorus nutrition of rice in relation to flooding and temporary loss of soil-water saturation in two lowland soils of Cambodia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the rainfed lowlands, temporary loss of soil-water saturation during crop growth is a common factor limiting rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield but its effects on phosphorus (P) availability are poorly understood...

Vang Seng; R.W. Bell; I.R. Willett; 1>H.J. Nesbitt

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of Steam Sterilization and Gamma Irradiation of Peat on Quality of Rhizobium Inoculants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and Industrial Microbiology Effect of Steam Sterilization and Gamma Irradiation of...Inoculants for M. sativa manufactured with steam-sterilized peat were similar in quality...higher gamma irradiation dosage. Effect of steam sterilization and gamma irradiation of...

Barend W. Strijdom; Henri Jansen van Rensburg

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Original article Biomass, litterfall and nutrient content in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Biomass, litterfall and nutrient content in Castanea sativa coppice stands November 1995) Summary - Aboveground biomass and nutrient content, litterfall and nutrient return) and Catania (Italy). Best regression equations for the aboveground biomass were obtained by applying the allo

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

180

A novel semidwarf mutant 02428ha in rice is caused by reduced gibberellin sensitivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rice (Oryza sativa L.) elongated uppermost internode (eui) gene effectively results in a recessive tall plant type. In eui background, we found a mutant 02428ha that exhibited a semidwarf phenotype. Because s...

Suobing Zhang; Renxiao Chen; Ling Zhao; Zhen Zhu…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Light intensity and photoperiod influence the growth and development of hydroponically grown leaf lettuce in a closed-type plant factory system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of light provided by various light intensities combined with different photoperiods on the growth and morphogenesis of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) ‘Hongyeom Jeockchukmyeon’ in a closed-type plant factory s...

Jeong Hwa Kang; Sugumaran KrishnaKumar…

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Light source and CO2 concentration affect growth and anthocyanin content of lettuce under controlled environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of light source and CO2 concentration on the growth and anthocyanin content of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. ‘Seonhong Jeokchukmyeon’) grown in growth chambers was examined. The plant was grown under 140 ...

Yoo Gyeong Park; Ji Eun Park…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Divergent cAMP Signaling Pathways Regulate Growth and Pathogenesis in the Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe grisea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...morphology, and reproduction revealed by targeted gene disruption Gilbert R.D. Johnson A.M. Dean R.A. Chemical signals responsible...Sequence Data Mutation Nuclear Proteins genetics Oryza sativa microbiology Sequence Homology, Amino Acid Signal Transduction Transcription...

Kiichi Adachi; John E. Hamer

184

Magnaporthe grisea Cutinase2 Mediates Appressorium Differentiation and Host Penetration and Is Required for Full Virulence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...host resistance. Nature 440: 535-539. Gilbert, R.D., Johnson, A.M., and Dean...Mutation genetics Oryza sativa drug effects microbiology Phenotype Plant Diseases microbiology Propranolol pharmacology RNA, Messenger genetics...

Pari Skamnioti; Sarah J. Gurr

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

185

Caught Red-Handed: Rc Encodes a Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Protein Conditioning Red Pericarp in Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and UV light. The regulatory elements that control these processes are only beginning to be understood. Recent studies have...M.E. (2005). Genetic analysis of adaptive syndromes interrelated with seed dormancy in weedy rice (Oryza sativa). Theor...

Megan T. Sweeney; Michael J. Thomson; Bernard E. Pfeil; Susan McCouch

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Submergence Tolerance Regulator SUB1A Mediates Crosstalk between Submergence and Drought Tolerance in Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...economizing carbohydrate reserves and significantly...Approximately 30% of the worlds rice (Oryza sativa...economizing carbohydrate reserves to enable development...suppression of the energy-consuming escape...promotes consumption of energy reserves, but SUB1A restricts...

Takeshi Fukao; Elaine Yeung; Julia Bailey-Serres

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

187

Phenology of Agromyzid (Diptera) leafminers and their natural enemies on selected Texas native plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the leaf-mining agromyzid fly, Liriomyza sativae began in late March on L. texensis and April on L. subcarnosus. Mining activity was unaffected by mean numbers of leaves per plant or leaf surface area. Few L. sativae mines were found on Lupinus texensis... begins flowering at the time of leaf emergence. An unidentified agromyzid gall maker utilized branchlet bases. Gall formation and leaf mining activity began shortly after leaf emergence. Leaf mining occurred mainly in April when leaf condition...

Praetorius, Richard Leonhardt

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Nitro-culture and Inoculation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................ Inoculatjon with Nitro-culture for alfalfa 12 ............................................... Cultures in soil from compost heap 12 .................................................................. Cultures in pure sand 13.... Soil of the best quality, obtained from the compost heap of the College Horticultural Department and pure crushed quartz sand, were used in the second series. The pots were of white clay, of the the ordinary six-inch pattern. CROSS...

Ball, O. M. (Oscar Melville)

1906-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

190

Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK 74078  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Blackleg of Canola Jennifer DominiakOlson, Asst. Ext. Specialist, Plant Disease Diagnostician, Tom. Asst., OSU PASS A sample of canola plants was collected by Heath Sanders from Alfalfa County; therefore it is not known what affect the disease will have on canola yields in our state

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

191

Vol. 18 Issue 5 MSU Extension May 2014 UP Ag Connections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marketing your farm products. 3...Dairy Farmers looking for Forages to Replace Alfalfa, Energy efficiency in East Lansing. Pat has been the agri-science educator and FFA advisor at Stephenson High School for 27 agriculture and farming to our students. Fifteen percent of the U.S. work force works in the agriculture

192

EFFECT OF AN ENHANCED CAMV 35S PROMOTER AND A FRUIT-SPECIFIC PROMOTER ON UIDA GENE EXPRESSION IN TRANSGENIC TOMATO PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECT OF AN ENHANCED CAMV 35S PROMOTER AND A FRUIT-SPECIFIC PROMOTER ON UIDA GENE EXPRESSION from alfalfa mosaic virus RNA4 (designated as CaMV 35S/AMV) and an E-8 fruit-ripening-specific promoter by the CaMV 35S/AMV or the E-8 fruit-ripening-specific promoter. Southern blot hybridization confirmed

Korban, Schuyler S.

193

Serological and Ecological Characteristics of a Nodule-Dominant Serotype from an Indigenous Soil Population of Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. trifolii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2 Medford (bean) 67 0.6 0.9 Klamath Falls (alfalfa) 20 0.8 4.1 Soil under...AR23, and AS27. In contrast to the fall rhizosphere response, host-serotype...M. Means. 1963. Serological groups of Rhizobium japonicum recovered...

Kamtin Leung; Kathryn Yap; Narjes Dashti; Peter J. Bottomley

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Quantifying the Responses of Mixed Rumen Microbes to Excess Carbohydrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fluid was collected from 1 of 4 cannulated Jersey cows fed a lactation diet (50% corn silage, 4.5% alfalfa hay, 21% corn wet milling product [Cargill Corn Milling, Dayton, OH], 9.05% ground corn, 4.64% soybean meal, 1.30...

Timothy J. Hackmann; Leanne E. Diese; Jeffrey L. Firkins

2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

195

SECTION G (BOTANICAL SCIENCES) AND RELATED ORGANIZATIONS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cell walls in the seed coats of alfalfa...reports on the nitrogen metabolism of squash under different...able to introduce starch suspensions into...rest period of seeds and buds as related...classified as follows: cereal diseases, twenty-five...investigations and corn seed treatments were noteworthy...

Sam F. Trelease; Arthur J. Eames; A. S. Foster; F. E. Denny; G. W. Martin; W. A. Whitney; W. H. Horr

1930-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

Studies in 2-Acetylaminofluorene Carcinogenesis: I. The Intracellular Distribution of Nucleic Acids and Protein in Rat Liver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bone ash, 1.0 Linseed oil meal, 7.7 NaCl, 0...Alfalfa, 1.0 Cod-liver oil, 2.0 Casein, 8.0 Corn oil, 26.0 4We are deeply...with the aid of mild heating. Extensive tests conducted...according to the procedure of Price and Laird (9). Identical...

Robert J. Rutman; Abraham Cantarow; and Karl E. Paschkis

1954-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this version : Evon, Philippe and Colas, Dorothée and Pontalier, Pierre-Yves and Rigal, Luc The twin-screw-oatao@listes-diff.inp-toulouse.fr #12;The twin-screw extrusion technology, an original solution for the extraction of proteins from Keywords: Twin-screw extrusion, Protein extraction, Sunflower, Alfalfa. Twin-screw extrusion has been used

Mailhes, Corinne

198

Dining Services Catering Menu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, avocado, tomato, Swiss cheese, mixed greens, alfalfa sprouts and Ranch dressing) SALAD BUFFETS (served (served with creamy ranch dressing or vinaigrette) · BBQ Chicken Leg Quarters · Dry-Rubbed Tri, and sunflower seeds topped with creamy slaw dressing) · Grilled Chicken Caesar Salad · Chinese Chicken Salad

Faraon, Andrei

199

melitto files Joint publication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stores for a cheaper price. For example, a ratio of canola oil and Ivory soap to a quart of water can, such as alfalfa. Therefore, the yield per acre is higher and the price per bale of hay is lower. With lower hay costs, a meat farmer is able to support more cows per farm at a cheaper price, allowing for the value

Jawitz, James W.

200

MSU Extension Publication Archive Archive copy of publication, do not use for current recommendations. Up-to-date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-- Corn cobs -- Corn screenings -- Wood chips -- Straw--wheat, oats, rye, barley -- Alfalfa (not good% moisture when harvested. Corn stover, at the time of grain harvest, has a moisture content about twice that of grain. At the time of grain harvest, corn cobs have a moisture content 10-20 % greater than the moisture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Commercial Fertilizers and Their Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................................................................... 36 Fertilizers for Irish Potatoes..................................................................... 38 Fertilizers for Sweet Potatoes ........................ ......................................... 40 Fertilizers for Alfalfa.... The rice farmer who wastes his rice straw ashes is losing about 37 pounds of potash per acre, which he will be obliged to buy back some day. The rice farmer loses about $2.70 worth of nitrogen per acre when he burns his straws Cotton stalks, when burned...

Fraps, G. S.

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Plant isoflavone and isoflavanone O-methyltransferase genes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides enzymes that encode O-methyltransferases (OMTs) from Medicago truncatula that allow modification to plant (iso)flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. In certain aspects of the invention, the genes encoding these enzymes are provided. The invention therefore allows the modification of plants for isoflavonoid content. Transgenic plants comprising such enzymes are also provided, as well as methods for improving disease resistance in plants. Methods for producing food and nutraceuticals, and the resulting compositions, are also provided.

Broeckling, Bettina E.; Liu, Chang-Jun; Dixon, Richard A.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

203

SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2002  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 July, 2002 1 July, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants SPEAR3 Technical Progress on Track Summer Shutdown Projects Help Yourselves to Some Limelight 2002 Stanford-Berkeley Synchrotron Summer Schools a Success SSRL29 is Fast Approaching 2002 SPEAR Run Ends Very Successfully CANDLE Representative Visits SSRL Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Research Administration Announcements SMB Staff Scientist Position in Macromolecular Crystallography 1. Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants (contact: Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, jgardea@utep.edu) As the legend goes, King Midas could convert anything he touched to gold.

204

EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

38: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an 38: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Minnesota Agri-Power Plant and Associated Facilities On October 7, 1998 (63 FR 53885), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] announced its intent to prepare a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75-103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri- Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities. After careful review of this proposed biopower

205

EIS-0300: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0300: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Minnesota Agri-Power Plant and Associated Facilities In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), and Minnesota Statutes, Ch 116D, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] announce their intent to prepare a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75-103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

206

Is there a "too big to fail" problem in the field?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) 21cm survey to measure the number density of galaxies as a function of their rotational velocity, Vrot,HI (as inferred from the width of their 21cm emission line). Based on the measured velocity function we statistically connect galaxies with their host halos, via abundance matching. In a LCDM cosmology, low-velocity galaxies are expected to be hosted by halos that are significantly more massive than indicated by the measured galactic velocity; allowing lower mass halos to host ALFALFA galaxies would result in a vast overestimate of their number counts. We then seek observational verification of this predicted trend, by analyzing the kinematics of a literature sample of field dwarf galaxies. We find that galaxies with Vrot,HImeasured galactic rotation curves. This issue is analogous to the "too big to fail" problem ...

Papastergis, Emmanouil; Haynes, Martha P; Shankar, Francesco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Citrus Orchard Management in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

alfalfa and cot- Figure 2. Power driven shredders (over- sized rotary mowers) are used to keep or- chard weeds and grass under control. ton in young orchards increases the danger of losses from root rot diseases. Water may be applied in young... and weeds to grow in space not occupied and shaded by the trees. The development of power- driven shredders has encouraged a number of orchardists to adopt the "permanent border and shredded (mowed) sod" method of orchard soil management. Some...

Hancock, Bluefford G.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

The influence of kind and level of roughages, inert and flavoring agents in the diet upon beef cattle performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be lowered. Experiments were planned to determine (1) the effects of two levels (10 and 20%) of alfalfa hay, cottonseed hulls, rice hulls, flax shives and ammoniated rice hulls, upon feedlot performance and carcass characteristics of cattle fed high... and cottonseed hulls at levels of 10, 20 and 30 percent. Average daily gains and feed intake were higher for the groups fed cottonseed hulls; however, the groups fed rice hulls required less feed per hundred pounds of gain. Recently a process for ammoniating...

Vergara, Jaime Alfredo

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Influence of crude fiber from two different sources and two levels of cobalt on the biotic potential of Haemonchus contortus in sheep  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fertile egg production by H. contortus (P~O. I). A 5% crude fiber ration (alfalfa) was associated with higher (P~0. 001) eggs per gram counts in the lambs than a corresponding ration with 5X crude fiber (cotton seed hulls). Cobalt supplementation had a.... Packed Cell Volume Haemoglobin Concentration Cobalt Levels in Whole Blood. Prepatent Period. Effect of Crude Fiber on H. contortus Fertile Egg Production. Effect of Roughage (cotton seed hulls) on Egg Production by H. contortus. Fecal Output...

Njau, Barnabas Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

210

Costs of producing fruit in Alto Valle Del Rio Negro, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to alfalfa~ cereal grains, wheat, corn, and small amounts of grapes. Some fr~it was produced, but capital limitations restricted the growth of this enterprise g 14~ pp. 14-15+, The Southern Railroad Company created, the Cinco Saltos agricultural...'oduction of modern packing techniques, and development of local manufacture of specialized fruit-grading machines, are other examples Argentine Fruit Distributors was founded in 1928 by several Argentine rai, lroad companies to promote the de- velopment...

Bongiorno, Aldo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Comparative Sequencing of Plant Genomes: Choices to Make The first sequenced genome of a plant,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMENTARY Comparative Sequencing of Plant Genomes: Choices to Make The first sequenced genome of a plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, was published ,6 years ago (Arabidopsis Genome Initiative, 2000). Since that time, the complete rice genome (Oryza sativa; Goff et al., 2002; Yu et al., 2002; International Rice

Purugganan, Michael D.

212

SHORT COMMUNICATION Impact of growing conditions on the competitive ability of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicated that canola and Bromus tectorum were superior competitors in both loam and sandy soils, thus-weed competition, replacement series, biofuels, Bromus tectorum, canola Davis, P. B., Maxwell, B. et Menalled, F. D, canola Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz (gold of pleasure, large seeded false flax), a proposed biofuel

Maxwell, Bruce D.

213

Article original Biomasse, productivit et transferts de matire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Article original Biomasse, productivité et transferts de matière organique dans une séquence le 19 septembre 1995) Summary - Biomass, productivity and organic matter fluxes in Castanea sativa elevations were studied on the flanks of the Etna volcano (Sicily). Aboveground biomass was to 22 and 24 Mg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

American Journal of Botany 92(12): 19701974. 2005. EMBOLIZED CONDUITS OF RICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, POACEAE) REFILL DESPITE NEGATIVE XYLEM PRESSURE1 VOLKER STILLER,2,5 JOHN S. SPERRY,3 AND RENEE LAFITTE4 2, 2000), and leaves (Salleo et al., 2001; Stiller et al., 2003). The direct result of cavitation, Stiller et al. (2003) have shown that rice leaves (Oryza sativa) are especially vulnerable to xylem

Stiller, Volker

215

A Cell Wallâ??Degrading Esterase of Xanthomonas oryzae Requires a Unique Substrate Recognition Module for Pathogenesis on Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Boraston, A.B., Bolam, D.N., Gilbert, H.J., and Davies, G.J. (2004...Biol. Crystallogr. 55: 779-784. Gilbert, H.J., Stalbrand, H., and Brumer...Molecular Sequence Data Oryza sativa microbiology Point Mutation Protein Structure, Tertiary...

Gudlur Aparna; Avradip Chatterjee; Ramesh V. Sonti; Rajan Sankaranarayanan

2009-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

Conserved Alternative Splicing of Arabidopsis Transthyretin-Like Determines Protein Localization and S-Allantoin Synthesis in Peroxisomes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...order of magnitude higher (500 units/mg). This could suggest...Urah is at the C terminus. In keeping with these considerations...from Candida utiliz (0.8 units; Sigma-Aldrich) and in the...from the European Arabidopsis Stock Centre. Oryza sativa (Vialone...

Ilaria Lamberto; Riccardo Percudani; Rita Gatti; Claudia Folli; Stefania Petrucco

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

The effect of fertilizer treatments on several amino acids of Dallis grass grown in the Gulf Coast region of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-up of the forage ?as affected when various gains were observed with supplements of methionine, cystine and cystine plus casein added to grasses from fertilised and un-fertilised fielders Sheldon, Blue and Albrecht (4, 2S, 24) found that the nutritive value... of methionine ~ The addition of barnyard manure along with the sulfur, in the second year of the tests, brought even greater concentrations of this amino acid in alfalfa. In an effort to substantiate further these general findings, Sheldon, et al. (4, 2S, 24...

Polzer, Wilfred Leo

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

The effect of sulfate sulfur on the yield and chemical composition of oats, vetch, and turnips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with sulfur and gypsum applications to alfalfa in Washington and Oregon. Subsequent vork showed that a large part of the ali'alfa land in Oregon vas deficient in sulfur. Experiments conducted over a period of several years on various soil types in southern... Oregon showed that, yields of ali'alf'a and cover crops could be increased from 50 percent to 1000 percent by the use of various fertilissrs containing sulfur (35). Other workers in Oregon ob- tained similar results with crops other than legumes...

Gipson, Jack Rogers

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Insects Attacking Forage Crops.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on alfalfa leaves within web. Also attacks young corn ant1 soqhllm plants near ground. Have three dark spots in triangular shape on sides of most segments. GARDEN WEBWORM. Paqe II. 12. Foliage devoured by very hairy or wooly caterpillars up to 2 inches long... with irregular holes with ragged edges. Dark green worm up to nearly 2 inches long; light-coloretl line down middle of back and on each side of this line is a greenish-brown to black band. General feeder on all fora: ARMYWORM. Page 7. 3. Holes eaten in leaves...

Randolph, N. M.; Garner, C. F.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

An evaluation of Cerium-144 as an indigestible marker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF TABLES AND FIGURE Table 144 Retention of Ce With Different Feedstuff s. Page 18 IV. Level of Adsorption and Tenacity of Binding of 144Ce 144 Distribution of Ce by Particle Size After a Marked Fraction of Alfalfa Hay (fine) Was Incubated...: CUNULATIVE FECAL EXCRETION OF Ce FOLLOWING SINGLE DOSE 100 g a e w SO 40 m 0 gv Oy yV V OV 5 8 0 0 0 v~ 20 60 Hours Foi1ow1nS Administration Q Sheep number 1 Sheep number 2 Q Sheep number 3 100 (Castle, 1956) did not reveal significant...

Huston, James Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sorghum gene expression modulated by water deficit and cold stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hypothetical protein T6G15.100 [Arabidopsis thaliana] 2.5 WS1_74_C10_A002 Putative ripening-related protein [Vitis vinifera] 2.5 FM1_46_A08_A003 Putative polyprotein [Zea mays] 2.5 RHIZ2_16_D10_A003 Phospholipase-like protein [Oryza sativa] 2.5 DSAF1... GTP binding protein-like [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6.5 BE592336 B1156H12.22 protein (OSJNBa0024F24.10 protein) [Oryza sativa] 6.5 AW679302 Hypothetical protein [Arabidopsis thaliana] 6.4 BE362310 Putative ripening-related protein [Vitis vinifera...

Lim, Sanghyun

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

Molecular cloning and characterization of a rice phosphoinositide-specic phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC1, that is activated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular cloning and characterization of a rice phosphoinositide-speci¢c phospholipase C gene, OsPI-PLC-speci®c phospholipase C (OsPI-PLC1, Oryza sativa L. phosphoinositide-speci®c phospholipase C1). OsPI-PLC1 encodes a 599, characteristics of this class of enzymes. Expression of OsPI-PLC1 was induced by various chemical and biological

Goodman, Robert M.

224

The effect of soil water content on the phytotoxicity of diuron, fluridone, metribuzin and trifluralin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Soil Water Content on the Phytotoxicity of Diuron, Fluridone, Netribuzin and Trifluralin (August 1979) Paul Alan Baumann, B. S. Southwest Missouri State (kuversity, Springfield Chairman of Advisory Ccnrnittee: Qr. Norris G. Nerkle 'The effect... that simazine hect less effective in reducing top growth of oats (Avena sativa L. var. "Rodney") as the moisture level of the soil decreased. Almost three times as much simazine was required to give 50% reduction in growth when the xoisture level of the soil...

Baumann, Paul A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rapid determination of endogenous cytokinins in plant samples by combination of magnetic solid phase extraction with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (Fe3O4/SiO2/P(AMPS-co-EGDMA)) copolymer was prepared and used as a magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) medium for recovery of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) from plant extracts. This magnetic porous polymer was characterized by electron microscopy, nitrogen sorption experiments, elemental analysis and Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. It was demonstrated to have high extraction capacity toward \\{CKs\\} in plants due to its specificity, surface area and porous structure. Coupled with hydrophilic interaction chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC–MS/MS), a rapid, simple, and effective MSPE–HILIC–MS/MS analytical method for the quantitative analysis of endogenous \\{CKs\\} in Oryza sativa (O. sativa) roots was successfully established. Good linearities were obtained for all \\{CKs\\} investigated with correlation coefficients (R2) > 0.9975. The results showed that \\{LODs\\} (S/N = 3) were ranged from 0.18 to 3.65 pg mL?1. Reproducibility of the method was obtained with intra-day and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 16.1% and the recoveries in plant samples ranged from 72.8% to 115.5%. Finally, the MSPE–HILIC–MS/MS method was applied to several plant samples, and the amounts of endogenous \\{CKs\\} in O. sativa roots, leaves and Arabidopsis thaliana (A. thaliana) were successfully determined.

Zhao Liu; Bao-Dong Cai; Yu-Qi Feng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

A programmable exposure control system for determination of the effects of pollutant exposure regimes on plant growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A field-exposure research facility was constructed to provide a controlled environment to determine the influence of the various components of ozone exposure (concentration, frequency and duration) on plant response. The facility uses modified open-top chambers and an automated control system for continuous delivery and control of single or multiple pollutants over a growing season. Numerous exposure profiles (e.g. various episodic regimes, daily peak profiles with sinusoidal-type or square-wave type peaks) can be produced and controlled in all chambers. Ozone is produced by commercially available generators; their outputs are controlled by an HP 41CV hand-held computer through a Hewlett-Packard Interface Loop System (HP-IL). Chamber microenvironmental data and ozone concentration data are collected continuously with a data acquisition system that includes mean hourly ozone concentration, air and soil temperature, relative humidity and solar radiation. The hourly ozone concentration in each chamber ranged from 2 to 12% of the requested concentration over a 174-day season. Initial studies with this facility compared the response of alfalfa and tall fescue growth to episodic and daily peak exposure profiles with equivalent integrated exposure indices over the growing season. Over the period of three cuttings (133 days) alfalfa growth was reduced more when exposed to the episodic profile than with the exposure regime of daily ozone peaks. Tall fescue growth was reduced only slightly over a period of three cuttings (90 days) when exposed to either regime.

W.E. Hogsett; David T. Tingey; S.R. Holman

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Quaternised biomass as anion exchanger for the removal of fluoride from water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dried Chinese Reed, a fast growing plant, was used as a model biomass for the development of anion exchangers using a quaternisation agent, N-(3-chloro-2-hydroxypropyl) trimethylammonium chloride (CHMAC), for the removal of fluoride from water. Parameters investigated in the adsorption studies include F? concentration, agitation time, adsorbent dose and pH. Equilibrium adsorption data followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Presence of chloride, nitrate and sulfate decreased the adsorption significantly. Quaternised Hanf sativa and coconut coir pith (solid waste from coconut coir fibre industry) were also tested for the removal of fluoride with and without cross linking.

C. Namasivayam; W.H. Hoell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Property:EIA/861/RtoSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RtoSpp RtoSpp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name RTO_SPP Property Type Boolean Description Indicates that the organization conducts operations in the SPP RTO. [1] References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - 861 Webfile Layout for 2010.doc" Pages using the property "EIA/861/RtoSpp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + true + B Basin Electric Power Coop + true + C C & L Electric Coop Corp + true + Central Nebraska Pub P&I Dist + true + City Utilities of Springfield + true + City Water and Light Plant + true + City of Alexandria, Louisiana (Utility Company) + true + City of Altus, Oklahoma (Utility Company) + true + City of Arma, Kansas (Utility Company) + true +

229

Data Assimilation R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 To investigate these problems, ARM science team members conducted two field studies near Boardman, Oregon, during June of 1991 and 1992. The site was chosen to provide strong contrasts in surface moisture while minimizing the differences in topography. The region, described in detail by Doran et al. (1992), consists of a substantial dry steppe (desert) upwind of an extensive area of heavily irrigated farm land, 15 km in width and divided into 800-m-diameter circular fields in a close packed array, in which wheat, alfalfa, corn, or potatoes were grown (Figure 1). A full rotation of the irrigation arm was completed approximately once every 28 or 35 h during the growing season. This region provides marked

230

The Outer Stellar Populations and Environments of Unusually HI-rich Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nature of HI-rich galaxies from the ALFALFA and GASS surveys, which are defined as galaxies in the top 10th percentile in atomic gas fraction at a given stellar mass. We analyze outer (R>1.5 Re) stellar populations for a subset of face-on systems using optical g-r versus r-z colour/colour diagrams. The results are compared with those from control samples that are defined without regard to atomic gas content, but are matched in redshift, stellar mass and structural parameters. HI-rich early-type (C>2.6) and late-type (C 10.5) HI-rich galaxies, regardless of type.

Kauffmann, Guinevere

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effect of supplemental fat in high-energy rations on hot-weather performance of producing dairy cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.91 Crude Fiber, 10.23 4.94 5.48 25.98 8.34 ish, $ 4.85 4.26 4.34 9.20 1.99 Nitrogen-Free Extraot, % 56.83 52.87 53.44 33.81 14.28 12 A double reversal type of experimental design as suggested "by Brandt (3) and reviewed by Snedecor (19) was used... MILD WEATHER, 1957 Rations B CM CT Alfalfa Hay Tracy Silage Water, % 8.2 6 10.30 8.96 9.96 75.83 Crude Protein, % 12.22 15.25 15.92 16.19 1.30 Crude Fat, % 3.94 7.51 9.50 2.55 0.67 Crude Filler, % 10.74 5.07 5.06 21.95 6.86 Ash, % 4.94 4.24 4...

Harris, Ralph R.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

232

Grasshoppers and Their Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Conventional insecticides labeled (L) for grasshopper control in field crops.* Trade names Alfalfa Corn a Cotton Peanuts Small grains b Sorghum Soybeans Sunflowers Vegetables c Asana XL L L L L L L L Baythroid 2 L L L L L Capture 2 EC L L Dimethoate d LL L LL L... Di-Syston 15 G L L Furadan 4F L L L L Fury L L L L L L Guthion 2 L L Guthion Solupak 50 WP L Imidan 70 W L L L Karate (Zeon Tech) L L L Leverage 2.7 L Lorsban 4E-SG L Lorsban 75 WG L L L L L L Lorsban 4 E L L L L Malathion ULV e LLL f LL Malthion 8...

Patrick, Carl D.

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 3A is defined as Warm - Humid with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina Anson County, North Carolina Archer County, Texas Arkansas County, Arkansas Ashley County, Arkansas Atoka County, Oklahoma Attala County, Mississippi Autauga County, Alabama Baldwin County, Georgia

234

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

235

Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NercSpp NercSpp Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Nerc Spp Entity conducts business operations within the SPP region (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/NercSpp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + true + Anadarko Public Works Auth + true + Arkansas Electric Coop Corp + true + Ashley Chicot Elec Coop, Inc + true + Auburn Board of Public Works + true + B Bailey County Elec Coop Assn + true + Basin Electric Power Coop + true + Big Country Electric Coop, Inc + true + Bluestem Electric Coop Inc + true + Bowie-Cass Electric Coop, Inc + true + Brown-Atchison E C A Inc + true +

236

EVOLUTION IN THE H I GAS CONTENT OF GALAXY GROUPS: PRE-PROCESSING AND MASS ASSEMBLY IN THE CURRENT EPOCH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey ?.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group ''proximity' membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

Hess, Kelley M. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Wilcots, Eric M., E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ethylene is not involved in adaptive responses to flooding in the Amazonian wild rice species Oryza grandiglumis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The Amazonian wild rice Oryza grandiglumis has two contrasting adaptation mechanisms to flooding submergence: a quiescence response to complete submergence at the seedling stage and an escape response based on internodal elongation to partial submergence at the mature stage. We investigated possible factors that trigger these responses. In stem segments excised from mature O. grandiglumis plants, complete submergence only slightly promoted internodal elongation with increased ethylene levels in the internodes, while partial submergence substantially promoted internodal elongation without increased ethylene levels in the internodes. Incubation of non-submerged stem segments under a continuous flow of humidified ethylene-free air promoted internodal elongation to the same extent as that observed for partially submerged segments. Applied ethylene had little effect on the internodal elongation of non-submerged segments irrespective of humidity conditions. These results indicate that the enhanced internodal elongation of submerged O. grandiglumis plants is not triggered by ethylene accumulated during submergence but by the moist surroundings provided by submergence. The growth of shoots in O. grandiglumis seedlings was not promoted by ethylene or complete submergence, as is the case in O. sativa cultivars possessing the submergence-tolerant gene SUB1A. However, because the genome of O. grandiglumis lacks the SUB1A gene, the quiescence response of O. grandiglumis seedlings to complete submergence may be regulated by a mechanism distinct from that involved in the response of submergence-tolerant O. sativa cultivars.

Takuma Okishio; Daisuke Sasayama; Tatsuya Hirano; Masahiro Akimoto; Kazuyuki Itoh; Tetsushi Azuma

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Legume Information System | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Legume Information System Legume Information System Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Legume Information System Dataset Summary Description LIS stores genetic and genomic data for crops and modal species in the legume family. LIS stores datasets from numerous legumes through species-specific webpages, and uses the reference species Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula as a basis for comparisons between and among diverse legume species. Other genomes are being added as they become available. For other legume species, LIS hosts transcriptome assemblies (both traditional EST and NGS-based) and other datasets. Comparative maps, reference datasets, sequence search tools, etc. make these datasets available for exploration and discovery. New features in 2013 include powerful new sequence-search methods and interfaces; new genome browsers for chickpea, common bean, and pigeonpea; inferred syntenic relationships between all sequenced legume genomes; and a new database of trait and QTL data for bean and peanut. LIS is funded by the USDA-ARS, and is developed and maintained jointly by the National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) and the USDA-ARS at Ames, Iowa.

239

Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Annotation Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon Ludmila Tyler 1,2 , Jennifer N Bragg 1† , Jiajie Wu 1,3† , Xiaohan Yang 4 , Gerald A Tuskan 4 , John P Vogel 1* Abstract Background: Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast- growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally

240

Red Rice Research and Control.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s cu l t iva ted white r i c e , Oryza sativa L. Red r i c e crosses read i ly .- with white r i c e and i s very s i m i l a r t o it i n appearance. The main morpho- logical d i f ferences t h a t d i s t ingu i sh it from white r i c... l e s i n white r i c e . Since these characters can be t r ans fe r red by crossing, new red r i c e types can and do appear. Red r i c e i s undesirable because: 1. Red r i c e p l a n t s compete with cu l t iva ted r i c e...

Baker, John B.; Baldwin, Ford L.; Bourgeois, W.J.; Cox, Clodis H.; Craigmiles, Julian P.; Dishman, William D.; Eastin, E. Ford; Helpert, Charles W.; Hill, Lewis C.; Huey, Bobby A.; Klosterboer, Arlen D.; Sonnier, Earl A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0-1540) North Carotina State University - 0-1540) North Carotina State University - Jet Fuel from Cametina Sativa: A Systems Approach Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location!s) CCitY/County/State): Raleigh, NC Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of genetically modified (GM) camel ina that produces more oil than natural cametina and produces terpenes in the valves and seed coats of the plant. Funding will also support development of catalysts for transforming the oil and terpenes produced by GM cametina into jet fuel. Proposed work will consist of (1) laboratory-based genetic modification of E. coti and camelina; (2) indoor growth of the resulting GM cametina plants in contained growth chambers and greenhouses; (3) laboratory-based analysis of the resulting GM E. coti and GM cametina plants using

242

Aphids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aphids Aphids Nature Bulletin No. 421-A May 29, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APHIDS Aphids, or Plant Lice, are tiny defenseless insects that have soft bodies but needle-like beaks with which they puncture plants and suck the sap. They weaken or even kill many plants and also may infect them with virus, bacterial or fungus diseases. Aphids, unless controlled, multiply enormously and cause serious damage in orchards, vineyards, truck farms, gardens greenhouses, and field crops such as corn, cotton, small grains, clover and alfalfa. There are hundreds of species of aphids distributed over the world and there is scarcely a kind of plant, wild or cultivated, that is not infested by one or more kinds of plant lice. Some feed on stems and leaves, some on the roots, and some on both. Others feed on buds, and a few -- like the Hickory Aphid which infests hickory, maple and other forest trees -- feed on bark underneath the limbs. The hickory aphid is about one-quarter of an inch long, and one of the largest, but most kinds are about the size of a pinhead: less than one-twentieth of an inch in length. Most species are green but many are pink, white, brown or blackish. The woolly aphids, which feed on apple, pear, hawthorn and elm trees, are reddish or purplish but cover themselves with a cottony white secretion of wax.

243

Data:00fa9a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln County Power Dist No 1 Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: COMMERCIAL SERVICE OVER 50 KVA - RURAL Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all commercial, industrial, church, governmental and street lighting facilities receiving service from the Lincoln County Power District No. 1's existing facilities, and which are located within the Rural System. The Customer interconnected load must be connected at 51 kVA or greater. Service shall be subject to the established rules and regulations of the Lincoln County Power District No. 1. Service shall be provided as single-phase, 60 hertz, and at the available secondary voltage. Service hereunder shall only be used for intended purposes. Commercial purposes shall include alfalfa and commodity crop processing facilities. Governmental purposes shall include wastewater treatment, water treatment and water pumping if such service is not provided under Rate Schedule LMWP - R. The Customer shall not use the electric service hereunder as an auxiliary or supplement to any other source and shall not sell the electric power and energy purchased hereunder.

244

Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Agricultural Industry Advanced Vehicle Technology: Benchmark Study for Reduction in Petroleum Use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diesel use on farms in the United States has remained relatively constant since 1985, decreasing slightly in 2009, which may be attributed to price increases and the economic recession. During this time, the United States’ harvested area also has remained relatively constant at roughly 300 million acres. In 2010, farm diesel use was 5.4% of the total United States diesel use. Crops accounting for an estimated 65% of United States farm diesel use include corn, soybean, wheat, hay, and alfalfa, respectively, based on harvested crop area and a recent analysis of estimated fuel use by crop. Diesel use in these cropping systems primarily is from tillage, harvest, and various other operations (e.g., planting and spraying) (Figure 3). Diesel efficiency is markedly variable due to machinery types, conditions of operation (e.g., soil type and moisture), and operator variability. Farm diesel use per acre has slightly decreased in the last two decades and diesel is now estimated to be less than 5% of farm costs per acre. This report will explore current trends in increasing diesel efficiency in the farm sector. The report combines a survey of industry representatives, a review of literature, and data analysis to identify nascent technologies for increasing diesel efficiency

Roger Hoy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Assessment of the impact on crops of effluent gases from geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have assessed the potential impact of regionally dispersed sources of geothermal gaseous effluents on crops in the Imperial Valley. We used a detailed model of the photosynthesis and growth of sugar beets fumigated by H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ and generalized from the model calculations to other crops. Model calculations were made with estimates of time series of expected ground-level concentrations of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ calculated by the Air Quality Assessment element of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) at 22 locations around the valley. Results indicate that in the absence of interactions with other ambient pollutant gases, all locations would experience an increase (from slight to significant) in total growth of sugar beets. Seven locations will experience an increase of at least 10%. We calculated the emissions rate at which negative effects cancel out the benefits of H/sub 2/S fertilization; in the worst case, emission rates are expected to be no more than 1/13 this crossover rate. The expected emission rate will be less than that necessary for negative effects on the most sensitive species (such as alfalfa) by a factor of 4. Similar results for other crops are summarized in the report. If CO/sub 2/ emissions are increased proportionately, the dominance of deleterious effects is not expected to occur even under maximum development as set forth in IVEP scenario projections. 23 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

Kercher, J.R.

1981-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Economic feasibility analysis of water-harvesting techniques for mined-land reclamation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A water harvesting, agricultural production system, field tested as a means of reclaiming strip-mined land is described. Though the technical feasibility of the system is becoming increasingly apparent, economic feasibility and legal issues may determine its potential application. The purpose of this study is to explore the economic feasibility of the system and to provide information for use in assessing whether further investigation of water harvesting reclamation techniques is warranted. The economic feasibility of the PNL reclamation system hinges on whether its net benefits exceed those of conventional reclamation. This preliminary feasibility study assesses the net private benefits of each system using data for the Peabody Coal Company's Kayenta mine on the Black Mesa in Arizona. To compare the alternative reclamation systems, the present value of direct net benefits (income minus production and reclamation costs) is calculated for grazing (conventional reclamation) or for cropping (PNL reclamation). Three of the PNL system slope treatments have lower estimated total costs than conventional reclamation. The difference is $3895/acre for compacted slope, $3025/acre for salt-compacted slope and $2310/acre for crop-on-slope. These differences constitute a substantial cost advantage for the system on the basis of the present value of land reclamation and maintenance costs. The system also has advantages based on the estimated value of agricultural production capacity. Even the lowest yield levels considered for alfalfa, corn, and pinto beans had higher net present values than grazing.

Nieves, L.A.; Marti, M.H.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radionuclide concentrations in agricultural products near the Hanford Site, 1982 through 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed monitoring data for agricultural products collected from 1982 through 1992 near the Hanford Site to determine radionuclide concentration trends. While samples were collected and analyzed, and results reported annual in Hanford Site environmental reports, an 11-year data set was reviewed for this report to increase the ability to assess trends and potential Hanford effects. Products reviewed included milk, chicken, eggs, beef, vegetables, fruit, wine, wheat, and alfalfa. To determine which radionuclides were detected sufficiently often to permit analysis for trends and effects, each radionuclide concentration and its associated uncertainty were ratioed. Radionuclides were considered routinely detectable if more than 50% of the ratios were between zero and one. Data for these radionuclides were then analyzed statistically, using analyses of variance. The statistical analyses indicated the following: for the most part, there were no measurable effects for Hanford operations; radionuclide concentrations in all products reviewed remained relatively low when compared to concentrations that would result in a 1-mrem effective dose equivalent to an individual; radionuclide concentrations are decreasing in general; however, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in all media and {sup 129}I in milk increased from 1982 to 1986, then decreased gradually for the remainder of the review period. The {sup 129}I concentrations may be correlated with processing of irradiated reactor fuel at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant.

Antonio, E.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Genome sequences of two Phytophthora species responsible for Sudden Oak Death and Soybean Root Rot provide novel insights into their evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approximately 60 species of Phytophthora are all destructive pathogens, causing rots of roots, stems, leaves and fruits of a wide range of agriculturally and ornamentally important plants (1). Some species, such as P. cinnamomi, P. parasitica and P. cactorum, each attack hundreds of different plant host species, whereas others are more restricted. Some of the crops where Phytophthora infections cause the greatest financial losses include potato, soybean, tomato, alfalfa, tobacco, peppers, cucurbits, pineapple, strawberry, raspberry and a wide range of perennial tree crops, especially citrus, avocado, almonds, walnuts, apples and cocoa, and they also heavily affect the ornamental, nursery and forestry industries. The economic damage overall to crops in the United States by Phytophthora species is estimated in the tens of billions of dollars, including the costs of control measures, and worldwide it is many times this amount (1). In the northern midwest of the U.S., P. sojae causes $200 million in annual losses to soybean alone, and worldwide causes around $1-2 billion in losses per year. P. infestans infections resulted in the Irish potato famine last century and continues to be a difficult and worsening problem for potato and tomato growers worldwide, with worldwide costs estimated at $5 billion per year.

Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathi, Sucheta; Aerts, Andrea; Bensasson, Douda; Dehal, Paramvir; Dubchak, Inna; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly; Jiang, Rays; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt; McDonald, Hayes; Medina, Monica; Morris, Paul; Putnam, Nik; Rash, Sam; Salamov, Asaf; Smith, Brian; Smith, Joe; Terry, Astrid; Torto, Trudy; Grigoriev, Igor; Rokhsar, Daniel; Boore, Jeffrey

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Data:A0087bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b 87bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln County Power Dist No 1 Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: INDUSTRIAL SERVICE OVER 50 KVA - RURAL Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all commercial, industrial, church, governmental and street lighting facilities receiving service from the Lincoln County Power District No. 1's existing facilities, and which are located within the Rural System. The Customer interconnected load must be connected at 51 kVA or greater. Service shall be subject to the established rules and regulations of the Lincoln County Power District No. 1. Service shall be provided as single-phase, 60 hertz, and at the available secondary voltage. Service hereunder shall only be used for intended purposes. Commercial purposes shall include alfalfa and commodity crop processing facilities. Governmental purposes shall include wastewater treatment, water treatment and water pumping if such service is not provided under Rate Schedule LMWP - R. The Customer shall not use the electric service hereunder as an auxiliary or supplement to any other source and shall not sell the electric power and energy purchased hereunder.

251

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Assessment of the impact on crops of effluent gases from geothermal energy development in the Imperial Valley, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential impact of regionally dispersed sources of geothermal gaseous effluents on crops in the Imperial Valley was assessed. A detailed model of the photosynthesis and growth of sugar beets fumigated by H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ and generalized from the model calculations to other crops was used. Model calculations were made with estimates of time series of expected ground-level concentrations of H/sub 2/S and CO/sub 2/ calculated by the air quality assessment element of the Imperial Valley Environmental Project (IVEP) at 22 locations around the valley. The model calculations also used time series data of meteorological variables such as air temperature, solar radiation, and relative humidity, which were measured by the air quality baseline element in the field of the Imperial Valley. Results indicate that, in the absence of interactions with other ambient pollutant gases, all location would experience an increase (from slight to significant) in total growth of sugar beets. Seven locations will experience an increase of at least 10%. The emissions rate at which negative effects cancel out the benefits of H/sub 2/S fertilization was calculated; in the worst case, emission rates are expected to be no more than 1/13 of this crossover rate. The expected emission rate will be less than that necessary for negative effects on the most sensitive species (such as alfalfa) by a factor of 4. Similar results for other crops are summarized in the report. If CO/sub 2/ emissions are increased proportionately, the dominance of deleterious effects is not expected to occur, even under maximum development as set forth in IVEP scenario projections. 8 figures, 6 tables.

Kercher, J.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Does fundamental host range match ecological host range? A retrospective case study of a Lygus plant bug parasitoid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using the retrospective case study of Peristenus digoneutis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) introduced in the United States for biological control of native Lygus plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae), laboratory and field studies were conducted in the area of origin to evaluate whether the fundamental host range of P. digoneutis matches its ecological host range. Furthermore, it was determined whether these approaches would have been indicative of the post-introduction host range of P. digoneutis in North America [Day, W.H., 1999. Host preference of introduced and native parasites (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) of phytophagous plant bugs (Hemiptera: Miridae) in alfalfa-grass fields in the north-eastern USA, BioControl 44, 249–261.]. Seven non-target mirid species were selected to define the fundamental host range of P. digoneutis in the area of origin in Europe. Laboratory choice and no-choice tests demonstrated that all selected non-target species were attacked by P. digoneutis and were largely suitable for parasitoid development. To confirm the validity of the fundamental host range, the ecological host range of P. digoneutis in the area of origin was investigated. Peristenus digoneutis was reared from 10 hosts, including three Lygus species and seven non-target hosts from the subfamily Mirinae. Despite the fact that laboratory tests demonstrated a high parasitism level in non-targets, ecological assessments in both North America (Day, 1999) and Europe suggest a much lower impact of P. digoneutis on non-target mirids, with low levels of parasitism (below 1% in Europe). Therefore, ecological host range studies in the area of origin provide useful supplementary data for interpreting pre-release laboratory host range testing.

T. Haye; H. Goulet; P.G. Mason; U. Kuhlmann

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Integrated Assessment of Hadley Centre (HadCM2) Climate-Change Impacts on Agricultural Productivity and Irrigation Water Supply in the Conterminous United States. Part II. Regional Agricultural Production in 2030 and 2095.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from records for 1961-1990. The scenario runs for 2025-2034 and 2090-2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-y periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the NE. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn yields were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward yield trends under scenarios of climate change. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization.

Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Rosenberg, Norman J.; Brown, Robert A.; Thomson, Allison M.

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center. Annual report, September 15, 1990--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Defective Pollen Wall is Required for Anther and Microspore Development in Rice and Encodes a Fatty Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aliphatic alcohols naturally exist in many organisms as important cellular components; however, their roles in extracellular polymer biosynthesis are poorly defined. We report here the isolation and characterization of a rice (Oryza sativa) male-sterile mutant, defective pollen wall (dpw), which displays defective anther development and degenerated pollen grains with an irregular exine. Chemical analysis revealed that dpw anthers had a dramatic reduction in cutin monomers and an altered composition of cuticular wax, as well as soluble fatty acids and alcohols. Using map-based cloning, we identified the DPW gene, which is expressed in both tapetal cells and microspores during anther development. Biochemical analysis of the recombinant DPW enzyme shows that it is a novel fatty acid reductase that produces 1-hexadecanol and exhibits >270-fold higher specificity for palmiltoyl-acyl carrier protein than for C16:0 CoA substrates. DPW was predominantly targeted to plastids mediated by its N-terminal transit peptide. Moreover, we demonstrate that the monocot DPW from rice complements the dicot Arabidopsis thaliana male sterile2 (ms2) mutant and is the probable ortholog of MS2. These data suggest that DPWs participate in a conserved step in primary fatty alcohol synthesis for anther cuticle and pollen sporopollenin biosynthesis in monocots and dicots.

Shi, J.; Shanklin, J.; Tan, H.; Yu, X.-H.; Liu, Y.; Liang, W.; Ranathunge, K.; Franke, R. B.; Schreiber, L.; Wang, Y.; Kai, G.; Ma, H.; Zhang, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Maximal Replacement of Forage and Concentrate with a New Wet Corn Milling Product for Lactating Dairy Cows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the maximal amount of concentrate and forage that could be replaced with a new wet corn milling product. The corn milling product contained 23.1% crude protein, 9.9% ruminally undegradable protein, 13.7% acid detergent fiber, 40.3% neutral detergent fiber, and 2.6% ether extract (% of dry matter; DM). In experiment 1, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The four diets contained 54.3% forage (alfalfa:corn silages, 1:1 DM basis) with the wet corn milling product replacing 0, 50, 75, or 100% of the concentrate portion (corn and soybean meal) of the diet (DM basis). The diets containing wet corn milling product resulted in 7.8% lower DM intake, equivalent milk production (28.5 kg/d), and 13.6% greater efficiency of 4% fat-corrected milk (FCM) production than the control diet. There was no effect of diet on ruminal pH. In experiment 2, 16 Holstein cows were assigned to one of four diets in a replicated 4 × 4 Latin square design with 28-d periods. The 100% concentrate replacement diet from experiment 1 was used as control diet. For the test diets, forage was replaced with 15, 30, or 45% of the corn milling product (DM basis). Efficiency of FCM production (1.16) was not affected by diet. Rumination time was reduced for the 30 and 45% forage replacement diets, but ruminal pH was unaffected. In experiment 3, 30 Holstein cows were assigned at parturition to either a control diet (no corn milling product) or a diet containing 40% corn milling feed in place of both forage and concentrate (optimal levels from experiments 1 and 2) for 9 wk. The diet containing corn milling feed resulted in 21% greater efficiency of FCM production than the control diet. These results indicate that a new feed product based on wet corn milling ingredients has the potential to effectively replace all of the concentrate and up to 45% of the forage in the diet for lactating dairy cows.

K. Boddugari; R.J. Grant; R. Stock; M. Lewis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Chewing, rumen pool characteristics, and lactation performance of dairy cows fed 2 concentrations of a corn wet-milling coproduct with different forage sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We used a novel corn wet-milling coproduct [CMP; approximately 70% dry matter, 28% crude protein, 36% neutral detergent fiber (NDF), and 18% nonstructural carbohydrates] in diets formulated to contain 18.4% forage NDF, 17.4% crude protein, 20.2% starch, and 3.7% sugar. Six primiparous, rumen-cannulated Jersey cows were assigned to a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Diets were formulated to contain 20 and 30% CMP with 3 forage sources [corn silage (CS) and 40.5% NDF, CS replaced with 10% alfalfa hay (AH) and 45.0% NDF, or CS replaced with 7% grass hay (GH) and 67.4% NDF], with each providing 18.4% forage NDF in the diet. Total-tract digestibilities of NDF, N, and organic matter were not affected by treatment. Similarly, no treatment effects were detected for kinetics of NDF disappearance in situ from CMP or respective forage source or for N disappearance in situ from CMP. Grass hay increased total and liquid pool size of rumen contents compared with AH (by 3.2 and 3.0 kg, respectively). Total time spent chewing increased in cows fed GH by over 35 min compared with those fed AH, partially due to a trend for increased minutes spent ruminating. Mean particle size of rumen contents also tended to be higher in the GH (0.55 mm) than AH (0.69 mm) diets. No effects on production of milk or milk components were detected, but dry matter intake (DMI) tended to decrease when CMP increased from 20 to 30%. Gross feed efficiency (fat-corrected milk/DMI) tended to be greater when cows were fed AH and GH compared with CS and was greater for AH than GH diets. In diets containing low starch, increasing CMP from 20 to 30% potentially maintained similar fat-corrected milk production with lower DMI. However, more consideration also should be given to interactions among forages with respect to fill, digestion, and passage of fiber with increased inclusion rates of CMP.

D.M. Shepherd; J.L. Firkins; P. VonBehren

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AS MINIHALOS AND DWARF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present dark matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact, High-Velocity H I Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10{sup 4} K H I gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z = 0 have dark-matter masses of ?10{sup 7} M{sub ?} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the 'Strigari mass scale' observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs, we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed H I mass and predict the associated (projected) H I half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d ?> 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km s{sup –1}), we predict physical H I half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kpc (or angular sizes of 0.'6 to 2.'1) for distances ranging from 300 kpc to 2 Mpc. As a consistency check, we model the gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo T, for which there is a well-resolved H I column density profile and a known distance (420 kpc). For Leo T, we find that a subhalo with M{sub 300} = 8 (± 0.2) × 10{sup 6} M{sub ?} best fits the observed H I profile. We derive an upper limit of P{sub HIM} ?< 150 cm{sup –3} K for the pressure of any enveloping hot intergalactic medium gas at the distance of Leo T. Our analysis suggests that some of the UCHVCs may in fact constitute a population of 21 cm-selected but optically faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: yakovfae@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

263

DNA sequence analyses of blended herbal products including synthetic cannabinoids as designer drugs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, various herbal products adulterated with synthetic cannabinoids have been distributed worldwide via the Internet. These herbal products are mostly sold as incense, and advertised as not for human consumption. Although their labels indicate that they contain mixtures of several potentially psychoactive plants, and numerous studies have reported that they contain a variety of synthetic cannabinoids, their exact botanical contents are not always clear. In this study, we investigated the origins of botanical materials in 62 Spice-like herbal products distributed on the illegal drug market in Japan, by DNA sequence analyses and BLAST searches. The nucleotide sequences of four regions were analyzed to identify the origins of each plant species in the herbal mixtures. The sequences of “Damiana” (Turnera diffusa) and Lamiaceae herbs (Mellissa, Mentha and Thymus) were frequently detected in a number of products. However, the sequences of other plant species indicated on the packaging labels were not detected. In a few products, DNA fragments of potent psychotropic plants were found, including marijuana (Cannabis sativa), “Diviner's Sage” (Salvia divinorum) and “Kratom” (Mitragyna speciosa). Their active constituents were also confirmed using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS), although these plant names were never indicated on the labels. Most plant species identified in the products were different from the plants indicated on the labels. The plant materials would be used mainly as diluents for the psychoactive synthetic compounds, because no reliable psychoactive effects have been reported for most of the identified plants, with the exception of the psychotropic plants named above.

Jun Ogata; Nahoko Uchiyama; Ruri Kikura-Hanajiri; Yukihiro Goda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Organic fertilizer effects on growth, crop yield, and soil microbial biomass indices in sole and intercropped peas and oats under organic farming conditions  

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Abstract In a field experiment, peas (Pisum sativum L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.) were grown as sole crops and intercrops, fertilized with horse manure and yard-waste compost derived from shrub and garden cuttings at 10 t C ha?1 each. The objectives were to compare the effects of these organic fertilizer and cropping system in organic farming on (a) yield of peas and oats, grown as the sole crop or intercropped, as well as N2 fixation and photosynthetic rates, (b) the yield of wheat as a succeeding crop, (c) microbial biomass indices in soil and roots, and (d) microbial activity estimated by the CO2 evolution rate in the field and the amount of organic fertilizers, recovered as particulate organic matter (POM). In general, organic fertilizer application improved nodule dry weight (DW), photosynthetic rates, N2 fixation, and N accumulation of peas as well as N concentration in oat grain. Averaged across fertilizer treatments, pea/oat intercropping significantly decreased nodule DW, N2 fixation and photosynthetic rate of peas by 14, 17, and 12%, respectively, and significantly increased the photosynthetic rate of oats by 20%. However, the land equivalent ratio (LER) of intercropped peas and oats exceeded 1.0, indicating a yield advantage over sole cropping. Soil microbial biomass was positively correlated with pea dry matter yields both in sole and intercropped systems. Organic fertilizers increased the contents of microbial biomass C, N, P, and fungal ergosterol in soil and CO2 production, whereas the cropping system had no effects on these microbial indices. According to the organic fertilizer recovered as POM, 70% (manure) and 64% (compost) of added C were decomposed, but only 39% (manure) and 13% (compost) could be attributed to CO2–C during a 101-day period. This indicated that horse manure was more readily available to soil microorganisms than compost, leading to increased grain yields of the succeeding winter wheat.

Ramia Jannoura; Rainer Georg Joergensen; Christian Bruns

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Compression ignition engine performance and emission evaluation of industrial oilseed biofuel feedstocks camelina, carinata, and pennycress across three fuel pathways  

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Abstract Industrial oilseeds camelina (Camelina sativa L.), carinata (Brassica carinata), and pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) offer great potential as biofuel feedstocks due to their non-food nature and positive agronomic attributes. This research focused on compression ignition (CI) engine performance and emissions of these industrial oilseeds as compared to both traditional feedstocks and petroleum diesel. A John Deere 4.5 L test engine was used to evaluate these oils using three fuel pathways (triglyceride blends, biodiesel, and renewable diesel). This engine research represents the first direct comparison of these new biofuel feedstocks to each other and to conventional sources. For some industrial oilseed feedstock and fuel pathway combinations, this study also represents the first engine performance data available. The results were promising, with camelina, carinata, and pennycress engine performance very similar to the traditional oils for each fuel pathway. Fuel consumption, thermal efficiency, and emissions were all were typical as compared to traditional oilseed feedstocks. Average brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) for the industrial oilseed biofuels was within ±1.3% of the conventional oilseed biofuels for each fuel type. Initial research with triglyceride blends (TGB), formed by blending straight vegetable oil with gasoline, indicate it may be an ideal fuel pathway for farm-scale fuel production, and was compatible with a direct injection CI engine without modification. TGB had lower fuel consumption and a higher thermal efficiency than biodiesel for each feedstock tested. For several categories, TGB performed similar to petroleum diesel. TGB volumetric bsfc was only 1.9% higher than the petroleum runs. TGB combustion characteristics were similar to biodiesel. Biodiesel runs had several emission benefits such as reductions in carbon monoxide (CO), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and formaldehyde (CH20) emissions as compared to TGB runs. The renewable diesels had petroleum-like engine performance and combustion characteristics, while still maintaining some of the benefits of biodiesel such as reduced CO emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also 6% lower for renewable diesel runs than petroleum. Both crude and refined oil was used as feedstock, and did not significantly affect engine performance or emissions in a modern CI engine.

A.C. Drenth; D.B. Olsen; P.E. Cabot; J.J. Johnson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Biomass yield and nitrogen content of annual energy/forage crops preceded by cover crops  

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Abstract In order to reduce input costs and improve sustainability of energy/forage crops in the northern Great Plains (NGP), preceding cover crops can be included into existing annual crop systems. The objective of the study was to determine biomass yield and quality of five annual energy/forage crops, grown after six different, leguminous and non-leguminous cover crop species. The experiment was conducted at two locations, Fargo and Prosper, ND, from 2010 to 2012. The experimental design was a randomized complete block with three replicates, in a split-plot arrangement where the preceding season's cover crop was the main plot and the forage crop was the sub-plot. Six cover crops, forage pea (Pisum sativum L.) cv. Arvika, Austrian winter pea (Pisum sativum ssp. arvense (L.) Poir), hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.) forage radish (Raphanus sativus var. niger) cv. Daikon, turnip (Brassica rapa var. rapa) cv. Purple Top, and forage turnip (Brassica campestris x napus) cv. Pasja, were planted no-till on 8 to 9 August in 2010 and 2011 into oat (Avena sativa L.) residue. In the following spring, five energy/forage crops, maize (Zea mays L.), forage sorghum and sweet sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.), oat, and barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) were planted no-till onto the winter-killed cover crops residue. Results across locations and years indicated forage pea and forage radish, produced the highest dry matter yield (3.3 Mg ha?1) in the fall. Total plant N content was 116 kg N ha?1 in forage peas and 76 kg N ha?1 in forage radish, respectively. Results across locations and years indicated all energy/forage crops had greater biomass yield, and total N content when preceded by a legume cover crop compared with a non-legume or the check, in the previous year. Forage sorghum had the highest average biomass yield among the five energy/forage crops, with 17.8 Mg ha?1, followed by sweet sorghum with 15.3 Mg ha?1. In conclusion, forage pea was the most suitable cover crop to provide additional N for the subsequent crops in the NGP. Forage sorghum and sweet sorghum can be considered as the most productive energy/forage crops, especially when preceded by a legume cover crop.

D.P. Samarappuli; B.L. Johnson; H. Kandel; M.T. Berti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z