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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

A rapid analytical pyrolysis method - Alfalfa (Medicago sativa)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increase in 4-coumaryl alcohol (H) units during lignification in Increase in 4-coumaryl alcohol (H) units during lignification in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) alters extractability and molecular weight of lignin Angela Ziebell 1,2 , Kristen Gracom ,1,2 , Rui Katahira 1 , Fang Chen 3,4 , Yunqiao Pu 5,6 , Art Ragauskas 5,6 , Richard A. Dixon 3,4 and Mark Davis 1,2 1-National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401-3393; 2-Bioenergy Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Golden, CO 80401-3393; 3-Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK 73401; 4-Bioenergy Science Center, Ardmore, OK 73401; 5-Institute of Paper Science and Technology at Georgia Tech., Atlanta, GA 30318; 6-Bioenergy Science Center, Georgia Tech., Atlanta, GA 30318 Running head: Increase in coumaryl alcohol units alters lignin molecular weight

2

The use of gypsum and a coal desulfurization by-product to ameliorate subsoil acidity for alfalfa growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid soils limit the growth of aluminum-(Al) sensitive crops such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Management of acid subsoils can be difficult due to physical and economic constraints. Field experiments were conducted at two locations to evaluate the effectiveness of surface-applied gypsum and a flue gas desulfurization by-product for reducing the toxic effects of acid subsoils on alfalfa. The materials were applied at rates of 0, 5, 10, and 15 Mg ha-1. In addition, a glasshouse experiment was conducted that used 0, 5, and 10 Mg ha-1 of gypsum only. Field studies were concluded 41 and 45 months after treatment application at the two locations. No effect of material on alfalfa yield or tissue mineral concentration was observed. Also, rate did not affect yield. However, there were differences in plant tissue mineral concentration in several harvests that were related to rate. Soil was sampled periodically to 120 cm and indicated movement of Ca and S into the soil profile to depths of 60 and 120 cm, respectively. Subsoil pHH2O and pHCaCl2 were not affected by treatment. Extractable and exchangeable Al were not reduced by movement of Ca and S into the soil. In the glasshouse study, alfalfa yields and root growth were not affected by gypsum rate. As gypsum rate increased, plant tissue S increased, but K and Mg decreased. Alfalfa roots did not grow below 60 cm, even though there was indication of material movement to 90 cm in the soil. Although sulfur moved to 75 cm, no effect on soil Al was observed. Leachate collected from the bottoms of columns indicated that soil cations were leached as a result of gypsum application. Gypsum and the flue gas desulfurization by-product did not significantly affect the acid soils used in these studies or improve alfalfa growth.

Chessman, Dennis John

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

On the Performance of Pyrgeometers with Silicon Domes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net radiation and the individual components of incoming and outgoing solar and longwave radiation were measured over alfalfa (Medicago sativa. L.). Solar radiation was measured with precision spectral pyranometers and longwave radiation with ...

A. Weiss

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Dual inoculation with an Aarbuscular Mycorrhizal fungus and Rhizobium to facilitate the growth of alfalfa on coal mine substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of Glomus mosseae and Rhizobium on Medicago sativa grown on three types of coal mine substrates, namely a mixture of coal wastes and sands (CS), coal wastes and fly ash (CF), and fly ash (FA). Inoculation with Rhizobium alone did not result in any growth response but G. mosseae alone displayed a significant effect on plant growth. G. mosseae markedly increased the survival rate of M. sativa in CS substrate. In CF and FA substrates the respective oven dry weights of M. sativa inoculated with G. mosseae were 1.8 and 5.1 times higher than those without inoculation. Based on nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) uptake and legume growth, the results also show that dual inoculation in CS and CF substrates elicited a synergistic effect. This indicates that inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi may be a promising approach for revegetation of coal mine substrates.

Wu, F.Y.; Bi, Y.L.; Wong, M.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Beijing (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Alfalfa County, Oklahoma ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

6

Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso In the well-known Greek legend the touch of King Midas would convert anything to metallic gold. Recently, a team working at SSRL lead by Professor Jorge Gardea-Torresdey from the University of Texas at El Paso have shown that ordinary alfalfa plants can accumulate very small particles (nanoparticles) of metallic gold (1). The best-known materials that contain nanoparticles of metallic gold are gold colloids. These lack the familiar metallic luster, but show bright colors which range from red, violet or blue, depending upon the size of the nanoparticles (2,3). Colloidal gold has traditionally been used to color materials such as glass (e.g. gold ruby glass and cranberry glass) and enamels (e.g. famille rose enamels) since the 16th century. The earliest report of a colloidal gold preparation may be in the Bible. The book of Exodus reports that Moses destroyed the golden calf in a manner that may have resulted in an aqueous (water-based) gold colloid, which he then forced the Israelites to drink. In modern times gold colloids are imbibed for a variety of ailments (despite little or no evidence of any health-related benefits), but the most important applications may be in the field of nano-technology (see 1, and refs therein).

7

Low Level Gamma Spectroscopy Measurements of Radium and Cesium in Lucerne (Medicago Sativa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen years after Chernobyl nuclear accident, activity concentration of 137Cs still could be detected in food and soil samples in Central and Eastern Europe. In this paper radiation levels of radium and cesium in Lucerne will be presented. It is a perennial plant with a deep root system and it is widely grown throughout the world as forage for cattle. The samples of Lucerne were taken from twelve different locations in Vojvodina in the summer period July-September 2004. The samples were specially dried on the air and after that ground, powdered and mineralized by method of dry burning on the temperature of 450 deg. C. Gamma spectrometry measurements of the ash were performed by means of actively shielded germanium detector with maximal background reduction. For cesium 137Cs 10 mBq/kg order of magnitude detection limits were achieved.

Fokapic, S.; Bikit, I.; Mrda, D.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Mihaljev, Z. [Scientific Veterinary Institute, Rumenacki put 20, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Cupic, Z. [Research Institute for Reproduction, A.I. and Embryo Transfer Temerin, 21235 Temerin, Industrijska zona bb. (Serbia)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Impact of alfalfa on soil and water quality  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dominance of row crop agriculture in rolling landscapes of western and Southwestern Minnesota is identified as a primary, non-point source of sediments and associated pollutants reaching the Minnesota River. Currently as a biomass energy project, alfalfa is being promoted in western Minnesota to harvest the leaves for animal feed and stems to generate electricity. As a perennial, leguminous crop grown with minimum inputs, introduction of alfalfa in row cropped lands has potential to improve both in-situ soil productivity and downstream water quality. A field study was initiated in 1996 to compare the volume of runoff and pollutants coming from alfalfa an com-soybean fields in western Minnesota. Two pair of alfalfa and corn-soybean watersheds were instrumented at Morris in the Fall of 1996 to measure rainfall, runoff, and sample water for sediment load, phosphorus, nitrogen, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. Simulated rainfall-runoff experiments were conducted on an existing crop rotation - input management study plots at Lamberton to evaluate soil quality effects of the inclusion of alfalfa in a corn-soybean rotation under manure and fertilization management schemes. Alfalfa soil water use as a function of frequency of harvest was also monitored at Morris to evaluate the effect of cutting schedule on soil water use. During the growing season of 1997, alfalfa under a two-cut management scheme used about 25-mm (an inch) more soil water than under a three-cut schedule. The mean differences between the treatments were not significant. The conclusions drawn in this report come from analysis of data collected during one winter-summer hydrologic and crop management cycle. Continued observations through a period of at least 3-5 years is recommended to improve the instrumentation robustness and discern the variability due to climate, soil, and crop management factors.

Sharma, P.; Moncrief, J.; Gupta, S.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Animal feed compositions containing phytase derived from transgenic alfalfa and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A value-added composition of matter containing plant matter from transgenic alfalfa which expresses exogenous phytase activity is disclosed. The phytase activity is a gene product of an exogenous gene encoding for phytase which has been stably incorporated into the genome of alfalfa plants. The transgenic alfalfa expresses phytase activity in nutritionally-significant amounts, thereby enabling its use in animal feeds to eliminate the need for phosphorous supplementation of livestock, poultry, and fish feed rations.

Austin-Phillips, Sandra (Madison, WI); Koegel, Richard G. (Madison, WI); Straub, Richard J. (Brooklyn, WI); Cook, Mark (Madison, WI)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Life cycle analysis of alfalfa stem-based bioethanol production system .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Alfalfa stem can be a potential feedstock for producing bioethanol. Numerous studies have been carried out to assess the conversion of different feedstocks into bioethanol, (more)

Sooriya Arachchilage, Kishari

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Polyploid genome of Camelina sativa revealed by isolation of fatty acid synthesis genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

possessing useful biodiesel properties, thereby furtherFinally, the properties of C. sativa biodiesel are already

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Water sensors with cellular system eliminate tail water drainage in alfalfa irrigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. Improving irrigation water management of alfalfa. In:number, sensor number and water arrival time. Wire meshplate Terminals Fig. 1. The water-arrival, or wetting-front,

Saha, Rajat; Raghuwanshi, Narendra S; Upadhyaya, Shrinivasa K; Wallender, Wesley W.; Slaughter, David C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Genetic Variability of Cell Wall Degradability for the Selection of Alfalfa with Improved Saccharification Efficiency Marc-Olivier Duceppe & Annick Bertrand & Sivakumar Pattathil & Jeffrey Miller & Yves Castonguay & Michael G. Hahn & Réal Michaud & Marie-Pier Dubé # Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012 Abstract Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) has a high potential for sustainable bioethanol production, particularly because of its low reliance on N fertilizer. We assessed near-infrared reflec- tance spectroscopy (NIRS) as a high-throughput technique to measure cell wall (CW) degradability in a large number of lignified alfalfa stem samples. We also used a powerful immu- nological approach, glycome profiling, and chemical analyses to increase our knowledge of the composition of CW poly- saccharides of alfalfa stems with various levels

15

Global analysis of the transcriptional regulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti cell cycle progression and study of cell cycle regulation during symbiosis with Medicago sativa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The complex [alpha]-proteobacterial cell cycle regulatory network is essential not only for faithful replication and segregation of the genome, but also to coordinate unique cellular differentiation events that have evolved ...

De Nisco, Nicole J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Alfalfa Market News Page 1 5/18/2011 N/A = prices not available at this time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%; Demand strong; Very dry with extreme fluctuations in temperature; Substantial yield variation. Colfax Boe wheat, asking for alfalfa; Hot and dry; Low yields; Heavy weevils early Valencia Kyle Tator, County

Castillo, Steven P.

17

Dissection of defense responses of skl, an ethylene insensitive mutant of Medicago truncatula  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interactions between Medicago truncatula and Phytophthora medicaginis were examined using skl, a mutant blocked in ethylene perception, and a range of wild accessions of this plant species. P. medicaginis infection of M. truncatula plants resulted in compatible responses, whereas the mutant genotype was found to be hyper-susceptible to the pathogen. Phytophthora reproduction and colonization rates of Medicago tissues supported this conclusion. Infection of skl with different pathogens reinforced this observation. Ethylene production in infected A17 and skl roots showed reduced ethylene evolution in the mutant and suggested that a positive feedback loop, known as autocatalytic ethylene production, amplified the ethylene signal. To complement the study, expression analyses of defense response genes in this interaction were studied by real time RTPCR of Phytophthora-infected and mock-infected roots. The genes analyzed were PAL, CHS, IFR, ACC oxidase, GST, and PR10. The sequences needed for the analysis were found through the scrutiny of the M. truncatula EST database employing phylogenetics and bio-informatics tools. In A17 all the genes studied were up-regulated, although the specific gene expression patterns differed. The comparison of gene expression between A17 and skl genotypes allowed the differentiation between ethylene-dependent and ethylene-independent responses. Discrete results showed that ACC oxidase homologues were downregulated in the ethylene perception mutant, corroborating the ethylene observations. However, the expression of genes involved in the phenylpropanoid metabolism was increased in skl relative to A17, suggestive of an antagonism between the ethylene perception pathway and the regulation of the phenylpropanoid pathway. This result implied that Medicago phytoalexins accumulate in the disease interaction, but raised questions about their role in resistance to Phytophthora infection. This study establishes a link between mechanisms that regulate symbiotic infection and the regulation of disease resistance to Oomycete pathogens, especially P. medicaginis. The results served to identify a series of Phytophthora-induced genes, which remain pathogen-responsive even in the absence of a functional ethylene perception pathway. While it is possible that the products of these genes are involved in resistance to P. medicaginis, the present results demonstrate that ethylene perception is required for resistance.

Pedro, Uribe Mejia

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Genetic characterization of red rice (Oryza sativa L.) and control in imidazolinone tolerant rice (Oryza sativa L.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red rice from the southern United States was collected and analyzed using Simple Sequence Length Polymorphism (SSLP) markers in an effort to test the assumption that red rice is Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The 18 markers used are distributed across all 12 chromosomes of the rice genome and can be used to distinguish between sibling cultivars. The results indicate that traditional classification of red rice based on morphological characteristics alone is inadequate. Some red rice was closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. indica, while other red rice was more closely related to Oryza sativa ssp. japonica. Some red rice samples collected from Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas are very closely related to the noxious weed, Oryza rufipogon accession IRGC 105491. This research revealed that different classes of red rice are intermingled across the southern United States rice belt. Within individual commercial production fields, Oryza sativa ssp. indica-like red rice and Oryza rufipogon-like red rice can be found within a single 9 m collection site. In 2000 and 2001, studies were conducted at several locations across the Texas rice-producing region with imidazolinone tolerant rice to determine the most efficacious sequential application rate and timing of imazethapyr for control of red rice and other weeds. At Beaumont, red rice and barnyardgrass control was greater than 94% with 0.07, 0.09 and 0.10 kg/ha preplant incorporated or preemergence followed by at least 0.04 kg/ha early postemergence on a clay soil. Broadleaf signalgrass control near Eagle Lake showed that preplant incorporated and preemergence applications followed by early postemergence applications provided greater than 86% control in 2000, and greater than 90% control in 2001. Sequential postemergence applications at Beaumont resulted in greater than 95% red rice and barnyardgrass control when 0.04 kg/ha late postemergence followed any early postemergence application. Sequential postemergence applications controlled broadleaf signalgrass greater than 98% in both years. Red rice control at Lissie on a fine sandy loam soil was at least 98% with all sequential treatments. Crop injury was found to be a function of the postemergence application in all studies. Crop yields were not reduced by early season crop injury from imazethapyr applications, regardless of soil type.

Ottis, Brian Vance

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum Agricultural Network: Wisconsin Arlington Research Station Fields 295 and 27 (Alfalfa)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes field research in Wisconsin as part of the Flue Gas Desulfurization Gypsum (FGDG) Agricultural Network. The objective of this study, conducted during 2009-2010, was to evaluate potential beneficial agricultural uses of FGDG as a soil amendment to improve alfalfa production. FGDG was compared to a commercially available gypsum product (C-GYP) widely sold in the U.S. Midwest and other areas. A study was established in two fields (Field 295 in 2009/2010 and Field 27 in 2010) at ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluation of alfalfa leaf meal for dairy cows. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of laboratory tests and two feeding experiments were conducted to determine the quality and evaluate the feeding value of alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) for dairy cows. An experiment was also conducted to enhance the protein value of ALM for ruminants. The fiber content of 6 different samples obtained from the processing plant from November 1996 to August 1997 were variable, ranging from 28.8 to 44.5% of DM for NDF, and from 16.0 to 28.6% of DM for ADF. Ash content ranged from 10.1 to 13.8% of the DM. The protein content of ALM was fairly constant and ranged from 21.8 to 23.6% of DM. Amino acids comprise at least 70% of the total CP in ALM, but essential amino acids comprise only about 35% of the total CP. The amino acid profile of ALM is similar to that of alfalfa hay, but markedly different from that of soybean meal. Overall, ALM produced to date is similar in nutrient content to prime alfalfa hay. In one of the feeding trials, ALM pellets were used to replace part of the hay in diets for early lactation cows. The results indicate that ALM pellets can make up as much as 16% of the diet DM in replacement of an equivalent amount of high quality chopped alfalfa hay without adverse effects on production or rumen health. In an other study, ALM replaced soybean meal to supply up to 3 3 % of the total CP in the diet without any detrimental effect on production. However, in each study, dry matter intake was reduced when ALM was included in the diet at or above 15 to 16% of the DM. Although this reduction in feed intake did not influence milk production over the short duration of these studies, it is not known what would happen if ALM was fed over long periods of time. Also, these results should not be interpreted to suggest either that ALM may used to replace all the hay in the diets or that ALM in meal form may be used to replace hay in the diets. Moreover, feed consumption by cows used in these experiments was rather high and somewhat atypical of most cows.

Akayezu, J.M.; Jorgensen, M.A.; Linn, J.G.; Jung, H.J.G. [USDA, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alfalfa leaf meal in wintering beef cow diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred dry pregnant cows (1389 lb) and twenty-four pregnant heifers (1034 lb) were assigned by calving date and body condition to one of four dietary treatments for a wintering period during their late gestation. Dietary treatments consisted of supplementing crude protein (CP) at 100 % or 120 % of the recommended intake using either soybean meal or alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) as the supplemental protein source. Cows were group fed (two replicate pens/treatment) while heifers were individually fed for the duration of the study. The study lasted 70 (early) or 85 (late) days for cows and ended when the first cow in each replicate calved. For heifers, the study lasted for 100 days and ended accordingly when each heifer calved. Heifers fed ALM had consumed less (P .05) by protein source. Feeding 120 % of recommended protein (2.38 vs 2.07 lb/day) to heifers increased (P Cows fed ALM had faster (P cows calved, weight change was similar (P > .05) for each protein source. However, cows fed alfalfa leaf meal consumed more (P = .054) total dry matter (DM). Calving traits were not affected by protein source or intake. Wintering heifers or cows on ALM-based supplements had no detrimental effect on performance of heifers or cows or their calves at birth. Additional protein may be required by heifers to ensure that they continue gaining weight during late gestation.

Zehnder, C.M.; Hall, J.M.; Brown, D.B.; DiCostanzo, A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alfalfa leaf meal in finishing steer diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ninety-six medium frame, Angus and Angus cross steer calves (average initial weight 540 lb.) were allotted to a heavy or light weight block and then randomly assigned to one of four dietary treatments for a 167 or 189-day finishing phase, respectively. Treatments were control (supplemental soybean meal), alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) providing 33%, 66%, 100% of supplemental protein. Finishing diets were formulated to contain .61 Mcal NE{sub g}/lb dry matter, 12.5% crude protein, .6 % Ca and .3 % P. There were no significant (P >.05) effects of dietary treatments on daily gain or dry matter required /lb of gain. Steers fed 100 % ALM consumed more (P <.05) dry matter than steers fed either of the other three treatments. Dry matter consumption increased linearly (P >.05) with increasing ALM. There was no significant (P >.05) dietary treatment effect on marbling, KPH %, yield grade, quality grade, or liver abscesses. There was an apparent trend in reduced liver abscess incidence in steers fed 100 % ALM. Steers fed 66 % ALM had significantly (P <.05) greater backfat measurements, backfat also had a cubic effect (P <.05). Hot carcass weight had a quadratic relation (P <.05) with level of ALM. Substituting alfalfa leaf meal for soybean meal in diets of finishing steers increased DM intake, but this increase was accompanied by an increase in gain which resulted in similar feed efficiency. There may be an advantage in blending ALM and soybean meal as feed efficiency was improved when cattle were fed the blend. Also, feeding ALM may result in lower incidence of liver abscess.

Zehnder, C.M.; DiCostanzo, A.; Smith, L.B.; Brown, D.B.; Hall, J.M.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

23

Alfalfa leaf meal in wintering beef cow diets. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One hundred dry pregnant cows (1389 lb) and twenty-four pregnant heifers (1034 lb) were assigned by calving date and body condition to one of four dietary treatments for a wintering period during their late gestation. Dietary treatments consisted of supplementing crude protein (CP) at 100 % or 120 % of the recommended intake using either soybean meal or alfalfa leaf meal (ALM) as the supplemental protein source. Cows were group fed (two replicate pens/treatment) while heifers were individually fed for the duration of the study. The study lasted 70 (early) or 85 (late) days for cows and ended when the first cow in each replicate calved. For heifers, the study lasted for 100 days and ended accordingly when each heifer calved. Heifers fed ALM had consumed less (P < .05) hay and corn dry matter (DM). Overall diet DM intakes were unaffected (P > .05) by protein source. Feeding 120 % of recommended protein (2.38 vs 2.07 lb/day) to heifers increased (P < .05) their rate of gain by almost .5 lb/head/day. Cows fed ALM had faster (P < .05) rates of gain when gain was measured 22 days before calving. Once cows calved, weight change was similar (P > .05) for each protein source. However, cows fed alfalfa leaf meal consumed more (P = .054) total dry matter (DM). Calving traits were not affected by protein source or intake. Wintering heifers or cows on ALM-based supplements had no detrimental effect on performance of heifers or cows or their calves at birth. Additional protein may be required by heifers to ensure that they continue gaining weight during late gestation.

Zehnder, C.M.; Hall, J.M.; Brown, D.B.; DiCostanzo, A.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effect of Heat Treating Alfalfa Hay on Chemical Composition and Ruminal In Vitro Protein Degradation1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional (unshredded) and shredded alfalfa hays were heated in either a forced-air oven or a steam pressure cooker at different times and temperatures to determine the effect of heat treatment on chemical composition and ruminal protein degradability. Rates of protein degradation and extents of protein escape were estimated using a ruminal inhibitor in vitro system. Both rates and extents were corrected for the proportion of total N in ADIN. Estimated net protein escape (total escape minus ADIN-bound CP) of unshredded and shredded hays was increased by oven or steam heating. Optimal oven treatments, as indicated by the greatest increase in net protein escape, were 120 min at 150C and 60 min at 160'C. Net protein escapes of shredded hay were greater than unshredded hay when neither was heated and when hays were heated to the same extent. Equivalent protein protection was obtained by oven heating for 120 min at 140'C, 60 rnin at 150"C, and 30 rnin at lWC, which gave net protein escapes of 55, 54, and 54% for shredded hay and 44, 45, and 43% for unshredded hay, respectively. Similar protein protection was obtained at lower

J. H. Yang; A. Broderick; R. G. Koegel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refinement of weed risk assessments for biofuels using Camelina sativa as a model species Philip B and Environmental Sciences, Montana State University, PO Box 173120, Bozeman, MT 59717-3120, USA Summary 1. Biofuel. However, concerns have been raised on the invasiveness of biofuel feedstocks. Estimating invasion

Peterson, Robert K. D.

26

Jet Fuel from Camelina: Jet Fuel From Camelina Sativa: A Systems Approach  

SciTech Connect

PETRO Project: NC State will genetically modify the oil-crop plant Camelina sativa to produce high quantities of both modified oils and terpenes. These components are optimized for thermocatalytic conversion into energy-dense drop-in transportation fuels. The genetically engineered Camelina will capture more carbon than current varieties and have higher oil yields. The Camelina will be more tolerant to drought and heat, which makes it suitable for farming in warmer and drier climate zones in the US. The increased productivity of NC States-enhanced Camelina and the development of energy-effective harvesting, extraction, and conversion technology could provide an alternative non-petrochemical source of fuel.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

In silico analysis of motifs in promoters of Differentially Expressed Genes in rice (Oryza sativa L.) under anoxia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to characterise the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) in rice coleoptiles under anoxia by identifying motifs that are common in the promoter region of co-regulated ... Keywords: AREs, DEGs, Oryza sativa, anaerobic response elements, anoxia, bioinformatics, consensus promoter motif, differentially expressed genes, eukaryotic promoters, gene promoters, in silico motifs, in-silico motifs, microarrays, molecular mechanisms, motif detection, promoter motifs, rice, transcriptional regulation

Ashutosh Kumar; Shuchi Smita; Neeti Sahu; Vivekanand Sharma; Shankaracharya; Ambarish S. Vidyarthi; Dev Mani Pandey

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Potential for crop drying with geothermal hot water resources in the western United States: alfalfa, a case study. Report 305-100-02  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results of engineering, economic, and geographic analysis of the use of low-temperature geothermal heat for the commercial drying of grains, grasses, fruits, vegetables and livestock products in the United States are reported. Alfalfa (lucerne) dehydration was chosen for detailed process and cost study. Six different geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A conveyor type that could utilize geothermal hot water for its entire heat requirement proved to be the most economical. A capital cost estimate for an all-geothermal alfalfa dehydration plant near the Heber Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Imperial Valley, California was prepared. The combined cost for heat exchangers and dryer is about $1.6 million. Output is about 11 metric tons per hour. Acreage, production and dollar value data for 22 dryable crops were compiled for the areas surrounding identified hydrothermal resources in 11 western states. The potential magnitude of fossil fuel use that could be replaced by geothermal heat for drying these crops will be estimated.

Wright, T.C.

1977-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Alfalfa Anise (Fennel)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methomyl is one of many pesticides undergoing an endangered species assessment under litigation involving California's Red Legged Frog. The Environmental Fate and Effects Division requires crop information for all methomyl use sites so that the maximum potential use of methomyl can be determined. Currently, methomyl labels refer to applications on a per season basis. This makes it impossible to determine the maximum number of applications per year without understanding the total number of times a crop can be grown in a year. The maximum number of times a crop can be grown on the same field in one year in California for all methomyl use sites was researched and is provided in the Table 1. The maximum number of crop cycles that can be grown on an acre on land was based on the normal planting and harvest dates, crop length taking into account soil preparation, and climatic requirements. Sources of information included official publications by California state experts, national crop publications, and personal communication with the Western Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Center director. First, BEAD compiled thecrop table with published information only. Then, BEAD sent the draft table to the director of the Western IPM Center for review and refinement. Table 1. Maximum number of crops cycles per year in California for methomyl use sites.

Toxic Substances; Monisha Kaul; Biologist Mwbu; Arnet Jones Chief; Melissa Panger Biologist; Sweet Lupine White; Sweet Lupine White

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reaction of North American Oats (Avena sativa L.) to Crown Rust  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crown rust, caused by the fungus Puccinia coronata, is a severe disease negatively impacting seed quality and yield in oat (Avena sativa). Host genetic resistance is the primary means for controlling this disease. The most extensive oat map contains nearly 2,500 genetic markers, many of which are restriction and amplified fragment length polymorphic (RFLP or AFLP) markers. However, the use of more abundant single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) markers combined with diversity arrays technology (DArT) would be more advantageous for marker assisted breeding (MAB) and genome wide selection (GWS) applications due to the availability of high density genotyping technologies. The purpose of using this technology is to improve the competitiveness of oat by producing varieties with durable resistance to crown rust and desirable traits that will benefit oat growers in the U.S. Panels of winter and spring oat were evaluated for resistance to crown rust in four field environments in Texas, Louisiana, Minnesota, and North Dakota during a two-year study in 2010 and 2011. Plants representing 702 elite lines of oat were phenotyped for crown rust resistance and found to have highly diverse responses. The winter oat lines demonstrated the best crown rust resistance and are expected to yield the most QTL to be used in developing durable crown rust resistance. Heritability of crown rust resistance in this study ranged from 0.88 to 0.90 in spring and winter oats, respectively. Crown rust measurements were also found to be repeatable. Repeatability ranged from 0.56 to 0.88 at Castroville, TX in 2011 and 2010, respectively in spring oats and from 0.79 at St. Paul, MN in 2011 to 0.96 at Castroville, TX in 2010 in winter oats. Oat lines contributed by states along the Puccinia pathway in Texas, Louisiana, Minnesota, North Dakota, and Wisconsin on average exhibited the best crown rust resistance as compared to other areas in the country where spring and winter oat are grown. GGE biplot analysis indicated that Castroville, TX was the most representative and most ideal testing location. The above results are expected to increase knowledge of the genetic diversity of the oat germplasm, yield comprehensive genotyping and phenotyping information for North American oat breeding programs, and to promote further use of GWS and MAB for key traits regarding disease resistance in oat. Future work is to conclude the association mapping process by completing genotypic analysis.

Lange, Carol 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Chemical characterization of ash generated from alfalfa stem gasification: Agricultural and environmental implications. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report provides results of Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures (TCLP) and Synthetic Leachate Test Procedure (SLTP) for the alfalfa stem ash. The TCLP simulates solute leaching in landfill by using acetic acid as a solvent and SLTP simulates potential for leaching from synthetic acid rain. This report also provides information on detailed chemical characterization of organic and inorganic constituents of the ash. The analysis performed includes information on compounds that may represent a potential risk to human or animal health and those constituents that may have beneficial use as soil amendments and conditioners. A sample of the fly (filter) ash from the test burn conducted in Finland was received in May 1997 and used for initial investigation. Three additional fly ash samples and one sample of bottom ash (reactor bed ash) were received in June 1997. The samples were either tested at the University of Minnesota or sent to a reputable laboratory, and various tests were conducted according to the standard methods. The result of the comprehensive tests conducted in May 1997 (report submitted previously) were used as a screening procedure for conducting tests on June 1997 samples. To provide a more comprehensive representation of ash characteristics the results for fly ash received in May are presented along with results from fly ash samples received in July. The average, range and coefficient of variation (CV) are provided. The TCLP and SLTP tests conducted in the laboratory indicated that the concentration of heavy metals were below or close to the detection limits for fly and bottom ash samples (Tables 1 and 2). The ash was also characterized for a number of classes of organic compounds that may pose potential environmental or health risks. These are polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total and individual dioxin and furan compounds.

Rosen, C.; Mozaffari, M.; Russelle, M.; Nater, E.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Combining ultrasonic sward height and spectral signatures to assess the biomass of legume-grass swards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In binary mixtures of either white clover (Trifolium repens L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) or lucerne (Medicago sativa L.) with perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) as well as in pure swards of each single species, biomass has been assessed ... Keywords: Grassland, Precision farming, Ultrasonic sensor, Vegetation index, Yield

Thomas Fricke, Michael Wachendorf

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop, Inc Electric Coop, Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 296 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes RTO SPP Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Single Phase Commercial Commercial General Service Three Phase Commercial General Service- Single Phase Farm, Public Halls, Domestic Commercial Large Power Industrial Large Power LP-200 Industrial Residential Service Residential Yard Light Service- (7,000 Lumen Mercury vapor or 9,500 Lumen HPS) Lighting Average Rates Residential: $0.0879/kWh Commercial: $0.1090/kWh

34

Cannabis sativa : an optimization study for ROI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite hemp's multifarious uses in over 30 countries ranging from the manufacture of paper to specialty textiles, construction, animal feed, and fuel, its acceptance in the US has been shunned because of its association ...

Esmail, Adnan M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Alfalfa County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

435919°, -98.3964938° 435919°, -98.3964938° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.7435919,"lon":-98.3964938,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modification indeed improves sugar yields during the saccharification processes for bioethanol production. In their study, the lignin biosynthe- sis pathway was downregulated...

37

Imaging Lignin-Downregulated Alfalfa Using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

products and in industrial fermentation processes. Introduction Short-chain weak organic acids are potent acids also occur as inhibitory com- pounds in industrial fermentation processes. One important example is the detrimental effect of acetic acid and other weak acids on the production of bioethanol with the yeast

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney

38

Aluminum Tolerance in Alfalfa as Expressed in Tissue Culture w. A. Parrot and J. H. Bouton*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to these conditions, have led re- searchers to propose using whole plant selection in a breeding program to increase, with a 16-h photoperiod. Illumination wasprovided by cool white fluorescent tubes (75-125 umolphoton -2 s progress obtained by using a callus assay to identify Al-tolerant parents, vs. using whole-plant screening

Parrott, Wayne

39

Screening Methods to Develop Alfalfa Germplasms Tolerant of Acid, Aluminum Toxic Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

densities, lower exchangeable Al and higher Ca contents in the sub- soil after application of phosphogypsum

Parrott, Wayne

40

ARE Update Volume 12, Number 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

alfalfa corn soybeans wheat sorghum irrigated 2004 and $5corn, alfalfa, soy- beans, sorghum, and wheat) or decide notsoybeans, wheat, and sorghum. While sorghum and wheat are

Pfeiffer, Lisa; Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia; Sunding, David L.; Ajami, Newsha; Carman, Hoy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Biomass production by fescue and switchgrass alone and in mixed swards with legumes. Final project report  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the role of biomass in alleviating potential global warming, the absence of information on the sustainability of biomass production on soils of limited agricultural potential is cited as a major constraint to the assessment of the role of biomass. Research on the sustainability of yields, recycling of nutrients, and emphasis on reduced inputs of agricultural chemicals in the production of biomass are among the critical research needs to clarify optimum cropping practice in biomass production. Two field experiments were conducted between 1989 and 1993. One study evaluated biomass production and composition of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) grown alone and with bigflower vetch (Vicia grandiflora L.) and the other assessed biomass productivity and composition of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) grown alone and with perennial legumes. Switchgrass received 0, 75 or 150 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually as NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} or was interseeded with vetch. Tall fescue received 0, 75, 150 or 225 kg ha{sup {minus}1} of N annually or was interseeded with alfalfa (Medicago L.) or birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus L.). It is hoped that production systems can be designed to produce high yields of biomass with minimal inputs of fertilizer N. Achievement of this goal would reduce the potential for movement of NO{sub 3} and other undesirable N forms outside the biomass production system into the environment. In addition, management systems involving legumes could reduce the cost of biomass production.

Collins, M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Univ. of Agronomy

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Responses of High Biomass Rice (Oryza sativa L.) to Various Abiotic Stresses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice produces a lot of biomass which is an important trait in increasing grain yield and it is a potential feedstock for bioenergy production. High biomass rice is important to meet the growing demands of grains and biomass for food, fodder and bio-fuel industries. Limited studies have been conducted to determine its response to unfavorable conditions. The main objectives of this study were to determine the response of selected high biomass rice to drought, rainfed and flooded conditions and identify best genotypes that can be grown in unfavorable areas. Two experiments were conducted in summer 2009 to evaluate biomass yield and agronomic traits of selected high biomass genotypes. A greenhouse study had genotypes grown under drought condition - different field capacity (FC) i.e. 100 percent, 75 percent and 50 percent FC, while the field study had rainfed and flooded environments. Most of the genotypes performed well under fully saturated soil conditions but some were less affected by drought. Limited water delayed first tiller emergence and reduced tiller count, rate of tiller production, plant height, rate of increase in height, shoot and root weight, root:shoot (R:S) ratio, percent dry matter (percent DM) and total biomass. The plant height, tiller plant-1, and total biomass at maturity were lower under rainfed conditions and their flowering was delayed compared to flooded conditions. Majority of these traits were correlated with high biomass yield. Genotype 11 which is tall and late maturing produced the highest number of tillers plant-1 and tillers/ 750 cm2 and had the highest biomass yield under both rainfed and flooded conditions. It performed equally well under drought conditions particularly in root and R:S ratio, but genotype 12 was the best in most parameters measured in the greenhouse. Although it was the shortest genotype, it was highest in biomass yield, earliest to tiller, had the highest shoot weight and tiller count, and had the fastest tiller production. The high biomass genotypes like conventional rice were affected by drought and performed better under flooded conditions. However, these two genotypes can produce optimum results under limited availability of water and hence be used for biomass production under stressed environments.

Kondhia, Aditi Nitinkumar

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterization and genetic analysis of a very high tillering and dwarf rice (Oryza sativa L.) mutant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focused on characterizing and determining the inheritance pattern of very high tillering and dwarf traits of a rice mutant. To characterize the new mutant, field phenotyping studies, and response of two mutant lines (M-13662 & M-13684) to three levels of nitrogen (179, 202, 224 kg ha-1) and five planting densities (1, 2, 3, 4, 5 plants hill-1) in greenhouse conditions were conducted. A separate study was carried out to determine the response of the two mutant lines to gibberellic acid (GA) application. The mutants were 50-55 cm tall and produced 89-121 tillers plant-1 at harvest. Dwarfness of the mutants was due to average shortening of the top four internodes as well as compression of 2-3 basal internodes. The first tiller emerged at the 4th leaf stage whereas no tiller was observed in semi-dwarf rice cultivar, Cocodrie. Results showed that the production of high tiller numbers was the result of the release of axillary buds from a dormant stage rather than the initiation of additional axillary buds. The mutants were late maturing than controls (Cocodrie & Zhe733). The panicles were very short (10-12 cm) and had 25-30 small grains. The majority of tillers of the mutants followed the dn-type dwarf pattern based on Takedas classification, but a few plants had a different dwarfing pattern not included in the classification. Both mutant lines were found to have similar agronomic traits but were significantly different from controls. The tillering ability of the mutants was affected by the five different planting densities as well as the three nitrogen levels. Mutants produced more tillers, both productive and non-productive, at the lowest plant density. The longest and shortest panicles were observed at 202 kg ha-1 and 179 kg ha-1, respectively. Variations in other agronomic traits were found not significant. The response of the mutant to GA application was similar to Cocodrie, and thus was considered GA responsive. Preliminary DNA data using SSR markers supported the presumed origin of the mutants and the genetic analysis indicated that one recessive gene controlled both the dwarfing and very high tillering traits.

Mani, Dhananjay

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Integration of novel SSR and gene-based SNP marker loci in the chickpea genetic map and establishment of new anchor points with Medicago truncatula genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

India Turkey Nepal Nepal Iran India Afghanistan TurkeyTurkey Lebanon Turkey Turkey Ethiopia Pakistan India IranIndia Iran Iran Iran Iran Unknown India India India India

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Genomic organization of chromosomal centromeres in the cultivated rice, Oryza sativa L., and its wild progenitor, O. rufipogon Griff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Centromeres are responsible for sister-chromatid cohesion, kinetochore formation, and accurate transmission of chromosomes. Rice provides an excellent model for organizational and functional studies of centromeres since several of its chromosomes contain limited amounts of satellite and other repetitive sequences in their centromeres. To facilitate molecular characterization of the centromeres, we screened several BIBAC and BAC libraries of japonica and indica rice, using several centromere-specific repeat elements as probes. The positive clones were identified, fingerprinted and integrated into our whole genome physical map databases of the two rice subspecies. BAC/BIBACbased physical maps were constructed for the centromeric regions of the subspecies. To determine whether the genomic organization of the centromeres has changed since the cultivated rice split from its progenitor and to identify the sequences potentially playing an important role in centromere functions, we constructed a large-insert BIBAC library for the wild progenitor of Asian cultivated rice, O. rufipogon. The library contains 24,192 clones, has an average insert size of 163 kb, and covers 5 x haploid genome of wild rice. We screened the wild rice library with two centromere 8-specific overgo probes designed from the sequences flanking centromere 8 of japonica rice. A BIBACbased map was constructed for wild rice centromere 8. Two of the clones, B43P04 and B15E04, were found to span the entire region of the wild rice centromere and thus selected for sequencing the centromere. By sequencing the B43P09 clone, a 95% genomic sequence of the long arm side of wild rice centromere 8 was obtained. Comparative analysis revealed that the centromeric regions of wild rice have a similar gene content to japonica rice, but the centromeric regions of japonica rice have undergone chromosomal rearrangements at both large scale and nucleotide levels. In addition, although the 155-bp satellite repeats showed dramatic changes at the middle region, they are conserved at the 5' and 3' ends of satellite monomers, suggesting that those regions might have important functional roles for centromeres. These results provide not only new insights into genomic organization and evolution, but also a platform for functional analysis of plant centromeres.

Uhm, Taesik

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Attachment and survival of viruses on lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata L.): role of physicochemical and biotic factors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enteric viruses are responsible for a significant amount of foodborne disease in the United States. Foodborne disease associated with enteric viruses has been increasing within the last few years due to technological advances and raised awareness. Salads and salad crops are the principal vector for transmission of enteric viruses. The objective of this study was to determine if viruses are able to attach non-specifically to the surface of lettuce and to determine the forces responsible for non-specific viral adsorption to lettuce. Additionally, the impact of the microbial flora on viral persistence was studied to determine the effect on viruses. The four viruses studied were echovirus 11, feline calicivirus, MS2 and Ï?X174. The viruses were chosen based on their varying isoelectric points and similar physicochemical attributes. The isoelectric point was not the main factor determining virus attachment to lettuce. Viruses had varying attachment efficiencies, with echovirus 11 having the highest affinity to lettuce and Ï?X174 the least. Viral adsorption to lettuce was mediated by electrostatic forces due to the removal of virus adsorption at pH 7 and 8 with the addition of 1 M NaCl to the buffer solutions. Microcosm studies indicated that the microbial flora did not have a negative impact on virus survival. The bacteriophages had the highest survival rate. Virus survival in the microcosm studies was not indicative of virus survival on the surface of the lettuce. The animal viruses exhibited survival rates greater than or equal to the survival of bacteriophages at 4?° C, but at room temperature viable animal viruses rapidly declined compared to the bacteriophages. Additional studies also indicated that the microbial flora was not able to degrade the viruses for aerobic microbial growth. Overall, these results indicate that viruses are able to attach to the surface of lettuce, providing a possible explanation for the high incidence of virus associated disease involving salads and fresh produce. More importantly the use of surrogates for virus studies involving fresh produce must be re-evaluated, because of the lack of correlation between animal viruses and bacteriophages. Appropriate viral surrogates, if used, have to be carefully chosen based on viral physicochemical properties as well as the infectious route of the virus.

Vega, Everardo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Root-induced changes to cadmium speciation in the rhizosphere of two rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes  

SciTech Connect

Our aim was to investigate rhizosphere effects on the chemical behavior of Cd. This was done in a glasshouse experiment, where two rice cultivars (Zhenong54 and Sixizhan) were grown in soil spiked with cadmium (Cd) at two levels, 3.9{+-}0.5 and 8.3{+-}0.5 mg kg{sup -1} soil, placed in a rhizobox until ripening stage. Chemical forms of cadmium near the root surface were then assessed using a sequential extraction procedure (SEP). There were significant differences in Cd species, especially exchangeable Cd (EXC-Cd) between the two rice cultivars as affected by rice roots. The lowest EXC-Cd with Zhenong54 appeared in the near-rhizosphere area with little difference between tillering stage and ripening stage while Sixizhan had its lowest EXC-Cd concentration in the root compartment. Both cultivars had slight changes in the Fe/Mn oxide-bound fraction of Cd (FMO-Cd) at the grain ripening stage while the control treatments without plants had a significant increase in FMO-Cd at the same time, indicating a transformation from a less bioavailable form (FMO-Cd) to more bioavailable forms (EXC-Cd). Soil microbial biomass in the vicinity of the root surface had opposite trends to some extent with EXC-Cd, partly because of the root-induced changes to bioavailable Cd. Unlike Zhenong54, Sixizhan had a higher Cd concentration in the root, but only a small proportion of Cd translocated from the root to grain. - Research highlights: {yields}We investigated genotypic effects on Cd speciation in the rhizosphere of rice. {yields}Zhenong54 (ZN) and Sixizhan (SX) were grown in rhizobox to show root-induced changes. {yields}Lowest exchangeable-Cd of ZN was in near-rhizosphere while SX in root compartment. {yields}Soil microbial biomass had opposite trends with exchangeable-Cd in both cultivars. {yields}Unlike ZN, SX had higher Cd content in roots, but lower Cd content in shoots.

Hu, Linfei [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); McBride, Murray B. [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cheng, Hao [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Wu, Jianjun [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Shi, Jiachun, E-mail: jcshi@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Xu, Jianming, E-mail: jmxu@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Wu, Laosheng [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China) [Institute of Soil and Water Resources and Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropic Soil and Plant Nutrition, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Nonpoint Source Pollution Control, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

RUMINAL EFFECTS OF A DEAMINASE INHIBITOR AND MONENSIN G.M.J. HORTON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-third these levels were added. The diet consisted of 60% rolled barley, 36% dehydrated alfalfa pellets, 2% tallow, 1

Recanati, Catherine

49

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.fuelfirst.com Pyrolysis of energy crops including alfalfa stems, reed canarygrass, and eastern gamagrass q

A. A. Boateng A; H. G. Jung B; P. R. Adler C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes  

SciTech Connect

There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Changes in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Extractability Are Correlated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Short Communication Changes in Cell Wall Carbohydrate Extractability Are Correlated with Reduced Recalcitrance of HCT Downregulated Alfalfa Biomass Sivakumar Pattathil, 1 Trina...

52

On-farm Assessment of Nitrogen Fertilizer application to corn on Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in soils cropped to corn with varying N fertilization. Can.as affected by tillage, corn-soybean-alfalfa rotations, andsoil nitrogen mineralization for corn production in eastern

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Agricultural and Resource Economics Update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

corn, soybeans, cotton, canola, sugarbeets, alfalfa, papaya,processed products such as canola oil, produced with GMing. In contrast, the same canola oil would have to bear a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, October--December 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alfalfa leaf meal (AML) is a critical co-product to the economics of the alfalfa biomass energy system. Research is being conducted to characterize the nutritional value of ALM in dairy, beef, and turkey diets and provide an estimate of the economic value al ALM to livestock producers.

Baloun, J.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Marsha M. Wright1 R. Craig Runyan2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

precious resource. Good Luck! 1 Which crop uses more water per pound of dry matter produced? Alfalfa. Go gallon of milk produced Go to 6 3 Alfalfa uses more water, but requires little or no nitrogen fertilizer to four gallons of water for every gallon of milk produced. More water is needed to process her feed. Go

56

pc085464 1..19  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of a Medicago truncatula smooth leaf margin1 Mutant Reveals Context-Dependent Effects on Compound Leaf Development W OA Chuanen Zhou, a Lu Han, a,1 Chunyan Hou, a...

57

Minnesota agripower project. Quarterly report, April--June 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) propose to build an alfalfa processing plant integrated with an advanced power plant system at the Granite Falls, Minnesota Industrial Park to provide 75 MW of base load electric power and a competitively priced source of value added alfalfa based products. This project will utilize air blown fluidized bed gasification technology to process alfalfa stems and another biomass to produce a hot, clean, low heating value gas that will be used in a gas turbine. Exhaust heat from the gas turbine will be used to generate steam to power a steam turbine and provide steam for the processing of the alfalfa leaf into a wide range of products including alfalfa leaf meal, a protein source for livestock. The plant will demonstrate high efficiency and environmentally compatible electric power production, as well as increased economic yield from farm operations in the region. The initial phase of the Minnesota Agripower Project (MAP) will be to perform alfalfa feedstock testing, prepare preliminary designs, and develop detailed plans with estimated costs for project implementation. The second phase of MAP will include detailed engineering, construction, and startup. Full commercial operation will start in 2001.

Baloun, J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Economic development through biomass system integration: Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alfalfa is a well-known and widely-planted crop that offers environmental and soil conservation advantages when grown as a 4-year segment in a 7-year rotation with corn and soybeans. Alfalfa fixes nitrogen from the air, thereby enhancing soil nitrogen and decreasing the need for manufactured nitrogen fertilizer. With alfalfa yields of 4 dry tons per acre per year and the alfalfa leaf fraction sold as a high-value animal feed the remaining alfalfa stem fraction can be economically viable fuel feedstock for a gasifier combined cycle power plant. This report is a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. The sale of an animal feed co-product and electricity both help cover the production cost of alfalfa and the feedstock processing cost, thereby requiring neither the electricity or leaf meal to carry the total cost. The power plant provides an important continous demand for the feedstock and results in continous supply of leaf product to provide a reliable supply needed for the leaf meal product.

DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Minnesota Agripower Project, Task IV research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic analysis is being conducted by the Department of Applied Economics in support of Minnesota Alfalfa Producer`s development of alfalfa as a dedicated biomass feedstock for energy production. University Researchers have assisted in the development and implementation of inventory control systems and procedures. This report lists the tasks for which researchers are currently finalizing economic analysis. The tasks encompass three main areas: (1) optimization of feedstock transportation system, (2) analysis of market potential for new alfalfa products, and (3) total systems analysis.

Fruin, J.; Tiffany, D.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

When crop transgenes wander in California, should we worry?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

unlikely the exception being canola. However, other trans-radish (Oryza sativa), canola (Brassica napus) and pearletc. ) Brown mustard Canola Carrot Chicory Chrysanthemum

Ellstrand, Norman C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CX-007719: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-007719: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina State University - Jet Fuel from Camelina Sativa: A Systems Approach CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11232011...

62

NMR Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NMR NMR Characterization of C3H and HCT Down-Regulated Alfalfa Lignin Yunqiao Pu & Fang Chen & Angela Ziebell & Brian H. Davison & Arthur J. Ragauskas Published online: 20 October 2009 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC. 2009 Abstract Independent down-regulation of genes encoding p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase (C3H) and hydroxycinnamoyl CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) has been previously shown to reduce the recalcitrance of alfalfa and thereby improve the release of fermentable sugars during enzymatic hydrolysis. In this study, ball-milled lignins were isolated from wild-type control, C3H, and HCT gene down-regulated alfalfa plants. One- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques were utilized to determine structural changes in the ball-milled alfalfa lignins resulting from this genetic engineering.

63

Historical Albedo Values at St. Paul Minnesota, 196985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incoming and reflected hemispheric radiation were measured at St. Paul over four different surfaces (sod, alfalfa, soybeans, and green peas) for a combined total of 5778 days between 21 November 196931 December 1985. Statistical summaries of the ...

Donald G. Baker; David L. Ruschy

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

GMOs in animal agriculture: time to consider both costs and benefits in regulatory evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

81%), corn (35%), and canola (30%) crops grown globally areGE corn, soybean, cotton, canola, wheat, potato, alfalfa,Soybeans Maize (Corn) Cotton Canola Page 9 of 14 animal feed

Van Eenennaam, Alison L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Forage Crops.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reports of Cooperating Stockmen and Farmers from 71 Counties - Alfalfa - Japan Clover - Crimson Clover - White Clover - Velvet Bean - Beggar Weed - Cow Peas - Rescue Grass - Kaffir Corn - Field Corn - Chufas

Unknown author

1901-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Economic development through biomass system integration. Volumes 2--4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners.

DeLong, M.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Minnesota Agripower Project. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report very briefly summarizes activities related to the use of alfalfa as a fuel for electricity generation. A pilot plant processing facility was obtained and operated during the reporting period. Power purchase agreements and contracts for research and development are noted. Other work included preliminary research of: (1) turkey breeder stock for livestock feeding trials with the co-product alfalfa leaf meal, and (2) USDA indices for power purchase pricing formulas.

Hanson, C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Minnesota agri-power project. Quarterly report, January--March 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involves the growing of trial quantities of alfalfa for gasification pilot plant tests and the use of by-products of alfalfa plants as animal feeds for beef and dairy cattle and turkeys. The various tasks under this project are described. Tasks are: design; review and confirm feedstock supply plan; performance guarantees and warranties; sales contracts; site plan construction and environmental permits report; environmental monitoring plan; and project management, engineering, and administration.

Baloun, J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Use of low-quality geothermal heat in grain drying and related agricultural applications. Quarterly report, January 4, 1977-April 4, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

State profiles of geothermal area crop acreage, production, dollar value, and drying energy were begun. Technical feasibility analyses were done for four geothermally augmented, natural gas alfalfa dryers, a steam-tube predryer design, and an all-geothermal conveyor dryer; costing is underway. Details of a geothermal conveyor-type alfalfa dryer in New Zealand were obtained. A computer simulation of rotary drum dehydration was acquired and extensively modified for use in determining operating parameters and performance for low-temperature geothermal alfalfa dryers. The most important nutrients in alfalfa from a market standpoint were determined and experimental results assessed showing the changes nutrients undergo in conventional drying; indications are that low-temperature drying will yield an acceptable product. Innovative techniques for alfalfa processing were identified for potential geothermal application. Markets, institutional characteristics, and the outlook for growth in the dehydrated alfalfa industry were examined, and a list of existing plants near geothermal resources was compiled. Only three plants were close enough to permit geothermal retrofitting; two plants, at El Centro, California, and Twin Falls, Idaho, are the subject of site-specific studies in which detailed costs and siting options are to be analyzed.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Minnesota Agri Power Project. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program status and accomplishments for a project to develop alfalfa as a biomass fuel for power generation are summarized in this report. The main areas of reporting include: (1) alfalfa separation pilot plant testing, (2) design of gasification plant, (3) alfalfa leaf meal feeding trials and analysis, (4) integrated plant design and cost estimate, and (5) site plan construction and environmental permits. The alfalfa separation pilot plant fractionation equipment encountered operating problems from rocks and other tramp materials in the alfalfa bales. An investigation of techniques and equipment to remove the tramp materials resulted in the selection of a vibrating conveyor system. The Carbona gasification plant design basis and the Westinghouse scope of supply and design basis for the hot gas filter are provided in the report. The alfalfa leaf meal feeding trials showed that this economically critical co-product can be a viable livestock feed ingredient if favorable price, availability, and quality are maintained. The Stone and Webster basis of design for the integrated plant is included, and the basis for development of gas turbine performance runs is also detailed.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Minnesota Agripower Project. Quarterly report, July 1996--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Program status and accomplishments for the quarter are summarized in this report. The Agri-Power project is aimed at the development of alfalfa as a biomass fuel for power generation. Components of the project include varietal evaluation and selection; development of harvest, storage, and transportation systems; pellet production; and assessment of gasification and other combustion systems. Major items reported for the quarter include: (1) Design Package - economic analysis, (2) Review and Confirmation of the Alfalfa Feedwater Supply - sampling studies and resistance studies of varietals, and (3) Project Management, Engineering, and Administration - evaluation of gasification and power generating cycles.

Hanson, C.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Rice Cropping Schedule for Central Hokkaido, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A framework for the probabilistic risk assessment of the rice (Oryza sativa L.) cropping schedule (PRARCS) is presented. The method accounts for interannual meteorological variation, as opposed to the traditional cultivation schedule planning ...

Manabu Nemoto; Takahiro Hamasaki; Ryoji Sameshima; Etsushi Kumagai; Hiroyuki Ohno; Yasuyuki Wakiyama; Atsushi Maruyama; Shinkichi Goto; Kiyoshi Ozawa

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Research Article Open Access Brigham et al., J Microbial Biochem Technol 2011, S3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

million barrels/day (215 trillion gallons/yr) of crude oil used for transportation vegetable oils is Camelina sativa. One of the major advantages to this species pretreatment. Round III Biofuel Seed Grants Molecular Diagnostics for Algae

Sinskey, Anthony J.

74

Characterization of paralogous protein families in rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: High gene numbers in plant genomes reflect polyploidy and major gene duplication events. Oryza sativa, cultivated rice, is a diploid monocotyledonous species with a ~390 Mb genome that has undergone segmental ...

Lin, Haining

75

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Advanced Research Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23, 2011 CX-007719: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina State University - Jet Fuel from Camelina Sativa: A Systems Approach CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 11232011...

76

Comparison of class 2 transposable elements at superfamily resolution reveals conserved and distinct features in cereal grass genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affrc.go.jp [21,31]. Sorghum genome (Sorbi1) and annota-T, Poliakov A, et al: The Sorghum bicolor genome and theOryza sativa (rice), Sorghum bicolor and Zea mays and

Han, Yujun; Qin, Shanshan; Wessler, Susan R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Summary of Agricultural Experiments Used in Soil Carbon Sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P, phosphorus S, soybean (Glycine max L.) Sf, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) Sm, sorghum (Sorghum spp.) V, vetch ( Vicia sativa L.) W, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) NA is not...

78

pp154229 1729..1746  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monocot Oryza sativa Goff et al. (2002); Yu et al. (2002) TIGR version 6.1 sb Monocot Sorghum bicolor Paterson et al. (2009) JGI version 1.0 bd Monocot Brachypodium distachyon...

79

Association mapping and marker-assisted selection of the lettuce dieback resistance gene Tvr1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

232 bp in rice (Oryza sativa L. ) [33], 435 bp in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. ) [34], 585 bp in tomato (Solanumpotato (0.5 [30]), and sorghum (0.30 [34]). A positive D

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Southwest MN IPM STUFF All the pestilence that's fit to print  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pollination. Corn moisture stress is visible on light textured soils and compacted areas. Grasshoppers Red soybean fields. Fields taken from CRP or alfalfa often have higher populations of grasshoppers, red- #12 to trigger treatment. Small nymphs and smaller sized grasshopper species (e.g. red-legged) and nymphs cause

Amin, S. Massoud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University 127 Noble Research Center, Stillwater, OK 74078  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Blackleg of Canola Jennifer DominiakOlson, Asst. Ext. Specialist, Plant Disease Diagnostician, Tom. Asst., OSU PASS A sample of canola plants was collected by Heath Sanders from Alfalfa County; therefore it is not known what affect the disease will have on canola yields in our state

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

82

Weed Management in Pulse Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During At harvest #12;GoldSky ­ Crop Rotation · 9 Months: alfalfa, barley, canola, chickpea, dry bean PEA CAMELINA CANOLA BARLEY GOLDSKY Crop Rotation Study #12;GoldSky Crop Rotation Study ­ Herbicide #12;0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Lentil Canola Camelina Barley Field Pea Oat VisualDamage(%) GoldSky 1

Maxwell, Bruce D.

83

ARM - Instrument - ecor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

120-360 wheat or wheat stubble EF3: 0-48 pasture, 132-260 soybeans, wheat EF5: 80-154 sorghum or wheat, 155-260 wheat or wheat stubble EF6: 0-90 grazed pasture, 91-360 alfalfa and...

84

Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect

Consolidated Appropriations Resolution, 2003 Conference Report for the Department of Energy's Biological and Environmental Research (BER) program provided $481,000 for the Legume Genome Initiative at the University of Oklahoma. These funds were used to support our research that is aimed at determining the entire sequence of the gene rich regions of the genome of the legume, Medicago truncatula, by allowing us to obtain a greater degree of finished BAC sequences from the draft sequences we have already obtained through research funded by the Noble Foundation. During the funding period we increased the number of Medicago truncatula BACs with finished (Bermuda standard) sequences from 109 to 359, and the total number of BACs for which we collected sequence data from 584 to 842, 359 of which reached phase 2 (ordered and oriented contigs). We also sequenced a series of pooled BAC clones that cover additional euchromatic (gene rich) genomic regions. This work resulted in 6 refereed publications, see below. Genes whose sequence was determined during this study included multiple members of the plant disease resistance (R-gene) family as well as several genes involved in flavinoid biosynthesis, nitrogen fixation and plant-microbial symbosis. This work also served as a prelude to obtaining NSF funding for the international collaborative effort to complete the entire sequence of the Medicago truncatula genomic euchromatic regions using a BAC based approach.

Bruce A. Roe

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

85

EIS-0300: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0300: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Minnesota Agri-Power Plant and Associated Facilities In accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), and Minnesota Statutes, Ch 116D, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] announce their intent to prepare a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75-103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri-Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities.

86

SSRL HEADLINES Jul 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 July, 2002 1 July, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants SPEAR3 Technical Progress on Track Summer Shutdown Projects Help Yourselves to Some Limelight 2002 Stanford-Berkeley Synchrotron Summer Schools a Success SSRL29 is Fast Approaching 2002 SPEAR Run Ends Very Successfully CANDLE Representative Visits SSRL Upcoming Events at SSRL and Elsewhere User Research Administration Announcements SMB Staff Scientist Position in Macromolecular Crystallography 1. Science Highlight - Plants with the Midas Touch: Formation of Gold Nanoparticles by Alfalfa Plants (contact: Jorge Gardea-Torresdey, jgardea@utep.edu) As the legend goes, King Midas could convert anything he touched to gold.

87

EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

38: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an 38: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement Proposed Minnesota Agri-Power Plant and Associated Facilities On October 7, 1998 (63 FR 53885), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Minnesota Environmental Quality Board [MEQB, a Minnesota State agency] announced its intent to prepare a joint Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding a proposal by the Minnesota Valley Alfalfa Producers (MnVAP) to construct and operate a 75-103 megawatt biomass fueled gasifier and electric generating facility, known as the Minnesota Agri- Power Plant (MAPP), and associated transmission lines and alfalfa processing facilities. After careful review of this proposed biopower

88

HI Clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey is in the process of yielding a complete HI dataset of the Virgo Cluster and its environs (Giovanelli et al. 2007, Kent et al., in preparation). Assuming a distance to Virgo of 16.7 Mpc, the minimum detectable HI mass by ALFALFA is of order 2 x 10^7 Msun. A number of the HI detections appear to have interesting properties. Some appear associated with, but offset from, low surface brightness optical counterparts; others, at larger spatial offsets, may be tidally related to optical counterparts. Yet another class includes detections which are not identifiable with any optical counterparts. We present the ALFALFA results on these objects in the Virgo region, as well as followup aperture synthesis observations obtained with the VLA.

Brian R. Kent

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt. Final report Part 1: Agronomic aspects, March 1, 1988--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The relative high cost of energy derived from biomass is a major deterrent to greater use of biomass for energy production One of the most important methods of lowering the cost of dedicated biomass production is to increase the yield per unit of land area so that fixed costs can be applied to more tons of forage. For this study, the authors selected grass and legume crops with potential for high biomass yields and those that offer protection from soil erosion. The research reported here was conducted to identify those species and cultural practices that would result in high biomass yields for various land capabilities with acceptable and soil erosion potential. They also conducted research to determine if intercropping sorghum into alfalfa or reed canarygrass could increase biomass yields over alfalfa or reed canarygrass grown alone and still have the advantage for limiting soil erosion.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Use of geothermal heat for crop drying and related agricultural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Observations led to the selection of the alfalfa dehydration industry for in-depth analysis of the application of moderate-temperature geothermal heat. Six geothermal heat exchanger/dryer configurations were examined. A low-temperature conveyor dryer using geothermal water to supply all required heat was chosen for site-specific analysis, the retrofitting of a large alfalfa dehydration plant within the Heber KGRA in the Imperial Valley, California. Even in the most favorable scenario--sharing a geothermal pipeline with the neighboring fertilizer plant--geothermal retrofitting would increase the price of the alfalfa ''dehy'' about 40 percent. The geothermal brine is estimated to cost $2.58/million Btu's compared with a 1977 natural gas cost of $1.15. Capital cost for heat exchangers and the new dryers is estimated at $3.3 million. The Heber plant appeared to offer the only good opportunity for geothermal retrofitting of an existing alfalfa dehydration plant. Construction of new plants at geothermal resource sites cannot be justified due to the uncertain state of the ''dehy'' industry. Use of geothermal heat for drying other crops may be much more promising. The potato dehydration industry, which is concentrated in the geothermal-rich Snake River Valley of Idaho, appears to offer good potential for geothermal retrofitting; about 4.7 x 10{sup 12}Btu's are used annually by plants within 50 miles of resources. Drying together at the geothermal wellhead several crops that have interlocking processing seasons and drying-temperature requirements may be quite attractive. The best ''multicrop drying center'' site identified was at Power Ranch Wells, Arizona; 34 other sites were defined. Agricultural processing applications other than drying were investigated briefly.

Gordon, T.J.; Wright, T.C.; Fein, E.; Munson, T.R.; Richmond, R.C.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Genomics Presentations from DOE JGI's Fourth Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting, 2009  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tMedicago trunculata Resequencing of 384 lines, Joann Mudge \tPerformance Comparison of Two Genome Partitioning Platforms, Jon Armstrong \tPrescreening Illumina Data Results in High-Quality Genome Polishing, Cliff Han \tGenePRIMP: Improving Microbial Gene Prediction Quality, Amrita Pati \tIMG Systems for Comparative Analysis of Microbial Genomes and Metagenomes, Victor Markowitz \tAutomated Microbial Genome Annotation, Miriam Land \tNew Technology Drafts: Production and Improvements, Alla Lapidus \tHuman Microbiome Finishing, Jessica Hostetler

93

Ophiostoma dentifundum sp. nov. from oak in Europe, characterized using molecular phylogenetic data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 40, Baku AZ1073, Republic of Azerbaijan. Mycol. Res. 109 (10): 1127­1136 (October 2005). f GenBank accession no. ITS b-tubulin O. fusiforme CMW 9968c CBS 112912 Populus nigra Azerbaijan D. N. Aghayeva T AY280481 AY280461 CMW 8281 CBS 112909 Castanea sativa Azerbaijan D. N. Aghayeva NT AY280482 AY

94

Plant Pathology (2008) 57, 383 Doi: 10.1111/j.1365-3059.2007.01716.x 2008 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report of Cryphonectria parasitica on chestnut (Castanea sativa) in Azerbaijan D. N. Aghayevaa * and T. C. Harringtonb a Institute of Botany, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku AZ1073, Azerbaijan; and b of sweet chestnut mortality from the Great Caucasus region of Azerbaijan. Upon field inspection in 2004

Harrington, Thomas C.

95

Foliar lead uptake by lettuce exposed to atmospheric fallouts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Foliar lead uptake by lettuce exposed to atmospheric fallouts Gaëlle Uzu, Sophie Sobanska of foliar uptake of lead by lettuce (lactuca sativa) exposed to the atmospheric fallouts of a lead Pb-rich fallouts are studied. INTRODUCTION Particles emitted in the atmosphere present a large

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

96

Hempseed oil in a nutshell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial hemp is as a class of non-drug Cannabis sativa varieties, and hempseed is technically an achene, or nut. Both the seed and hemp's tall stalk provide significant carbohydrate feedstocks for a wide variety of industrial purposes in sever

97

Radium-226 and calcium uptake by crops grown in mixtures of sand and cay tailings from phosphate mining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radium-226 is a naturally occurring radionuclide found in reclaimed clay and sand tailing from phosphate mining. Field studies were conducted to investigate the effects of sand/clay ratio (SCR), Ca supplement and organic amendments on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in turnip, banana pepper, cabbage, yellow squash, mustard, and alfalfa. For vegetables, treatment effects included SCR (2:1, 4:1, 6:1, and 8:1), phosphogypsum (PG) 0,22, and 134 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}, and peat 0,100, and 200 Mg ha{sup {minus}1}. For alfalfa grown in a 1:1 SCR mixture, treatments included organic amendments (control, peat, sewage slude, sawdust, composted sewage sludge, composted garbage and humate) applied at 44.8 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} (2.2 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} for humate). Plant {sup 226}Ra concentration tended to be higher in the 4:1 than in the 2:1 SCR mix but this depended on the crop an d the season. Organic amendments and PG had no effect (p<0.05) on the {sup 226}Ra concentration in vegetables and alfalfa. Mean {sup 226}Ra concentration in plant tissues ranged from 3.4 Bq kg{sup {minus}1} in banana pepper fruit to 31.1 Bq kg{sup {minus}1}. A quadratic relationship based on 631 observations was observed between {sup 226}Ra and Ca concentration in plant tissues. The {sup 226}Ra/Ca ratio in plant tissues ranged from 0.85 to 2.13 kBq {sup 226}Ra kg{sup {minus}1} Ca and decreased with increasing plant {sup 226}Ra. Results indicated that wide differences in plant {sup 226}Ca concentration were related more to differences in plant Ca levels than to soil factors. 21 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Million, J.B. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Sartain, J.B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Gonzalez, R.X.; Carrier, W.D. III [Bromwell & Carrier, Lakeland, FL (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Economic analysis of wind-powered crop drying. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in crop drying. Drying of corn, soybeans, rice, peanuts, tobacco, and dehydrated alfalfa were addressed.

Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Measurement and analysis of the surface energy budget for ARM field experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study is to conduct experiments to investigate the scaling properties of surface-atmosphere interactions and feedbacks as they relate to regional fluxes of heat and water vapor. This is part of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. To achieve this objective, two field campaigns were conducted in northeastern Oregon during June 1991 and June 1992. Analysis of the data collected during these campaigns revealed the following: (1) fluxes over a dry, semi-arid grass/brush area show only small spatial heterogeneity; (2) fluxes over an irrigated farm were dependent on crop type and stage of development. In particular, fluxes over row crops such as potatoes and corn were very similar to each other, but somewhat different than fluxes over wheat and alfalfa. In general, higher latent and lower sensible heat fluxes were experienced over wheat and alfalfa compared to corn and potatoes; (3) meteorological factors had a major influence on fluxes. In particular, significantly higher latent heat fluxes were experienced on days with moderate winds compared to days with light winds over the irrigated farm. This was presumably due to the advection of sensible heat from the surrounding dry rangeland.

Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Application of solar energy to industrial drying or dehydration processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of a solar energy system to the Lawrence, Kansas alfalfa dehydration plant, owned by the Western Alfalfa Corporation, is an attractive opportunity to demonstrate the feasibility of using solar energy to supply industrial process heat. The work undertaken for this project is reviewed. The design parameters of the dehydrator, including the energy consumed by the plant, the airflow requirements of the dehydrator, and the interface between the dehydrator and the solar array are discussed. The design of the collector array, the selection of solar collectors, the calculation of collector areas for the array, and the simulations of the system performance are addressed. Discussions of the detailed engineering drawings and specifications of the array construction, duct work, air handling equipment, system controls, and data monitoring, and acquisition systems are presented. The results of the contractors' bids based on these drawings and specifications are given. An economic analysis of the solar system using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory format is presented. Finally, the impact of the solar system on the process energy requirements and on the operation of the plant are discussed. (WHK)

Not Available

1977-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Biological conversion of biomass to methane. Final report, June 1, 1976-January 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental methane fermentation system was constructed for the purpose of evaluating the processng requirements and conversion efficiencies associated with production of methane from various organic feed stocks. The fermentation reactors had an operating volume 0.775 m/sup 3/. This permitted operation with an approximate continuous feed of milled organics including beef feedlot manure, corn stover, wheat straw and alfalfa hay. A thermochemical pretreatment was applied to the corn stover and wheat straw in order to increase the biodegradability of these substrates. Working with these large units provided sufficient volumes of fermented slurry for evaluation of the dewatering properties of these slurries. Kinetic data were obtained by operating four reactors at different retention times. These data were used to calculate a first order rate constant and the percent of substrate volatile solids that were biodegradable. These data were obtained on beef feed lot manure at 40/sup 0/C and 60/sup 0/C nominal fermentation temperatures. Data from the fermentation of corn stover showed that the biodegradability of the stover volatile solids was only 36 percent at the thermophilic fermentation temperature. The first order rate constant was found to be 0.25 day/sup -1/. Thermochemical pretreatment increased the biodegradability of stover volatile solids to 71 percent. The final substrate tested was a green crop that was field dried - alfalfa. Significant foaming problems were encountered with this material. The volatile solids were found to be 74 percent biodegradable at a fermentation temperature of 60/sup 0/C. (MHR)

Pfeffer, J T

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Does It Matter Who Scouts?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scouting is the most widely used integrated pest management (IPM) technique. It has been argued that only independent crop consultants provide unbiased scouting information. In contrast, chemical dealers inflate scouting reports and/or reduce economic thresholds in order to increase pesticide sales while farmers may use excessively low treatment thresholds due to risk aversion and/or overestimation of pest pressure.. Since the majority of scouting is done by farmers and chemical dealer employees, it follows that scouting may not be a very effective means of reducing reliance on chemical pesticides. This study applies an implicit demand formulation of the Lichtenberg-Zilberman damage abatement model to data from a survey of Maryland field crop growers to examine differences in pesticide demand between growers using scouts trained and supervised by extension and those using chemical dealer employees or scouting themselves. Our results give partial support to those skeptical of the quality of scouting by farmers themselves and by consultants working for chemical dealers. We found that soybean growers using extension trained scouts had significantly lower pesticide demand than those using chemical dealer employees or scouting themselves. However, we found no significant differences in the pesticide demands for alfalfa, corn, and small grains. Since soybeans in Maryland are substantially more pesticide-intensive than corn, alfalfa, or small grains, these results suggest that it does matter who scouts when there is scope for substantial savings in pesticides.

Erik Lichtenberg; Ayesha Velderman Berlind

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Genome-wide identification of lineage-specific genes in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protein sequences were compared among Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus to identify differential gene (DG) sets that are in one but not the other two genomes. The DG sets were screened against a plant transcript database, the NR protein database and six newly-sequenced genomes (Carica, Glycine, Medicago, Sorghum, Vitis and Zea) to identify a set of species-specific genes (SS). Gene expression, protein motif and intron number were examined. 192, 641 and 109 SS genes were identified in Arabidopsis, Oryza and Populus, respectively. Some SS genes were preferentially expressed in flowers, roots, xylem and cambium or up-regulated by stress. Six conserved motifs in Arabidopsis and Oryza SS proteins were found in other distant lineages. The SS gene sets were enriched with intronless genes. The results reflect functional and/or anatomical differences between monocots and eudicots or between herbaceous and woody plants. The Populus-specific genes are candidates for carbon sequestration and biofuel research.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Data Assimilation R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook R. L. Coulter, T. J. Martin, and D. R. Cook Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 To investigate these problems, ARM science team members conducted two field studies near Boardman, Oregon, during June of 1991 and 1992. The site was chosen to provide strong contrasts in surface moisture while minimizing the differences in topography. The region, described in detail by Doran et al. (1992), consists of a substantial dry steppe (desert) upwind of an extensive area of heavily irrigated farm land, 15 km in width and divided into 800-m-diameter circular fields in a close packed array, in which wheat, alfalfa, corn, or potatoes were grown (Figure 1). A full rotation of the irrigation arm was completed approximately once every 28 or 35 h during the growing season. This region provides marked

105

Climate Zone 3A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A A Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard consisting of Climate Zone Number 3 and Climate Zone Subtype A. Climate Zone 3A is defined as Warm - Humid with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 . The following places are categorized as class 3A climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina Anson County, North Carolina Archer County, Texas Arkansas County, Arkansas Ashley County, Arkansas Atoka County, Oklahoma Attala County, Mississippi Autauga County, Alabama Baldwin County, Georgia

106

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

107

Property:EIA/861/NercSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NercSpp NercSpp Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Boolean. Description: Nerc Spp Entity conducts business operations within the SPP region (Y or N) [1] References ↑ EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2008 - F861 File Layout-2008.doc Pages using the property "EIA/861/NercSpp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + true + Anadarko Public Works Auth + true + Arkansas Electric Coop Corp + true + Ashley Chicot Elec Coop, Inc + true + Auburn Board of Public Works + true + B Bailey County Elec Coop Assn + true + Basin Electric Power Coop + true + Big Country Electric Coop, Inc + true + Bluestem Electric Coop Inc + true + Bowie-Cass Electric Coop, Inc + true + Brown-Atchison E C A Inc + true +

108

Property:EIA/861/RtoSpp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RtoSpp RtoSpp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name RTO_SPP Property Type Boolean Description Indicates that the organization conducts operations in the SPP RTO. [1] References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - 861 Webfile Layout for 2010.doc" Pages using the property "EIA/861/RtoSpp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alfalfa Electric Coop, Inc + true + B Basin Electric Power Coop + true + C C & L Electric Coop Corp + true + Central Nebraska Pub P&I Dist + true + City Utilities of Springfield + true + City Water and Light Plant + true + City of Alexandria, Louisiana (Utility Company) + true + City of Altus, Oklahoma (Utility Company) + true + City of Arma, Kansas (Utility Company) + true +

109

Agribusiness geothermal energy utilization potential of Klamath and Western Snake River Basins, Oregon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resource assessment and methods of direct utilization for existing and prospective food processing plants have been determined in two geothermal resource areas in Oregon. Ore-Ida Foods, Inc. and Amalgamated Sugar Company in the Snake River Basin; Western Polymer Corporation (potato starch extraction) and three prospective industries--vegetable dehydration, alfalfa drying and greenhouses--in the Klamath Basin have been analyzed for direct utilization of geothermal fluids. Existing geologic knowledge has been integrated to indicate locations, depth, quality, and estimated productivity of the geothermal reservoirs. Energy-economic needs and balances, along with cost and energy savings associated with field development, delivery systems, in-plant applications and fluid disposal have been calculated for interested industrial representatives.

Lienau, P.J.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Scoping calculation for components of the cow-milk dose pathway for evaluating the dose contribution from iodine-131. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project: Dose code recovery activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of scoping calculations have been undertaken to evaluate The absolute and relative contribution of different exposure pathways to doses that may have been received by individuals living in the vicinity of the Hanford site. This scoping calculation (Calculation 001) examined the contributions of the various exposure pathways associated with environmental transport and accumulation of iodine-131 in the pasture-cow-milk pathway. Addressed in this calculation were the contributions to thyroid dose of infants and adult from (1) the ingestion by dairy cattle of various feedstuffs (pasturage, silage, alfalfa hay, and grass hay) in four different feeding regimes; (2) ingestion of soil by dairy cattle; (3) ingestion of stared feed on which airborne iodine-131 had been deposited; and (4) inhalation of airborne iodine-131 by dairy cows.

Ikenberry, T.A.; Napier, B.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Ensiling wet distillers grains with other feeds. SDSU Extension Extra 4029  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the last century, livestock producers have relied heavily on highly valued crops to feed their cattle. Corn grain and silage, alfalfa hay and silage as well as other highly productive crops have been used extensively. Changes in oil prices have sparked interest into renewable energy alternatives. Ethanol production from corn has gained popularity in the Midwest resulting in increased availability of corn distillers grains. Corn distillers grains are an excellent feed for ruminants. They can usually be purchased as wet (40-70 % moisture) or dry. They supply approximately 10 % more energy than corn grain, and approximately 30 % protein, 10 % fat and 1 % phosphorus. These are highly priced nutrients and thus desirable in a feed, although they might pose a challenge when formulating diets. When distillers grains

A. D. Garcia; K. F. Kalscheur

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Beneficial uses of geothermal energy description and preliminary results for phase 1 of the Raft River irrigation experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first phase of an experiment using geothermal water for irrigation is described and preliminary results are discussed. The water was from a moderate temperature well, having salinity of about 2000 ppM, and is considered characteristic of the types of geothermal fluids that will be obtained from the young volcanic/young sediment formations of the northern intermountain west. The activity was completed at a location adjacent to ERDA's Raft River Geothermal Project in southern Idaho. About 12.5 acres, of which part had no previous cultivation, were subdivided by crops and irrigation practices for investigation with the geothermal water and a control comparison water from the relatively pure Raft River. Flood and sprinkler application techniques were used and wheat, barley, oats, grasses, alfalfa, potatoes, and garden vegetables were successfully grown. An accompanying experiment evaluated the behavior of an established alfalfa crop located nearby, when most of the irrigation water was geothermal. The experiment addressed heavy metal uptake in plants, plant fluoride retention and damage, plant tolerances to salts, soil alterations and other behavior as a result of the geothermal fluids, all of which were largely believed to eliminate geothermal water from contention for crop growing utilization. Not all analyses and results are complete in this reporting, but first results indicate no apparent difference between the geothermal watered crops and those obtained using the fresh water control. Extensive chemical analyses, neutron activation analyses, and other evaluations of crop samples are discussed, and some of the findings are presented. Although evaluation of crop yields was not an objective, extrapolations from samples indicate that yield results were comparable to those commonly found in the area, and the yield varied little between water sources. (JGB)

Schmitt, R.C.; Spencer, S.G.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

THE SURVEY OF H I IN EXTREMELY LOW-MASS DWARFS (SHIELD)  

SciTech Connect

We present first results from the Survey of H I in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), a multi-configuration Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) study of the neutral gas contents and dynamics of galaxies with H I masses in the 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} M{sub sun} range detected by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA (ALFALFA) survey. We describe the survey motivation and concept demonstration using Very Large Array imaging of six low-mass galaxies detected in early ALFALFA data products. We then describe the primary scientific goals of SHIELD and present preliminary EVLA and WIYN 3.5 m imaging of the 12 SHIELD galaxies. With only a few exceptions, the neutral gas distributions of these extremely low-mass galaxies are centrally concentrated. In only one system have we detected H I column densities higher than 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}. Despite this, the stellar populations of all of these systems are dominated by blue stars. Further, we find ongoing star formation as traced by H{alpha} emission in 10 of the 11 galaxies with H{alpha} imaging obtained to date. Taken together these results suggest that extremely low-mass galaxies are forming stars in conditions different from those found in more massive systems. While detailed dynamical analysis requires the completion of data acquisition, the most well-resolved system is amenable to meaningful position-velocity analysis. For AGC 749237, we find well-ordered rotation of 30 km s{sup -1} at {approx}40'' distance from the dynamical center. At the adopted distance of 3.2 Mpc, this implies the presence of a {approx}>1 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun} dark matter halo and a baryon fraction {approx}<0.1.

Cannon, John M.; Engstrom, Eric; Allan, John; Erny, Grace; Fliss, Palmer; Smith, AnnaLeigh [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Legume Information System | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Legume Information System Legume Information System Agriculture Community Menu DATA APPS EVENTS DEVELOPER STATISTICS COLLABORATE ABOUT Agriculture You are here Data.gov » Communities » Agriculture » Data Legume Information System Dataset Summary Description LIS stores genetic and genomic data for crops and modal species in the legume family. LIS stores datasets from numerous legumes through species-specific webpages, and uses the reference species Glycine max, Lotus japonicus, and Medicago truncatula as a basis for comparisons between and among diverse legume species. Other genomes are being added as they become available. For other legume species, LIS hosts transcriptome assemblies (both traditional EST and NGS-based) and other datasets. Comparative maps, reference datasets, sequence search tools, etc. make these datasets available for exploration and discovery. New features in 2013 include powerful new sequence-search methods and interfaces; new genome browsers for chickpea, common bean, and pigeonpea; inferred syntenic relationships between all sequenced legume genomes; and a new database of trait and QTL data for bean and peanut. LIS is funded by the USDA-ARS, and is developed and maintained jointly by the National Center for Genome Resources (NCGR) and the USDA-ARS at Ames, Iowa.

116

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Volatile fatty acid fermentation of lime-treated bagasse by rumen microorganisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the design and operation of a batch, anaerobic, in vitro fermentation of sugarcane bagasse by a mixed culture of ruminal microflora. The bagasse was supplemented with a small amount of alfalfa (0.16 g alfalfa/g bagasse) to provide necessary nutrients. The volatile fatty acid (VFA) product concentrations, yields and proportions of each acid for six different bagasse concentrations (10, 20, 35, 50, 75, and 100 g/L) are reported. Bagasse was treated with calcium hydroxide to increase the digestibility of the cell wall carbohydrates. The treatment conditions were: Ca(OH)2 loading = 10 g/100 g dry bagasse, water loading = 8.5 g/g dry bagasse, temperature 100'C, and treatment time = 1 hour. Compared to untreated bagasse, the lime-treated bagasse gave higher total VFA concentrations, faster rates of acidogenesis, and more stable molar proportions of individual VFA'S. The highest total VFA concentration obtained from lime-treated bagasse was 690 mM (45 g/L). By applying the lime pretreatment, the total VFA concentrations increased over 80% for a 10 g dry bagasse/L loading fermentation (from 4.5g VFA/L to 8.5 g VFAAL) With lime pretreatment, approximately 71 to 96% of the final total VFA yields were accomplished within the initial three days of fermentation, whereas only 52 to 67% were achieved without pretreatment during the same time period. At all solid loadings, the VFA molar compositions resulting from lime-treated bagasse were quite constant: acetate, 64-70%; propionate, 21-28%; butyrate, 6.5-7.6%; and other acids were about 1% each. In this thesis, we examined the effect of higher substrate concentration up to 100 g dry bagasse/L. For untreated bagasse, the VFA yields were fairly constant regardless of substrate concentration (ca. 0.37 g VFA/g dry substrate). However, for lime-treated bagasse, the total VFA yields decreased as the substrate concentrations increased. The best total VFA yield obtained from 10 g/L lime-treated bagasse was 0.63 g VFA/g dry raw substrate (or 0.82 g VFA/g dry ash-free substrate or 0.94 g VFA/g dry ash-free, lignin- free substrate). This is greater than yields previously reported in the literature using lignocellulosic substrates, and hence demonstrates the superiority of this very effective lime pretreatment.

Lee, Chang-Ming

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annotation Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon Ludmila Tyler 1,2 , Jennifer N Bragg 1† , Jiajie Wu 1,3† , Xiaohan Yang 4 , Gerald A Tuskan 4 , John P Vogel 1* Abstract Background: Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast- growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally

119

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0-1540) North Carotina State University - 0-1540) North Carotina State University - Jet Fuel from Cametina Sativa: A Systems Approach Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Location!s) CCitY/County/State): Raleigh, NC Proposed Action Description: Funding will support development of genetically modified (GM) camel ina that produces more oil than natural cametina and produces terpenes in the valves and seed coats of the plant. Funding will also support development of catalysts for transforming the oil and terpenes produced by GM cametina into jet fuel. Proposed work will consist of (1) laboratory-based genetic modification of E. coti and camelina; (2) indoor growth of the resulting GM cametina plants in contained growth chambers and greenhouses; (3) laboratory-based analysis of the resulting GM E. coti and GM cametina plants using

120

Data:A0087bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

87bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b 87bd5-b899-4da6-b93f-f98b1807f43b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln County Power Dist No 1 Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: INDUSTRIAL SERVICE OVER 50 KVA - RURAL Sector: Industrial Description: Applicable to all commercial, industrial, church, governmental and street lighting facilities receiving service from the Lincoln County Power District No. 1's existing facilities, and which are located within the Rural System. The Customer interconnected load must be connected at 51 kVA or greater. Service shall be subject to the established rules and regulations of the Lincoln County Power District No. 1. Service shall be provided as single-phase, 60 hertz, and at the available secondary voltage. Service hereunder shall only be used for intended purposes. Commercial purposes shall include alfalfa and commodity crop processing facilities. Governmental purposes shall include wastewater treatment, water treatment and water pumping if such service is not provided under Rate Schedule LMWP - R. The Customer shall not use the electric service hereunder as an auxiliary or supplement to any other source and shall not sell the electric power and energy purchased hereunder.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Aphids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aphids Aphids Nature Bulletin No. 421-A May 29, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation APHIDS Aphids, or Plant Lice, are tiny defenseless insects that have soft bodies but needle-like beaks with which they puncture plants and suck the sap. They weaken or even kill many plants and also may infect them with virus, bacterial or fungus diseases. Aphids, unless controlled, multiply enormously and cause serious damage in orchards, vineyards, truck farms, gardens greenhouses, and field crops such as corn, cotton, small grains, clover and alfalfa. There are hundreds of species of aphids distributed over the world and there is scarcely a kind of plant, wild or cultivated, that is not infested by one or more kinds of plant lice. Some feed on stems and leaves, some on the roots, and some on both. Others feed on buds, and a few -- like the Hickory Aphid which infests hickory, maple and other forest trees -- feed on bark underneath the limbs. The hickory aphid is about one-quarter of an inch long, and one of the largest, but most kinds are about the size of a pinhead: less than one-twentieth of an inch in length. Most species are green but many are pink, white, brown or blackish. The woolly aphids, which feed on apple, pear, hawthorn and elm trees, are reddish or purplish but cover themselves with a cottony white secretion of wax.

122

Data:00fa9a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a a00-616c-4673-b2cc-4174055e430a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Lincoln County Power Dist No 1 Effective date: 2009/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: COMMERCIAL SERVICE OVER 50 KVA - RURAL Sector: Commercial Description: Applicable to all commercial, industrial, church, governmental and street lighting facilities receiving service from the Lincoln County Power District No. 1's existing facilities, and which are located within the Rural System. The Customer interconnected load must be connected at 51 kVA or greater. Service shall be subject to the established rules and regulations of the Lincoln County Power District No. 1. Service shall be provided as single-phase, 60 hertz, and at the available secondary voltage. Service hereunder shall only be used for intended purposes. Commercial purposes shall include alfalfa and commodity crop processing facilities. Governmental purposes shall include wastewater treatment, water treatment and water pumping if such service is not provided under Rate Schedule LMWP - R. The Customer shall not use the electric service hereunder as an auxiliary or supplement to any other source and shall not sell the electric power and energy purchased hereunder.

123

FUEL LEAN BIOMASS REBURNING IN COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report describes research conducted between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2002, for the project entitled ''Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning in Coal-Fired Boilers,'' DOE Award No. DE-FG26-00NT40811. Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning is a method of staging fuel within a coal-fired utility boiler to convert nitrogen oxides (NOx) to nitrogen by creating locally fuel-rich eddies, which favor the reduction of NOx, within an overall fuel lean boiler. These eddies are created by injecting a supplemental fuel source, designated as the reburn fuel, downstream of the primary combustion zone. Chopped biomass was the reburn fuel for this project. Four parameters were explored in this research: the initial oxygen concentration ranged between 1%-6%, the amount of biomass used as the reburn fuel ranged between from 0%-23% of the total % energy input, the types of biomass used were low nitrogen switchgrass and high nitrogen alfalfa, and the types of carrier gases used to inject the biomass (nitrogen and steam). Temperature profiles and final flue gas species concentrations are presented in this report. An economic evaluation of a potential full-scale installation of a Fuel-Lean Biomass Reburn system using biomass-water slurry was also performed.

Jeffrey J. Sweterlitsch; Robert C. Brown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Areally averaged estimates of surface heat flux from ARM field studies  

SciTech Connect

The determination of areally averaged surface fluxes is a problem of fundamental interest to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The Cloud And Radiation Testbed (CART) sites central to the ARM program will provide high-quality data for input to and verification of General Circulation Models (GCMs). The extension of several point measurements of surface fluxes within the heterogeneous CART sites to an accurate representation of the areally averaged surface fluxes is not straightforward. Two field studies designed to investigate these problems, implemented by ARM science team members, took place near Boardman, Oregon, during June of 1991 and 1992. The site was chosen to provide strong contrasts in surface moisture while minimizing the differences in topography. The region consists of a substantial dry steppe (desert) upwind of an extensive area of heavily irrigated farm land, 15 km in width and divided into 800-m-diameter circular fields in a close packed array, in which wheat, alfalfa, corn, or potatoes were grown. This region provides marked contrasts, not only on the scale of farm-desert (10--20 km) but also within the farm (0.1--1 km), because different crops transpire at different rates, and the pivoting irrigation arms provide an ever-changing pattern of heavy surface moisture throughout the farm area. This paper primarily discusses results from the 1992 field study.

Coulter, R.L.; Martin, T.J.; Cook, D.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The Arecibo Galaxy Environments survey IV: the NGC7448 region and the HI mass function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe results from the Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey (AGES). The survey reaches column densities of ~3x10^18 cm^-2 and masses of ~10^7 M_O, over individual regions of order 10 sq deg in size, out to a maximum velocity of 18,000 km s^-1. Each surveyed region is centred on a nearby galaxy, group or cluster, in this instance the NGC7448 group. Galaxy interactions in the NGC7448 group reveal themselves through the identification of tidal tails and bridges. We find ~2.5 times more atomic gas in the inter-galactic medium than in the group galaxies. We identify five new dwarf galaxies, two of which appear to be members of the NGC7448 group. This is too few, by roughly an order of magnitude, dwarf galaxies to reconcile observation with theoretical predictions of galaxy formation models. If they had observed this region of sky previous wide area blind HI surveys, HIPASS and ALFALFA, would have detected only 5% and 43% respectively of the galaxies we detect, missing a large fraction of the atom...

Davies, J I; Burns, L; Minchin, R; Momjian, E; Schneider, S; Smith, M; Taylor, R; van Driel, W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The existence and detection of optically dark galaxies by 21cm surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One explanation for the disparity between Cold Dark Matter (CDM) predictions of galaxy numbers and observations could be that there are numerous dark galaxies in the Universe. These galaxies may still contain baryons, but no stars, and may be detectable in the 21cm line of atomic hydrogen. The results of surveys for such objects, and simulations that do/do not predict their existence, are controversial. In this paper we use an analytical model of galaxy formation, consistent with CDM, to firstly show that dark galaxies are certainly a prediction of the model. Secondly, we show that objects like VIRGOHI21, a dark galaxy candidate recently discovered by us, while rare are predicted by the model. Thirdly, we show that previous 'blind' HI surveys have placed few constraints on the existence of dark galaxies. This is because they have either lacked the sensitivity and/or velocity resolution or have not had the required detailed optical follow up. We look forward to new 21cm blind surveys (ALFALFA and AGES) using the Arecibo multi-beam instrument which should find large numbers of dark galaxies if they exist.

J. I. Davies; M. J. Disney; R. F. Minchin; R. Auld; R. Smith

2006-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Production cost analysis of Euphorbia lathyris. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to estimate costs of production for Euphorbia lathyris (hereafter referred to as Euphorbia) in commercial-scale quantities. Selection of five US locations for analysis was based on assumed climatic and cultivation requirements. The five areas are: nonirrigated areas (Southeast Kansas and Central Oklahoma, Northeast Louisiana and Central Mississippi, Southern Illinois), and irrigated areas: (San Joaquin Valley and the Imperial Valley, California and Yuma, Arizona). Cost estimates are tailored to reflect each region's requirements and capabilities. Variable costs for inputs such as cultivation, planting, fertilization, pesticide application, and harvesting include material costs, equipment ownership, operating costs, and labor. Fixed costs include land, management, and transportation of the plant material to a conversion facility. Euphorbia crop production costs, on the average, range between $215 per acre in nonirrigated areas to $500 per acre in irrigated areas. Extraction costs for conversion of Euphorbia plant material to oil are estimated at $33.76 per barrel of oil, assuming a plant capacity of 3000 dry ST/D. Estimated Euphorbia crop production costs are competitive with those of corn. Alfalfa production costs per acre are less than those of Euphorbia in the Kansas/Oklahoma and Southern Illinois site, but greater in the irrigated regions. This disparity is accounted for largely by differences in productivity and irrigation requirements.

Mendel, D.A.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

FUEL LEAN BIOMASS REBURNING IN COAL-FIRED BOILERS  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes research conducted between July 1, 2000, and June 30, 2002, for the project entitled ''Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning in Coal-Fired Boilers,'' DOE Award No. DE-FG26-00NT40811. Fuel Lean Biomass Reburning is a method of staging fuel within a coal-fired utility boiler to convert nitrogen oxides (NOx) to nitrogen by creating locally fuel-rich eddies, which favor the reduction of NOx, within an overall fuel lean boiler. These eddies are created by injecting a supplemental fuel source, designated as the reburn fuel, downstream of the primary combustion zone. Chopped biomass was the reburn fuel for this project. Four parameters were explored in this research: the initial oxygen concentration ranged between 1%-6%, the amount of biomass used as the reburn fuel ranged between from 0%-23% of the total % energy input, the types of biomass used were low nitrogen switchgrass and high nitrogen alfalfa, and the types of carrier gases used to inject the biomass (nitrogen and steam). Temperature profiles and final flue gas species concentrations are presented in this report. An economic evaluation of a potential full-scale installation of a Fuel-Lean Biomass Reburn system using biomass-water slurry was also performed.

Jeffrey J. Sweterlitsch; Robert C. Brown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Catalytic gasification studies in a pressurized fluid-bed unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the project is to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of producing specific gas products via the catalytic gasification of biomass. This report presents the results of research conducted from October 1980 to November 1982. In the laboratory scale studis, active catalysts were developed for generation of synthesis gases from wood by steam gasification. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Co-Mo on silica-alumina doped with 2 wt % Na, was found to retain activity indefinitely for generation of a methanol synthesis gas from wood at 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C) and 1 atm (100 kPa) absolute pressure. Catalysts for generation of a methane-rich gas were deactivated rapidly and could not be regenerated as required for economic application. Sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate were effective as catalysts for conversion of wood to synthesis gases and methane-rich gas and should be economically viable. Catalytic gasification conditions were found to be suitable for processing of alternative feedstocks: bagasse, alfalfa, rice hulls, and almond hulls. The PDU was operated successfully at absolute pressures of up to 10 atm (1000 kPa) and temperatures of up to 1380/sup 0/F (750/sup 0/C). Yields of synthesis gases at elevated pressure were greater than those used for previous economic evaluations. A trimetallic catalyst, Ni-Cu-Mo on silica-alumina, did not display a long life as did the doped trimetallic catalyst used in laboratory studies. A computer program for a Radio Shack TRS-80 Model I microcomputer was developed to evaluate rapidly the economics of producing either methane or methanol from wood. The program is based on economic evaluations reported in previous studies. Improved yields from the PDU studies were found to result in a reduction of about 9 cents/gal in methanol cost.

Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Mitchell, D.H.; Robertus, R.J.; Brown, M.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Digestion of protein in the equine small and large intestines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four mature pony geldings weighing an average of 134 kg and fitted with ileal cannulas were used in two 4X4 Latin square experiments to determine the digestibility of forage and soybean meal protein in different segments of the equine digestive tract. Chromic oxide was fed in both trials to measure ileal flow and fecal excretion. Digestion and absorption of nitrogen was determined from changes in nitrogen:chromium ratios, and true digestion of nitrogen was computed by regression analyses. In trial 1, four diets containing varying ratios of chopped bermudagrass and alfalfa hays were fed. True total tract nitrogen digestibility was 89.6%. True digestibility of forage nitrogen in the small intestine was 40.5% in this trial, while true postileal digestibility was 78.1%. These data indicate that almost 90% of forage protein was digested over the total digestive tract. Approximately 45% of the digestible forage nitrogen was digested prececally with the remaining nitrogen being digested postileally. Thus, when ponies were fed all forage diets the lower tract was a major site for protein digestion. In trial 2, a basal, corn-based diet and three diets with soybean meal as the primary source of protein were formulated to contain approximately 5%, 9.5%, 14% and 16.5% crude protein as fed. True total tract digestion of nitrogen was 95.3%. True digestibility of feed (SBM) nitrogen in the small intestine over the range of linearity was 72.2%, while true digestibility of nitrogen reaching the large intestine was 89.8%. These data indicate that the protein in soybean meal was almost completely digested in the equine digestive tract. Further, while results from this trial indicate there may be an upper limit to the quantity of SBM nitrogen digested in the small intestine from a meal, approximately 75% of the digestible SBM protein was digested prececally when nitrogen intake was less than approximately 125 mg/kg body weight/feeding.

Farley, Eleanor Baker

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Soil-to-Plant Concentration Ratios for Assessing Food Chain Pathways in Biosphere Models  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions project Assessment of Food Chain Pathway Parameters in Biosphere Models, which was established to assess and evaluate a number of key parameters used in the food-chain models used in performance assessments of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Section 2 of this report summarizes characteristics of samples of soils and groundwater from three geographical regions of the United States, the Southeast, Northwest, and Southwest, and analyses performed to characterize their physical and chemical properties. Because the uptake and behavior of radionuclides in plant roots, plant leaves, and animal products depends on the chemistry of the water and soil coming in contact with plants and animals, water and soil samples collected from these regions of the United States were used in experiments at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to determine radionuclide soil-to-plant concentration ratios. Crops and forage used in the experiments were grown in the soils, and long-lived radionuclides introduced into the groundwater provide the contaminated water used to water the grown plants. The radionuclides evaluated include 99Tc, 238Pu, and 241Am. Plant varieties include alfalfa, corn, onion, and potato. The radionuclide uptake results from this research study show how regional variations in water quality and soil chemistry affect radionuclide uptake. Section 3 summarizes the procedures and results of the uptake experiments, and relates the soil-to-plant uptake factors derived. In Section 4, the results found in this study are compared with similar values found in the biosphere modeling literature; the studys results are generally in line with current literature, but soil- and plant-specific differences are noticeable. This food-chain pathway data may be used by the NRC staff to assess dose to persons in the reference biosphere (e.g., persons who live and work in an area potentially affected by radionuclide releases) of waste disposal facilities and decommissioning sites.

Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geothermal source potential and utilization for methane generation and alcohol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was conducted to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating a geothermally heated anaerobic digester with a fuel alcohol plant and cattle feedlot. Thin stillage produced from the alcohol production process and manure collected from the cattle feedlot would be digested in anaerobic digesters to produce biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide, and residue. The energy requirements to maintain proper digester temperatures would be provided by geothermal water. The biogas produced in the digesters would be burned in a boiler to produce low-pressure steam which would be used in the alcohol production process. The alcohol plant would be sized so that the distiller's grains byproduct resulting from the alcohol production would be adequate to supply the daily cattle feed requirements. A portion of the digester residue would substitute for alfalfa hay in the cattle feedlot ration. The major design criterion for the integrated facilty was the production of adequate distiller's grain to supply the daily requirements of 1700 head of cattle. It was determined that, for a ration of 7 pounds of distiller's grain per head per day, a 1 million gpy alcohol facility would be required. An order-of-magnitude cost estimate was prepared for the proposed project, operating costs were calculated for a facility based on a corn feedstock, the economic feasibility of the proposed project was examined by calculating its simple payback, and an analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity of the project's economic viability to variations in feedstock costs and alcohol and distiller's grain prices.

Austin, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Biomass Biorefinery for the production of Polymers and Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conversion of biomass crops to fuel is receiving considerable attention as a means to reduce our dependence on foreign oil imports and to meet future energy needs. Besides their use for fuel, biomass crops are an attractive vehicle for producing value added products such as biopolymers. Metabolix, Inc. of Cambridge proposes to develop methods for producing biodegradable polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) in green tissue plants as well as utilizating residual plant biomass after polymer extraction for fuel generation to offset the energy required for polymer extraction. The primary plant target is switchgrass, and backup targets are alfalfa and tobacco. The combined polymer and fuel production from the transgenic biomass crops establishes a biorefinery that has the potential to reduce the nations dependence on foreign oil imports for both the feedstocks and energy needed for plastic production. Concerns about the widespread use of transgenic crops and the growers ability to prevent the contamination of the surrounding environment with foreign genes will be addressed by incorporating and expanding on some of the latest plant biotechnology developed by the project partners of this proposal. This proposal also addresses extraction of PHAs from biomass, modification of PHAs so that they have suitable properties for large volume polymer applications, processing of the PHAs using conversion processes now practiced at large scale (e.g., to film, fiber, and molded parts), conversion of PHA polymers to chemical building blocks, and demonstration of the usefulness of PHAs in large volume applications. The biodegradability of PHAs can also help to reduce solid waste in our landfills. If successful, this program will reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, as well as contribute jobs and revenue to the agricultural economy and reduce the overall emissions of carbon to the atmosphere.

Dr. Oliver P. Peoples

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

136

Effect Of Solid Phase Organic Substrate Characteristics On Sulfate Reducer Activity And Metal Removal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. This paper is a progress report on studies whose objectives are to determine methods of analysis that will rate metal sorption and sulfate reduction activity of organic materials for use in passive treatment systems (PTS). Substrates tested include agricultural residues (alfalfa pellets, sugar beat pulp pellets, brewery waste, corncobs, and walnut hulls), inoculums (dairy manure and wetland inoculum), and a variety woods (maple, oak, pine, poplar, and walnut). Characteristics targeted include moisture, organic and nutrient content; water, ethanol and acid soluble and insoluble fractions and metal sorption capacity. The short-term and long-term effects of organic substrate characteristics on metal removal and sulfate reduction rate are being evaluated in batch and column experiments receiving mine water. These data are not presented in this paper but will be included in the oral presentation. Measured values of moisture and organic content ranged from 5.5 to 65 % and 7.4 to 95 % relative to raw sample weights, respectively. The water-soluble fractions and protein content ranged from 0 to 32 % and 2 to 23 % relative to dried samples, respectively. Low concentration zinc sorption studies were described well by Freundlich isotherms. Using a wider range of concentrations, manganese sorption to substrates was more closely modeled by Langmuir isotherms. The highest manganese sorption was observed for manure, corncobs, walnut hulls and wetland inoculum (8-13 mg Mn / gram substrate at an equilibrium concentration (Ce) = 50 mg/L Mn). Corncobs and walnut hulls can be included in substrate specifications to target manganese removal. Moisture and organic content are important parameters in the specification of organic substrates as a significant portion of the raw organic substrate weight can be inorganic. A high soluble fraction should correlate with a rapid startup of SRB activity and thus is an important element in substrate specification. All substrates have some capacity for metal sorption and their quantification is essential for use in PTS.

J. Seyler; L. Figueroa; D. Ahmann; T. R. Wildeman; M. Robustelli

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dry deposition of pan to grassland vegetation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peroxyacetyl nitrate or PAN (CH{sub 3}C(O)OONO{sub 2}) is formed in the lower troposphere via photochemical reactions involving nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). PAN has a lifetime in the free troposphere of about three months and is removed by photolysis or reaction with OH. Dry deposition will decrease its lifetime, although the few measurements that have been made indicate that this process is slow. Measurements of the uptake of PAN by alfalfa in growth chambers indicated that the dry deposition velocity (downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height) was 0.75 cm s{sup {minus}1}. Garland and Penkett measured a dry deposition velocity of 0.25 cm s{sup {minus}1} for PAN to grass and soil in a return-flow wind tunnel. Shepson et al. (1992) analyzed trends of PAN and O{sub 3} concentrations in the stable nocturnal boundary layer over mixed deciduous/coniferous forests at night, when leaf stomata were closed, and concluded that the deposition velocity for PAN was at least 0.5 cm s{sup {minus}1}. We measured the dry deposition velocity of PAN to a grassland site in the midwestern United States with a modified Bowen ratio technique. Experiments were conducted on selected days during September, October, and November of 1990. An energy balance Bowen ratio station was used to observe the differences in air temperature and water vapor content between heights of 3.0 and 0.92 m and to evaluate the surface energy balance. Air samples collected at the same two heights in Teflon {reg_sign} bags were analyzed for PAN by a gas chromatographic technique. We present an example of the variations of PAN concentrations and gradients observed during the day and compare measurements of the dry deposition velocity to expectations based on the physicochemical properties of PAN.

Doskey, P.V.; Wesely, M.L.; Cook, D.R.; Gao, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Current status of the IGT RENUGAS{reg_sign} process  

SciTech Connect

The RENUGAS process was specifically developed for pressurized fluidized bed gasification of biomass to produce either an industrial fuel gas or a chemical synthesis gas depending on air- or oxygen-blown operation. The RENUGAS gasifier is a single state fluidized bed reactor with a deep bed of inert solids that provide stable fluidization behavior and needed heat capacity for efficient transfer of energy released by the combustion to the endothermic devolatilization and gasification reactions. The use of a deep single-stage bed of inert solids yields high carbon conversion and low production of oils and tars. The 11 metric tons per day RENUGAS process development unit built at IGT under a USDOE program, has been tested under various operating conditions with a variety of feedstocks from RdF to woody and herbaceous biomass. Currently, the PDU is being used to test hot gas cleanup for power turbines in support of the Hawaii demonstration gasifier. Biomass conversions of over 95% were achieved for most biomass tested. The successful demonstration of the PDU tests resulted in RENUGAS being selected for further scaleup a 91 metric ton per day demonstration gasifier being constructed in Hawaii by the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR); a research program being conducted by Westinghouse Electric to validate a hot gas cleanup system for operation of the RENUGAS gasifier with a gas turbine; and the feasibility study of a 70-80 Megawatt combined cycle power plant using an air blown RENUGAS gasifier with alfalfa stems as the feedstock. In this paper, the development of the IGT RENUGAS process from a concept in 1977 to its status in three current programs is discussed.

Lau, F.S.; Carty, R.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Development of the IGT RENUGAS{reg_sign} process  

SciTech Connect

The RENUGAS process was specifically developed for pressurized fluidized bed gasification of biomass to produce either an industrial fuel gas or a chemical synthesis gas depending on air- or oxygen-blown operation. The RENUGAS gasifier is a single stage fluidized bed reactor with a deep bed of inert solids that provide stable fluidization behavior and needed heat capacity for efficient transfer of energy released by the combustion to the endothermic devolatilization and gasification reactions. The use of a deep single-stage bed of inert solids yields high carbon conversion and low oils and tars production. The 11 metric tonne per day RENUGAS process development unit (PDU) built at IGT under a US DOE program, has been tested under various operating conditions with a variety of feedstocks from RdF to woody and herbaceous biomass. Currently, the PDU is being used to test hot gas cleanup for power turbines in support of the Hawaii demonstration gasifier. Biomass conversions of over 95% were achieved for most biomass tested. The successful demonstration of the PDU tests resulted in RENUGAS being selected for further scaleup to a 91 metric ton per day demonstration gasifier being constructed in Hawaii by the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research (PICHTR); a research program being conducted by Westinghouse Electric to validate a hot gas cleanup system for operation of the RENUGAS gasifier with a gas turbine; and the feasibility study of a 70-80 Megawatt combined cycle power plant using an air blown RENUGAS gasifier with alfalfa stems as the feedstock. In this paper, the IGT RENUGAS process is described and its status in three current programs is discussed.

Lau, F.S.; Carty, R.H.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A STUDY OF THE FERTILITY AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL OF RICE SOIL WITH RESPECT TO THE APPLICATION OF BIOCHAR AND SELECTED AMENDMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was carried out to assess the effect of biochar on the carbon dynamics of wetland rice soils and on the growth and grain yield of rice plants (Oryza sativa L.). Pot experiments were conducted with amendments of chemical and organic origins in addition to woodderived biochar. Maximum soil carbon storage was observed with biochar compared to organic amendments such as composts and chemical fertilizer. Major soil carbon sequestration parameters like soil organic carbon (SOC), particulate organic carbon (POC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were found to be greater with biochar. Aggregate formation was also significant under biochar trials. Considerable reduction in greenhouse gases (GHGs) emission, especially carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrous oxide (N2O), was observed with biochar. Applications of biochar considerably influenced the growth profile and grain yield of the rice plants compared to other amendments. Hence, these results suggest that biochar of appropriate applied proportion can influence wetland rice soil carbon dynamics and has the potential to combat global warming without compromising productivity. The role of biochar as a green viable carbon negation option is supported by the study since the results showed a positive response towards soil and vegetation carbon Corresponding author:

Shanthi Prabhav; Renuka R; Sreekanth N. P; Babu Padmakumar; A. P Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "alfalfa medicago sativa" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Use of various acute, sublethal and early life-stage tests to evaluate the toxicity of refinery effluents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The toxicities of effluents from three Ontario, Canada, refineries were assessed with microbes, plants, invertebrates, and fish. Acute toxicity was assessed by the Microtox test, an assay based on electron transport activity in submitochondrial particles, and Daphnia magna (water flea); growth of Selenastrum capricornutum (alga); growth of Lemna minor (aquatic plant); germination of Lactuca sativa (nonaquatic plant); survival, growth, and maturation of Panagrellus redivivus (nematode); and genotoxicity in the SOS-Chromotest. Only the Microtox test and the submitochondrial particle test detected acute toxicity in the effluent samples. Reduced survival and sublethal responses were caused by some effluents, but not all effluents were toxic, and none caused a response in all of the tests applied. The results suggest that the effluent treatment systems used at Ontario refineries have largely eliminated acute toxicity to the organisms in their test battery. Although reduced survival and sublethal effects were detected in some of the effluents, the effects were minor. Some of the tests provided evidence, albeit weak, of variations in the responses of the test organisms to a temporal series of effluent samples. Not unexpectedly, there were also minor differences in the responses of the tests to effluents from the three refineries. The fathead minnow test seems to be a sensitive indicator of the sublethal toxicity of Ontario refinery effluents.

Sherry, J.; Scott, B.; Dutka, B. [National Water Research Inst., Burlington, Ontario (Canada)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Changes in cadmium mobility during composting and after soil application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of twelve weeks of composting on the mobility and bioavailability of cadmium in six composts containing sewage sludge, wood chips and grass was studied, along with the cadmium immobilization capacity of compost. Two different soils were used and Cd accumulation measured in above-ground oat biomass (Avena sativa L.). Increasing pH appears to be an important cause of the observed decreases in available cadmium through the composting process. A pot experiment was performed with two different amounts of compost (9.6 and 28.8 g per kg of soil) added into Fluvisol with total Cd 0.255 mg kg{sup -1}, and contaminated Cambisol with total Cd 6.16 mg kg{sup -1}. Decrease of extractable Cd (0.01 mol l{sup -1} CaCl{sub 2}) was found in both soils after compost application. The higher amount of compost immobilized an exchangeable portion of Cd (0.11 mol l{sup -1} CH{sub 3}COOH extractable) in contaminated Cambisol unlike in light Fluvisol. The addition of a low amount of compost decreased the content of Cd in associated above-ground oat biomass grown in both soils, while a high amount of compost decreased the Cd content in oats only in the Cambisol.

Hanc, Ales [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: hanc@af.czu.cz; Tlustos, Pavel; Szakova, Jirina; Habart, Jan [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Characterization of Rice NADPH Oxidase Genes and Their Expression under Various Environmental Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases (Noxs) are key producers of reactive oxygen species under both normal and stress conditions in plants. We demonstrate that at least eleven genes in the genome of rice (Oryza sativa L.) were predicted to encode Nox proteins, including nine genes (OsNox19) that encode typical Noxs and two that encode ancient Nox forms (ferric reduction oxidase 1 and 7, OsFRO1 and OsFRO7). Phylogenetic analysis divided the Noxs from nine plant species into six subfamilies, with rice Nox genes distributed among subfamilies I to V. Gene expression analysis using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and real-time qRT-PCR indicated that the expression of rice Nox genes depends on organs and environmental conditions. Exogenous calcium strongly stimulated the expression of OsNox3, OsNox5, OsNox7, and OsNox8, but depressed the expression of OsFRO1. Drought stress substantially upregulated the expression of OsNox13, OsNox5, OsNox9, and OsFRO1, but downregulated OsNox6. High temperature upregulated OsNox59, but significantly downregulated OsNox13 and OsFRO1. NaCl treatment increased the expression of OsNox2, OsNox8, OsFRO1, and OsFRO7, but decreased that of OsNox1, OsNox3, OsNox5, and OsNox6. These results suggest that the expression profilesInt. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14 9441

Gang-feng Wang; Wen-qiang Li; Wen-yan Li; Guo-li Wu; Cong-yi Zhou; Kun-ming Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Root-Uptake of C-14 Acetic Acid by Various Plants and C-14 Dynamics Surrounding the Experimental Tessera  

SciTech Connect

Carbon-14 (C-14, t{sub 1/2} = 5.73x10{sup 3} yrs) from radioactive waste is one of the most important radioactive nuclides for environmental assessment in the context of geological disposal, and understanding the transfer of radioactive elements to plants is essential for public health safety. In order to obtain fundamental knowledge, culture experiments using marigold (Tagetes patula L.), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea S.), paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), radish (Raphanus sativus L.), and carrot (Daucus carota L.) plants were conducted to examine root-uptake and dynamics of C-14 in the laboratory. The C-14 radioactivity in each plant part (e.g. shoot, root, edible part, etc.), medium (e.g. culture solution, sand, etc.), and air was determined. The distribution of C-14 in the plants was visualized using autoradiography. For a comparison, autoradiography was also done using Na-22. Results of the present study indicated that C-14 labeled CO{sub 2} gas was released from the culture solution to the atmosphere. Clear autoradiography images were observed in plants for the shoots and lower roots which were soaked in the culture solution. The upper roots which were not soaked in the culture solution were not clearly imaged. In the radiotracer experiment using Na-22, a clear image was observed for the whole carrot seedling, even including the upper root, on the autoradiography. However, the amounts of C-14 acetic acid absorbed by all the plants through their roots were considered to be very small. Inorganic carbon transformed from C-14 acetic acid would be taken up by plants through the roots, and some fraction of C-14 would be assimilated into the shoots by photosynthesis. (authors)

Ogiyama, S.; Takeda, H.; Uchida, S. [Office of Biospheric Assessment for Waste Disposal, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (Japan); Suzuki, H. [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University (Japan); Inubushi, K. [Graduate School of Horticulture, Chiba University (Japan)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Annotation and comparative analysis of the glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background Glycoside hydrolases cleave the bond between a carbohydrate and another carbohydrate, a protein, lipid or other moiety. Genes encoding glycoside hydrolases are found in a wide range of organisms, from archea to animals, and are relatively abundant in plant genomes. In plants, these enzymes are involved in diverse processes, including starch metabolism, defense, and cell-wall remodeling. Glycoside hydrolase genes have been previously cataloged for Oryza sativa (rice), the model dicotyledonous plant Arabidopsis thaliana, and the fast-growing tree Populus trichocarpa (poplar). To improve our understanding of glycoside hydrolases in plants generally and in grasses specifically, we annotated the glycoside hydrolase genes in the grasses Brachypodium distachyon (an emerging monocotyledonous model) and Sorghum bicolor (sorghum). We then compared the glycoside hydrolases across species, both at the whole-genome level and at the level of individual glycoside hydrolase families. Results We identified 356 glycoside hydrolase genes in Brachypodium and 404 in sorghum. The corresponding proteins fell into the same 34 families that are represented in rice, Arabidopsis, and poplar, helping to define a glycoside hydrolase family profile which may be common to flowering plants. Examination of individual glycoside hydrolase familes (GH5, GH13, GH18, GH19, GH28, and GH51) revealed both similarities and distinctions between monocots and dicots, as well as between species. Shared evolutionary histories appear to be modified by lineage-specific expansions or deletions. Within families, the Brachypodium and sorghum proteins generally cluster with those from other monocots. Conclusions This work provides the foundation for further comparative and functional analyses of plant glycoside hydrolases. Defining the Brachypodium glycoside hydrolases sets the stage for Brachypodium to be a monocot model for investigations of these enzymes and their diverse roles in planta. Insights gained from Brachypodium will inform translational research studies, with applications for the improvement of cereal crops and bioenergy grasses.

Tyler, Ludmila [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Bragg, Jennifer [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Wu, Jiajie [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Vogel, John [USDA-ARS Western Regional Research Center

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Structural, Biochemical, and Phylogenetic Analyses Suggest That Indole-3-Acetic Acid Methyltransferase Is an Evolutionarily Ancient Member of the SABATH Family  

SciTech Connect

The plant SABATH protein family encompasses a group of related small-molecule methyltransferases (MTs) that catalyze the S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methylation of natural chemicals encompassing widely divergent structures. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) methyltransferase (IAMT) is a member of the SABATH family that modulates IAA homeostasis in plant tissues through methylation of IAA's free carboxyl group. The crystal structure of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) IAMT (AtIAMT1) was determined and refined to 2.75 Angstroms resolution. The overall tertiary and quaternary structures closely resemble the two-domain bilobed monomer and the dimeric arrangement, respectively, previously observed for the related salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase from Clarkia breweri (CbSAMT). To further our understanding of the biological function and evolution of SABATHs, especially of IAMT, we analyzed the SABATH gene family in the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. Forty-one OsSABATH genes were identified. Expression analysis showed that more than one-half of the OsSABATH genes were transcribed in one or multiple organs. The OsSABATH gene most similar to AtIAMT1 is OsSABATH4. Escherichia coli-expressed OsSABATH4 protein displayed the highest level of catalytic activity toward IAA and was therefore named OsIAMT1. OsIAMT1 exhibited kinetic properties similar to AtIAMT1 and poplar IAMT (PtIAMT1). Structural modeling of OsIAMT1 and PtIAMT1 using the experimentally determined structure of AtIAMT1 reported here as a template revealed conserved structural features of IAMTs within the active-site cavity that are divergent from functionally distinct members of the SABATH family, such as CbSAMT. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that IAMTs from Arabidopsis, rice, and poplar (Populus spp.) form a monophyletic group. Thus, structural, biochemical, and phylogenetic evidence supports the hypothesis that IAMT is an evolutionarily ancient member of the SABATH family likely to play a critical role in IAA homeostasis across a wide range of plants.

Zhao,N.; Ferrer, J.; Ross, J.; Guan, J.; Yang, Y.; Pichersky, E.; Noel, J.; Chen, F.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Application of Fibrolytic Enzymes and Bacterial Inoculants to Sorghum Silage and Small-Grain Hay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fibrolytic enzymes and microbial inoculants have potential to improve the value of feedstuff and feedstock. An experiment was conducted to determine the nutritive value, ensiling characteristics, and in situ disappearance kinetics of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) silages pretreated with fibrolytic enzyme (xylanase plus cellulase: XC) or microbial [Promote ASB (Lactobacillus buchneri and L. plantarum); PRO] inoculants. The greatest yield was for cultivar PS 747 and the least for MMR 381/73 (MMR). Neutral detergent fiber (NDF) concentration was least for XC treated silage, and acid detergent fiber (ADF) concentration was least for XC and PRO treated silage. In vitro true digestibility (IVTD) was greatest for PRO treated Dairy Master BMR (DBMR), whereas, acid detergent lignin was least for PRO treated DBMR. Aerobic stability was not improved by PRO, however, aerobic stability of XC treated MMR was 63 h greater than the control. Generally, the in situ disappearance kinetics were improved with the application of XC and PRO, and XC had the greatest effect on silage with greater NDF and ADF concentrations. A second experiment was conducted to determine if the same application rates of either inoculant would reduce the fiber fraction of two cultivars each of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) or oat (Avena sativa L.) hays. Forage was harvested twice during the tillering stage (H1) and (H2) and a third after grain harvest (H3). The IVTD was greater for oat than wheat due to a lesser fiber fraction. Forage from H2 had lesser NDF and ADF and greater CP and IVTD concentrations. In situ DM, NDF, ADF, and ERD were greater for wheat and oat at tillering than stover and NDF and ERD were greater for Harrison than Fannin at tillering. Treatment of oat or wheat hays with XC or PRO enhanced in situ disappearance kinetics. Both XC and PRO may be used to reduce the fiber fractions of sorghum silage and small-grain hay. Additionally, it appears the inoculant PRO can be used to improve fermentation characteristics of sorghum silage.

Thomas, Martha 1980-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Genetic diversity and species relationships in the Oryza complex and glufosinate tolerance in rice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The weed red rice is a major problem in rice producing areas world wide. All of the red rice in commercial rice fields in the United States has traditionally been considered to be the same species as commercial rice, Oryza sativa. However, using DNA markers it was found that most of the red rice with black hulls was sufficiently divergent to be considered a separate species. This includes TX4, a red rice ecotype that has been reported to have considerable natural tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate. TX4 is closely related to samples that have been classified as Oryza rufipogon. However, it was shown that both the TX4-like red rice from commercial fields and most of the Oryza rufipogon accessions in the US National Small Grains Collection are more accurately classified as Oryza nivara. This is significant since Oryza rufipogon is regulated under the Federal Noxious Weed Act, while Oryza nivara is not. Oryza nivara closely related to TX4 was found to be widely distributed across the rice production areas of Texas and was also found in Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi. Of 240 samples from across Texas, 23 samples from six different counties were identical with TX4 with all 18 DNA markers tested. The reported glufosinate tolerance of TX4 is a potential problem since this same herbicide would be used in conjunction with genetically modified (GM) that is being developed as a method of red rice control. Thus, field, greenhouse and tissue culture studies were conducted to evaluate the degree of glufosinate tolerance in TX4. TX4 typically was severely damaged by glufosinate, but not efficiently controlled. Even with the maximum number of herbicide applications at the proposed maximum label rate, TX4 often re-sprouted and produced viable seed. Herbicide tolerance was found to be variable, but appears to be sufficient to present a problem with the use of the GM glufosinate resistant varieties currently under development, particularly when combined with variation in the response of ??sensitive?? varieties.

Vaughan, Laura Kelly

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze into biologically active compounds. Jatropha curcas SM does not contain glucosinolates but contains curcin, a known phytotoxin (toxalbumin). A 14-d greenhouse study was conducted to determine how Sinapis alba (white mustard, WM), Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, IM), Camelina sativa (camelina) and Jatropha curcas (jatropha) applied to soil at varying application rates and incubation times affected seed germination and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Seed meals were analyzed for the presence of glucosinolates, and were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 percent (w/w) to Darco fine sand soil and incubated for 1, 7 or 14 d prior to planting. With the weed species, germination and survival was most reduced by 2.5 percent WM SM incubated 1d for Johnsongrass and 14 d for redroot pigweed. Cotton and sorghum seedlings showed strong negative responses to WM SM applications of 2.5 percent at any incubation time. All crops and weed species were most inhibited by 2.5 percent application with any SM, but incubation days varied. Seed meals of each species showed negative results dependent on the incubation day, but overall, WM and camelina SMs were most detrimental compared to IM and jatropha. A second greenhouse study was conducted to determine the availability of nutrients in SMs (WM and IM) to cotton and sorghum compared to inorganic fertilization. Seed meals were applied at 1.0 and 2.5 percent (w/w) and initially incubated for 35 days prior to planting. Emergence of both species was so poor that treatments were incubated for an additional 21 d and replanted. Application rates of 2.5 percent WM and IM SMs reduced sorghum heights and biomass, but only WM had a negative effect on cotton yield. However, the higher of the SM application rates provided greater levels of nutrients compared to the fertilized treatment and control. Results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM applications should be considered before land-applying SMs in organic cropping systems in order to successfully manage weeds while producing a profitable crop.

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Root Morphological and Physiological Bases to Understand Genotypic Control of Mineral Acquisition in Rice Grains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rice (Oryza sativa L.) supports half of the human population. However, predominant rice consumption leads to malnutrition due to mineral deficiencies. The research goal was to support identification of genes responsible for the uptake/accumulation of potassium (K), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn) and molybdenum (Mo), thus promoting the breeding for rice with high grain concentrations of these elements. Prior studies identified rice genotypes with high grain-K, -Fe, -Zn or -Mo concentrations that were hypothesized to be due to differences in root traits. The research objective was to identify root traits associated with these elements. These traits could be bases for identifying genes. The first study determined if these genotypes showed similar accumulation patterns in leaves as in grains, which would hint at influences of the roots and enable identifying distinct root traits and possible genes in vegetative growth stages. The second study determined if root traits of high grain-Mo genotypes displayed an acid-tolerance mechanism as these genotypes originated from Malaysia where acidic soils strongly adsorb Mo making it unavailable for plants. The third study identified root trait differences of high grain-K, -Fe, -Zn and -Mo genotypes in hydroponics media, while the fourth determined root trait differences in these genotypes in sand-culture media including a 1-Naphthalene Acetic Acid (NAA) seed treatment for perturbation. The first study identified several high grain-Mo genotypes with similar Mo accumulation patterns in V4 to V6 stage-leaves as in grains, suggestive of a root influence. The second study established that gross morphological and physiological root traits of a high grain-Mo genotype were not part of an acid-tolerance mechanism. Neither the third nor fourth study identified root traits related to shoot K, Fe, Zn or Mo concentration, however positive associations of seedling vigor traits with several beneficial elements, including K, and negative associations with numerous toxic elements were established. Lack of correlation with root traits suggests other mechanisms (e.g. active uptake transporters) instead control the observed grain accumulation differences. Based on the fourth study, either direct effects of NAA on element uptake/transfer or indirect effects on soil pH and redox potential altered tissue Fe and Zn levels.

Chittoori, Ratnaprabha 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The mechanism of chloroplast division in higher plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of plant cells contain plastids that are self-replicating, double membrane organelles with their own unique genetic component. The current investigation concerns the developmental events that strictly determine the number of chloroplasts found in a normal mesophyll cell. The process of chloroplast biogenesis has been well characterized at the cellular level, but the molecular basis of chloroplast division and the role of nuclear genes in the control of plastid division and maturation are poorly understood. In young developing leaf cells proplastids number approximately 10 per cell. As the leaf continues to develop these proplastids divide and develop concomitantly until roughly 65 to 100 chloroplasts are present in each mature mesophyll cell. A gene controlling chloroplast division has been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana, and its inactivation results in a large decrease in the number of chloroplasts per cell. Because of the complexity of leaf development in Arabidopsis and other dicots, chloroplast division studies are typically very difficult. Unlike Arabidopsis, understanding the chloroplast division process in a grass species, such as rice, is greatly facilitated by the direct spatial and temporal relationship between chloroplast biogenesis and leaf development. To extend the body of knowledge of chloroplast division into the grass species, the Arabidopsis gene was used to isolate the corresponding gene in rice, Oryza sativa. To verify the function of this rice gene, it was introduced into the Arabidopsis mutant, characterized by a decreased number of chloroplasts, in order to reinstate chloroplast biogenesis in the mutant. A plasmid construct containing an antisense version of the gene and the hygromycin gene (used as a selectable marker) was then introduced into rice callus in order to knock-out production of the protein involved in chloroplast division. A phenotypic analysis of the resultant rice plants revealed that there was no significant reduction in chloroplast number. To determine gene expression patterns, mRNA was isolated from mature rice tissue and analyzed via the northern blot method. A Southern analysis of genomic DNA was performed to quantitate the number of integration sites of the antisense gene.

Proctor, John Michael

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Characterization of novel rice germplasm from West Africa and genetic marker associations with rice cooking quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic resource enhancement is the foundation of any good breeding program. Landraces from West Africa, interspecifics between Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima and improved lines from the West African Rice Development Association and other research centers were introduced to the Beaumont Rice Research center for in situ evaluation and characterization. Beside the introduction of seeds, milled samples were also introduced for grain chemistry analysis. Field evaluation combined with physicochemical and molecular characterization revealed unique characteristics among African germplasm. New rice for Africa (NERICA) lines performed well in the USA environment. Varieties like Nerica 2, Nerica 3, Nerica 4, and Nerica 5 need more attention because of their superior performance in yield and grain quality. Landraces did not perform well due to their height and late maturity and their resulting problems with lodging. The rapid visco analyzer RVA profiles showed that the cultivar Jaya has unusually strong paste viscosity features. Comparing West Africa samples grown in Cote dâ??Ivoire with those grown in Texas, parameters like AA, ASV, Hot, Cool, and CT were not stongly affected by the environment. According to the Stbk value, cultivars grown in Cote dâ??Ivoire will cook softer than when they were grown in Texas. The lack of the environmental effect is somewhat surprising considering the difference in latitude, soil types, weather patterns, and management practices between the two locations. Apparent amylose is a key element to characterize a rice cultivar; however certain varieties like Cocodrie and Dixiebelle have similar apparent amylose content but dramatically different functional qualities. A population derived from Cocodrie and Dixiebelle was developed for genotypic and phenotypic analysis of grain chemistry traits that affect functionality. It was concluded that the amount of soluble amylose in the grain had a significant effect on flour pasting properties, even when total apparent amylose content did not vary. Marker association studies revealed that the Waxy microsatellite and the Waxy exon 10 SNP markers were associated with soluble amylose content and RVA characteristics. These markers will speed up the development of new rice cultivars with desirable quality characteristics in West Africa and in the USA.

Traore, Karim

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

TASK 3.4--IMPACTS OF COFIRING BIOMASS WITH FOSSIL FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With a major worldwide effort now ongoing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, cofiring of renewable biomass fuels at conventional coal-fired utilities is seen as one of the lower-cost options to achieve such reductions. The Energy & Environmental Research Center has undertaken a fundamental study to address the viability of cofiring biomass with coal in a pulverized coal (pc)-fired boiler for power production. Wheat straw, alfalfa stems, and hybrid poplar were selected as candidate biomass materials for blending at a 20 wt% level with an Illinois bituminous coal and an Absaloka subbituminous coal. The biomass materials were found to be easily processed by shredding and pulverizing to a size suitable for cofiring with pc in a bench-scale downfired furnace. A literature investigation was undertaken on mineral uptake and storage by plants considered for biomass cofiring in order to understand the modes of occurrence of inorganic elements in plant matter. Sixteen essential elements, C, H, O, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, B, Mo, and Cl, are found throughout plants. The predominant inorganic elements are K and Ca, which are essential to the function of all plant cells and will, therefore, be evenly distributed throughout the nonreproductive, aerial portions of herbaceous biomass. Some inorganic constituents, e.g., N, P, Ca, and Cl, are organically associated and incorporated into the structure of the plant. Cell vacuoles are the repository for excess ions in the plant. Minerals deposited in these ubiquitous organelles are expected to be most easily leached from dry material. Other elements may not have specific functions within the plant, but are nevertheless absorbed and fill a need, such as silica. Other elements, such as Na, are nonessential, but are deposited throughout the plant. Their concentration will depend entirely on extrinsic factors regulating their availability in the soil solution, i.e., moisture and soil content. Similarly, Cl content is determined less by the needs of the plant than by the availability in the soil solution; in addition to occurring naturally, Cl is present in excess as the anion complement in K fertilizer applications. An analysis was performed on existing data for switchgrass samples from ten different farms in the south-central portion of Iowa, with the goal of determining correlations between switchgrass elemental composition and geographical and seasonal changes so as to identify factors that influence the elemental composition of biomass. The most important factors in determining levels of various chemical compounds were found to be seasonal and geographical differences related to soil conditions. Combustion testing was performed to obtain deposits typical of boiler fouling and slagging conditions as well as fly ash. Analysis methods using computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy and chemical fractionation were applied to determine the composition and association of inorganic materials in the biomass samples. Modified sample preparation techniques and mineral quantification procedures using cluster analysis were developed to characterize the inorganic material in these samples. Each of the biomass types exhibited different inorganic associations in the fuel as well as in the deposits and fly ash. Morphological analyses of the wheat straw show elongated 10-30-{micro}m amorphous silica particles or phytoliths in the wheat straw structure. Alkali such as potassium, calcium, and sodium is organically bound and dispersed in the organic structure of the biomass materials. Combustion test results showed that the blends fed quite evenly, with good burnout. Significant slag deposit formation was observed for the 100% wheat straw, compared to bituminous and subbituminous coals burned under similar conditions. Although growing rapidly, the fouling deposits of the biomass and coal-biomass blends were significantly weaker than those of the coals. Fouling was only slightly worse for the 100% wheat straw fuel compared to the coals. The wheat straw ash was found to show the greatest similar

Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Donald P. McCollor; Kurt E. Eylands; Melanie D. Hetland; Mark A. Musich; Charlene R. Crocker; Jonas Dahl; Stacie Laducer

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z