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Sample records for alder maple willows

  1. Sediment Control: Willows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediment Control: Willows Sediment Control: Willows LANL recently planted 10,000 willows and constructed wing ditches to increase sediment retention in Pueblo and Los Alamos...

  2. Acer glabrum mountain maple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Salix spp. willow · Buds with single cap-like scale, lateral · Catkins erect · Usually riparian #12

  3. NREL: Energy Analysis - Ben Maples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maples Photo of Ben Maples Ben Maples is a member of the Technology Systems and Sustainability Analysis Group in the Strategic Energy Analysis Center. Engineer On staff since May...

  4. Willows in the Spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, DaMaris B.

    2012-05-31

    gestational period of adolescence. It fictionalizes the oppressions and opportunities that emerged as a result of the Women's Suffrage Movement in the United States. Inspired by the glorious achievements of women in Kansas' history, Willows in the Spring is a...

  5. 7 Introduction to Maple Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meade, Douglas B.

    , plastics and drugs. The reactor model developed in this chapter's application is based on the principle195 7 Introduction to Maple Programming Chemical engineers apply principles of chemistry, physics and undergo other chemical changes during the manufacturing process. Reactors and reactor models can be used

  6. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #14 A willow island 19 April 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #14

  7. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #12 Willow sapling 15 February 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #9

  8. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #18 Pedro Quintana 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering

  9. (Agricultural Need for Sustainable Willow Effluent Recycling)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the use of SRC willow for bioremediation. Alistair McCracken & Chris Johnston AFBI Environment!!! The challenges ! Energy Policy & The Environment Sustainable Water Mgmt Affordability (Fuel poverty SRC willow, for the management of waste water effluents. · To establish FIVE effluent recycling

  10. Maple Mainline The University of Vermont Extension, Addison County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Maple Mainline The University of Vermont Extension, Addison County Maple Sugarmakers Association and Vermont Maple Syrup Makers' Association are pleased to offer the 8th annual Vermont Maple Conferences on 3, quality control, and mar- keting to sugarmakers in Vermont and surrounding re- gions. These all day

  11. ADistributed Computer Algebra System Based on Maple and Java 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADistributed Computer Algebra System Based on Maple and Java 1 Wolfgang Schreiner Research Distributed Maple is a system for writing parallel programs in the computer algebra system Maple. It allows scheduler from Maple and implements a parallel programming model on top. The system is portable to most

  12. An Appreciation of Berni Julian Alder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William Graham Hoover

    2015-10-17

    Berni Julian Alder profoundly influenced my research career at the Livermore Laboratory and the Davis Campus' Teller Tech, beginning in 1962 and lasting for over fifty years. I very much appreciate the opportunity provided by his Ninetieth Birthday Celebration to review some of the many high spots along the way.

  13. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #6 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 July 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  14. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #2 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 March 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  15. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #11 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 January 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  16. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #15 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 26 May 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status

  17. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #17 Pedro Quintana;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report #16 Covering the time period from

  18. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #5 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 June 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  19. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #19 Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 September 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  20. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #4 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 May 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  1. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #9 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 11 November 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  2. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #3 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 April 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  3. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #10 Pedro Quintana Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 15 December 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix

  4. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #16 Pedro Quintana, Florida 32816 15 June 2010 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly Status Report

  5. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #1 Drs. Pedro Quintana, Orlando, Florida 32816 14 February 2009 #12;2 Ecological Studies of Willow (Salix caroliniana): Monthly

  6. ECOLOGICAL STUDIES OF WILLOW (SALIX CAROLINIANA): MONTHLY STATUS REPORT #13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Continue Task 2.4 (Life history) Continue Task 2.5 (Spatial analysis of willow distribution) 2nd Jan ­ Mar colonized the islands. We then clipped willow seedlings and cuttings into small sections, placed them

  7. Willows indirectly reduce arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization of understorey plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becklin, Katie M.; Pallo, Megan L.; Galen, Candace

    2012-01-01

    in AMF colonization of alpine perennial plants across a willow-meadow ecotone is due to variation in (i) above-ground competition with willows for light (experiment 1), (ii) below-ground interactions with willows and their ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF...

  8. Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow CreekWillow

  9. Northern Lakes District of MAPLE project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Northern Lakes Region #12;Current Landcover of NHLD #12;MAPLE Project · Region is defined by lake tourism Lakes #12;Ecology "Greenlash" Gradual Change Development pattern Lake centered Tourism Town centered Key problems near urban corridor Overfishing of public-access lakes; good on lakes with limited access and few

  10. Maple Syrup--Production, Composition, Chemistry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    CHAPTER 4 Maple Syrup--Production, Composition, Chemistry, and Sensory Characteristics Timothy D Chemistry 111 A. Transformation during storage 115 B. Transformations during reverse osmosis Processing 121 IX. Syrup Standards 124 X. Syrup Chemistry 126 A. Density 126 B. Carbohydrates 126 C. pH 126 D

  11. Maple Implementation of the Kirchhoff's "Third and Fourth Laws"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Maple Implementation of the Kirchhoff's "Third and Fourth Laws" NICOLAS RATIER1 , MAYA MARKOVA2 1 an implementation in Maple language of the Kirchhoff's third law and its dual, the so­called Kirchhoff's fourth law­called Kirch- hoff's "third and fourth laws" [5]. These laws allows one to express network functions, in a very

  12. Willow Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow Creek Wind

  13. Picture from Microsoft ClipArt Exploring the Norway Maple with 4 of the 5 Senses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashline, George

    Picture from Microsoft ClipArt Sapling #2 Exploring the Norway Maple with 4 of the 5 Senses Materials: -Journal -Pencil -Norway Maple Tree Task: Let's explore the Norway Maple with four senses! "Did you know": Norway Maple's trees leaves have five lobes. They are also wide leaves and range from four

  14. Definite Integrals, Some Involving Residue Theory Evaluated by Maple Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, Kimiko o [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The calculus of residue is applied to evaluate certain integrals in the range (-{infinity} to {infinity}) using the Maple symbolic code. These integrals are of the form {integral}{sub -{infinity}}{sup {infinity}} cos(x)/[(x{sup 2} + a{sup 2})(x{sup 2} + b{sup 2}) (x{sup 2} + c{sup 2})]dx and similar extensions. The Maple code is also applied to expressions in maximum likelihood estimator moments when sampling from the negative binomial distribution. In general the Maple code approach to the integrals gives correct answers to specified decimal places, but the symbolic result may be extremely long and complex.

  15. Willow firing in retrofitted Irish peat plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broek, R. van den; Faaij, A.; Kent, T.

    1995-11-01

    Interest in biomass electricity in Ireland is being re-awakened by environmental concerns about CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation and the potential of biomass production to provide an alternative agricultural enterprise. The technical and economical feasibility of wood-fuelled power production using willow from energy farming in existing peat-fired plants in Ireland is being studied within the framework of the EU JOULE II+ programme. These options are compared with new combustion plants and a biomass integrated gasifier with combined cycle (BIG/CC). Background studies supplied data for yields of willow farming, establishment of willow plantations, harvesting methods, logistics and costs and efficiencies for different retrofit options at Irish peat plants. All technologies considered are currently available or are expected to be available in the near future. Neither agricultural subsidies nor possible CO{sub 2} taxes have been included. In the least cost supply scenario storage and chipping of wood is done at the power station. In this case wood is only stored in the form of sticks and wood harvested by a chips harvester is supplied to the plant directly during the harvesting season. Fuel costs at the plant gate were estimated between 3.3 and 11 EGU/GJ{sub LHV}. This wide range resulted in a wide range of kWh costs. For the lowest cost option they ranged between 5.4 and 15 ECUcents/kWh. The cheapest proven retrofit option is the conversion of the existing milled peat Lanesborough unit 3 into a bubbling fluidized bed with kWh costs ranging from 5.6 up to 16 ECUcents/kWh. For this plant, costs per tonne of avoided CO{sub 2} emissions varied between 1 and 70 ECU. It is noteworthy that the kWh costs for all options considered were very close. Especially in the high costs scenario a BIG/CC appeared to have lower kWh cost than all biomass combustion plants. Mainly for the retrofitted plants the fuel costs were by far the largest kWh cost component.

  16. Copying Maple graphs into Word Once you create a graph with Maple, you can copy and paste it into Word pretty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zirbel, Craig L.

    Copying Maple graphs into Word Once you create a graph with Maple, you can copy and paste it into Word pretty easily. However, you might be unhappy with the result, if it looks like this: This image to get the image into Word in a better way. Below are two Maple graphs. On a Macintosh, you can click

  17. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Canastota`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-15

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix sachalinensis.times.S. miyabeana named `Canastota`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 2.7-fold more woody biomass than its female parent (Salix sachalinensis `SX61`), 28% greater woody biomass yield than its male parent (Salix miyabeana `SX64`), and 20% greater woody biomass yield than a standard production cultivar, Salix dasyclados `SV1` when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Canastota` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. `Canastota` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by willow sawfly.

  18. Model selection as a tool for phylogeographic inference: an example from the willow Salix melanopsis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Jack

    Model selection as a tool for phylogeographic inference: an example from the willow Salix in order to infer the phylogeographic history of Salix melan- opsis, a riparian willow with a disjunct

  19. Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Willow species (genus: Salix) with contrasting habitat affinities differ in their photoprotective, we investigated the response of six willow (Salix) species to a short- term drought. In a greenhouse

  20. DynaFlexPro for Maple RAJANKUMAR M. BHATT and VENKAT N. KROVI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    ., and currently in version 2.2.8, is marketed by MapleSoft, Inc., of Waterloo, Ontario [1]. DFP is a Maple toolbox, and redirection of energy from the source into a usable mechanical form. Designers have created, refined

  1. Page36 March 2015 taste. Maple products also have a dis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    that are pure, highly sustainable and possess a small carbon footprint compared to coconut water. Maple sap-permeate beverage, one birch sap beverage, and one coconut water used for comparative purposes (only the maple

  2. Probing substituent effects in aryl-aryl interactions using stereoselective diels-alder cycloadditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Steven E.

    Stereoselective Diels?Alder cycloadditions that probe substituent effects in aryl?aryl sandwich complexes were studied experimentally and theoretically. Computations on model systems demonstrate that the stereoselectivity ...

  3. Zero-discharge of nutrients and water in a willow dominated constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    filled with soil and planted with clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.). The surface area of the systems; recycling; Salix; water treatment; willow; zero-discharge Introduction Discharge of domestic sewage from and plant- ed with clones of willow (Salix viminalis L.) (Figure 2). The surface area of the systems depends

  4. Expansion of Canopy-Forming Willows Over the Twentieth Century on Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    of each of the dominant canopy-forming willow species (Salix richardsonii, Salix glauca and Salix pulchra, disease, or growing conditions. Keywords Arctic Á Tundra Á Climate change Á Willows (Salix spp.) Á Shrub and Zhang 2009). Willows (Salix spp.) are well adapted to invading ecosystems when conditions change. Pollen

  5. Maple Symbolic Computation in the Calculus of Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreia M. F. Louro; Delfim F. M. Torres

    2008-06-04

    It is the aim of this work to identify and illustrate the potential and weaknesses of the computer algebra system Maple in the area of the Calculus of Variations: a classical area of mathematics that studies the methods for finding maximum and minimum values of functionals of integral type. Variational problems are usually solved with the help of the necessary optimality conditions of Euler-Lagrange, which are, in general, nonlinear and difficult second order differential equations to be solved. We show how the computer algebra system Maple can be useful in the determination and resolution of these equations. We will also present the solution to the celebrated brachistochrone problem from the point of view of the calculus of variations and the Maple system, and a reformulation of the classical problem obtained by restricting the class of admissible functions.

  6. Picture from http://www.first-school.ws/activities/crafts/animals/birds/turkeymaple.htm A Red Maple Turkey Centerpiece

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashline, George

    A Red Maple Turkey Centerpiece Materials: -Toilet Paper Tube -A Couple of Red Maple Leaves (any color make a Turkey with using a Red Maple Tree? "Did you know?": Red Maples have a huge span of colors when have color in it. · After collecting about 3 leaves each, we will start constructing our turkey

  7. RESEARCH UPDATE Wet woodland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    alluvial deposits. · Grey willow (Salix cinerea) and alder (Alnus glutinosa) dominate pioneer communities

  8. A Maple Package for Root Systems and Finite Coxeter Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stembridge, John

    A Maple Package for Root Systems and Finite Coxeter Groups Version 2.4 #3; February 28, 2004 John R in the study of root systems, #12;nite Coxeter groups, and Weyl characters. The coxeter package contains 38;nds in the appendices of Bourbaki [1]. The weyl package is a supple- ment to coxeter containing 12

  9. A Maple Package for Symmetric Functions Version 2.4 #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stembridge, John

    This document provides an introduction to Version 2.4 of SF, a package of 25 Maple programs that create an environment for computations involving symmetric functions and related structures. Included are programs Edition. 1 This work has been supported by NSF grants DMS--0070685 and DMS--0245385. 1 #12; dramatically

  10. A Maple Package for Symmetric Functions Version 2.4*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stembridge, John

    * * Maple programs that create an environment for computations involving symmetric functi* *ons and related structures. Included are programs for manipulating partitions, for conv* *erting sym- metric functions are ___________________________ *Version 2.4 is the Hermann Weyl Birthday Edition. 1This work has been supported by NSF grants DMS

  11. A Maple Package for Posets Version 2.4 #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stembridge, John

    provides an introduction to Version 2.4 of posets, a package of 41 Maple programs that provide Flag Day Edition. 1 This project has been supported by grants from the NSF and NSA. 1 #12; is about 2 Edition''), and the second is a collection of plain text files that comprise the Vanilla Edition. Both

  12. Profitability of Willow Biomass Crops Affected by Incentive Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Crops in New York Short-rotation woody crops (SRWC) like shrub willow (Salix spp.) are a potential source of biomass for energy generation and bioproducts in the USA [1, 2] and globally [3]. While@syr.edu Bioenerg. Res. (2013) 6:53­64 DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9234-y #12;result in a very positive net energy

  13. Alder Mutual Light Co, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -Telephone Co JumpAlcoholesAlcopanAldaAlder Mutual

  14. MHK Projects/White Alder Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal IslandWestWave <Alder

  15. Quantavo: a Maple Toolbox for Linear Quantum Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvaro Feito

    2008-06-14

    This manual describes the basic objectives, functionalities and uses of the toolbox for Maple (Maplesoft^TM) called Quantavo. It is intended to facilitate calculations both symbolically and numerically related to Quantum Optics. In particular the evolution, measurement and entanglement properties of quantum states in the Fock basis can be simulated with it. It is provided to the community as a free open source module.

  16. Red Willow County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycledMesa,Willow County,

  17. Vinylboranes as trans-dihydroxyethylene equivalents in Diels-Alder reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Aniko Maria

    1993-01-01

    Novel vinylborane-based trans-dihydroxyethylene equivalents were developed for the synthesis of trans-cyclohexenediol derivatives. The synthetic utility of the new dienophiles was demonstrated by their Diels-Alder reaction ...

  18. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 120(4):830839, 2008 RESPONSE OF SONGBIRDS TO RIPARIAN WILLOW HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debinski, Diane M.

    ABSTRACT.--We compared the structure of riparian willow (Salix spp.) habitat and songbird diversity across- itat changes in other environments. Montane riparian willows (Salix spp.) support the great- est

  19. Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter at the end of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Fig 1. Willow biomass crops resprouting in the spring after being harvested the previous winter BACKGROUND Research and development of shrub willows as biomass crops has been occurring since the mid to planting is an essential step in the biological and economic success of willow biomass crops. Typically

  20. Origins of Reactivity and Selectivity of a Series of Proximity-Induced Transannular Diels-Alder Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Cyndi Qixin

    2013-01-01

    Diels-Alder reaction between butadiene and ethylene to formof each isolated reactant, butadiene and ethylene in themoieties were always butadiene and propene. Creating

  1. Botanical Name Qty Common Name Description Price Size Abutilon 'Dwarf Red' 20 flowering maple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    flowering maple 18" x 24"; evergreen. Orange-red bell-shaped flowers most of the year, attract hummingbirds. Frost-tender. $11.00 1G S B4 Abutilon 'Painted Bells' 16 gold and orange rose flowering maple to 6, showy globes of purple flowers with a metallic sheen in early summer. $7.50 4" BU, + B6 Aloe 'Caitlin' 5

  2. 14TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON INSECT-PLANT INTERACTIONS Estimating direct resistance in willows against a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , making these plants suitable as bioenergy crops. However, Salix coppices are sensitive to herbivory as a short rotation coppice crop to produce biomass as a source of bioenergy. Willows are well suited, often reach high densities in willow plantations (Bjo¨rkman et al., 2004; Peacock et al., 2004

  3. Suzhou Red Maple Wind Blade Mould Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy Equipment CoSolarReservoirPowerRed Maple

  4. Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing theMassachusetts:PageMap ofMaple

  5. Control of Willow Baccharis and Spiny Aster With Pelleted Herbicides. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutz, J.L.; Scifres, C.J.; Mohr, W.C.; Drawe, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    production of native range forages on an Odem sandy clay loam soil in South Texas which supported residual forage plants at the ?. time of treatment. However, crrtificial revegetation may be neces- sary when the system is used to renovate rangeland... grassland soils following disturbance, and is a control. However, the low volatile esters of 2.4-D persistent invader of abandoned fields (Hoffman, l(2.4-d ichlorophenoxy) acetic acid] at 1.68 to 2.24 undated). Willow baccharis generally attains ilograms...

  6. Willow Valley, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow Creek

  7. How to use Maple as a technical word processor for the web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for display on the web that you can easily create using maple and the distill command. I shall now give step by step instructions on how I created such a thing

  8. Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Section 3. Subbasin Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Section 3. Subbasin Assessment Table of Contents...........................................................................................i Table of Contents..........................................................................................16 3.1.2 Subbasin Existing Water Resources

  9. A successional study of Willows (Salix spp.) on sandbar islands in the Mississippi River using GIS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Genevieve Ann

    1996-01-01

    Willows (Salix nigra Marsh. and Salix interior Row.) are short-lived, early successional species which require moist, sandy soil to germinate and can withstand long periods of innundation. Sandbar islands in the Mississippi River possess...

  10. Analysis of the HVAC System at the Willow Branch Intermediate School 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, G.

    1997-01-01

    This report presents an analysis of the HVAC system at the Willow Branch Intermediate School for the MEEN 685 class project. The school is located at College Station, Texas. A portion of the school belonged to Oakwood Intermediate School which...

  11. Postfledging Survival and Movements of Willow and Dusky Flycatchers in the Central Sierra Nevada 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormwald, Lisa M.

    2011-10-21

    endangered willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) and the dusky flycatcher (E. oberholseri). My focus was to estimate fledgling survival and examine factors that influence survival, evaluate postfledging movements and habitat use, and estimate post...

  12. Specificity of Phenolic Glycoside Induction in Willow Seedlings (Salix sericea) in Response to Herbivory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    Specificity of Phenolic Glycoside Induction in Willow Seedlings (Salix sericea) in Response Salix sericea (Marsh.) (Salicaceae) seedlings were used to investigate phyto- chemical induction . Specificity of elicitation . Salix . Plagiodera versicolora . Calligrapha multipunctata bigsbyana . Phenolic

  13. WILLOW VERSUS GLOBAL WARMING p.6 MASTERING POTATO LATE BLIGHT p.34

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    change BIOENERGY CROP PRODUCTION This and that TBE, species observations, foulbrood WATER, AQUACULTURE for bioeconomy This and that Malaria and mast cells 41 Short-rotation coppice willow crops have the potential

  14. Does red alder (Alnus rubra) in upland riparian forests elevate macroinvertebrate and detritus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Diane

    negative effects of timber harvest (such as sedimentation and loss of coarse woody debris) on downstream-growth alder sites exported significantly greater count (mean = 9.4 individuals·m­3 water, standard error (SE) = 3.7) and biomass (mean = 3.1 mg dry mass·m­3 water, SE = 1.2) densities of macroinvertebrates than

  15. Diels-Alder Cycloaddition for Fluorophore Targeting to Specific Proteins inside Living Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The inverse-electron-demand- selective derivatization: copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cyclo- additions (CuAAC),9 strain-promoted azide-cycloalkyne cycloadditions,10 and inverse-electron-demand Diels-Alder cycloadditions of tetrazines and trans-cyclooctenes.11

  16. Abstract We evaluated feeding preference and damage by the slug, Arion subfuscus, on seedlings of two willow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    of two willow species, Salix sericea and S. eriocephala, and their F1 in- terspecific hybrids. Trays subfuscus · Fitness · Hybrid · Chemical defense · Salix Introduction Detailing the relationships between

  17. Chemical variation within and among six northern willow species Tommi Nyman a,*, Riitta Julkunen-Tiitto b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, Tommi

    phenolic compounds in 120 leaf samples representing six northern Salix species. Multivariate clustering are produced. Ó 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Salix, Salicaceae; Willows; HPLC

  18. BEAVER DISTRIBUTION 233 CM. Fish ,md Cime 75(4): 233-238 1 989

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beier, Paul

    . tremuloides, willow, Salix spp, and alder, Ainus incana, were the most heavily used woody forage species tremuloides, cottonwood, P. trichocarpa, willow, Salix spp., mountain alder, AInus incana, gray dogwood

  19. Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-04-01

    Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  20. Understanding the spectacular failure of DNA barcoding in willows (Salix): Does this result from a trans-specific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Spencer C.H.

    Understanding the spectacular failure of DNA barcoding in willows (Salix): Does this result from, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3B2 Abstract Willows (Salix: Salicaceae) form a major ecological component two to seven plastid genome regions (~3.8 kb; ~3% of the genome) from 71 Salix species across all five

  1. Efficient utilization of red maple lumber in glued-laminated timber beams. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janowiak, J.J.; Manbeck, H.B.; Hernandez, R.; Moody, R.C.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

    1995-09-01

    The feasibility of utilizing cant-sawn hardwood lumber, which would not usually be desired for furniture manufacture, was studied for the manufacture of structural glue-laminated (glulam) timber. Two red maple beam combinations were evaluated. Test results of 42 red maple glulam beams showed that it was feasible to develop structural glulam timber from cant-swan lumber. The glulam combinations made from E-rated lumber exceeded the target design bending stress of 2,400 lb/in 2 and met the target modulus of elasticity (MOE) of 1.8 x 106 lb/in 2.

  2. HOMOGENIZATION OF THE STEFAN PROBLEM, WITH APPLICATION TO MAPLE SAP EXUDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    are then applied to solve a much more complicated problem involving multi-phase flow and heat transport in trees that arises from multi-phase flow in a porous medium coupled with heat transport. In particular, we are motivated by the study of sap flow in a maple tree that is subject to both thawing and freezing [5]. We seek

  3. Fertilization of Red Maple (Acer rubrum) and Littleleaf Linden (Tilia cordata) Trees at Recommended Rates Does

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    -and-burlapped red maple (Acer rubrum) and littleleaf linden (Tilia cordata) were planted into a relatively infertile or not irrigated during 3 years. An additional treatment of an unirrigated, split (spring/fall) fertilizer on growth in a relatively infertile silt loam soil, and plants were not harmed by quick- release fertilizers

  4. The Characterisation of Peat Grown Willow and Silver Birch as potential Bioenergy Feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    performance. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to give a detailed chemical within the wood. Combustion tests Figure 7. Stove operating with scrub willow Wood can be tested as small logs or as briquettes. With no processing of the wood, a standard stove would only be able to fit 1kg

  5. BIRD USE OF NATURAL AND RECENTLY REVEGETATED COTTONWOOD-WILLOW HABITATS ON THE KERN RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIRD USE OF NATURAL AND RECENTLY REVEGETATED COTTONWOOD-WILLOW HABITATS ON THE KERN RIVER1 William Conference; September 22-24, 1988; Davis, California. 2 Wildlife Biologist, Center for Environmental Studies of the California-endangered yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus; Anderson and Laymon, 1989). In addition, we

  6. Improving the Profitability of Willow Crops--Identifying Opportunities with a Crop Budget Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    area is harvested annually [23]. Production costs are less affected by natural gas/fertilizer price. Productivity of 12 oven-dried tons (odt) ha-1 year-1 and a biomass price of $ (US dollars) 60 odt-1 results willow T. Buchholz (*) :T. A. Volk Department of Forest and Natural Resource Management, State University

  7. Structural Modification of Sol-Gel Materials through Retro Diels-Alder Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCCLAIN,MARK D.; PRABAKAR,SHESHASAYANA; GREAVES,JOHN; SHEA,KENNETH J.

    1999-12-08

    Hydrolysis and condensation of organically bridged bis-triethoxysilanes, (EtO){sub 3}Si-R-Si(OEt){sub 3}, results in the formation of three dimensional organic/inorganic hybrid networks (Equation 1). Properties of these materials, including porosity, are dependent on the nature of the bridging group, R. Flexible groups (akylene-spacers longer than five carbons in length) polymerize under acidic conditions to give non-porous materials. Rigid groups (such as arylene-, alkynylene-, or alkenylene) form non-porous, microporous, and macroporous gels. In many cases the pore size distributions are quite narrow. One of the motivations for preparing hybrid organic-inorganic materials is to extend the range of properties available with sol-gel systems by incorporating organic groups into the inorganic network. For example, organically modified silica gels arc either prepared by co-polymerizing an organoalkoxysilane with a silica precursor or surface silylating the inorganic gel. This can serve to increase hydrophobicity or to introduce some reactive organic functionality. However, the type and orientation of these organic functionalities is difficult to control. Furthermore, many organoalkoxysilanes can act to inhibitor even prevent gelation, limiting the final density of organic functionalities. We have devised a new route for preparing highly functionalized pores in hybrid materials using bridging groups that are thermally converted into the desired functionalities after the gel has been obtained. In this paper, we present the preparation and characterization of bridged polysilsesquioxanes with Diels-Alder adducts as the bridging groups from the sol-gel polymerization of monomers 2 and 4. The bridging groups are constructed such that the retro Diela-Alder reaction releases the dienes and leaves the dienophiles as integral parts of the network polymers. In the rigid architecture of a xerogel, this loss of organic functionality should liberate sufficient space to modify the overall porosity. Furthermore, the new porosity will be functionalized with the dienophilic olefin bridging group. We also demonstrate that by changing the type of Diels-Alder adduct used as the bridging group, we can change the temperature at which the retro-Diels-Alder reaction will occur.

  8. Proceedings of the 19th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-142 263 bLACk wILLow TRee IMPRoveMeNT: DeveLoPMeNT oF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STRACT Introduction Short rotation woody crops, such as willows (Salix spp.), continue to be examined as biomass regenerated. Black willow (Salix nigra Marsh.) fits well into a biomass program for the southern United States number of sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nutt.) clones were included. Survival of the sandbar clones

  9. Computer Lab 4. Power series methods. Maple's dsolve command can be invoked with an option called series, which finds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slastikov, Valeriy V.

    independent solutions. The same command produces series with logarithmic singularitiesComputer Lab 4. Power series methods. Maple's dsolve command can be invoked with an option called series, which finds power series about x = 0 of solutions of differential equations. For example, if you

  10. Vanadium redox flow battery efficiency and durability studies of sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene)s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Cy H.; Kim, Soowhan; Stains, Ronald; Wei, Xiaoliang; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    Sulfonated Diels Alder poly(phenylene) (SDAPP) was examined for vanadium redox flow battery (VRFB) use. The ion exchange capacity (IEC) was varied from 1.4, 1.6 and 2.0 meq/g in order to tune the proton conductivity and vanadium permeability. Coulombic efficiencies between 92 to 99% were observed, depending on IEC (lower IEC, higher coulombic efficiencies). In all cases the SDAPP displayed comparable energy efficiencies (88 - 90%) to Nafion 117 (88%) at 50mA/cm2. Membrane durability also was dependent on IEC; SDAPP with the highest IEC lasted slightly over 50 cycles while SDAPP with the lowest IEC lasted over 400 cycles and testing was discontinued only due to time constraints. Accelerated vanadium lifetime studies were initialed with SDAPP, by soaking films in a 0.1 M V5+ and 5.0 M total SO4-2 solution. The rate of degradation was also proportional with IEC; the 2 meq/g sample dissolved within 376 hours, the 1.6 meq/g sample dissolved after 860 hours, while the 1.4 meq/g sample broke apart after 1527 hours.

  11. Plant Toxicity, Adaptive Herbivory, and Plant Community Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-03-06

    Our general objective is to first examine how the dynamics .... the maximum possible energy intake rate) by ..... and hare contributes to the willow-alder transition.

  12. A National Assessment of Promising Areas for Switchgrass, Hybrid Poplar, or Willow Energy Crop Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.

    1999-02-01

    The objective of this paper is to systematically assess the cropland acreage that could support energy crops and the expected farm gate and delivered prices of energy crops. The assessment is based on output from two modeling approaches: (1) the Oak Ridge County-Level Energy Crop (ORECCL) database (1996 version) and (2) the Oak Ridge Integrated Bioenergy Analysis System (ORIBAS). The former provides county-level estimates of suitable acres, yields, and farmgate prices of energy crops (switchgrass, hybrid poplar, willow) for all fifty states. The latter estimates delivered feedstock prices and quantities within a state at a fine resolution (1 km2) and considers the interplay between transportation costs, farmgate prices, cropland density, and facility demand. It can be used to look at any type of feedstock given the appropriate input parameters. For the purposes of this assessment, ORIBAS has been used to estimate farmgate and delivered switchgrass prices in 11 states (AL, FL, GA, IA, M N, MO, ND, NE, SC, SD, and TN). Because the potential for energy crop production can be considered from several perspectives, and is evolving as policies, economics and our basic understanding of energy crop yields and production costs change, this assessment should be viewed as a snapshot in time.

  13. SU-E-P-04: Transport Theory Learning Module in the Maple Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Both, J [University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The medical physics graduate program at the University of Miami is developing a computerized instructional module which provides an interactive mechanism for students to learn transport theory. While not essential in the medical physics curriculum, transport theory should be taught because the conceptual level of transport theory is fundamental, a substantial literature exists and ought to be accessible, and students should understand commercial software which solves the Boltzmann equation.But conventional teaching and learning of transport theory is challenging. Students may be under prepared to appreciate its methods, results, and relevance, and it is not substantially addressed in textbooks for the medical physicists. Other resources an instructor might reasonably use, while excellent, may be too briskly paced for beginning students. The purpose of this work is to render teaching of transport theory more tractable by making learning highly interactive. Methods: The module is being developed in the Maple mathematics environment by instructors and graduate students. It will refresh the students' knowledge of vector calculus and differential equations, and will develop users' intuition for phase space concepts. Scattering concepts will be developed with animated simulations using tunable parameters characterizing interactions, so that students may develop a “feel” for cross section. Transport equations for one and multiple types of radiation will be illustrated with phase space animations. Numerical methods of solution will be illustrated. Results: Attempts to teach rudiments of transport theory in radiation physics and dosimetry courses using conventional classroom techniques at the University of Miami have had small success, because classroom time is limited and the material has been hard for our students to appreciate intuitively. Conclusion: A joint effort of instructor and students to teach and learn transport theory by building an interactive description of it will lead to deeper appreciation of the transport theoretical underpinnings of dosimetry.

  14. Forest floor community metatranscriptomes identify fungal and bacterial responses to N deposition in two maple forests

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hesse, Cedar N.; Mueller, Rebecca C.; Vuyisich, Momchilo; Gallegos-Graves, La Verne; Gleasner, Cheryl D.; Zak, Donald R.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-04-23

    Anthropogenic N deposition alters patterns of C and N cycling in temperate forests, where forest floor litter decomposition is a key process mediated by a diverse community of bacteria and fungi. To track forest floor decomposer activity we generated metatranscriptomes that simultaneously surveyed the actively expressed bacterial and eukaryote genes in the forest floor, to compare the impact of N deposition on the decomposers in two natural maple forests in Michigan, USA, where replicate field plots had been amended with N for 16 years. Site and N amendment responses were compared using about 74,000 carbohydrate active enzyme transcript sequences (CAZymes)more »in each metatranscriptome. Parallel ribosomal RNA (rRNA) surveys of bacterial and fungal biomass and taxonomic composition showed no significant differences in either biomass or OTU richness between the two sites or in response to N. Site and N amendment were not significant variables defining bacterial taxonomic composition, but they were significant for fungal community composition, explaining 17 and 14% of the variability, respectively. The relative abundance of expressed bacterial and fungal CAZymes changed significantly with N amendment in one of the forests, and N-response trends were also identified in the second forest. Although the two ambient forests were similar in community biomass, taxonomic structure and active CAZyme profile, the shifts in active CAZyme profiles in response to N-amendment differed between the sites. One site responded with an over-expression of bacterial CAZymes, and the other site responded with an over-expression of both fungal and different bacterial CAZymes. Both sites showed reduced representation of fungal lignocellulose degrading enzymes in N-amendment plots. The metatranscriptome approach provided a holistic assessment of eukaryote and bacterial gene expression and is applicable to other systems where eukaryotes and bacteria interact.« less

  15. POPSCI.COM38 POPULAR SCIENCE NOVEMBER 2010 SEPTEMBER 8 Personal-robotics company Willow Garage begins selling the PR2, a $400,000 open-platform robot that can fold laundry, play pool, and fetch beer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    POPSCI.COM38 POPULAR SCIENCE NOVEMBER 2010 THEDIYMRI SEPTEMBER 8 Personal-robotics company Willow Garage begins selling the PR2, a $400,000 open-platform robot that can fold laundry, play pool, and fetch

  16. Performance and evaluation of gas-engine-driven split-system cooling equipment at the Willow Grove Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Schmelzer, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    DOE`s Federal Energy Management Program supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenditures within the federal sector; one such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP)(formerly the Test Bed Demonstration program), seeks to evaluate new energy saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the federal government. This report describes the field evaluation conducted to examine the performance of a 15-ton natural-gas-engine- driven, split-system, air-conditioning unit. The unit was installed at a multiple-use building at Willow Grove Naval Air Station, a regular and reserve training facility north of Philadelphia, and its performance was monitored under the NTDP.

  17. trig.ms CarlLee Fall1997 This is a Maple worksheet to plot the trigonometric functions. Note: scaling=constrained causes the same scale to be used on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    : scaling=constrained causes the same scale to be used on bothaxes. view=[­4*Pi..4*Pi,­10..10] causes with the last four trig functions, since they assume arbitrarily largevalues. discont=true causes Maple to try

  18. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  19. STOPOVER ECOLOGY AND HABITAT SELECTION OF JUVENILE SWAINSON'S THRUSHES DURING FALL MIGRATION ALONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew

    [Picea]), with interspersed patches of broadleaf forest (willow [Salix] and alder [Alnus]) in poorly Picea) con parches dispersos de bosque latifoliado (Salix) y de Alnus en las zonas con poco drenaje

  20. DESIGNING AND OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Payette; D. Tillman

    2004-06-01

    During the period July 1, 2000-March 31, 2004, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) conducted an extensive demonstration of woody biomass cofiring at its Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. This demonstration, cofunded by USDOE and Allegheny, and supported by the Biomass Interest Group (BIG) of EPRI, evaluated the impacts of sawdust cofiring in both cyclone boilers and tangentially-fired pulverized coal boilers. The cofiring in the cyclone boiler--Willow Island Generating Station Unit No.2--evaluated the impacts of sawdust alone, and sawdust blended with tire-derived fuel. The biomass was blended with the coal on its way to the combustion system. The cofiring in the pulverized coal boiler--Albright Generating Station--evaluated the impact of cofiring on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) when the sawdust was injected separately into the furnace. The demonstration of woody biomass cofiring involved design, construction, and testing at each site. The results addressed impacts associated with operational issues--capacity, efficiency, and operability--as well as formation and control of airborne emissions such as NO{sub x}, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}2), opacity, and mercury. The results of this extensive program are detailed in this report.

  1. Sediment Control: Willows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-ThroughputUpcomingmagnetoresistanceand Governmentm D mSecurityWeirs SedimentSediment

  2. Chemical changes to leaf litter from trees grown under elevated CO2 and the implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John J.

    species. Quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides), white willow (Salix alba), and sugar maple (Acer saccharum-trembles (Populus tremuloides), des saules blancs (Salix alba) et des érables à sucre (Acer saccharum) dans des

  3. Performance and evaluation of gas engine driven rooftop air conditioning equipment at the Willow Grove (PA) Naval Air Station. Interim report, 1992 cooling season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, P.R.; Conover, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    In a field evaluation conducted for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the performance of a new US energy-related technology under the FEMP Test Bed Demonstration Program. The technology was a 15-ton natural gas engine driven roof top air conditioning unit. Two such units were installed on a naval retail building to provide space conditioning to the building. Under the Test Bed Demonstration Program, private and public sector interests are focused to support the installation and evaluation of new US technologies in the federal sector. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with DOE were the American Gas Cooling Center, Philadelphia Electric Company, Thermo King Corporation, and the US Naval Air Station at Willow Grove, Pennsylvania. Equipment operating and service data as well as building interior and exterior conditions were secured for the 1992 cooling season. Based on a computer assessment of the building using standard weather data, a comparison was made with the energy and operating costs associated with the previous space conditioning system. Based on performance during the 1992 cooling season and adjusted to a normal weather year, the technology will save the site $6,000/yr in purchased energy costs. An additional $9,000 in savings due to electricity demand ratchet charge reductions will also be realized. Detailed information on the technology, the installation, and the results of the technology test are provided to illustrate the advantages to the federal sector of using this technology. A history of the CRADA development process is also reported.

  4. 2014-10-08, 7:44 PM--FORESTS: Sugar maples reveal obstacles facing species in their e...nge --researchers --Monday, September 29, 2014 --www.eenews.net Page 1 of 3http://www.eenews.net/climatewire/stories/1060006547/print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    the Appalachian Mountains where temperatures were lower. Sap from these trees is boiled down to produce maple syrup. "We knew the system had warmed, but we weren't seeing the response you would expect," said.3 miles) per decade. Projected temperature increases between 2050 and 2090 under high carbon emissions

  5. Ackee, Lychee, Longan, Maple Syrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    , Collard greens, Daikon, Kale, Kohlrabi, Horseradish, Mustard greens, Radish, Rutabaga, Turnip, Turnip greens, Watercress Asparagus Barley, Corn, Lemongrass, Millet, Oat, Rye, Rice, Wheat, Sugarcane, Sorghum Black currant Poppy Tea Coffee Brazil nut Blueberry, Cranberry, Lingonberry Chinese Gooseberry, Kiwi

  6. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1996-01-01

    , well, we tried to help our guys pick up the pieces... Contributions are always welcome ? as are letters of comment, whether your opinions are flattering and/or constructive. The writers and I are keen to hear what you think! Thank you kindly. love...'t signify, as I don't believe these people should be prosecuted. They are motivated only by love and enthusiasm, they intend no harm to anyone (real or imaginary) through their creative endeavours, and they seem to make no profit from said endeavours...

  7. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01

    'n outlined the murders, I asked Det. Sgt. Kira Allyn out for lunch. And she accepted. And we had fun. Hot dogs in the park, and afterward we shared a popsicle. And I asked her out for dinner. She gave every signal I've ever seen to let me know she wanted...

  8. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 6 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1997-01-01

    Harding Welsh (Beau Starr), Detective Jack Huey (Tony Craig), Detective Louis Gardino (Daniel Kash), Detective Thomas Dewey (Tom Melissis), Elaine Besbriss (Catherine Bruhier), Inspector Margaret Thatcher (Camilla Scott), State's Attorney Louise St... characters, yeah, yeah.' 'The privacylaws don't apply.' 'Well, someone should do something. ...Hey, if we're fictional, then we belong to our creator, right? Paul Haggis. He should do something.' 'Actually, Ray, we belong to a company named Alliance...

  9. Pure Maple Syrup Issue 9 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1999-01-01

    ) and Detective Stanley Raymond Kowalski (Callum Keith Rennie). Other vital characters are Lieutenant Harding Welsh (Beau Starr), Detective Jack Huey (Tony Craig), Detective Louis Gardino (Daniel Kash), Detective Thomas Dewey (Tom Melissis), Elaine Besbriss... been. How very lonely. 'Hey, Benny...' He waited until Benton raised his head once more, those sad blue eyes meeting his. 'You've got me now, and I'll hold you, and touch you, and hug you as much as I can for the rest of my life, OK? I promise...

  10. Restoring cottonwood & willow riparian forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    for the lower San Joaquin Basin In California's Central Valley, widespread flow regulation and land development. In the lower San Joaquin Basin, alteration of natural flow regimes for flood control, irrigation in degraded river reaches has become an increasingly frequent restoration activity in the lower San Joaquin

  11. Appendix 58 Flathead Forest Plan Amendment 21, Appendix IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SUBBASIN The Swan Subbasin is bounded by the Swan Range to the east, the Mission Mountains. Mountain hemlock are also found at higher elevations in the southern part of the Mission Range. Drier a well developed shrub layer, e.g., menziesia, alder, mountain maple, huckleberry, etc. The wetland

  12. Cover Letter Sample 1723 Maple Drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    web site. First Financial is one of the largest credit unions in the country with a strong reputation

  13. Sweet Potato Fries $4 Maple Dipping Sauce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Company Whale Wheat Ale $5 6th Row Brewery O'Fallon Wheach $6 O'Fallon Brewery St. Louis IPA $5 Urban Chestnut Brewing Company Schlafly Hefeweizen $4 Schlafly Brewery Nightly Specials Monday House Wine

  14. Maple River Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMapPark,Ridge,

  15. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2013 causing over 3 million in damage to monitoring gages, roadways and storm water control structures on Laboratory property. Collaborating with Mother Nature to...

  16. Fast-growing shrub willow named `Owasco`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

    2007-07-03

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.Salix miyabeana named `Owasco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 49% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 39% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.7-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Owasco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Owasco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  17. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Millbrook`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-04-24

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.Salix miyabeana named `Millbrook`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 9% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 2% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Millbrook` produced greater than 2-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Millbrook` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Millbrook` displays a low incidence of rust disease.

  18. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Otisco`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P. (Marcellus, NY); Kopp, Richard F. (Marietta, NY); Smart, Lawrence B. (Geneva, NY); Volk, Timothy A. (Syracuse, NY)

    2007-09-11

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Otisco`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 42% more woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX64`) and 33% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Otisco` produced greater than 2.5-fold more stem biomass than two other current production cultivars, `SX67` and `SX61`. `Otisco` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Otisco` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  19. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Oneida`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-01

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea.times.S. miyabeana named `Oneida`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing 2.7-times greater woody biomass than one of its parents (`SX67`) and greater than 36% more biomass than current production cultivars (`SV1` and `SX64`). `Oneida` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Oneida` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  20. Diamond Willow Extension | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|Winds Wind

  1. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-EearnstakesLos AlamosPortableNewLosplants

  2. 2015 Sports Team Breakfast Buffet Buttermilk Pancakes with Maple Syrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Lunch One Sandwich ($2.00 per additional Sandwich) Pasta Salad or Green Salad with Dressing Granola Bar@ramadaprincegeorge.com #12;2015 Sports Team Game Time Buffet Pasta Buffet Pitchers of Chilled Fruit Juice & Ice Tea Freshly Fruit Salad Roast Beef Dinner Buffet Pitchers of Chilled Fruit Juice & Ice Tea Chef's Freshly Baked

  3. 18 Maple Syrup Digest HIGH VACUUM IN GRAVITY TUBING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    where elec- tricity is not available, time needed for maintenance of a pump and extractor gravity tubing, or tubing without the use of a pump, to be a poor substitute for a modern system with a pump, extractor, and the latest tubing arrangement. Sap yields from gravity systems are often half

  4. Introduction to Symbolic Computation: a Maple/MATLAB Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    software. Ideally, this course will be taken before the "MCS 471" (numerical analysis). Based on five, and taking into account future trends and current research developments. 1 Introduction The department the standard for scientific computing in almost all engineering disciplines. Thirdly, the second edition [9

  5. Introduction to Symbolic Computation: a Maple/MATLAB Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    mathematical software. Ideally, this course will be taken before the \\MCS 471" (numerical analysis). Based courses, and taking into account future trends and current research developments. 1 Introduction the standard for scienti#12;c computing in almost all engineering disciplines. Thirdly, the second edition [9

  6. Maple Mainline This year's Vermont Maplerama will be held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    at the Franklin County Field days site in Highgate, and will offer a fun weekend of tours, great food in tapping, evaporation and remote vacuum sensing. You will have the opportunity to see all of this delicious food, includ- ing appetizers and cash bar at the trade show on Thurs- day, home cooked breakfasts

  7. Maple Bluff, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMap of BiomassMapMap

  8. Maple Glen, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMap of

  9. Maple Grove, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMap ofGrove, Minnesota:

  10. Maple Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMap ofGrove,

  11. Maple Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMap

  12. Maple Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMapPark, Illinois:

  13. Maple Plain, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMapPark,

  14. Maple Ridge, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMapPark,Ridge, Ohio:

  15. Maple Valley, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange | OpenMapPark,Ridge,Valley,

  16. Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,Open EnergyMathews County,Matla SolarMatrix

  17. Shanghai Maple Tongji University hybrid automobile research partnership |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology Co Ltd Jump to:Technical Physics SITPOpen Energy

  18. Maple Ridge 1a Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing theMassachusetts:PageMap

  19. Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2005 portion) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing theMassachusetts:PageMap5

  20. Maple Ridge Wind Farm (2006 portion) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing theMassachusetts:PageMap5(2006

  1. Maple Ridge Wind Farm phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios TowardsInformation Reducing

  2. Willow Creek, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to:Willoughby, Ohio:

  3. Willow Creek, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to:Willoughby, Ohio:Montana: Energy

  4. Willow Grove, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to:Willoughby, Ohio:Montana:

  5. Willow Park, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to:Willoughby, Ohio:Montana:Park,

  6. Willow Springs, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to:Willoughby,

  7. EA-1023: Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project, Eugene, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund habitat acquisition (of land or a conservation easement), wildlife...

  8. Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and alternative land-uses: arable and set-aside (agricultural land taken out of production). We deployed litter cultivation of biomass for biofuels (trans- port fuels) and bioenergy (heat and power) has pro- voked much of the northern hemisphere, how- ever, a small, but growing proportion of biomass crops consist of tree species

  9. Los Alamos plants willows for flood June 18, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mexico experienced thousand-year rains in September 2013 causing over $3 million in damage to monitoring Nature to control sediment migration, ADEP's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) and contractors Terranear

  10. Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

  11. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Tully Champion`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-08-28

    A distinct female cultivar of Salix viminalis.times.S. miyabeana named `Tully Champion`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 25% more woody biomass than two current production clones (Salix dasyclados `SV1` and Salix miyabeana `SX64`), more than 2.5-fold greater biomass than one of its parents (Salix miyabeana `SX67`), and nearly 3-fold more biomass than another production clone (Salix sacchalinensis, `SX61`) when grown in the same field for the same length of time (two growing seasons after coppice) in Tully, N.Y. `Tully Champion` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested repeatedly after two to four years of growth. `Tully Champion` displays a low incidence of rust disease and is not damaged by potato leafhoppers.

  12. Fast-growing willow shrub named `Fish Creek`

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abrahamson, Lawrence P.; Kopp, Richard F.; Smart, Lawrence B.; Volk, Timothy A.

    2007-05-08

    A distinct male cultivar of Salix purpurea named `Fish Creek`, characterized by rapid stem growth producing greater than 30% more woody biomass than either of its parents (`94001` and `94006`) and 20% more biomass than a current production cultivar (`SV1`). `Fish Creek` can be planted from dormant stem cuttings, produces multiple stems after coppice, and the stem biomass can be harvested when the plant is dormant. In the spring following harvest, the plant will re-sprout very vigorously, producing new stems that can be harvested after two to four years of growth. This harvest cycle can be repeated several times. The stem biomass can be chipped and burned as a source of renewable energy, generating heat and/or electricity. `Fish Creek` displays a low incidence of rust disease or damage by beetles or sawflies.

  13. City of Willow Springs, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler, IowaScottsboro,KansasKansas

  14. Whispering Willow I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,What Is a Small Community WindWhere is DBWind Farm

  15. MHK Projects/Willow Island | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoosSlough BendVidal IslandWestWaveWillapaIsland

  16. Diamond Willow Wind (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|Winds Wind7) Wind

  17. Diamond Willow Wind (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|Winds Wind7) Wind8)

  18. Tassajara Creek restoration project: Continued riparian habitat monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Michelle; Percelay, Julie

    2008-01-01

    brush (Baccharis pilularis ) Willow species (Salix spp. )Willow species (Salix spp. )Willow species (Salix spp. ) Willow species (Salix spp. )

  19. Post-Project Assessment of the 2003 Cerrito Creek Restoration and Recommendations for Additional Stormwater Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlong, Michelle; Cook, Michael; Kennedy, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    near Kains Ave) Willow - Salix sp. (prolific along entirebank primarily) Willows - Salix sp. (various) Poison Oak -

  20. An Intramolecular Diels-Alder Approach to the Eunicelins: Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Ophirin B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to stereoselectively provide the diene 4 (93%, >98:2 d.r.).10 With diene 4 in hand, the stage was set for the closure

  1. A combined intramolecular Diels-Alder/intramolecular Schmidt reaction: Formal synthesis of (+/-)-stenine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Jennifer E.; Aubé , Jeffrey

    2002-01-01

    . The specific context of this work is the formal total synthesis of stenine, shown retrosynthetically in Scheme 1. A B N O O H D N BnO O H C BnO N 3 O stenine Scheme 1 Stenine and related alkaloids [3-11] have drawn considerable attention from.... As expected (see below), the major diastereomer, 5, had the stereochemistry required for the stenine synthesis. The structures of lactams 5 and 7 were confirmed by X-ray crystallography of the corresponding debenzylated derivatives. We assign the unusual...

  2. The Role of Native Riparian Vegetation in Resisting Invasion by Giant Reed, Arundo donax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palenscar, Kai

    2012-01-01

    demography of arroyo willow (Salix lasiolepis: Salicaceae).whereas sandbar willow (Salix exigua) facilitated invasion1998). Sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nutt. ) and mulefat (

  3. P2 de Calculo III com Maple --2008.1 27 de maio de 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewiner, Thomas (Thomas Lewiner)

    ) associada. 1 2 pt (e) Calcule as derivadas parciais de f (x, y) e verifique o resultado do item anterior. 1

  4. Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Literature Cited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . (2002) Umatilla River Floodplain and Wetland: A Quantitative Characterization, Classification for Management of Smallmouth Bass in John Day Reservoir. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Information.E., Fransen, B.R. and Bisson, P.A. (1996) Incorporation of nitrogen and carbon from spawning coho salmon

  5. Reduced Population Control of an Insect Pest in Managed Willow Monocultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Funding: The study was financed by The Swedish Energy Agency (http, or preparation of the manuscript. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests

  6. POLYGYNY AND EXTRA-PAIR PATERNITY IN A POPULATION OF SOUTHWESTERN WILLOW FLYCATCHERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    , el beneficio de esta estrategia puede ser contrarestado por pe´rdidas ocasionadas por la paternidad´mero desproporcionado de PEP como resultado de la estrategia de apareamiento poli´gina de sus parejas y que tanto los

  7. AGE, HABITAT, AND YEARLY VARIATION IN THE DIET OF A GENERALIST INSECTIVORE, THE SOUTHWESTERN WILLOW FLYCATCHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    , fi . W bw , b , w H D . U b , w fl b b w (Populus fremontii) ww (Salix , ó H á D . U b , E. t. extimus áb bó Populus . Salix ., ó Tamarix w b fl. I , bb Sw Ww F . T w U S, w b w (Populus .) ww (Salix .) b b

  8. Initial Effects of Brush Cutting and Shoot Removal on Willow Browse Quality Roy V. Rea1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillingham, Michael

    of Northern British Columbia, 3333 University Way, Prince George, British Columbia, Canada, V2N 4Z9. Abstract

  9. Successes, Failures and Suggested Future Directions for Ecosystem Restoration of the Middle Sacramento River, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    woody stems such as willows (Salix spp. ), blue elderberry (Goodding’s black willow (Salix gooddingii)]. • Percent of

  10. Patterns of NPP, GPP, respiration, and NEP during boreal forest succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    mariana [Mill. ]), and willow (Salix spp. )] were calculatedAlnus crispa), willow (Salix spp. ), poplar, and aspen (

  11. ALDER ESTABLISHMENT AND CHANNEL DYNAMICS IN A TRIBUTARY OF THE SOUTH FORK EEL RIVER, MENDOCINO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and Professor, Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis. 14 USDA Forest and Hedman (1977) call this inner region the "active channel." They de- scribe the active channel

  12. Origins of Reactivity and Selectivity of a Series of Proximity-Induced Transannular Diels-Alder Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Cyndi Qixin

    2013-01-01

    9 3.6 Intrinsic Reaction Coordinate (IRC)Intrinsic Reaction Coordinate (IRC) Calculation An intrinsica transition state geometry, an IRC calculation can trace a

  13. Cognitive Research in Asian Small-Clawed Otters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perdue, Bonnie M.; Snyder, Rebecca J.; Maple, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Snyder, R. J. , Pratte, J. , Marr, M. J. , & Maple, T. L. (Snyder, R. J. , Zhihe, Z. , Marr, M. J. , & Maple, T. L. (Perdue, Snyder, Pratte, Marr, & Maple, 2009). At least two

  14. Beyond the Seas: Eighteenth-Century Convict Transportation and the Widening Net of Penal Sanctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Willow Mary

    2011-01-01

    the Deck by Piling Up Sanctions: Is Intermediate Punishmentthe Widening Net of Penal Sanctions By Willow Mary Meyer AWidening Net of Penal Sanctions By Willow Mary Meyer Doctor

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF LEAST BELL'S VIREO NEST SITES ALONG THE SANTA YNEZ RIVER1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Most next (59.4%) were located in willows (Salix spp.) or mugwort (Artemisia douglasiana) at heights (Populus fremontii), arroyo willow (Salix lasio

  16. Wetlands as Best Management Practices to Mitigate Agricultural Nonpoint Source Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpuzcu, Mahmut Ekrem

    2012-01-01

    Hydrocotyle umbellata), native willows (Salix exiguaand Salix goodingi. ), and oak (Quercus lobata). Miller Lakeinclude native willows (Salix exigua and Salix goodingii),

  17. How Predation Risk Shapes Avian Nest Site Selection and Processes Underlying Nest Predation Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latif, Quresh Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    three species of willow (Salix exidua, S. lucida, S. lutea)riparian habitats are dominated by either willow (Salixexidua, Salix lucida, and Salix lutea) or black cottonwood (

  18. Ecological Applications, 21(6), 2011, pp. 22832296 2011 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Songbird response to increased willow (Salix spp.) growth in Yellowstone's northern range LISA M. BARIL,1, Montana 59717 USA Abstract. After nearly a century of height suppression, willows (Salix spp Mountains, USA; riparian; Salix spp.; songbirds; vegetation structure; willow communities; willow

  19. Texas Big Tree Registry A list of the largest trees in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5'or willow, weeping Salix babylonica 120'' 10'or yellow-poplar (tuliptree, yellow poplar) Liriodendron

  20. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Salix spp.) Younger stands have less species diversity. Willows are typical pioneers in disturbed ar

  1. General Descriptions of Major Wetland Plant Communities in the upper portion of the Flathead Subbasin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ponds, and on the edge of marshes, potholes, and lakes. Drummond's willow (Salix drummondiana in wet meadow complexes (which often have some beaver influence). Bebb's willow (Salix bebbiana) and Geyer's willow (Salix geyeriana) are much less common as dominant species. Sandbar willow (Salix exigua

  2. OIKOS 103: 579589, 2003 Birds have no impact on folivorous insect guilds on a montane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Edward F.

    on the community of insects feeding on Lemmon's willow, Salix lemmonii, at Carman Valley, California. Salix

  3. Appendix 28 Geomorphology of the Lower Flathead River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tree or shrub species such as Populius trichocarpa (black cottonwood) and Salix exigua (sandbar willow

  4. Tidal Marsh Vegetation of China Camp, San Pablo Bay, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baye, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    riparian thickets (Salix lasiolepis) and Sarcocornia saltFigure 13). Willow thickets (Salix lasiolepis) with ground

  5. Benzo[a]pyrene co-metabolism in the presence of plant root extracts and exudates: Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    and energy source. Plant root extracts of osage orange (Maclura pomifera), hybrid willow (Salix alba

  6. J.Org. Chem. 1989,54, 2931-2935 Electronic Factors Influencing the Activation Barrier of the Diels-Alder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48202 Gregory J. Wolber Department of Chemistry, Mercy College of Detroit, Detroit, Michigan 48219 Receiued February 9, 1989 Ab initio molecular

  7. Phenylseleno Acrylate As A Novel Ethylene Equivalent for Diels-Alder Reactions And An ortho-Benzoquinone Cycloaddition Strategy Toward Morphine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Felix Rene

    2013-01-01

    and 1,3-butadiene. .. 99 Schemephenyl-1,3-butadiene 67. .and 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene (Scheme 1-4, Equation 3).

  8. Snapping Supernovae at z>1.7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldering, Greg

    2009-01-01

    LBNL-61879 Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of California. Snapping Supernovae at z > 1.7 Greg Aldering,of very high redshift Type Ia supernovae for cosmology and

  9. Testing a Mechanistic Model of Forest-Canopy Mass and Energy Exchange Using Eddy Correlation: Carbon Dioxide and Ozone Uptake by a Mixed Oak-Maple Stand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amthor, JS; Goulden, ML; Munger, JW; Wofsy, SC

    1994-01-01

    exchange of mass and energy between a forest canopy and thewater, energy, and momentum exchange between a forest andmeasurements of forest mass and energy exchange are

  10. "code_support' for CLIFFORD, Bigebra, Octonion, GTP, Cliplus, Octonion in Maple 8 `Copyright 1995-2003 by Rafal Ablamowicz (*) and Bertfried Fauser ($)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablamowicz, Rafal

    . > split:=proc(pat,str) local a_seq,a1,x,pos,len,n; ############################################### options:=length(a1); pos:=1; while(SearchText(pat,a1,pos..len) 0) do n:=SearchText(pat,a1,pos..len); x:=substring(a1,pos..n-1); a_seq:=a_seq,x; a1:=substring(a1,n+length(pat)..len); len:=length(a1); od: a

  11. SYMBIOSIS (2009) 47, 2333 2009 Balaban, Philadelphia/Rehovot ISSN 0334-5114 Diazotrophic endophytes of native black cottonwood and willow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    2009-01-01

    . The presence of these diazotrophic microorganisms may help explain the ability of these pioneering tree species. Introduction Most plants in their native environments depend on symbioses with microorganisms tolerance, pathogen resistance, seed germination, seedling length, and aiding in phytoremediation

  12. GIS-based Multi-criteria Evaluation with Analytical Hierarchy Process to assess suitable areas for Willow Short Rotation Coppice production in Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maeda, Sayaka

    In Scotland, agriculture remains the dominant form of land use in rural areas, indicating that the successful implementation of renewable energy strategies has the potential to provide opportunities for dedicated biomass ...

  13. 1.3 Towards MEMS Probes for Intracellular Y. Hanein, K. F. Bhringer, R. C. Wyeth, and A. O. D. Willows,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1.3 Towards MEMS Probes for Intracellular Recording Y. Hanein, K. F. BÎhringer, R. C. Wyeth, and A the complex interactions of brain cells. Recent interest in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and in particular in bio- MEMS research has led to miniaturization of microelectrodes for ex- tracellular neuronal

  14. Intracellular Neuronal Recording with High Aspect Ratio MEMS Probes Yael Hanein*, U. Lang*, J. Theobald**, R. Wyeth**, T. Daniel**, A. O. D. Willows**, D. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Tom

    Intracellular Neuronal Recording with High Aspect Ratio MEMS Probes Yael Hanein*, U. Lang*, J. INTRODUCTION Extensive work in recent years has shown the potential of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) for neurological and electrochemical sensing applications. MEMS devices are particularly promising due

  15. Microoxen: Microorganisms to move microscale loads Douglas B. Weibel, Piotr Garstecki, Declan Ryan, Willow R. DiLuzio, Michael Mayer, Jennifer E. Seto,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Michael

    organelles and synaptic vesicles (1­5). In eukaryotic mitochondria, a rotary motor, ATP synthase, produces proteins makes up the remarkable rotary motor that powers the motion of flagella (8). Interest sensors already present in the cell (or introduced through genetic engineering) to be used, and (iii

  16. REVEGETATION ALONG COYOTE CREEK (SANTA CLARA COUNTY) AT TWO FREEWAY BRIDGES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fremontii), valley willow (Salix hind- siana), red willow (S. laevigata), and coast live oak (Quercus the reason for the relatively poor survival of Salix cuttings over the first month after planting. However

  17. Ecology, 90(9), 2009, pp. 24542466 2009 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creel, Scott

    Abstract. Recent increases in the height and growth ring width of willow (Salix spp.) and other woody; elk; nonconsumptive effect; predation; risk effect; Salix spp.; trophic cascade; willow; wolf

  18. List of publications Peter Dalin Articles in peer-reviewed journals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    brevicollis (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) on Salix. BioControl 57: 611-618. 13. Wang, X-P., Q-S. Yang, P. Dalin, X. Eklund (2004) Leaf beetle grazing does not induce willow trichome defense in the coppicing willow Salix

  19. 2000 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 54(2), 2000, pp. 526533

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, Tommi

    species of nematine sawflies that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.). Most of the species are mono sawflies that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.) also offer a good model system for the study of evo

  20. --AMERICAN MIDLAND NATURALIST --Monday Jan 29 2001 02:05 PM 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank, Nathan Egan

    of Symmorphuscristatuswasps,leaf beetle larvae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and willow (Salix spp.) trees is a model systemfor beetles and willow (Salix) tree species has become a model system for studying both chemical defense

  1. Towards a Stable Future: A Design Proposal for Cerrito Creek in Blake Garden, Kensington, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Karuna; Pinto, Pedro; Sherraden, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Fig. 29: Sample Plant List Douglas spirea willow sedgesplanting plan would be to list native plants appropriate for

  2. California black rails depend on irrigation-fed wetlands in the Sierra Nevada foothills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Orien M. W.; Chen, Stephanie K.; Risk, Benjamin B.; Tecklin, Jerry; Beissinger, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Juncaceae) and willows (Salix spp. ). At each point we alsoOther sedges Rushes Salix Habitat loss and degradation are

  3. Evaluation of Riparian Restoration to Enhance Anadromous Fish Habitat along a Napa County Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaber, Christine O.

    2008-01-01

    douglasii Ouercus lobata Salix SD. Umbellularia californicaUntagged willow stakes (Salix sp. ) were planted along the

  4. Encroachment of upland Mediterranean plant species in riparian ecosystems of southern Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Maria J.

    2010-01-01

    angustifolia), grey willow (Salix atrocinerea), AfricanSalicaceae Citrus sinensis Populus alba Populus nigra Salixalba Salix babilonica (*) Salix spp. Tamaricaceae

  5. Tensile and thickness swelling properties of strands from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were investigated in this study. Strands from four Louisiana-grown species--willow (Salix spp.), yellow

  6. Ecological Entomology (2008), DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2311.2008.01035.x 2008 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    2008-01-01

    ) and the native ant Prenolepis imparis on the structure of insect herbivore communities on willow trees (Salix, Prenolepis imparis, on the community of herbivorous insects occurring on willow trees, Salix lasiolepis, native ants, Salix, willow. #12;2 Julie P. Nygard, Nathan J. Sanders and Edward F. Connor ©

  7. Remarks On The PARRONDO PARADOX Shalosh B. EKHAD 1 and Doron ZEILBERGER 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    ;nitely many cities labelled by the integers. The train company Y (resp. Z) has service from city n by a Maple package PARRONDO downloadable from Zeilberger's website. 2 If your current capital is n dollars #12; The Maple Package PARRONDO Tells You the BEST Periodic Strategy The Maple package PARRONDO far

  8. Integrating a Comprehensive Modal Emissions Model into ATMIS Transportation Modeling Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Matthew; Malcom, Carrie; Scora, George

    2001-01-01

    Weir Canyon Maple Main I-15 SR71 SR241 AM Paramics AM GPS MDGreen Rinver Maple Main SR241 SR71 I-15 AM Paramics AM GPSWeir Canyon Maple Main I-15 SR71 SR241 EC EC* 1B 2B 2C a)

  9. The Nearby Supernova FactoryThe Nearby Supernova Factory W.M. Wood-Vasey, G. Aldering, B. C. Lee, S. Loken, P. Nugent, S. Perlmutter, R. Quimby, J. Siegrist, L. Wang Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 0.45 0.5 SupernovaeDiscovered/year/0.02 MagnitudeError Redshift Redshift distribution for Various

  10. [4 + 2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : synthesis of highly substituted tetrahydropyridines and indolizidine alkaloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumidajski, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as activated imino dienophiles in intermolecular and intramolecular aza Diels-Alder reactions affording tetrahydropyridines and indolizidines. The [alpha]-amino nitrile cycloadducts are ...

  11. Enantioselective [4 + 2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : application to the total synthesis of (-)-quinolizidine 2071

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Shaun D. (Shaun David)

    2011-01-01

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions affording quinolizidines and indolizidines. The resulting a-amino nitrile cycloadducts are versatile intermediates that ...

  12. [4+2] cycloadditions of iminoacetonitriles : a general strategy for the synthesis of quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Kevin M. (Kevin Matthew)

    2007-01-01

    Iminoacetonitriles participate as reactive dienophiles in intermolecular and intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloadditions leading to quinolizidines, indolizidines, and piperidines. The resultant a-amino nitrile cycloadducts ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectra (1) emission spectroscopy (1) mass distribution (1) nickel 56 (1) oxygen (1) photometry (1) photosphere (1) spectra (1) Filter by Author Aldering, G. (3) Antilogus, P. (3)...

  14. Penobscot Tribe- 2012 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With this award, the Penobscot Indian Nation will advance the preconstruction activities required to secure funding for the proposed 227-megawatt (MW) Alder Stream wind project.

  15. The kinematics of falling maple seeds and the initial transition to a helical motion This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    seed falls in a characteristic helical motion. A crude analogy with autorotation of a wind turbine the vertical axis, leading to the gyration about the vertical axis and an opening of the cone angle before. The spiral motion appears to be stable against wind disturbance and is insensitive to the initial conditions

  16. The establishment, biological success and host impact of Diorhabda elongata, imported biological control agents of invasive Tamarix in the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgeons, Jeremy L.

    2009-05-15

    and high water usage. The ability of Tamarix to function as facultative phreatophytes in an arid floodplain has resulted in a shift in species composition from native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.), obligate phreatophytes which... (Neill 1985). Insect diversity at the family and species level are greatly reduced in 5 Tamarix stands when compared to native willow (Salix interior Rowlee) and seep- willow (Baccharis salicina Torr. & Gray) stands (Knutson et al. 2003). Measure...

  17. North American Journal of Fisheries Management 22:151164, 2002 Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331, USA Abstract.--Large woody debris (LWD) is important of the Pacific Northwest have been by LWD from large conifers, many riparian forests in the region are dominated by red alder Alnus rubra. The effects of the small size and short life of LWD from red alders on channel

  18. Synthetic studies toward palau򡭩ne and enantioselective total synthesis of biogenetically related (+)-phakellin and (+)-monobromophakellin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shaohui

    2009-05-15

    -Alder Reaction and Tsv Reduction Heating diene 2.30 together with dienophile 2.3 in benzene at 95 ?C for 96 h in the presence of 2,6-lutidine, pleasingly led to the formation of a single regioisomeric Diels-Alder adduct 2.32 in 48% overall yield following...

  19. 9/1/2011 file: W1109D_Cruise_Plan_v5.doc CRUISE PLAN R/V WECOMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Lighted Buoy, Light #652) 1300 Deploy Sitka (80m water depth) at comfortable distance from Alder buoy and Hales subsurface mooring (44° 38.0'N, 124° 18.5'W) (6' diam buoy 1000#, 70 m 3/8" wire rope + 45 m ½" chain + 3-wheel anchor 2500#) Recover Alder with anchor (6' diam buoy 1000#, 70 m 3/8" wire

  20. Synthesis of (-)-Tetracycline Mark G. Charest, Dionicio R. Siegel, and Andrew G. Myers*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    group of the Diels-Alder adduct 5 (triethyl- amine trihydrofluoride, 76%) and oxidized the hydroxyl to bring about the cycloaddition of hydroxyl-protected variants of enone 3 (or 2) with the diene precursor R-hydroxyl group within enone 3 is an important feature of the successful Diels-Alder cyclization

  1. Los Alamos exceeds waste shipping goal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June, 18 2014 - The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon wetland after damage from September 2013 floods...

  2. Environmental Cleanup Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon wetland after damage from September 2013 floods. - 61814 A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste headed to the Waste...

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory selects three small businesses...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon wetland after damage from September 2013 floods. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot...

  4. Rising global temperatures accelerate drought-induced forest...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon wetland after damage from September 2013 floods. A shipment carrying Los Alamos transuranic waste headed to the Waste Isolation Pilot...

  5. A Conceptual Model for Floodplains in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opperman, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    V, McBride JR, Dodd RS. 2005. Salix exigua clonal growth andas narrow-leaved willow (Salix exigua) can also regenerate

  6. University of Joensuu, PhD Dissertations in Biology Phylogeny and ecological evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, Tommi

    -plant interactions, Nematinae, phylogeny, Salix, sawfly, speciation The nematine sawflies (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) that induce galls on willows (Salix spp.) form one of the most abundant and speciose herbivore

  7. Salix exigua clonal growth and population dynamics in relation to disturbance regime variation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douhovnikoff, V; McBride, J R; Dodd, R S

    2005-01-01

    of clones: application to Salix exigua . Theoretical andcolonization and coexistence of Salix spp. in a seasonally ?of arroyo willow ( Salix lasiolepis : Salicaceae). American

  8. Ecology, 89(1), 2008, pp. 134144 2008 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank, Nathan Egan

    beetle Chrysomela aeneicollis and the willow Salix orestera, which compose the first and second trophic; food chain; networks; population dynamics; predator­prey; productivity; Salix orestera; trophic

  9. 176 www.newphytologist.org Blackwell Publishing Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conducted, studying the response of willows (Salix cinerea) to damage by adult leaf beetles (Phratora. Key words: induced plant defence, insect herbivory, leaf trichomes, Salix cinerea, tolerance. New

  10. TECHNIQUES FOR MINIMIZING AND MONITORING THE IMPACT OF PIPELINE CONSTRUCTION ON COASTAL STREAMS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are vegetated by riparian forests or woodlands. These are dominated exclusively by arroyo willow (Salix red wil- low (Salix laevigata), black cottonwood (Populus tri- chocarpa), western sycamore (Platanus

  11. Ecology, 93(8) Supplement, 2012, pp. S138S150 2012 by the Ecological Society of America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    specialization and the role of trait lability in structuring diverse willow (genus Salix) communities JESSICA A diversity; phylogenetic signal; Populus; Salix; waterlogging. INTRODUCTION It is frequently hypothesized

  12. www.newphytologist.org 623 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    ), and phenylpropanoid concentrations of two willow species (Salix sericea and Salix eriocephala) across five fertility glycosides, phenotypic plasticity, secondary metabolism, Salix eriocephala, Salix sericea. New Phytologist

  13. WETLAND FUNCTIONS AND VALUES: THE STATE OF OUR UNDERSTANDING NOVEMBER AMERICAN WATER RESOURCES ASSOCIATION 1978

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Animals must have adequate energy and nutrients to survive and reproduce. However, it is not necessary Dakota, deer feed on willow (Salix sp.), aspen (Po

  14. Wednesday, February 11th Luncheon Hadley Room, Lincoln Campus Center Noon 1PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Baby Green Salad~Garlic and Herb Roasted Airline Chicken Breast~ ~Roasted Czajkowski Farm Potatoes~ Mixed Berry Cobbler with Maple Farms Ice Cream~Tea

  15. Old Calculus 223, Fall 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathematics software available on these computers includes Matlab, Maple, Geometer's Sketchpad, and Excel. There will be a student assistant on hand to help ...

  16. Abstract The ability of Trametes versicolor ATCC 20869 to colonize several natural and synthetic materials (wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsay, Juliana

    materials (wheat straw, jute, hemp, maple woodchips, and nylon and poly- ethylene teraphthalate fibers such as woodchips is cheaper. In M. Shin · T.

  17. Magnetism and superconductivi[t]y in Pr-based filled skutterudite arsenides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayles, Todd Allen

    2008-01-01

    1.5 Superconductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .and M. B. Maple, ”Superconductivity and non-Fermi liquidSAN DIEGO Magnetism and Superconductiviy in Pr-based Filled

  18. A procedure for finding the k-th power of a matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branko Malesevic; Ivana Jovovic

    2007-04-08

    We give a new procedure in Maple for finding the k-th power of a martix. The algorithm is based on the article [1].

  19. The Mathematics of Musical Instruments Rachel W. Hall and Kresimir Josic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josic, Kresimir

    The Mathematics of Musical Instruments Rachel W. Hall and Kresimir Josi´c August 29, 2000 Abstract. In particular, we consider the physical properties of a Norwegian folk instrument called the willow flute and are crucial in the design of keyboard instruments. The willow flute example also provides a nice introduction

  20. The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective Willow Hallgren, Udaya Bhaskar;1 The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective Willow Hallgren* , Udaya Bhaskar Gunturu, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing. Wind power installed capacity increased by 35

  1. Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion* Willow Hallgren, C. Adam Schlosser, Erwan impacts of a large-scale biofuels expansion Willow Hallgren,1 C. Adam Schlosser,1 Erwan Monier,1 David March 2013. [1] A global biofuels program will potentially lead to intense pressures on land supply

  2. Establishment phase greenhouse gas emissions in short rotation woody biomass plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    February 2014 Keywords: SRWC Populus Salix Greenhouse gas balance Bioenergy Land use change a b s t r a c plantations with willow (Salix spp.), hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.), and control plots in spring 2010 at two-rotation woody bio- energy crops (SRWC), specifically hybrid-poplar (Populus spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), being

  3. &p.1:Abstract We conducted an experimental study of the effects of nutrient addition on the susceptibility of two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    on the susceptibility of two species of willows (Salix eriocephala and S. sericea) and their hybrid to a pathogen plant susceptibility · Hybrid performance · Logit modeling · Salix spp. · Soil nutrient heterogeneity; Christensen et al. 1995). Two common willows of eastern North America, Salix eriocephala and S. sericea

  4. Conversion of open lands to short-rotation woody biomass crops: site variability affects nitrogen cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    incomplete. In this study, we investigated the effects of converting pasture and hayfields to willow (Salix: bioenergy, GHG, land use conversion, leaching, nitrogen, plantation establishment, Populus spp., Salix spp spp.) and willow (Salix spp.) have emerged as possible sources of biomass energy in the Northern Lake

  5. Journal of Chemical Ecology, Vol. 26, No. 9, 2000 0098-0331/00/0900-2049$18.00/0 2000 Plenum Publishing Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Publishing Corporation 2049 EFFECTS OF WILLOWS (Salix brachycarpa) ON POPULATIONS OF SALICYLATE salicylate-mineralizing microbes and total microbial biomass in soils from under willows (Salix brachycarpa of salicylate mineralizers in soils from under Salix (4.6­10.1 mg C/g) than under Kobresia (0.23­0.76 mg

  6. Effects of cross host species inoculation of nitrogen-fixing endophytes on growth and leaf physiology of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    . Many energy crops including corn may still benefit from diazotrophic endo- phyte inoculations allowing of diazotrophic endophytes isolated from willow (Salix sitchensis, Sitka willow) and poplar (Populus trichocarpa There is a growing emphasis on sustainable food and energy crop production that maintains high productiv- ity while

  7. Pacific AC Intertie (Oregon -Washington -Canada)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willows WILLOWS A LOGAN CREEK & SCHULLER JACINTO PROVIDENT STONY GORGE ELK CREEK Black Butte Lake COVELO LAYTONVILLE FORT BRAGG BIG RIVER ELK WILLITS A POTTER VALLEY MENDOCINO CALPELLA Ukiah MASONITE UKIAH UPPER BRUNSWICK GRASS VALLEY BANGOR DOBBINS COLGATE COLUMBIA HILL CAPE HORN SHADY GLEN BEALE AFB 2 BEALE AFB 1

  8. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    computational packages, we perform a symmetry classification of destabilizing bifurcations in bidirectional is the equivariant degree and the "Equivariant Degree Maple c Library Package" that performs exact computations is completely taken over by the "Equivariant Degree Maple c Library Package". This equivariant degree approach

  9. Automatic Generation of Generating Functions for Chromatic Polynomials for Grid Graphs (and more general creatures) of Fixed (but arbitrary!) Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    ://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/pj.html and arviv.org. Written: March 30, 2011. Very Important: This article comments on the Maple package http function of both c and z. The Maple package KamaTzviot automatically computes these rational function by at most m colors. Let's label the vertices of G, once and for all, by the integers {1, . . . , m

  10. Remarks On The PARRONDO PARADOX Shalosh B. EKHAD 1and Doron ZEILBERGER 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    apt spatial analog. Suppose that we have infinitely * *many cities labelled by the integers is accompanied by a* * Maple package PARRONDO downloadable from Zeilberger's website. 2 If your current Package PARRONDO Tells You the BEST Periodic Strategy The Maple package PARRONDO far extends

  11. GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREEN MOUNTAIN MORRIS DANCERS A young men's team performing Morris & Sword dances from England Mountain (boys) and Maple Leaf (girls) will be recruiting new members in January 2009, typically 6th grade, but as a springtime dance, to awaken the earth. The Green Mountain Morris and Maple Leaf Morris are based in Norwich

  12. CURRICULUM VITAE Name: EMILE F. TALBOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    specializing in small reactors - Commissioning Specialist for the MAPLE Nuclear Reactors at Chalk River Labs at Chalk River Labs (from May 2001 to April 2006) - Safety analysis support for the MAPLE Reactors (to May calculations on superconductivity Summer 1977: A.E.C.L., Chalk River Nuclear Labs., Ontario Supervisor: Dr. E

  13. Welcome to the Hahn Horticulture Garden!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    species and cultivars as well as the Hahn Amphitheater. The winding path passes through Peggy's Meadow. To the east of the Pavilion lies the Utility Line Arboretum - a display created and maintained by Urban deal for small gardens. Our Trident Maple Allee is a row of stately maples, under

  14. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Phenylene-Containing Oligoacenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkhurst, Rebecca R.

    Synthesis of a new class of fully unsaturated ladder structures, phenylene-containing oligoacenes (POAs), using 3,4-bis(methylene)cyclobutene as a building block for sequential Diels–Alder reactions is described. The ...

  15. Total Synthesis of (?)-Himandrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Movassaghi, Mohammad

    We describe the first total synthesis of (?)-himandrine, a member of the class II galbulimima alkaloids. Noteworthy features of this chemistry include a diastereoselective Diels?Alder reaction in the rapid synthesis of the ...

  16. CX-008597: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alder Stream Wind Project Feasibility Project CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 07/03/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office

  17. Fall 2014-2015 Public Health Presentations Date Topic Speaker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    November21st, 2014 12:00-3:00pm Special Presentation REFUGEE SUMMIT Stephen Alder, PhD Academic Senate, Lowell Bennion Community Service Center Gerald Brown Utah State Refugee Coordinator Director, Refugee

  18. Cyclobutadiene–C[subscript 60] Adducts: N-Type Materials for Organic Photovoltaic Cells with High V[subscript OC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ggoch Ddeul

    New tetraalkylcyclobutadiene–C[subscript 60] adducts are developed via Diels–Alder cycloaddition of C[subscript 60] with in situ generated cyclobutadienes. The cofacial ?-orbital interactions between the fullerene orbitals ...

  19. 18 MAY 2012 VOL 336 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org814 PersPectiVes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    wine, epigal- locatechin gallate from green tea, and capsa- icin from peppers, activate AMPK (2 EGCG Salicylate A769662 Hotpeppers Willow tree bark Green te a Red wine grapesFrenchlilac OH OH HO HO H

  20. Screaming, flying, and laughing: magical feminism's witches in contemporary film, television, and novels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Kimberly Ann

    2007-09-17

    . ..................................179 Amy: My Mother, My (Bad) Self ...........................189 Wanna-Blessed-Be’s: The UC Sunnydale Wiccan Group .........198 Another Mother: Tara Defies the Law of Her Father .............206 Willow as Third Wave Witch Archetype...

  1. Ecology of the predator assemblage affecting nest success of passerines in Sierra Nevada, California 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocimano, Maria C.

    2010-07-14

    The endangered willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds in mountain meadows in the Sierra Nevada, which have been intensively modified, especially reducing meadow wetness, which favors easy access for mammalian predators to reach nesting areas...

  2. THE INFLUENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIATION OF FISH ASSEMBLAGES IN THE LOWER BRAZOS RIVER, TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LI, RAYMOND Y.

    2003-01-01

    of willow Salix sp., eastern cottonwood Populus deltoides, and sycamore Platanus occidentalis extended along both banks for most of the reach. This river segment was selected because it contained representative habitats of the lower Brazos River...

  3. Reproductive Peformance of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) at High Island, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnes, Andrew

    2012-02-14

    of the Texas coast will receive minor storm damage every few years and extreme storm damage about every 20 years (Morton and Paine 1985). The historic vegetation at this rookery were pecan (Carya illinoinensis), hackberry (Celtis laevigata), willow (Salix...

  4. Comparative breeding ecology of Lesser Sandhill Cranes (Grus canadensis canadensis) and Siberian cranes (G. leucogeranus) in Eastern Siberia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2007-04-25

    in the Kytalyk Resource Reserve in July 2000. 22 of arctic polygonal tundra includes sedges (Carex spp.), cotton grasses (Eriophrum spp.), bluegrasses (Poa spp.), and dwarf willows (Salix spp.) (Uspenskii et al. 1962, Matveev 1989...

  5. SNAKE SPECIES RICHNESS IN RELATION TO HABITAT IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF EAST CENTRAL TEXAS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putegnat, John

    2006-07-11

    habitats are 7 surrounded by rattlebush (Sesbania drummondii), greenbriar, yaupon, black willow (Salix nigra), and post oaks. Capture, Handling, and Data Collection Surveys were conducted for snake species from April ? August 2005, following...

  6. Spatial and Temporal Survey of Feral Pig Ectoparasites in Three Texas Wildlife Districts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Anthony

    2012-02-14

    by juniper-oak forests and forest belts of pecan, walnut (Juglans microcarpa Berl.), American sycamore (Platanus occidentals L.), eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoids Bartr. Ex Marsh), bur oak (Quercus macrocarpa Michx.), black willow (Salix nigra Marsh...

  7. Modelling the UK perennial energy crop market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Peter Mark William

    2014-11-27

    Biomass produced from perennial energy crops, Miscanthus and willow or poplar grown as short-rotation coppice, is expected to contribute to UK renewable energy targets and reduce the carbon intensity of energy production. ...

  8. Carex cherokeensis (Native) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James R. Manhart

    2011-08-10

    The endangered willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds in mountain meadows in the Sierra Nevada, which have been intensively modified, especially reducing meadow wetness, which favors easy access for mammalian predators to reach nesting areas...

  9. Wildlife Communities Autumn 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    or potentially interacting species living in the same area Ecological Communities e.g., pond community #12, predators) Trophic Interactions Primary producer Willow (Salix spp.) Herbivore White-tailed deer (O

  10. Using natural microbial symbionts of trees to remove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Sally

    . Research in our laboratory has demonstrated that poplar and willow can take up this insecticide from water of Bioremediation and Biodegradation S7:001. Doi:10.4172/2155-6199.S7- 001. This research was funded by NSF

  11. ITP Forest Products: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROFILE OF THE U.S. PULP AND PAPER INDUSTRY Industrial Technologies Program Wood chips from pulp and paper mills Willow tree research plots, Tully, New...

  12. Host identity impacts rhizosphere fungal communities associated with three alpine plant species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becklin, Katie M.; Hertweck, Kate L.; Jumpponen, Ari

    2012-01-01

    , diversity, and composition of rhizosphere fungi colonizing three alpine plant species, Taraxacum ceratophorum, Taraxacum officinale, and Polemonium viscosum. Roots were collected from open meadow and willow understory habitats at treeline on Pennsylvania...

  13. CX-006289: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Willow Creek Substation -Transformer Replacement and Substation ModificationsCX(s) Applied: B4.6Date: 07/26/2011Location(s): Grand County, ColoradoOffice(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  14. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 38 (2006) 794807 www.elsevier.com/locate/ympev

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Wc on Alnus, although a few are mycobionts of Salix or other hosts. The diVerent species of Alnicola exhibit spp.), while a small number of species are mycobionts of willows (Salix spp.) or other hosts. The host

  15. Aphid-tending Ants Affect Secondary Users in Leaf Shelters and Rates of Herbivory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Nathan J.

    Aphid-tending Ants Affect Secondary Users in Leaf Shelters and Rates of Herbivory on Salix communities within leaf shelters on Hooker's willow (Salix hookeriana) in a coastal dune ecosystem in northern

  16. Influence of Nutrient Loading on the Invasion of an Alien Plant Species, Giant Reed (Arundo donax), in Southern California Riparian Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2007-01-01

    infestation sampling sites. Salix laevigata leaves wereA. donax only (Table 5). Salix laevigata leaves containedA. Gray) and red willow (Salix laevigata Bebb) in the canopy

  17. A new European plant-specific emission inventory of biogenic volatile organic compounds for use in atmospheric transport models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl, GA

    2009-01-01

    10% Vaccinum sp. , 10% Salix sp. , 40% Betula pendula, 30%of Tea-Leafed Willow (Salix phylicifolia), Silver Birch (Be-f. Ref. d Robinia pseudoacacia Salix alba Salix caprea Salix

  18. Figure 10--Proportion of basal area accounted for by each tree spe-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    include lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), black oak, willow (Salix spp.), western white pine (P. monticola Forest QUKE Salix CADE PICO Figure 11--Spatial distribution of basal area of major tree species within

  19. Effects of geophagy on food intake, body mass, and nutrient dynamics of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hares (Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777) fed a formulated ration of feltleaf willow leaves (Salix'une ration formulée de feuilles de saule feutré (Salix alaxensis (Andersson) Coville), un aliment préféré des

  20. Selected Publications: Lidskog, R., Sundqvist, G., Kall, A-C, Sandin, P. & Larsson, S. 2013. Intensive forestry in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hypersensitive and non-hypersensitive responses are associated with resistance in Salix viminalis against hypersensitive response associated with resistance in the willow Salix viminalis against the gall midge Dasineura

  1. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theimer, Tad

    Available online 22 May 2008 Keywords: Arizona Arthropod diversity Exotic Malaise traps Native Salix a b dominated by native cottonwoods (Populus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) have transitioned to habitats

  2. Wildfire promotes dominance of invasive giant reed (Arundo donax) in riparian ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffman, Gretchen C.; Ambrose, Richard F.; Rundel, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    California, including Salix laevigata, S. lasiolepis, S.salicifolia (1–4 cm), Salix exigua (2–5 cm), S. lasiolepis (fremontii), and red willow (Salix laevigata) trees in the

  3. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 83: 285294, 1997. 285 c 1997 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in Belgium.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    and Geography, South Hadley, MA 01075, USA Accepted: February 6, 1997 Key words: Salix, hybridization, phenolic of five beetle species (four chrysomelids and one scarab) on two species of willows (Salix sericea and S

  4. 2003 The Netherlands Entomological Society Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata 107: 6979, 2003 69 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orians, Colin

    , Salix sericea, soil water Abstract We investigated the effects of soil nutrient and water availability on the growth and chemistry of the silky willow (Salix sericea Marshall), and on the performance of the imported

  5. VOL. 241616 COMMUNICATIONS Studies on the Barks of the Family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, R. Stephen

    salireposide, a glucoside first isolated from the bark of Salix repens by Wattiez2 in 1931.At that time Wattiezisolated the same salireposidefrom a Japanese willow, Salix purpurea L. subsp. angstifolia Koidz. Still

  6. PHYTOREMEDIATION OF CHLORPYRIFOS BY POPULUS AND Keum Young Lee, Stuart E. Strand, and Sharon L. Doty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    PHYTOREMEDIATION OF CHLORPYRIFOS BY POPULUS AND SALIX Keum Young Lee, Stuart E. Strand, and Sharon of chlorpyrifos, several plant species of poplar (Populus sp.) and willow (Salix sp.) were investigated

  7. July 2003 / Vol. 53 No. 7 BioScience 647 Throughout the world, rivers support particularly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rood, Stewart

    and shrubs, especially cottonwoods (Popu- lus spp.) and willows (Salix spp.) along rivers throughout landscape shaped by and dependent on the flowing river. However, rivers also provide water and energy

  8. The influence of vegetation on frost dynamics, infiltration rate and surface stability in Icelandic Andisolic rangelands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orradottir, Berglind

    2002-01-01

    . When snow cover was present soil temperature fluctuations were negligible. Incidence of frost heaving of wooden pegs in sparsely vegetated plant community was 3x greater than that observed in well-vegetated communities. Heaving of willow seedlings...

  9. CX-011374: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Willow Creek Building Pedestrian Bridge Replacement CX(s) Applied: B2.5 Date: 08/25/2009 Location(s): Idaho Offices(s): Idaho Operations Office

  10. Influences of Hunter Harvest, Temperature, and Relative Humidity on Northern Bobwhite and Scaled Quail in the Rolling Plains of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomecek, John Michael

    2015-04-30

    ), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), and willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) exhibit a reduced ability to withstand harvest when sub-populations lose connectivity through habitat change, thereby contributing to population decline (Small et al. 1991, Gibson... is of concern for conservationists worldwide. In North America, greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), ruffed grouse (Bonasa umbellus), and willow ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) exhibit a reduced ability to withstand harvest when sub-populations lose...

  11. Spectroscopic Determination of the Atomicf-Electron Symmetry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Butch, Nicholas P. ; Maple, M. Brian ; Hussain, Zahid ; Chuang, Yi-De Publication Date: 2015-06-09 OSTI Identifier: 1184069 GrantContract Number: FG02-04-ER46105; AC02-05CH11231...

  12. WETLANDS, Vol. 21, No. 4, December 2001, pp. 474483 2001, The Society of Wetland Scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .9% of the marsh surface. Key Words: salt marsh, Spartina alterniflora, benthic microalgae, meiofauna, macrofauna differences in assemblages of microalgae (Maples 1982, Blan- chard and Montagna 1992), meiofauna (Fleeger 1985

  13. Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links Publications 2015 Nicholas P. Butch, Michael E. Manley, Jason R. Jeffries, Marc Janoschek, Kevin Huang, M. Brian Maple, Ayman H. Said, Bogdan M. Leu, and Jeffrey W....

  14. CX-012823: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Reach-Maple Valley #1 Line Bridge Installation CX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 41873 Location(s): WashingtonOffices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  15. CX-005847: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rocky Reach - Maple Valley Access Road RepairCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 05/05/2011Location(s): King County, WashingtonOffice(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  16. Space, Place, and Music in New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raimondi, Julie Michelle

    2012-01-01

    would stop by after their gigs at White clubs, sit in onrehearsing needed for new gigs. Bands often choose pieceslong-standing Tuesday night gig tradition at the Maple Leaf.

  17. October 2009 21 DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    via the use of paraformaldehyde (PFA) pellets in tapholes, resulting in substantially higher sap 1970). Because sustainable maple tapping relies upon the ability of the tree to regrow more wood

  18. Carbohydrate Polymers 92 (2013) 334344 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    2013-01-01

    biomass ("U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry," 2011). Consis: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry," 2011). Red maple (Acer rubrum), also known

  19. Automatic Generation of Generating Functions for Chromatic Polynomials for Grid Graphs (and more general creatures) of Fixed (but arbitrary!) Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    ://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/pj.html and arviv.org. Written: March 30, 2011. Very Important: This article comments on the Maple package httpÃ?Pm (c)z n is a rational function of both c and z. The Maple package KamaTzviot automatically computes, so it can be legally colored by at most m colors. Let's label the vertices of G, once and for all

  20. Biomass power for rural development. Technical progress report, May 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuhauser, E.

    1996-02-01

    Developing commercial energy crops for power generation by the year 2000 is the focus of the DOE/USDA sponsored Biomass Power for Rural Development project. The New York based Salix Consortium project is a multi-partner endeavor, implemented in three stages. Phase-I, Final Design and Project Development, will conclude with the preparation of construction and/or operating permits, feedstock production plans, and contracts ready for signature. Field trials of willow (Salix) have been initiated at several locations in New York (Tully, Lockport, King Ferry, La Facette, Massena, and Himrod) and co-firing tests are underway at Greenidge Station (NYSEG). Phase-II of the project will focus on scale-up of willow crop acreage, construction of co-firing facilities at Dunkirk Station (NMPC), and final modifications for Greenidge Station. There will be testing of the energy crop as part of the gasification trials expected to occur at BED`s McNeill power station and potentially at one of GPU`s facilities. Phase-III will represent full-scale commercialization of the energy crop and power generation on a sustainable basis. Willow has been selected as the energy crop of choice for many reasons. Willow is well suited to the climate of the Northeastern United States, and initial field trials have demonstrated that the yields required for the success of the project are obtainable. Like other energy crops, willow has rural development benefits and could serve to diversify local crop production, provide new sources of income for participating growers, and create new jobs. Willow could be used to put a large base of idle acreage back into crop production. Additionally, the willow coppicing system integrates well with current farm operations and utilizes agricultural practices that are already familiar to farmers.

  1. Controlling porosity in bridged polysilsesquioxanes through elimination reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Prabakar, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.

    1996-06-01

    The retro Diels-Alder reaction was used to modify porosity in hydrocarbon-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels. Microporous polysilsesquioxanes incorporating a thermally labile Diels-Alder adduct as the hydrocarbon bridging group were prepared by sol-gel polymerization of trans-2,3-bis(triethoxysilyl)norbornene. Upon heating the 2,3-norbornenylene-bridges polymers at temperatures above 250 C, the norbornenylene-bridging group underwent a retro Diels-Alder reaction losing cyclopentadiene and leaving behind a ethenylene-bridged polysilsesquioxane. Less than theoretical quantities of cyclopentadiene were volatilized indicating that some of the diene was either reacting with the silanol and olefinic rich material or undergoing oligomerization. Both scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption porosimetry revealed net coarsening of pores (and reduction of surface area) in the materials with thermolysis.

  2. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  3. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  4. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  5. Energy use by biological protein transport pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Tassos

    Energy use by biological protein transport pathways Nathan N. Alder1 and Steven M. Theg2 1 of metabolic energy, using the free energy of ATP and GTP hydrolysis and/or a transmembrane protonmotive force provided insights into the mechanisms of energy transduction, force generation and energy use by different

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Metabolic profiling of major vitamin D metabolites using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Metabolic profiling of major vitamin D metabolites using Diels­Alder derivatization active forms of vitamin D are impor- tant analytical targets in both research and clinical practice. The current technology is such that each of the vitamin D metabolites is usually analyzed by individual assay

  7. Coulomb and Nuclear-Excitation of Giant-Dipole Resonances in (Alpha,alpha') Inelastic-Scattering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlomo, S.; Lui, YW; Youngblood, David H.; Udagawa, T.; Tamura, T.

    1987-01-01

    . UTNT-1 (unpublished) ~ T. Tamura, Rev. Mod. Phys. 37, 679 (1965); Oak Ridge Na- tional Laboratory Report ORNL-4152, 1967. ~oK. Alder and H. C. A. Pauli, Nuc1. Phys. AI28, 193 (1969). ' G. R. Satchler, Nucl. Phys. A195, 1 (1972); A224, 596 (1974). A...

  8. ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yongcheng

    ConstitutionAve. CityParkAve. SkylineDr. West Plum St. West Elizabeth St. International House 1400 Environmental Research Center Greenhouse Animal Sciences Morgan Library Natural Resources Lagoon Arthur Ditch Center A College Avenue Gym Field House National Center for Genetic Resources Preservation Alder Hall

  9. Condensation Reactions between 1,3-Butadiene Radical Cation and Acetylene in the Gas Guy Bouchoux,*, Minh Tho Nguyen, and Jean-Yves Salpin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    Condensation Reactions between 1,3-Butadiene Radical Cation and Acetylene in the Gas Phase Guy experimental and theoretical results concerning the reaction of [1,3-butadiene]+· radical cation, 1-Alder reaction involving ionized 1,3-butadiene and ethylene gives ionized cyclopenteny

  10. Appendix 1. RFLP patterns and locations of ITS region from Daphnia dentifera (d), Daphnia galeata mendotae (gm), Daphnia galeata galeata (g) and their hybrids. The RFLP pattern designators are the same as in Figure 4. Locations are listed alphabetically.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Derek

    mendotae (gm), Daphnia galeata galeata (g) and their hybrids. The RFLP pattern designators are the same as in Figure 4. Locations are listed alphabetically. Location Taxon C1 (d) C1+C2 (dxgm) C2 (gm) B+C2 (ggxgm) B (gg) rare Political region Latitude Longitude Alder Pond GM 1 1 Alaska 60.806983 -148

  11. Studies on Cicadella hieroglyphica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hackman, Lucy McFarland

    1922-01-01

    The following notes on the l ife history of Ci cad el la hi eroglyphi ca consist of observations made from specimens in the field and in the laboratory, A gr owth of young willows along the Kansas river offered a splendid opportunity for the former..., for there Ci cad ell a hi eroglyphi ca may be found at all seasons in very large numbers. The laboratory observations were made from specimens collected at this place, and reared on willow in the laboratory. The most satisfactory results were obtained...

  12. This Page Left Blank Intentionally Informing Rangeland Stewardship With

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for wildlife as a result of conventional land management practices; degradation of water quality through on conservation and restoration projects in a manner compatible with existing agricultural operations. To assess, the Willow Slough Watershed Integrated Resources Management Plan identified three major categories of natural

  13. Habitat Use by Beaver Along the Big Sioux River in Eastern South Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to livestock grazing (Smith and Flake 1983). Grazing can have negative effects on beaver Castor canadensis~ 0.01) than uncuttrees. Mean distance from water of cut trees was less (P ~ 0.01) than for uncut a gradual decline in stands of willow Salix spp. because beaver harvest mature woody plants and cattle

  14. Molecular population genetics and epidemiology of Ceratocystis fagacearum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivors, Kelly Lynn

    1995-01-01

    and the other population represented a sexually active disease center. Three polymorphic RFLP loci were found. Only one population, Willow Springs, had more than 1 allele present at the RFLP loci. Very low levels of variation (G = 1, 1, and 11.69) were detected...

  15. MESOHABITAT USE AND COMMUNITY STRUCTURE OF BRAZOS RIVER FISHES IN THE VICINITY OF THE PROPOSED ALLENS CREEK RESERVOIR 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelwick, Frances P.; Li, Raymond Y.

    2003-01-01

    (Sinuosity Index of 2.16), lateral point bars and deep-water pools dominate the shoreline of our study reach. Rangeland and crop production dominates the land use of the lower Brazos River watershed. A gallery forest dominated by black willow (Salix nigra...

  16. The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia: A New Perspective* Willow Hallgren, Udaya Bhaskar: globalchange@mit.edu Website: http://globalchange.mit.edu/ #12;The Potential Wind Power Resource in Australia, and the utilization of this renewable energy resource is increasing rapidly: wind power installed capacity increased

  17. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  18. Gerding Edlen Development Gerding Edlen Development Company, LLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chilled Water 1 Passive Solar 1 Geothermal 2 Building-Integrated Wind 1 Waste Heat Recovery 2 Co PCC Willow Creek #12;6 INTEGRATED WIND WASTEWATER TREATMENT CENTRALIZED CHILLED historic buildings + new 10 story office tower · Presale to MEPT · Henrys, Diesel, GED, GBD · Perkins Coie

  19. Contra Costa Santa Clara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ON HOLD Rice Solar Energy Project Genesis Solar Energy Project Ridgecrest Solar Power Project WITHDRAWN Peaker San Gabriel Generating Station SUSPENDED Hydrogen Energy California Palen Solar Power Project Tracy Willow Pass GWF Tracy Lodi Energy Center Lodi Energy Center Mariposa Energy Mariposa Energy

  20. 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. University of Minnesota Extension is an equal opportunity educator and employer. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, this material is available in alternative formats u

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    were obtained from the State University of New York through its controlled breeding program while Act, this material is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to the Extension FOR ENERGY? Willows have been regarded to have a high biomass production potential for energy. As a Short

  1. UNDERGRADUATE Awards: Spring 2015 UW Department of Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlizerman, Eli

    UNDERGRADUATE Awards: Spring 2015 UW Department of Biology Biology - Friday Harbor Labs Award Award Amount: $1,000 The FHL Award supports Department of Biology undergraduates taking classes or conducting and Marian Kohn, and Prof. Dennis Willows and Dr. Susan Mahoney. Who Is Eligible? o Department of Biology

  2. Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www.scienceomega.com2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Bohemia, University of

    Increased European biofuel cultivation could harm human health1 by James Morgan for www that the large-scale production of biofuels in4 Europe could result in increased human mortality and crop losses that many biofuel plant species, including poplar and willow, release more isoprene ­ an6 ozone precursor

  3. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  4. This publication is intended as an introduction to how historical ecology can help local residents and resource managers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the contemporary landscape, which in turn can help control pollution sources. This document highlights areas the implementation of management measures to reduce the effects of diffuse sources of pollution, including urban the 1866 USCS T-sheet shown above depicts freshwater marsh (light green) merging into a willow riparian

  5. Chemistry & Biology Activating PI3-Kinase to Dampen Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    .chembiol.2014.07.012 Diterpene derivatives of the natural product acanthoic acid have potent anti, as the acetylation of salicylic acid to create aspirin showed. The disad- vantages of bioactive natural products such as willow bark and ginseng for their thera- peutic effects. The advent of organic extraction techniques

  6. RECOVERY OF RIPARIAN VEGETATION ON AN INTERMITTENT STREAM FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF CATTLE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECOVERY OF RIPARIAN VEGETATION ON AN INTERMITTENT STREAM FOLLOWING REMOVAL OF CATTLE1 Jerry J. Prior to removal of cattle in 1983, the plots contained mature sycamores, one young sycamore, and five, a significant willow corridor is probably only possible in the absence of cattle browsing. Grazing has been

  7. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and a biocontrol agent, the predatory bug Anthocoris nemorum, on four willow (Salix) genotypes used in short rotation coppicing. The biocontrol agent is omnivorous and survives on the plant in the absence of prey more resistant to herbivores (direct defence) or that support biological control agents (indirect

  8. Experimentally testing and assessing the predictive power of species assembly rules for tropical canopy ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayle, Tom M.; Eggleton, Paul; Manica, Andrea; Yusah, Kalsum M.; Foster, William A.

    2015-01-27

    and the role of trait lability in structuring diverse willow (genus Salix) communities. Ecology, 93, S138–S150. Sousa, W.P. (1979). Experimental investigations of disturbance and ecological successionl in a rocky inter-tidal algal community. Ecol. Monogr., 49...

  9. CHARLES J. KREBS, MARK R. T. DALE, VILIS 0. NAMS, A. R. E. SINCLAIR, & MARK O'DONOGHUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebs, Charles J.

    is dominated by gray willow (Salix glauca). For the 1700 shrub clip plots that we measured on control areas.1 Prominence values of the major tall shrub species in the treatment areas in 1987- 1988. Grid Salix glauca from M. Zbigmewicz, personal communication.) shrub species, Salix glauca and Betula glandulosa, before

  10. This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to consume herbivores is affected by variation in the plant food quality provided by different Salix (willow Bug) varied widely between the tested Salix varieties. The proneness of Anthocoris to consume eggs Sorten von Weide (Salix) untersucht, ob die Neigung von Prädatoren, Herbivore zu konsumieren, von

  11. Department of Ecology BSc/MSc thesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The insect feeds not only on planted willows (mostly fast growing Salix viminalis genotypes) but also other stands and plantations or if these beetles are evolving or learning to prefer different Salix species several generations in the green house on the natural Salix cinerea, on Salix viminalis (genotype: 78183

  12. Par Maryse VANDERPLANCK *, Etienne BRUNEAU ** et Denis MICHEZ * Abstract. Colletes cunicularius (L.) and Andrena vaga (Panzer), both vernal solitary ground nesting bees, have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmont, Pierre

    on Salix (Salicaceae) (oligolectic behavior). However a recent study has shown that Colletes cunicularius the proportion of willow pollen. Andrena vaga females collect pollen only on Salix but pollen loads of Colletes printanières psammophiles, ont été qualifiées d'oligolectiques strictes sur Salix (Salicaceae). Cependant des

  13. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 -0.50.00.51.01.52.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Cuttings of Carolina Willow (Salix caroliniana) To Nutrients, Soil Types, and Water Availability Castro ·Understand how environmental conditions control the spread of Salix caroliniana along the St. Johns River, FL seedling and cuttings survival of Salix caroliniana Effects on Seedlings Small seedlings grew significantly

  14. Mycologia, 96(6), 2004, pp. 13301338. 2004 by The Mycological Society of America, Lawrence, KS 66044-8897

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    that occur on willow (Salix spp.) in North America in one species complex, Melampsora epitea Thu obtained from urediniospores from rust- infected Salix leaves collected in the Canadian arctic that arctic and tem- perate Melampsora species on Salix hosts in North America have evolved distinct molecular

  15. Effects of Cellulase and Xylanase Enzymes on the Deconstruction of Solids from Pretreatment of Poplar by Leading Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ; and (6) woody energy crops such as willow (Salix spp.), eucalyptus (Eucalyptus spp.), as- pen, and hybrid additive (http://www1. eere.energy.gov/biomass). Currently, starch ethanol substi- tutes for over 5; (5) herba- ceous energy crops including miscanthus, alfalfa, switch- grass, and red canary grass

  16. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control, Avignon, France, 26-30th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brix, Hans

    The Danish Ministry of Environment and Energy has passed a new legislation that require the wastewater from. Keywords Constructed wetland, horizontal flow, Phragmites, Salix, vertical flow, willow. INTRODUCTION nitrogen (Ministry of Environment and Energy, 1997) . In step with the reduction in discharges from

  17. THE CRESCENT BYPASS: A RIPARIAN RESTORATION PROJECT ON THE KINGS RIVER (FRESNO COUNTY)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - vival include soil quality, irrigation technique, climate, topography, weed competition, gopher, the Tulare Lake Reclamation District No. 749 (TLRD) decided to pump floodwaters from the Lake. Four pumping. After dredging and installation of the pump-back stations in 1983, only weeds, a few willow trees

  18. CX-009235: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Willow Creek - Granby Tap 2.4 Kilovolt Distribution Line Structure 0/3A Pole Replacement Project CX(s) Applied: B4.6 Date: 09/20/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): Western Area Power Administration-Rocky Mountain Region

  19. The Wood-Based Biorefinery in a Petroleum Depleted World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chatterjee, Avik P.

    3 Year Old Willow #12;14 14 Woody Biomass Feedstocks Sustainably harvested low value wood from, Sustainable Bioproducts: Fuels, Chemicals, Materials Renewable Resources to "Green" Bio-Products Woody Biomass Feedstock #12;5 5 Spindletop at Beaumont, TX Circa late 1890's Birth of the Petroleum Industry in Texas

  20. A Novel Slurry-Based Biomass Reforming Process Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean C. Emerson; Timothy D. Davis; A. Peles; Ying She; Joshua Sheffel; Rhonda R. Willigan; Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Tianli Zhu

    2011-09-30

    This project was focused on developing a catalytic means of producing H2 from raw, ground biomass, such as fast growing poplar trees, willow trees, or switch grass. The use of a renewable, biomass feedstock with minimal processing can enable a carbon neutral means of producing H2 in that the carbon dioxide produced from the process can be used in the environment to produce additional biomass. For economically viable production of H2, the biomass is hydrolyzed and then reformed without any additional purification steps. Any unreacted biomass and other byproduct streams are burned to provide process energy. Thus, the development of a catalyst that can operate in the demanding corrosive environment and presence of potential poisons is vital to this approach. The concept for this project is shown in Figure 1. The initial feed is assumed to be a >5 wt% slurry of ground wood in dilute base, such as potassium carbonate (K2CO3). Base hydrolysis and reforming of the wood is carried out at high but sub-critical pressures and temperatures in the presence of a solid catalyst. A Pd alloy membrane allows the continuous removal of pure , while the retentate, including methane is used as fuel in the plant. The project showed that it is possible to economically produce H2 from woody biomass in a carbon neutral manner. Technoeconomic analyses using HYSYS and the DOE's H2A tool [1] were used to design a 2000 ton day-1 (dry basis) biomass to hydrogen plant with an efficiency of 46% to 56%, depending on the mode of operation and economic assumptions, exceeding the DOE 2012 target of 43%. The cost of producing the hydrogen from such a plant would be in the range of $1/kg H2 to $2/kg H2. By using raw biomass as a feedstock, the cost of producing hydrogen at large biomass consumption rates is more cost effective than steam reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass gasification and can achieve the overall cost goals of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program. The complete conversion of wood to hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide was repeatedly demonstrated in batch reactors varying in size from 50 mL to 7.6 L. The different wood sources (e.g., swamp maple, poplar, and commercial wood flour) were converted in the presence of a heterogeneous catalyst and base at relatively low temperatures (e.g., 310 �������°C) at sub-critical pressures sufficient to maintain the liquid phase. Both precious metal and base metal catalysts were found to be active for the liquid phase hydrolysis and reforming of wood. Pt-based catalysts, particularly Pt-Re, were shown to be more selective toward breaking C-C bonds, resulting in a higher selectivity to hydrogen versus methane. Ni-based catalysts were found to prefer breaking C-O bonds, favoring the production of methane. The project showed that increasing the concentration of base (base to wood ratio) in the presence of Raney Ni catalysts resulted in greater selectivity toward hydrogen but at the expense of increasing the production of undesirable organic acids from the wood, lowering the amount of wood converted to gas. It was shown that by modifying Ni-based catalysts with dopants, it was possible to reduce the base concentration while maintaining the selectivity toward hydrogen and increasing wood conversion to gas versus organic acids. The final stage of the project was the construction and testing of a demonstration unit for H2 production. This continuous flow demonstration unit consisted of wood slurry and potassium carbonate feed pump systems, two reactors for hydrolysis and reforming, and a gas-liquid separation system. The technical challenges associated with unreacted wood fines and Raney Ni catalyst retention limited the demonstration unit to using a fixed bed Raney Ni catalyst form. The lower activity of the larger particle Raney Ni in turn limited the residence time and thus the wood mass flow feed rate to 50 g min-1 for a 1 wt% wood slurry. The project demonstrated continuous H2 yields with unmodified, fixed bed Raney Ni, from 63% to 100% with correspond

  1. CURRICULUM VITAE -TEODOR BANICA Department of Mathematics, CNRS UMR 8088

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banica, Teodor

    year (Fall 1994) Linear algebra - 2nd year (Fall 1995) 1999-00: Assistant Professor, University 2003) 2004-09: Professor, Paul Sabatier University, Toulouse Multivariable calculus - 2nd year (Fall 2004) Integral calculus - 3rd year (Fall 2004) Maple and R - 2nd year (Fall 2005) Measure theory - 3rd

  2. Trade-offs and synergies in a world moving towards a more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada (Canada); MAPLE model. For more information, please contact: Ms. Martine A. Uyterlinde, uyterlinde of coal remains uncertain, as it depends on the estimates for costs and potential for CCS. Secondly, as there is a tendency towards coal, even though renewables also benefit. The addi- tional effect of enhanced

  3. The Invar Tensor Package

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose M. Martin-Garcia; Renato Portugal; Leon R. U. Manssur

    2007-04-13

    The Invar package is introduced, a fast manipulator of generic scalar polynomial expressions formed from the Riemann tensor of a four-dimensional metric-compatible connection. The package can maximally simplify any polynomial containing tensor products of up to seven Riemann tensors within seconds. It has been implemented both in Mathematica and Maple algebraic systems.

  4. Copyright 2012 Pearson Education, Inc. 1. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wandi

    ; · will be able to handle computationally intractable problems and generate numeric solutions; and · will be able others. Each Maple Manual for Fundamentals of Differential Equations, 8e, and Fundamentals, mathematical epidemiolo- gy, special functions, electrical circuits, and athletics. A brief overview of each

  5. Drill Press Speed Chart Recommended operating speeds (RPM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigg, Chris

    Drill Press Speed Chart Recommended operating speeds (RPM) Accessory Softwood (Pine) Hardwood (Hard Maple) Acrylic Brass Aluminum Steel Shop Notes Twist drill bits 1/16" - 3/16" 1/4" - 3/8" 7/16"- 5/8" 11 1000 600 350 Lubricate drill with oil when cutting steel 1/8" or thicker. Use center punch on all holes

  6. Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyar, Joan

    if the message (and alphabet) is English or Danish. 1 #12; 3. This was entitled ''Cold Country if the message (and alphabet) is English or Danish. 5. Do problem 48 on page 557. Try decrypting. What or Danish.) Turn in a copy of your Maple worksheet (don't change it to a PDF file this one time) via

  7. Institut for Matematik og Datalogi Syddansk Universitet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyar, Joan

    if the message (and alphabet) is English or Danish. 1 #12;3. This was entitled "Cold Country". It was encrypted if the message (and alphabet) is English or Danish. 5. Do problem 48 on page 557. Try decrypting. What or Danish.) Turn in a copy of your Maple worksheet (don't change it to a PDF file this one time) via

  8. Sorption Hysteresis of Benzene in Charcoal Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    Sorption Hysteresis of Benzene in Charcoal Particles W A S H I N G T O N J . B R A I D A , , J O (benzene) in water to a maple- wood charcoal prepared by oxygen-limited pyrolysis at 673 K. Gas adsorption m2/g, and appreciable porosity in ultramicropores Benzene sorption- desorption conditions

  9. Mining the Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Hieu D.

    , labeled by record number A000045, and 88 other sequences having the same terms. One learns from and Plouffe's gfun Maple package (see [2]) for computing the generating function of a given series given the first few terms, or to recognize certain families of integer sequences, e.g. see [1]. The package gfun

  10. R u t c o r R e p o r t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R u t c o r Research R e p o r t RUTCOR Rutgers Center for Operations Research Rutgers University Ben­Israel a RRR 36­99, November, 1999 a RUTCOR--Rutgers Center for Operations Research, Rutgers­known examples in Probability and Operations Research are analyzed using simulation with Maple. Keywords

  11. Chapter 2 x Pressure Distribution in a Fluid 139 2.113 A spar buoy is a rod weighted to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    Chapter 2 x Pressure Distribution in a Fluid 139 2.113 A spar buoy is a rod weighted to float vertically, as in Fig. P2.113. Let the buoy be maple wood (SG 0.6), 2 in by 2 in by 10 ft, floating

  12. Short Sage history Status Viability? Freedom! Python Interfaces SageTEX Combinatorics Sage-Combinat Sage: a free open-source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goubet, Olivier

    , Mathematica, ... Specialized free systems: Maxima, GAP, Pari, Singular, ... UFO'S: Axiom, MuPAD, ... #12, ... Specialized free systems: Maxima, GAP, Pari, Singular, ... UFO'S: Axiom, MuPAD, ... Early 2000's: frustration: Maple, Mathematica, ... Specialized free systems: Maxima, GAP, Pari, Singular, ... UFO'S: Axiom, Mu

  13. Math 331 -Fall 2008 Project 3 -Fractals Due Dec 17th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Scott

    Math 331 - Fall 2008 Project 3 - Fractals Due Dec 17th For this project, you should submit a paper clearly how you construct such a set and compute the similarity dimension. Plot the first 4 approximating must be entirely individual and that any form of sharing the paper or the Maple file will be penalized

  14. The TauPToo~kit:Flexib/e Seismic Travel-time and Ray-path Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    The TauPToo~kit:Flexib/e Seismic Travel-time and Ray-path Utilities H. Philip Crotwell, Thomas studies. These factors highlight the need for versatile utilities that allow the calculation of travel to implement this approach. We used Maple (Heal etal., 1996), a symbolic mathematics utility, to help convert

  15. MANUFACTURING OF TRIPLE-JUNCTION 4 fe a-Si ALLOY PV MODULES M. Izu, X. Deng, A. Krisko, K. Whelan, R. Young, II. C. G-&n&y, K. L. Namsimhan and S. R. Gvshinsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    MANUFACTURING OF TRIPLE-JUNCTION 4 fe a-Si ALLOY PV MODULES M. Izu, X. Deng, A. Krisko, K. Whelan West Maple Road, Troy, MI 48084 ABSTRACT Spectrum splitting, triple-junction a-Si alloy 4 f? PV modules *. These PV modules provide 9.5% initial and 8.0% stable conversion efficiencies, the highest reported values

  16. Long-term observation of the atmospheric exchange of CO2 with a temperate deciduous forest in southern Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    in southern Ontario, Canada Xuhui Lee School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, New Haven M. Staebler and Harold H. Neumann Atmospheric Environment Service, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Abstract of maple and aspen at Camp Borden in southern Ontario, Canada, between July 1995 and December 1997. Main

  17. Ejection of matrix-polymer clusters in matrix-assisted laser evaporation: Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Ejection of matrix-polymer clusters in matrix-assisted laser evaporation: Coarse-grained molecular, as related to the matrix-assisted laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique for polymer film deposition. Coarse- grained description of molecular matrix and polymer molecules is used in the model, allowing for large

  18. Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of polymeric materials: a molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of polymeric materials: a molecular dynamics study Tatiana Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently developed to deposit high-quality thin is modeled as a solution of polymer molecules in a molecular matrix. The breathing sphere model is used

  19. Ris National Laboratory DTU Optics and Plasma Research Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø National Laboratory DTU Postprint Optics and Plasma Research Department 2007 Paper: www (MAPLE) K Rodrigo1,2, J Schou1#, B Toftmann1 and R Pedrys2 1 Department of Optics and Plasma Research Department of Optics and Plasma Research, Risø National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark 2 Institute

  20. March 2015 Page19 Thinking of expanding, call

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    in the past, however these factors can now potentially be mitigated with the use of reverse osmosis and vacuum from consum- ers for more locally-produced foods. It is possible that maple pro- ducers with a birch yields from birch trees tapped using vacuum, and whether adding birch syrup production to exist- ing

  1. Computational Algebra Group Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Algebra Group Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics Department - y + 1 0 1 Introduction Our goal is to do linear algebra computations over arbitrary rings and fields. We have written a Maple package, GenericLinearAlgebra, that implements the following commands

  2. 70 J. Environ. Hort. 27(2):7079. June 2009 Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Inoculation Affects Root

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    in situ using minirhizotrons. One year after transplant, AMF colonization levels had increased in three colonization, mycorrhizal inoculation. Species used in this study: Acer buergerianum Miq. [trident maple], Acer nutrition. Commercial AMF inoculants are generally mar- keted on the claim that they will increase root

  3. Time Series Analysis of Aviation Dr. Richard Xie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is free · R is a language, not just a statistical tool · R makes graphics and visualization of the best, Mathematica, Maple ­ SAS, SPSS, STATA, R ­ ROOT, PAW, KNIME, Data Applied, etc. ­ Others #12;Use R! · R quality · A flexible statistical analysis toolkit · Access to powerful, cutting-edge analytics · A robust

  4. On Solving a Problem in Algebraic Geometry by Cluster Computing ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    program is implemented in the software library CASA on top of the computer algebra system Maple (computer algebra software for constructive algebraic geometry) which has been developed on topOn Solving a Problem in Algebraic Geometry by Cluster Computing ? Wolfgang Schreiner, Christian

  5. University of Illinois at Chicago Homepage: http://imyy.net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurder, Steven

    Yu, Yue University of Illinois at Chicago Homepage: http://imyy.net b Office 719 SEO 851 S. Morgan Design, Parallel Computing, Data Mining and Prediction, Scientific Software, Numerical Analysis Enterprise Guide, Minitab typography LATEX, Microsoft Office scientific Matlab, Maple, R, Lingo

  6. Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon pin solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Xunming

    Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in amorphous silicon p­i­n solar cells Lin 13244-1130 S. Guha and J. Yang United Solar Systems Corporation, 1100 West Maple Road, Troy, Michigan electroabsorption measurements to determine the built-in potential in semiconductor heterojunction devices

  7. New Light on Dark Energy (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Linder, Eric; Ho, Shirly; Aldering, Greg; Fraiknoi, Andrew

    2011-06-08

    A panel of Lab scientists ? including Eric Linder, Shirly Ho, and Greg Aldering ? along with Andrew Fraiknoi, the Bay Area's most popular astronomy explainer, gathered at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre on Monday, April 25, 2011, for a discussion about "New Light on Dark Energy." Topics will include hunting down Type 1a supernovae, measuring the universe using baryon oscillation, and whether dark energy is the true driver of the universe.

  8. doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00140-6 The Geysers -Cobb Mountain Magma System, California (Part 1): U-Pb zircon ages of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Mark

    doi:10.1016/S0016-7037(03)00140-6 The Geysers - Cobb Mountain Magma System, California (Part 1): U and regional geological relationships (1 analytical error): 2.47 0.04 Ma (rhyolite of Pine Mountain), 1.38 0.01 Ma (rhyolite of Alder Creek), 1.33 0.04 Ma (rhyodacite of Cobb Mountain), 1.27 0.03 Ma (dacite

  9. 252-328-4724 www.ecu.edu/transit Alphabetical Listing of Stops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, K.

    Circle & Willow Street 702 702 After Hours Service With SafeRide SafeRide is a point-to-point, on-demand & Mellow Mushroom -- 754 College Park Apartments 701 755 College View (Inbound/Outbound) 701 755 Copper;252-328-4724 · www.ecu.edu/transit 252-328-7433 (RIDE) SafeRide is a point-to-point, on-demand van service which

  10. Perchlorate ion (C104) removal using an electrochemically induced catalytic reaction on modified activated carbon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langille, Meredith Caitlyn

    2009-05-15

    to remove perchlorate ion. Bioremediation has been used to remove perchlorate, generally with the addition of acetate and hydrogen as electron donors. Phytoremediation with plants like smartweed, watercress and the trees chinaberry, elm, willow, mulberry... treatment processes to chemically reduce (a transfer of electrons) perchlorate ion cannot do so effectively due to a high activation energy barrier. This unique energy barrier and electron transfer process is called the bridged electron transfer (6, 7, 8...

  11. Ecological Entomology (2008), 33, 789795 DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2311.2008.01035.x 2008 The Authors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Edward F.

    2008-01-01

    trees (Salix lasiolepis) J U L I E P. N Y G A R D 1 , N AT H A N J . S A N D E R S 2 and E D WA R D F. C, Salix lasiolepis in Northern California, U.S.A. 2. Using paired control and treatment branches from guilds, herbivores, invasive ants, native ants, Salix, willow. #12;790 Julie P. Nygard, Nathan J. Sanders

  12. Ris Energy Report 2 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (raw or as wood pellets), forest chips, firewood and a very small amount of coppice willow from short-rota- tion forestry. Firewood, and to an increasing extent wood pellets, are mainly used to heat private Firewood 12.6 Industrial wood waste 7.2 Wood chips 3.2 (6.5 in 2002) Wood pellets 2.5 (4 in 2002) Total 75

  13. RedShift Systems Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycledMesa,Willow

  14. Redan, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycledMesa,WillowRedan,

  15. Redbird, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/WaterEnergy MarketingNewOpenRecycledMesa,WillowRedan,Redbird,

  16. Biochem. J. (2013) 455, 107118 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/BJ20130126 SUPPLEMENTARY ONLINE DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizet, Victor

    2013-01-01

    stated below branches). For accession numbers, see Table S3. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3TA, U.K. 4 Present address: Waters Corporation, 34 Maple Street, Milford Top10 Invitrogen N/A BL21 pLysS Invitrogen N/A GAS (serotype) NZ131 (M49) ASM1812v1 ACI61688 3487

  17. Magnitude of 1999 release to the ORR truly unique Record of the 14C-Pulse in Tree Rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnitude of 1999 release to the ORR truly unique Record of the 14C-Pulse in Tree Rings The 14C signature in the local tree ring record demonstrates the unique and unprecedented nature of the 1999 event-Jan-97 full leaves buds-oak buds-maple 1988 1999 2000 2001 Expected with no label N2000 N2001 D14C

  18. ELLESMERE ROAD MORNINGSIDEAVENUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    - 5 spaces PC - 8 spaces PD - 4 spaces PE - 4 spaces PJ - 6 spaces SW - 4 spaces SY - 1 space For more - Portables B4, C5 RC - Athletics Centre C4 SL - Student Centre C3 SY - Science Research A4 SW - Science Wing - Larch Hall B3 M - Maple Hall B3 Residences A 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 1 2 3 4 5 7 6 B DC E A B DC E SRC MW HW SW PO

  19. Windthrow Mechanics: Tree Winching and Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Stephen

    (Maple Ridge) July: Tree Winching in Prince George August: Second Wind Tunnel Session Plans for the year in Prince George Summary Averaged between 2 and 3 trees per day 18 Sx pulled (range 16-40 cm DBH) 13 Pl pulled (range 20-40 cm DBH) Grand total of 66 trees pulled in MKRF and Prince George #12;10/21/2003 8 #12

  20. Method of making thermally removable adhesives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aubert, James H.

    2004-11-30

    A method of making a thermally-removable adhesive is provided where a bismaleimide compound, a monomeric furan compound, containing an oxirane group an amine curative are mixed together at an elevated temperature of greater than approximately 90.degree. C. to form a homogeneous solution, which, when cooled to less than approximately 70.degree. C., simultaneously initiates a Diels-Alder reaction between the furan and the bismaleimide and a epoxy curing reaction between the amine curative and the oxirane group to form a thermally-removable adhesive. Subsequent heating to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. causes the adhesive to melt and allows separation of adhered pieces.

  1. LDRD final report on intelligent polymers for nanodevice performance control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JAMISON,GREGORY M.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; WHEELER,DAVID R.; SAUNDERS,RANDALL S.L; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; CARR,MARTIN J.; SHALTOUT,RAAFAT M.

    2000-01-01

    A variety of organic and hybrid organic-inorganic polymer systems were prepared and evaluated for their bulk response to optical, thermal and chemical environmental changes. These included modeling studies of polyene-bridged metal porphyrin systems, metal-mediated oligomerization of phosphaalkynes as heteroatomic analogues to polyacetylene monomers, investigations of chemically amplified degradation of acid- and base-sensitive polymers and thermally responsive thermoplastic thermosets based on Diels-Alder cycloaddition chemistry. The latter class of materials was utilized to initiate work to develop a new technique for rapidly building a library of systems with varying depolymerization temperatures.

  2. Alderney Renewable Energy ARE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -Telephone Co JumpAlcoholesAlcopanAldaAlder

  3. Aldine, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5 -Telephone Co JumpAlcoholesAlcopanAldaAlderAldine,

  4. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

  5. Ribbon reign: 20 years of postmodern influence on a cultural phenomenon 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spillane, Debra L.

    2004-09-30

    with initiation into full adult membership. Moreover, the culture, in addition to its economic tasks, or as part of them, provides ritual, routine, and religion to occupy and to orient everyone. Little energy is directed toward finding new solutions... be the ancestor to the later (Round Her Neck) She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, and the chorus, with its familiar ending, reads: 17 All round my hat, I vears a green willow, All round my hat, for twelve month and a day; If hanyone should hax, the reason vy I...

  6. Saltcedar: Biology and Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.

    2009-05-04

    -like scale from salt secre- tions. As its name implies, saltcedar can tolerate salinities as high as 15,000 ppm, whereas natives such as cottonwoods and willows typically must have salinities be- low 2,500 ppm. From March to September, the plant produces... energy to send down a tap root. The initial tap root grows downward rapidly, with little branching until it reaches the water table. Once it reaches the water ta- ble, the secondary branching of the root becomes profuse. One study documented a...

  7. Wilmington, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:Willow

  8. Wilmont Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:WillowWilmont Hills

  9. Wilson Engineering Services, PC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:WillowWilmont

  10. Wilson Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw,WhatUtilityRateNamingHelperVirginia:WillowWilmontWilson

  11. EIS-0183: Record of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of HeAgenda1:DepartmentLeaningthe Willow

  12. Cone University Health Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    Lot MSU Lot 20 Lot 6 Lot 9A Lot 5 Lot 15 Lot 14 Lot 22 Lot 4 Lot 4A Lot 5A Lot 16A Lot 16 Lot 7 Lot 7A Lot 11 Lot 18 Lot 19 51 38 546 52 5 4 65 33 519 520 518 6 23 517 526 525 523 527 528 543 522 521 Operations & Parking Services K S R Q T U Elm P O Ce dar Hick ory S ycam ore Maple Pine Y W X Z V Cafeteria

  13. Habitat use by the golden-cheeked warbler in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newnam, John Calvin

    2009-05-15

    ) in Burnet County, Lost Maples State Park (LMSP) in Bandera County, Meridian State Park (MSP) in Bosque County, Pedernales Falls State Park (PFSP) in Blanco County, and Possum Kingdom State Park (PKSP) in Palo Pinto County. One study site was located... and nests by study site. Site Transects Nests Palo Pinto 31 0 Somervell 58 2 Bosque 54 1 San Saba 81 7 Burnet 24 0 Travis 155 46 Blanco 77 6 Hays 59 9 Comal 89 2 Bexar 61 3 Bandera 97 7 Uvalde 50 0 Total 836 83 15 Results of Levene?s test indicated that I...

  14. Forest structure of the big Thicket Scenic Area, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Daniel Harrison

    1974-01-01

    , Cahaba series. Lob- lolly pine, water oak, black gum, and red maple are the dominant species visible. Interior view of stand 3, Lucy series. The large tree is southern magnolia and the under- story is redbay. Interior view of the bayhead stand (12...-hardwood forest which originally encompassed an area of two million acres (McLeod 1967). It contains elements of the oak-pine and southeastern ever- green forest regions of Braun (1950) and represents the westernmost extent of the southern mixed hardwood...

  15. Computer Algebra Solving of First Order ODEs Using Symmetry Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Cheb-Terrab; L. G. S. Duarte; L. A. C. P. da Mota

    1996-07-16

    A set of Maple V R.3/4 computer algebra routines for the analytical solving of 1st. order ODEs, using Lie group symmetry methods, is presented. The set of commands includes a 1st. order ODE-solver and routines for, among other things: the explicit determination of the coefficients of the infinitesimal symmetry generator; the construction of the most general invariant 1st. order ODE under given symmetries; the determination of the canonical coordinates of the underlying invariant group; and the testing of the returned results.

  16. Energy and Global Security Directorate 2015 Strategic Plan | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunities EnergyU.S. DOEEnergy StorageTricks Lead toJohn MaplesNational

  17. Method of making thermally removable polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); McElhanon, James R. (Livermore, CA); Saunders, Randall S. (late of Albuquerque, NM); Durbin-Voss, Marvie Lou (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A method of making a thermally-removable polyurethane material by heating a mixture of a maleimide compound and a furan compound, and introducing alcohol and isocyanate functional groups, where the alcohol group and the isocyanate group reacts to form the urethane linkages and the furan compound and the maleimide compound react to form the thermally weak Diels-Alder adducts that are incorporated into the backbone of the urethane linkages during the formation of the polyurethane material at temperatures from above room temperature to less than approximately 90.degree. C. The polyurethane material can be easily removed within approximately an hour by heating to temperatures greater than approximately 90.degree. C. in a polar solvent. The polyurethane material can be used in protecting electronic components that may require subsequent removal of the solid material for component repair, modification or quality control.

  18. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaltout, R.M.; Loy, D.A.; Wheeler, D.R.

    1999-04-21

    In-situ filling through hydrolysis and condensation of silicon alkoxides has been utilized to generate nanocomposites in which the filler phase can be intimately associated with the polymer on relatively small length scales. One problem of the method has been achieving useful fill volumes without bulk phase separation of the reacting silicon monomer from the polymer. In this paper, we describe the preparation of a new class of nanocomposite materials in which the inorganic filler phase is pre-assembled before copolymerization with an organic species. Maleimide monomers, prepared from alkoxysilylpropyl amines and maleic anhydride, were protected against side reactions by forming the oxonorbornene Diels-Alder adduct with furan. The monomers were then reacted under sol-gel conditions to form oligomers or polymers-the filler phase. The material was activated by thermal deprotection of the maleimide and reacted with organic monomers or polymers to form the filled nanocomposite.

  19. Assessment of Native Salmonids Above Hells Canyon Dam, Idaho, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.

    2002-11-01

    We investigated factors affecting the distribution and abundance of Yellowstone cutthroat trout (YCT), the abundance of all trout, and species richness in several drainages in the upper Snake River basin in Idaho. A total of 326 randomly selected sites were visited within the four study drainages, and of these, there was sufficient water to inventory fish and habitat in 56 of the sites in the Goose Creek drainage, 64 in the Raft River drainage, 54 in the Blackfoot River drainage, and 27 in the Willow Creek drainage. Fish were captured in 36, 55, 49, and 22 of the sites, respectively, and YCT were present at 17, 37, 32, and 13 of the sites, respectively. There was little consistency or strength in the models developed to predict YCT presence/absence and density, trout density, or species richness. Typically, the strongest models had the lowest sample sizes. In the Goose Creek drainage, sites with YCT were higher in elevation and lower in conductivity. In the Raft River drainage, trout cover was more abundant at sites with YCT than without YCT. In the Blackfoot River drainage, there was less fine substrate and more gravel substrate at sites with YCT than at sites without YCT. In the Willow Creek drainage, 70% of the sites located on public land contained YCT, but only 35% of private land contained YCT. The differences in variable importance between drainages suggests that factors that influence the distribution of YCT vary between drainages, and that for the most part the variables we measured had little influence on YCT distribution. n sites containing YCT, average cutthroat trout density was 0.11/m{sup 2}, 0.08/m{sup 2}, 0.10/m{sup 2}, and 0.08/m{sup 2} in the Goose Creek, Raft River, Blackfoot River, and Willow Creek drainages, respectively. In sites containing trout in general, average total trout density in these same drainages was 0.16/m{sup 2}, 0.15/m{sup 2}, 0.10/m{sup 2}, and 0.10/m{sup 2}. Models to predict YCT density, total trout density, and species richness were either weak (i.e., explained little variation) or contained small sample sizes. Based on our results, it appears that factors other than those we measured are affecting fish populations in these drainages.

  20. Investigation of the impacts of clearcutting, feral hogs, and white-tailed deer on the native vegetative resources of the Congaree Swamp National Monument (revised). Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, L.E.; Barry, J.E.

    1992-07-27

    Vegetation surveys, large mammal exclosures, and acorn collections were used to study the effects of past cuttings, feral hogs, and deer on the continued presence of large, majestic oaks on the monument. Few oaks other than laurel oak remain in the harvested areas of the western half of the monument which are dominated by green ash and sweetgum. This species composition is very similar to that of the predisturbance condition, sweetgum-green ash-laurel oak, bottomland forest type. The scattered, remaining large oaks (cherrybark, Shumard, water and willow oak) have failed to reproduce adequately under the conditions created by the harvest practices. Lack of acorn production and seedling establishment rather than large mammal predation of oaks appear to be the primary factors in the decline of oaks in the disturbed areas.

  1. The economics of biomass production in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.; Lichtenberg, E.; Roningen, V.O.; Shapouri, H.

    1995-12-31

    Biomass crops (e.g. poplar, willow, switchgrass) could become important feedstocks for power, liquid fuel, and chemical production. This paper presents estimates of the potential production of biomass in the US under a range of assumptions. Estimates of potential biomass crop yields and production costs from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) are combined with measures of land rents from USDA`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to estimate a competitive supply of biomass wood and grass crops. Estimates are made for one potential biomass use--electric power production--where future costs of electricity production from competing fossil fuels set the demand price. The paper outlines the methodology used and limitations of the analysis.

  2. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1995 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, Troy S.

    1996-06-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: (1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1995 and November 1995 floods, (2) reconstruction of 0.75 miles of riparian fence, (3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, (4) collection of approximately 55,000 native willow and cottonwood cuttings and installation of approximately 21,600 of these material, (5) implementation of two bioengineering projects and initiation of a third project, (6) installation of approximately 30 tree/rootwads for fish habitat enhancement, (7) removal of an abandoned flood irrigation dam/fish barrier, (8) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and (9) extensive interagency coordination.

  3. Umatilla River Subbasin Fish Habitat Improvement; 1994 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laws, Troy S.

    1995-06-01

    This annual report is in fulfillment of contract obligations with Bonneville Power Administration which is the funding source for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife`s Umatilla Basin Habitat Improvement Project. Major activities undertaken during this report period included: 1) Flood damage assessment of project leases after the May 1994 flood, 2) reconstruction of 1.25 miles of high tensile steel fence, 3) inspection and routine maintenance of 14.8 miles of fence, 4) collection of approximately 6,600 cottonwood and willow cuttings for transplanting in spring of 1995, 5) establishment of three bioengineered habitat restoration demonstration projects, 6) Implementation of a streambank stabilization workshop (bioengineering techniques) for Umatilla Basin residents and resource agency personnel, 7) collection and summarization of physical and biological monitoring data, and 8) extensive interagency coordination.

  4. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by the plant over a 17-day exposure period. The 90Sr in the exuded honeydew during this period amounted to 1.17 ± 0.28% of this total label. The honeydew would eventually be deposited into the soil at the base of the plant, but the activity would be so dispersed as to be undetectable. Moth larvae will consume 90Sr contaminated leaves but retain very little of the label (~0.02%) and only that contained in their digestive tracts. As the moths pupated and became adults, they contained no detectable amounts of 90Sr. Over the 10-day exposure period, ~4% of the phytoextracted 90Sr was lost from the plant as moth feces. However, like the honeydew, feces dispersed into the soil were undetectable. As the plant diminishes the content of 90Sr in the soil, the activity of the label in the leaves and new stems would also diminish. The results of these studies indicate that the risk for detectable transfer of 90Sr from willow trees growing in the contaminated soil along the 100-N shoreline through the food chain of herbivorous insects would be very slight to non-existent

  5. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Phytoextraction Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone – Field Treatability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.

    2010-01-11

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) is present both in the aquifer near the river and in the vadose and riparian zones of the river’s shore at 100-NR-2. Phytoextraction of 90Sr is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua). Past studies have shown that willow roots share uptake mechanisms for Sr with Ca, a plant macronutrient as well as no discrimination between Sr and 90Sr. Willow 90Sr concentration ratios [CR’s; (pCi 90Sr/g dry wt. of new growth tissue)/(pCi 90Sr/g soil porewater)] were consistently greater than 65 with three-quarters of the assimilated label partitioned into the above ground shoot. Insect herbivore experiments also demonstrated no significant potential for bioaccumulation or food chain transfer from their natural activities. The objectives of this field study were three-fold: (1) to demonstrate that a viable, “managed” plot of coyote willows can be established on the shoreline of the Columbia River that would survive the same microenvironment to be encountered at the 100-NR-2 shoreline; (2) to show through engineered barriers that large and small animal herbivores can be prevented from feeding on these plants; and (3) to show that once established, the plants will provide sufficient biomass annually to support the phytoextraction technology. A field treatability demonstration plot was established on the Columbia River shoreline alongside the 100-K West water intake at the end of January 2007. The plot was delimited by a 3.05 m high chain-link fence and was approximately 10 x 25 m in size. A layer of fine mesh metal small animal screening was placed around the plot at the base of the fencing to a depth of 45 cm. A total of sixty plants were placed in six slightly staggered rows with 1-m spacing between plants. The actual plot size was 0.00461 hectare (ha). At the time of planting (March 12, 2007), the plot was located about 10 m from the river’s edge. Less than two weeks later (March 21), the river began the spring rise. Periodic (daily) or continuous flooding occurred at the site over the next 3 to 4 months. River levels at times were over the top of the enclosure’s fence. This same pattern was repeated for the next 2 years. It was however evident that even submerged for part, or all of the day, that the plants continued to flourish. There were no indications of herbivory or animal tracks observed within the plot although animals were present in the area. Biomass production over the three years followed a typical growth curve with a yield of about 1 kg for the first year when the trees were establishing themselves, 4 kg for the second, and over 20 kg for the third when the trees were entering the exponential phase of growth. On a metric Ton per hectare (mT/ha) basis this would be 0.2 mT/ha in 2007, 0.87 mT/ha in 2008, and 4.3 mT/ha in 2009. Growth curve extrapolation predicts 13.2 mT/ha during a fourth year and potentially 29.5 mT/ha following a fifth year. Using the observed Ca and Sr concentrations found in the plant tissues, and Sr CR’s calculated from groundwater analysis, projected biomass yields suggest the trees could prove effective in removing the contaminant from the 100-NR-2 riparian zone.

  6. Tappable Pine Trees: Commercial Production of Terpene Biofuels in Pine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: The University of Florida is working to increase the amount of turpentine in harvested pine from 4% to 20% of its dry weight. While enhanced feedstocks for biofuels have generally focused on fuel production from leafy plants and grasses, the University of Florida is experimenting with enhancing fuel production in a species of pine that is currently used in the paper pulping industry. Pine trees naturally produce around 3-5% terpene content in the wood—terpenes are the energy-dense fuel molecules that are the predominant components of turpentine. The team aims to increase the terpene storage potential and production capacity while improving the terpene composition to a point at which the trees could be tapped while alive, like sugar maples. Growth and production from these trees will take years, but this pioneering technology could have significant impact in making available an economical and domestic source of aviation and diesel biofuels.

  7. Algorithmic Thomas Decomposition of Algebraic and Differential Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bächler, Thomas; Lange-Hegermann, Markus; Robertz, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider systems of algebraic and non-linear partial differential equations and inequations. We decompose these systems into so-called simple subsystems and thereby partition the set of solutions. For algebraic systems, simplicity means triangularity, square-freeness and non-vanishing initials. Differential simplicity extends algebraic simplicity with involutivity. We build upon the constructive ideas of J. M. Thomas and develop them into a new algorithm for disjoint decomposition. The given paper is a revised version of a previous paper and includes the proofs of correctness and termination of our decomposition algorithm. In addition, we illustrate the algorithm with further instructive examples and describe its Maple implementation together with an experimental comparison to some other triangular decomposition algorithms.

  8. IMPACTS OF INTERACTING ELEVATED ATMOSPHERIC CO2 AND O3 ON THE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTIONING OF A NORTHERN FOREST ECOSYSTEM: OPERATING AND DECOMMISSIONING THE ASPEN FACE PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Andrew J.; Zak, Donald R.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.

    2014-06-30

    Two of the most important and pervasive greenhouse gases driving global change and impacting forests in the U.S. and around the world are atmospheric CO2 and tropospheric O3. As the only free air, large-scale manipulative experiment studying the interaction of elevated CO2 and O3 on forests, the Aspen FACE experiment was uniquely designed to address the long-term ecosystem level impacts of these two greenhouse gases on aspen-birch-maple forests, which dominate the richly forested Lake States region. The project was established in 1997 to address the overarching scientific question: “What are the effects of elevated [CO2] and [O3], alone and in combination, on the structure and functioning of northern hardwood forest ecosystems?” From 1998 through the middle of the 2009 growing season, we examined the interacting effects of elevated CO2 and O3 on ecosystem processes in an aggrading northern forest ecosystem to compare the responses of early-successional, rapid-growing shade intolerant trembling aspen and paper birch to those of a late successional, slower growing shade tolerant sugar maple. Fumigations with elevated CO2 (560 ppm during daylight hours) and O3 (approximately 1.5 x ambient) were conducted during the growing season from 1998 to 2008, and in 2009 through harvest date. Response variables quantified during the experiment included growth, competitive interactions and stand dynamics, physiological processes, plant nutrient status and uptake, tissue biochemistry, litter quality and decomposition rates, hydrology, soil respiration, microbial community composition and respiration, VOC production, treatment-pest interactions, and treatment-phenology interactions. In 2009, we conducted a detailed harvest of the site. The harvest included detailed sampling of a subset of trees by component (leaves and buds, fine branches, coarse branches and stem, coarse roots, fine roots) and excavation of soil to a depth of 1 m. Throughout the experiment, aspen and birch photosynthesis increased with elevated CO2 and tended to decrease with elevated O3, compared to the control. In contrast to aspen and birch, maple photosynthesis was not enhanced by elevated CO2. Elevated O3 did not cause significant reductions in maximum photosynthesis in birch or maple. In addition, photosynthesis in ozone sensitive clones was affected to a much greater degree than that in ozone tolerant aspen clones. Treatment effects on photosynthesis contributed to CO2 stimulation of aboveground and belowground growth that was species and genotype dependent, with birch and aspen being most responsive and maple being least responsive. The positive effects of elevated CO2 on net primary productivity NPP were sustained through the end of the experiment, but negative effects of elevated O3 on NPP had dissipated during the final three years of treatments. The declining response to O3 over time resulted from the compensatory growth of O3-tolerant genotypes and species as the growth of O3-sensitive individuals declined over time. Cumulative NPP over the entire experiment was 39% greater under elevated CO2 and 10% lower under elevated O3. Enhanced NPP under elevated CO2 was sustained by greater root exploration of soil for growth-limiting N, as well as more rapid rates of litter decomposition and microbial N release during decay. Results from Aspen FACE clearly indicate that plants growing under elevated carbon dioxide, regardless of community type or ozone level, obtained significantly greater amounts of soil N. These results indicate that greater plant growth under elevated carbon dioxide has not led to “progressive N limitation”. If similar forests growing throughout northeastern North America respond in the same manner, then enhanced forest NPP under elevated CO2 may be sustained for a longer duration than previously thought, and the negative effect of elevated O3 may be diminished by compensatory growth of O3-tolerant plants as they begin to dominate forest communities. By the end of the experiment, elevated CO2 increased ecosystem C content by 11%, whereas

  9. Above ground productivity and floristic structure of a high subalpine herbaceous meadow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1979-01-01

    t c h e d a r e a s a re s t ands of tall willow (Salix sp . ) a n d k r u m m h o l z . T h e e p h e m e r a l s t r e a m f lowing nor th t h r o u g h the center of the s tudy a r e a is ou t l ined . Most of snow zone 3 a d j a c e n... m a i n e d until la te Ju ly . e x c e p t t h a t a r e a s o f t a l l w i l l o w (Salix s p . ) a n d k r u m m h o l z ( F i g u r e 1) w e r e n o t e x a m i n e d . T h e f i r s t q u a d r a t s w e r e e s t a b l i s h e d 1 8 J u n e...

  10. Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume III (Overview and Tools).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

    2001-10-01

    Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

  11. Control of hardwood regeneration in restored carolina bay depression wetlands.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Lee, J.; Barton, Christopher, D.; Blake, John, I.

    2012-06-01

    Carolina bays are depression wetlands located in the coastal plain region of the eastern United States. Disturbance of this wetland type has been widespread, and many sites contain one or more drainage ditches. Restoration of bays is of interest because they are important habitats for rare flora and fauna. Previous bay restoration projects have identified flood-tolerant woody competitors in the seedbank and re-sprouting as impediments to the establishment of desired herbaceous wetland vegetation communities. We restored 3 bays on the Savannah River Site, South Carolina, by plugging drainage ditches, harvesting residual pine/hardwood stands within the bays, and monitoring the vegetative response of the seedbank to the hydrologic change. We applied a foliar herbicide on one-half of each bay to control red maple (Acerrubrum), sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua), and water oak (Quercus nigra) sprouting, and we tested its effectiveness across a hydrologic gradient in each bay. Hardwood regeneration was partially controlled by flooding in bays that exhibited long growing season hydroperiods. The findings also indicated that herbicide application was an effective means for managing hardwood regeneration and re-sprouting in areas where hydrologic control was ineffective. Herbicide use had no effect on species richness in the emerging vegetation community. In late-season drawdown periods, or in bays where hydroperiods are short, more than one herbicide application may be necessary.

  12. Reduction of dimension for nonlinear dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heather A. Harrington; Robert A. Van Gorder

    2015-08-24

    We consider reduction of dimension for nonlinear dynamical systems. We demonstrate that in some cases, one can reduce a nonlinear system of equations into a single equation for one of the state variables, and this can be useful for computing the solution when using a variety of analytical approaches. In the case where this reduction is possible, we employ differential elimination to obtain the reduced system. While analytical, the approach is algorithmic, and is implemented in symbolic software such as {\\sc MAPLE} or {\\sc SageMath}. In other cases, the reduction cannot be performed strictly in terms of differential operators, and one obtains integro-differential operators, which may still be useful. In either case, one can use the reduced equation to both approximate solutions for the state variables and perform chaos diagnostics more efficiently than could be done for the original higher-dimensional system, as well as to construct Lyapunov functions which help in the large-time study of the state variables. A number of chaotic and hyperchaotic dynamical systems are used as examples in order to motivate the approach.

  13. A computer code for calculations in the algebraic collective model of the atomic nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Welsh; D. J. Rowe

    2015-02-20

    A Maple code is presented for algebraic collective model (ACM) calculations. The ACM is an algebraic version of the Bohr model of the atomic nucleus, in which all required matrix elements are derived by exploiting the model's SU(1,1) x SO(5) dynamical group. This, in particular, obviates the use of coefficients of fractional parentage. This paper reviews the mathematical formulation of the ACM, and serves as a manual for the code. The code enables a wide range of model Hamiltonians to be analysed. This range includes essentially all Hamiltonians that are rational functions of the model's quadrupole moments $q_M$ and are at most quadratic in the corresponding conjugate momenta $\\pi_N$ ($-2\\le M,N\\le 2$). The code makes use of expressions for matrix elements derived elsewhere and newly derived matrix elements of the operators $[\\pi\\otimes q \\otimes\\pi]_0$ and $[\\pi\\otimes\\pi]_{LM}$. The code also provides ready access to SO(3)-reduced SO(5) Clebsch-Gordan coefficients through data files provided with the code.

  14. The Number of Same-Sex Marriages in a Perfectly Bisexual Population is Asymptotically Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekhad, Shalosh B

    2011-01-01

    Why bother with fully rigorous proofs when one can very quickly get semi-rigorous ones? Yes, yes, we know how to get a "rigorous" proof of the result stated in the title of this article. One way is the boring, human one, citing some heavy guns of theorems that already exist in the literature. We also know how to get a fully rigorous proof automatically, using the methods in this http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/mamarim/mamarimhtml/georgy.htm neat article (but it would be a little more complicated, since the probability generating polynomial is not "closed form" but satisfies a second-order recurrence gotten from the Zeilberger algorithm), otherwise the same method would work, alas, it is not yet implemented. Instead, we chose to use the great Maple package http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/tokhniot/HISTABRUT">HISTABRUT(in fact, a very tiny part of it, procedure AlphaSeq), explained in this other http://www.math.rutgers.edu/~zeilberg/mamarim/mamarimhtml/histabrut.html">neat article, and get a semi-rig...

  15. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Wildlife Inventory, Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassirer, E. Frances

    1995-06-01

    Wildlife distribution/abundance were studied at this location during 1993 and 1994 to establish the baseline as part of the wildlife mitigation agreement for construction of Dworshak reservoir. Inventory efforts were designed to (1) document distribution/abundance of 4 target species: pileated woodpecker, yellow warbler, black-capped chickadee, and river otter, (2) determine distribution/abundance of rare animals, and (3) determine presence and relative abundance of all other species except deer and elk. 201 wildlife species were observed during the survey period; most were residents or used the area seasonally for breeding or wintering. New distribution or breeding records were established for at least 6 species. Pileated woodpeckers were found at 35% of 134 survey points in upland forests; estimated densities were 0-0.08 birds/ha, averaging 0.02 birds/ha. Yellow warblers were found in riparian areas and shrubby draws below 3500 ft elev., and were most abundant in white alder plant communities (ave. est. densities 0.2-2. 1 birds/ha). Black-capped chickadees were found in riparian and mixed tall shrub vegetation at all elevations (ave. est. densities 0-0.7 birds/ha). River otters and suitable otter denning and foraging habitat were observed along the Snake and Salmon rivers. 15 special status animals (threatened, endangered, sensitive, state species of special concern) were observed at Craig Mt: 3 amphibians, 1 reptile, 8 birds, 3 mammals. Another 5 special status species potentially occur (not documented). Ecosystem-based wildlife management issues are identified. A monitoring plant is presented for assessing effects of mitigation activities.

  17. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  18. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  19. Radiological surveys of properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, R W; Haywood, F.F. Cottrell, W.D.

    1981-03-01

    Results of the radiological surveys conducted at three properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area as well as one additional location downstream from the Middlesex Sampling Plant (Willow Lake), are presented. The survey revealed that the yard around the church rectory on Harris Avenue is contaminated with a /sup 226/Ra-bearing material, probably pitchblende ore from the former Middlesex Sampling Plant. The elevated /sup 226/Ra concentrations around and, to a lesser extent, underneath the rectory are leading to elevated /sup 222/Rn concentrations in air in the rectory and elevated alpha contamination levels (from radon daughters) on surfaces inside the rectory. External gamma radiation levels in the rectory yard are well above background levels, and beta-gamma dose rates at many points in the yard are above federal guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use. The radiological survey of a parking lot at the Union Carbide plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey revealed that a nearly circular region of 50-ft diam in the lot showed above-background external gamma radiation levels. Two isolated spots within this region showed concentrations of uranium in soil above the licensable level stated in 10 CFR 40. Soil samples taken in the area of elevated gamma radiation levels generally showed nearly equal activities of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U. The survey at the residences on William Street in Piscataway, revealed that the front yeard is generally contaminated from near the surface to a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 ft with /sup 226/Ra-bearing material, possibly pitchblende ore. The remainder of the yard shows scattered contaminaion. External gamma radiation levels inside the house are above the background level near some outside walls.

  20. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Naturita Uranium processing site near Naturita, Colorado. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    The proposed remedial action for the Naturita processing site is relocation of the contaminated materials and debris to the Dry Flats disposal site, 6 road miles (mi) [ 1 0 kilometers (km)] to the southeast. At the disposal site, the contaminated materials would be stabilized and covered with layers of earth and rock. The proposed disposal site is on land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and used primarily for livestock grazing. The final disposal site would cover approximately 57 ac (23 ha), which would be permanently transferred from the BLM to the DOE and restricted from future uses. The remedial action activities would be conducted by the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The remedial action would result in the loss of approximately 164 ac (66 ha) of soils, but 132 ac (53 ha) of these soils are contaminated and cannot be used for other purposes. Another 154 ac (62 ha) of soils would be temporarily disturbed. Approximately 57 ac (23 ha) of open range land would be permanently removed from livestock grazing and wildlife use. The removal of the contaminated materials would affect the 1 00-year floodplain of the San Miguel River and would result in the loss of riparian habitat along the river. The southwestern willow flycatcher, a Federal candidate species, may be affected by the remedial action, and the use of water from the San Miguel River ``may affect`` the Colorado squawfish, humpback chub, bonytail chub, and razorback sucker. Traffic levels on State Highways 90 and 141 would be increased during the remedial action, as would the noise levels along these transportation routes. Measures for mitigating the adverse environmental impacts of the proposed remedial action are discussed in Section 6.0 of this environmental assessment (EA).

  1. Development and Deployment of a Short Rotation Woody Crops Harvesting System Based on a Case New Holland Forage Harvester and SRC Woody Crop Header

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenbies, Mark; Volk, Timothy

    2014-10-03

    Demand for bioenergy sourced from woody biomass is projected to increase; however, the expansion and rapid deployment of short rotation woody crop systems in the United States has been constrained by high production costs and sluggish market acceptance due to problems with quality and consistency from first-generation harvesting systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of crop conditions on the performance of a single-pass, cut and chip harvester based on a standard New Holland FR-9000 series forage harvester with a dedicated 130FB short rotation coppice header, and the quality of chipped material. A time motion analysis was conducted to track the movement of machine and chipped material through the system for 153 separate loads over 10 days on a 54-ha harvest. Harvester performance was regulated by either ground conditions, or standing biomass on 153 loads. Material capacities increased linearly with standing biomass up to 40 Mgwet ha-1 and plateaued between 70 and 90 Mgwet hr-1. Moisture contents ranged from 39 to 51% with the majority of samples between 43 and 45%. Loads produced in freezing weather (average temperature over 10 hours preceding load production) had 4% more chips greater than 25.4 mm (P < 0.0119). Over 1.5 Mgdry ha-1 of potentially harvested material (6-9% of a load) was left on site, of which half was commercially undesirable meristematic pieces. The New Holland harvesting system is a reliable and predictable platform for harvesting material over a wide range of standing biomass; performance was consistent overall in 14 willow cultivars.

  2. Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, J.

    1995-12-31

    This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

  3. Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheeler, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

  4. Systems Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.L.

    1998-03-17

    The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

  5. Modifying woody plants for efficient conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinus, R.J.; Dimmel, D.R.; Feirer, R.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Malcolm, E.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The Short Rotation Woody Crop Program (SRWCP), Department of Energy, is developing woody plant species as sources of renewable energy. Much progress has been made in identifying useful species, and testing site adaptability, stand densities, coppicing abilities, rotation lengths, and harvesting systems. Conventional plant breeding and intensive cultural practices have been used to increase above-ground biomass yields. Given these and foreseeable accomplishments, program leaders are now shifting attention to prospects for altering biomass physical and chemical characteristics, and to ways for improving the efficiency with which biomass can be converted to gaseous and liquid fuels. This report provides a review and synthesis of literature concerning the quantity and quality of such characteristics and constituents, and opportunities for manipulating them via conventional selection and breeding and/or molecular biology. Species now used by SRWCP are emphasized, with supporting information drawn from others as needed. Little information was found on silver maple (Acer saccharinum), but general comparisons (Isenberg 1981) suggest composition and behavior similar to those of the other species. Where possible, conclusions concerning means for and feasibility of manipulation are given, along with expected impacts on conversion efficiency. Information is also provided on relationships to other traits, genotype X environment interactions, and potential trade-offs or limitations. Biomass productivity per se is not addressed, except in terms of effects that may by caused by changes in constituent quality and/or quantity. Such effects are noted to the extent they are known or can be estimated. Likely impacts of changes, however effected, on suitability or other uses, e.g., pulp and paper manufacture, are notes. 311 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawal, Adeniyi

    2012-09-29

    We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a �demonstration� size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

  7. Overcoming the Recalcitrance of Cellulosic Biomass by Value Prior to Pulping: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-221

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowell, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Value Prior to Pulping (VPP) project goal was to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of introducing a new value stream into existing pulp and paper mills. Essentially the intent was to transfer the energy content of extracted hemicellulose from electricity and steam generated in the recovery boiler to a liquid transportation fuel. The hemicellulose fraction was extracted prior to pulping, fractionated, or conditioned if necessary, and fermented to ethanol. Commercial adaptation of the process to wood hemicelluloses was a prerequisite for using this less currently valued component available from biomass and wood. These hemicelluloses are predominately glucurono-xylan in hardwoods and galactoglucomannan in softwoods (with a significant softwood component of an arabino-xylan) and will yield fermentation substrates different from cellulose. NREL provided its expertise in the area of fermentation host evaluation using its Zymomonas strains on the CleanTech Partner's (CTP) VPP project. The project was focused on the production of fuel ethanol and acetic acid from hemicellulose streams generated from wood chips of industrially important hardwood and softwood species. NREL was one of four partners whose ethanologen was tested on the hydrolyzed extracts. The use of commercially available enzymes to treat oligomeric sugar extracts was also investigated and coupled with fermentation. Fermentations by NREL were conducted with the Zymomonas mobilis organism with most of the work being performed with the 8b strain. The wood extracts hydrolyzed and/or fermented by NREL were those derived from maple, mixed southern hardwoods, and loblolly pine. An unhydrolyzed variant of the mixed southern hardwood extract possessed a large concentration of oligomeric sugars and enzymatic hydrolysis was performed with a number of enzymes, followed by fermentation. The fermentation of the wood extracts was carried out at bench scale in flasks or small bioreactors, with a maximum volume of 500 mL.

  8. Application of 2D-Nonlinear Shallow Water Model of Tsunami by using Adomian Decomposition Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waewcharoen, Sribudh; Boonyapibanwong, Supachai; Koonprasert, Sanoe [Department of Mathematics, King Mongkut's University of Technology, North Bangkok (Thailand)

    2008-09-01

    One of the most important questions in tsunami modeling is the estimation of tsunami run-up heights at different points along a coastline. Methods for numerical simulation of tsunami wave propagation in deep and shallow seas are well developed and have been widely used by many scientists (2001-2008). In this paper, we consider a two-dimensional nonlinear shallow water model of tsunami given by Tivon Jacobson is work [1]. u{sub t}+uu{sub x}+{nu}u{sub y} -c{sup 2}(h{sub x}+(h{sub b}){sub x}) {nu}{sub t}+u{nu}{sub x}+{nu}{nu}{sub y} = -c{sup 2}(h{sub y}+(h{sub b}){sub y}) h{sub t}+(hu){sub x}+(h{nu}){sub y} = 0 g-shore, h is surface elevation and s, t is time, u is velocity of cross-shore, {nu} is velocity of along-shore, h is surface elevation and h{sub b} is function of shore. This is a nondimensionalized model with the gravity g and constant reference depth H factored into c = {radical}(gH). We apply the Adomian Decompostion Method (ADM) to solve the tsunami model. This powerful method has been used to obtain explicit and numerical solutions of three types of diffusion-convection-reaction (DECR) equations. The ADM results for the tsunami model yield analytical solutions in terms of a rapidly convergent infinite power series. Symbolic computation, numerical results and graphs of solutions are obtained by Maple program.

  9. Interactive Supercomputing’s Star-P Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan; Husbands, Parry; Leibman, Steve

    2006-09-19

    The thesis of this extended abstract is simple. High productivity comes from high level infrastructures. To measure this, we introduce a methodology that goes beyond the tradition of timing software in serial and tuned parallel modes. We perform a classroom productivity study involving 29 students who have written a homework exercise in a low level language (MPI message passing) and a high level language (Star-P with MATLAB client). Our conclusions indicate what perhaps should be of little surprise: (1) the high level language is always far easier on the students than the low level language. (2) The early versions of the high level language perform inadequately compared to the tuned low level language, but later versions substantially catch up. Asymptotically, the analogy must hold that message passing is to high level language parallel programming as assembler is to high level environments such as MATLAB, Mathematica, Maple, or even Python. We follow the Kepner method that correctly realizes that traditional speedup numbers without some discussion of the human cost of reaching these numbers can fail to reflect the true human productivity cost of high performance computing. Traditional data compares low level message passing with serial computation. With the benefit of a high level language system in place, in our case Star-P running with MATLAB client, and with the benefit of a large data pool: 29 students, each running the same code ten times on three evolutions of the same platform, we can methodically demonstrate the productivity gains. To date we are not aware of any high level system as extensive and interoperable as Star-P, nor are we aware of an experiment of this kind performed with this volume of data.

  10. HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT, NHI WORK PACKAGE N-SR07TC0301, FY07 FIRST QUARTER REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, W

    2006-12-20

    The proof of concept of SO2 electrolysis for the hybrid sulfur (HyS) process is the second priority research target of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative's thermochemical program for FY07. The proof of concept of the liquid-phase option must be demonstrated at the single cell level for an extended run times (>100 hours). The rate of development of HyS will depend on the identification of a promising membrane or an alternative means for controlling sulfur formation. Once successful long-duration operation has been demonstrated, SRNL will develop a multi-cell stack that can be connected to the H2SO4 decomposer being developed by SNL for the S-I ILS for a Hybrid Sulfur Integrated Laboratory-Scale Experiment during FY 2008. During the first quarter of FY07, SRNL continued the component development and membrane development activities with the goal of identifying and characterizing improved electrodes, electrocatalysts, membranes and MEA configurations which could then be tested at larger scale in the SDE test facility. A modified glass cell was fabricated to allow measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) transport across membrane samples at elevated temperatures (up to 70 C). This testing also includes evaluating SO2 transport in different sulfuric acid concentrations (30-70 wt%). A new potentiostat/frequency analyzer was installed for determining ionic conductivity of membranes. This instrument enhances our capabilities to characterize membrane, electrocatalyst and MEA properties and performance. Continuing work from FY06, evaluations were preformed on various commercial and experimental membranes and electrocatalyst materials for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for sulfur dioxide transport as a function of acid strength including perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA), sulfonated polyetherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membranes. Experimental membranes from the sulfonated diels-alder polyphenylenes (SDAPP) and modified Nafion{reg_sign} 117 were evaluated for SO{sub 2} transport as well. These membranes exhibited reduced transport coefficient for SO{sub 2} transport without the loss in ionic conductivity.

  11. Multicomponent Seismic Analysis and Calibration to Improve Recovery from Algal Mounds: Application to the Roadrunner/Towaoc area of the Paradox Basin, UTE Mountain UTE Reservation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Hachey

    2007-09-30

    The goals of this project were: (1) To enhance recovery of oil contained within algal mounds on the Ute Mountain Ute tribal lands. (2) To promote the use of advanced technology and expand the technical capability of the Native American Oil production corporations by direct assistance in the current project and dissemination of technology to other Tribes. (3) To develop an understanding of multicomponent seismic data as it relates to the variations in permeability and porosity of algal mounds, as well as lateral facies variations, for use in both reservoir development and exploration. (4) To identify any undiscovered algal mounds for field-extension within the area of seismic coverage. (5) To evaluate the potential for applying CO{sub 2} floods, steam floods, water floods or other secondary or tertiary recovery processes to increase production. The technical work scope was carried out by: (1) Acquiring multicomponent seismic data over the project area; (2) Processing and reprocessing the multicomponent data to extract as much geological and engineering data as possible within the budget and time-frame of the project; (3) Preparing maps and data volumes of geological and engineering data based on the multicomponent seismic and well data; (4) Selecting drilling targets if warranted by the seismic interpretation; (5) Constructing a static reservoir model of the project area; and (6) Constructing a dynamic history-matched simulation model from the static model. The original project scope covered a 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) area encompassing two algal mound fields (Towaoc and Roadrunner). 3D3C seismic data was to acquired over this area to delineate mound complexes and image internal reservoir properties such as porosity and fluid saturations. After the project began, the Red Willow Production Company, a project partner and fully-owned company of the Southern Ute Tribe, contributed additional money to upgrade the survey to a nine-component (3D9C) survey. The purpose of this upgrade to nine components was to provide additional shear wave component data that might prove useful in delineating internal mound reservoir attributes. Also, Red Willow extended the P-wave portion of the survey to the northwest of the original 6 mi{sup 2} (15.6 km{sup 2}) 3D9C area in order to extend coverage further to the northwest to the Marble Wash area. In order to accomplish this scope of work, 3D9C seismic data set covering two known reservoirs was acquired and processed. Three-dimensional, zero-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) data was acquired to determine the shear wave velocities for processing the sh3Dseismic data. Anisotropic velocity, and azimuthal AVO processing was carried out in addition to the conventional 3D P-wave data processing. All P-, PS- and S-wave volumes of the seismic data were interpreted to map the seismic response. The interpretation consisted of conventional cross-plots of seismic attributes vs. geological and reservoir engineering data, as well as multivariate and neural net analyses to assess whether additional resolution on exploration and engineering parameters could be achieved through the combined use of several seismic variables. Engineering data in the two reservoirs was used to develop a combined lithology, structure and permeability map. On the basis of the seismic data, a well was drilled into the northern mound trend in the project area. This well, Roadrunner No.9-2, was brought into production in late April 2006 and continues to produce modest amounts of oil and gas. As of the end of August 2007, the well has produced approximately 12,000 barrels of oil and 32,000 mcf of gas. A static reservoir model was created from the seismic data interpretations and well data. The seismic data was tied to various markers identified in the well logs, which in turn were related to lithostratigraphy. The tops and thicknesses of the various units were extrapolated from well control based upon the seismic data that was calibrated to the well picks. The reservoir engineering properties were available from a number of wel

  12. Operational restoration of the Pen Branch bottomland hardwood and swamp wetlands - the research setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.A.

    2000-01-05

    The Savannah River Swamp is a 3020 Ha forested wetland on the floodplain of the Savannah River and is located on the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC. Historically the swamp consisted of approximately 50 percent bald cypress-water tupelo stands, 40 percent mixed bottomland hardwood stands, and 10 percent shrub, marsh, and open water. Creek corridors were typical of Southeastern bottomland hardwood forests. The hydrology was controlled by flooding of the Savannah River and by flow from four creeks that drain into the swamp prior to flow into the Savannah River. Upstream dams have caused some alteration of the water levels and timing of flooding within the floodplain. Major impacts to the swamp hydrology occurred with the completion of the production reactors and one coal-fired powerhouse at the SRS in the early 1950's. Water was pumped from the Savannah River, through secondary heat exchangers of the reactors, and discharged into three of the tributary streams that flow into the swamp. Flow in one of the tributaries, Pen Branch, was typically 0.3 m3 s-1 (10-20) cfs prior to reactor pumping and 11.0 m3 s-1 (400 cfs) during pumping. This continued from 1954 to 1988 at various levels. The sustained increases in water volume resulted in overflow of the original stream banks and the creation of additional floodplains. Accompanying this was considerable erosion of the original stream corridor and deposition of a deep silt layer on the newly formed delta. Heated water was discharged directly into Pen Branch and water temperature in the stream often exceeded 65 degrees C. The nearly continuous flooding of the swamp, the thermal load of the water, and the heavy silting resulted in complete mortality of the original vegetation in large areas of the floodplain. In the years since pumping was reduced, early succession has begun in some affected areas. Most of this has been herbs, grasses, and shrubs. Areas that have seedlings are generally willow thickets that support a lower diversity of wildlife. No volunteer seedlings of heavy-seeded hardwoods or cypress have been found in the corridor areas. Research was conducted to determine methods to reintroduce tree species characteristic of more mature forested wetlands. Three restoration strategies were formulated to deal with the differing conditions of the Upper Corridor, the Lower Corridor, and the Delta regions of the impacted area. Site preparation and planting of each area with mixtures of tree species were carried out to speed the restoration of the ecosystem. Species composition and selection were altered based on the current and expected hydrological regimes that the reforestation areas will be experiencing. Because of the operational design of the restoration project, a research program naturally followed to document the success. Many of those efforts are detailed here.

  13. COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Liu; Yadong Li

    2000-11-01

    Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

  14. U.S. Billion-Ton Update: Biomass Supply for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, Mark; Eaton, Laurence M; Graham, Robin Lambert; Langholtz, Matthew H; Perlack, Robert D; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F; Stokes, Bryce; Brandt, Craig C

    2011-08-01

    The report, Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply (generally referred to as the Billion-Ton Study or 2005 BTS), was an estimate of 'potential' biomass based on numerous assumptions about current and future inventory, production capacity, availability, and technology. The analysis was made to determine if conterminous U.S. agriculture and forestry resources had the capability to produce at least one billion dry tons of sustainable biomass annually to displace 30% or more of the nation's present petroleum consumption. An effort was made to use conservative estimates to assure confidence in having sufficient supply to reach the goal. The potential biomass was projected to be reasonably available around mid-century when large-scale biorefineries are likely to exist. The study emphasized primary sources of forest- and agriculture-derived biomass, such as logging residues, fuel treatment thinnings, crop residues, and perennially grown grasses and trees. These primary sources have the greatest potential to supply large, reliable, and sustainable quantities of biomass. While the primary sources were emphasized, estimates of secondary residue and tertiary waste resources of biomass were also provided. The original Billion-Ton Resource Assessment, published in 2005, was divided into two parts-forest-derived resources and agriculture-derived resources. The forest resources included residues produced during the harvesting of merchantable timber, forest residues, and small-diameter trees that could become available through initiatives to reduce fire hazards and improve forest health; forest residues from land conversion; fuelwood extracted from forests; residues generated at primary forest product processing mills; and urban wood wastes, municipal solid wastes (MSW), and construction and demolition (C&D) debris. For these forest resources, only residues, wastes, and small-diameter trees were considered. The 2005 BTS did not attempt to include any wood that would normally be used for higher-valued products (e.g., pulpwood) that could potentially shift to bioenergy applications. This would have required a separate economic analysis, which was not part of the 2005 BTS. The agriculture resources in the 2005 BTS included grains used for biofuels production; crop residues derived primarily from corn, wheat, and small grains; and animal manures and other residues. The cropland resource analysis also included estimates of perennial energy crops (e.g., herbaceous grasses, such as switchgrass, woody crops like hybrid poplar, as well as willow grown under short rotations and more intensive management than conventional plantation forests). Woody crops were included under cropland resources because it was assumed that they would be grown on a combination of cropland and pasture rather than forestland. In the 2005 BTS, current resource availability was estimated at 278 million dry tons annually from forestlands and slightly more than 194 million dry tons annually from croplands. These annual quantities increase to about 370 million dry tons from forestlands and to nearly 1 billion dry tons from croplands under scenario conditions of high-yield growth and large-scale plantings of perennial grasses and woody tree crops. This high-yield scenario reflects a mid-century timescale ({approx}2040-2050). Under conditions of lower-yield growth, estimated resource potential was projected to be about 320 and 580 million dry tons for forest and cropland biomass, respectively. As noted earlier, the 2005 BTS emphasized the primary resources (agricultural and forestry residues and energy crops) because they represent nearly 80% of the long-term resource potential. Since publication of the BTS in April 2005, there have been some rather dramatic changes in energy markets. In fact, just prior to the actual publication of the BTS, world oil prices started to increase as a result of a burgeoning worldwide demand and concerns about long-term supplies. By the end of the summer, oil pri

  15. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fisheries Program : Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d’Alene Reservation : 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firehammer, Jon A.; Vitale, Angelo J.; Hallock, Stephanie A.

    2009-09-08

    Historically, the Coeur d'Alene Indian Tribe depended on runs of anadromous salmon and steelhead along the Spokane River and Hangman Creek, as well as resident and adfluvial forms of trout and char in Coeur d'Alene Lake, for survival. Dams constructed in the early 1900s on the Spokane River in the City of Spokane and at Little Falls (further downstream) were the first dams that initially cut-off the anadromous fish runs from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe. These fisheries were further removed following the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams on the Columbia River. Together, these actions forced the Tribe to rely solely on the resident fish resources of Coeur d'Alene Lake for their subsistence needs. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe is estimated to have historically harvested around 42,000 westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) per year (Scholz et al. 1985). In 1967, Mallet (1969) reported that 3,329 cutthroat trout were harvested from the St. Joe River, and a catch of 887 was reported from Coeur d'Alene Lake. This catch is far less than the 42,000 fish per year the tribe harvested historically. Today, only limited opportunities exist to harvest cutthroat trout in the Coeur d'Alene Basin. It appears that a suite of factors have contributed to the decline of cutthroat trout stocks within Coeur d'Alene Lake and its tributaries (Mallet 1969; Scholz et al. 1985; Lillengreen et al. 1993). These factors included the construction of Post Falls Dam in 1906, major changes in land cover types, impacts from agricultural activities, and introduction of exotic fish species. The decline in native cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin has been a primary focus of study by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's Fisheries and Water Resources programs since 1990. The overarching goals for recovery have been to restore the cutthroat trout populations to levels that allow for subsistence harvest, maintain genetic diversity, and increase the probability of persistence in the face of anthropogenic influences and prospective climate change. This included recovering the lacustrine-adfluvial life history form that was historically prevalent and had served to provide both resilience and resistance to the structure of cutthroat trout populations in the Coeur d'Alene basin. To this end, the Coeur d'Alene Tribe closed Lake Creek and Benewah Creek to fishing in 1993 to initiate recovery of westslope cutthroat trout to historical levels. However, achieving sustainable cutthroat trout populations also required addressing biotic factors and habitat features in the basin that were limiting recovery. Early in the 1990s, BPA-funded surveys and inventories identified limiting factors in Tribal watersheds that would need to be remedied to restore westslope cutthroat trout populations. The limiting factors included: low-quality, low-complexity mainstem stream habitat and riparian zones; high stream temperatures in mainstem habitats; negative interactions with nonnative brook trout in tributaries; and potential survival bottlenecks in Coeur d'Alene Lake. In 1994, the Northwest Power Planning Council adopted the recommendations set forth by the Coeur d'Alene Tribe to improve the Reservation fishery (NWPPC Program Measures 10.8B.20). These recommended actions included: (1) Implement habitat restoration and enhancement measures in Alder, Benewah, Evans, and Lake Creeks; (2) Purchase critical watershed areas for protection of fisheries habitat; (3) Conduct an educational/outreach program for the general public within the Coeur d'Alene Reservation to facilitate a 'holistic' watershed protection process; (4) Develop an interim fishery for tribal and non-tribal members of the reservation through construction, operation and maintenance of five trout ponds; (5) Design, construct, operate and maintain a trout production facility; and (6) Implement a monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. These activities provide partial mitigation for the extirpation of anadromous fish resources from usual and