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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 81 § ¨ ¦ 81 LAKESHORE AVON BR ANT-EDEN ALD EN-LANC ASTER AU BURN W SH ELDON CALEDONIA HURON C REEK LEIC EST ER COL DEN ASH FORD INDIAN FALLS LAWTONS SAR DINIA RPD-037 -2 GLENWOOD PU LASKI PAVILION CON CORD COL LINS N ELM A ORC HARD PARK-H AMBU RG DANLEY CORNERS ST ILLWAT ER CHAFF EE-ARCAD E FAYETT E-WATERLOO LAKEVIEW JAVA SEN EC A W ELLER Y AU RORA E ZOAR BU FFALO TIOGA SILVER LAKE AKR ON ROM E RAT HBON E ALM A BET HANY WYOMING ULYSSES BR ANCH W SAN DY CREEK COL LINS BLOOMFIELD E LEBANON STATE LINE ALLEN CHUR CHVILLE BATH ATT ICA ELLI COT VILLE ROU LETT E BR ADFORD BU FFALO CREEK PEN N YAN N BEECH HILL-INDEPENDENC E GERRY-CH ARLOTTE STAGECOACH CHIPMUN K HEBRON VIN CENT BALD WI NSVILLE AKELEY OLEAN COWLESVILLE AN NIN SMET HPORT BR ADLEY BR OOK BU STI FIVE MILE BLOOMFIELD W SEN EC A FALLS NILE STAGECOACH LEWIS R UN BR ADFORD CAMDEN VAN ETT EN ROAN OKE SH ARON RICHBU RG FULTON N FINN EGAN H ILL TONAWANDA

2

Asters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asters Asters Nature Bulletin No. 431-A October 30, 1971 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ASTERS One of the charms of our American autumn is the profusion of asters that decorate the landscape from late August until the killing frosts of October or November. Some kinds, last wildflowers of the dying year, are still blooming when even the goldenrods are gone. Some are white; a few are pinkish; others range in color from pale blue to purple. They are very hardy but people who gather armloads of asters are disappointed to find that they close up and lose their beauty almost as soon as picked. The asters belong to that largest of all plant families, the Composites, which includes such common flowers as goldenrods, daisies, sunflowers, thistles and dandelions. The name aster, from the Latin and Greek word meaning "star", was given them because the flower head has a showy ring of rays or florets -- similar to those of a daisy, sunflower and chicory -- around a yellow center that turns reddish or purplish brown with age. Almost all are perennials. Each tiny seed has a short tuft of fuzz by which it is carried away in the wind.

3

Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug Paper on Fast Pharmaceuticals by APS Authors Featured in New Journal Art Scene Investigation: Picasso goes Nanotech Linda Young of APS Elected Vice Chair of DAMOP Moffat of BioCARS and U. of C. Receives 2011 ACA Patterson Award APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences SEPTEMBER 7, 2011 Bookmark and Share Brian Stephenson Argonne National Laboratory Director Eric D. Isaacs announced today that Brian Stephenson has been appointed Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences, effective September 1, 2011. The directorate comprises three research and support divisions centered on Argonne's

4

Tir (Aster) Geothermal Anomalies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tir (Aster) Geothermal Anomalies Tir (Aster) Geothermal Anomalies Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Tir (Aster) Geothermal Anomalies Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The focus of this research is the detection of shallow thermal anomalies for geothermal exploration and field management. The objective of this paper is to outline the steps involved in applying thermal infrared imagery (TIR) for this task. This process is part of an ongoing project at the Energy & Geoscience Institute (EGI), where we are developing a methodology to use daytime and nighttime thermal infrared imagery produced by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) to map shallow thermal anomalies. Kinetic temperature images

5

Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills How Did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? R&D 100 Awards for New X-ray Technologies In Nature: Fischetti on Minibeams Sidorowicz of AES Earns UChicago Argonne, LLC Board of Governors Outstanding Service Award for 2010 APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences OCTOBER 1, 2010 Bookmark and Share G. Brian Stephenson Argonne Director Eric Isaacs has appointed G. Brian Stephenson as the Interim Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences, effective Oct. 1, 2010. The text of Director Isaacs' announcement is below. Sept. 30, 2010 To: All employees From: Eric Isaacs, Argonne Director

6

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A particular application is the use of satellite thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard...

7

Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Unavailable Author(s): C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin Published: GRC, 2006 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Remote_Detection_Of_Quaternary_Borate_Deposits_With_Aster_Satellite_Imagery_As_A_Geothermal_Exploration_Tool&oldid=389959

8

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large areas for the purpose of geothermal exploration. A particular application is the use of satellite thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard an orbiting satellite. It can be used to search remotely for elevated surface temperatures, which may be associated with geothermal resources. The study region is in the central part of eastern California, with emphasis on the Coso geothermal field. Nighttime scenes are most

9

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Remote Detection of Quaternary Borate Deposits with ASTER Satellite Imagery as a Geothermal Exploration Tool Abstract In the Great Basin of the western United States, geothermal fluids are sometimes associated with surface crusts of borate evaporite minerals. These borates can therefore potentially serve as a geothermal exploration tool if they can be efficiently identified and mapped in the field. We demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec® spectroradiometer, and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals

10

ALD and Pulsed CVD of Ruthenium and Ruthenium Dioxide Thin Films From an Amidinate Precursor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Narrow window of O2 exposure (e.g. 0.02~0.04 Torr·s @ 325ºC) to obtain high quality pure Ru filmALD and Pulsed CVD of Ruthenium and Ruthenium Dioxide Thin Films From an Amidinate Precursor Xinwei, China Introduction Experimental ALD with O2 Ru metal film Pulsed CVD with NH3+H2 Ru metal film Pulsed

11

Combined SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Combined SWIR and LWIR Mineral Mapping Using MASTER/ASTER Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This research uses multispectral short-waveinfrared (SWIR) and long-wave-infrared (LWIR) remote sensing to map mineralogy associated with hot springs and epithermal mineral deposits. Selected sites around the world covering a range of active/inactive hot springs and deposit types are being studied using the ODIS/ASTER airborne simulator (MASTER) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). MASTER and ASTER data analysis contribute to mineral mapping in the VNIR/SWIR, however, their main contribution is improved mapping of

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster volcano archive Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and mapping with data from NASA's Earth Observing System Summary: -temporal, multi-spatial data fusion capabilities of ASTER for Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat. False...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster yellows group Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Space: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission Summary: Radiometer (ASTER) Urban Environmental Monitoring Program Michael S. Ramsey INTRODUCTION As the global... )...

14

Investigation of Thermal Stability and Delivery of Cobalt Amidinates and Novel Cobalt Formamidinates for Metallic Cobalt by ALD/CVD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigation of Thermal Stability and Delivery of Cobalt Amidinates and Novel Cobalt Si nanowire devices[2]. The Co precursor selection for CVD and ALD is primarily based on good thermal Liquid Injection process (DLI). ¾ For CVD and ALD of cobalt, various sources such as Co2(CO)8, (tert

15

Cite this: RSC Advances, 2013, 3, Cathodic ALD V2O5 thin films for high-rate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

passivation layers and more recently active storage material. Here we report a detailed study of ALD V2O5 as a high capacity cathode material, using vanadium tri-isopropoxide (VTOP) precursor with both O3 and H2O in electrochemical energy storage by Li-ion batteries, materials which actively store the ionic charge must

Ghodssi, Reza

16

NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

61- 61- NOIJLVaiSINIWaV NOIlVlAldOdNI AOU3N3 Z661 This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. AH telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office McPherson Square Bookstore 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)376-5055 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: Superintendent of Documents U.S. Government Printing Office Washington, DC 20402 (202)783-3238 FAX (202)512-2233 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., eastern time, M-F U.S. Government Printing Office c/o Mellon Bank P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such

17

Exploring the effect of Al2O3 ALD coating on a high gradient ILC single-cell cavity  

SciTech Connect

Encouraged by work at Argonne National Lab, we investigated atomic layer deposition technique (ALD) for high gradient superconducting RF cavities at JLab with an ALD coating system of Old Dominion University located on the JLab site. The goal of this study was to look into the possibility of coating a dielectric layer on top of RF niobium surface at a lower temperature of 120 C as compared to ANL coatings at 200 C to preserve niobium pentoxide on niobium surface. The initial coatings showed complete, but non-uniform coatings of the surface with several areas exhibiting discoloration, which was probably due to the temperature variation across the cavity surface. The initial coating showed a high RF losses, which were improved after discolored areas on the beam tubes were removed with HF rinse of the beam tubes only. The best result was 2 109 low field Q0 and Eacc = 18 MV/m limited by available power.

Grigory Eremeev, Anne-Marie Valente, Andy Wu, Diefeng Gu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Getting DEM from ASTER (~30m resolution) + importing it into ArcMap + georeferencing an image on top (e.g. satellite image, geological map)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the "Search Term" bar: type "ASTER GDEM" and the "ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model V002" will appear in the "Select Datasets" window at the bottom. Then, select the zone of interest in the "Spatial Search" window click once on the bar next to "Bounding Box" and a window will appear in which you can enter

19

2012 NNIN ALD Symposium ALD Staff Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; Remote Assisted - $165 · Rates ­ Non-academic ­Regular - $120/hr; Assisted use - $165/hr; Remote Assisted Reaction Unit #12;Problems (cont.) · Hot lid...melts things. ­ Put heat shield on hinge (custom - drawing available) #12;Heat Shield Hinge #12;#12;#12;Problems (cont.) · Hot lid...melts things. ­ Put heat shield

20

ASTER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nationality United States Organization NASA Weblink http:asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov Sensor Data Number of Bands 14 Spatial Resolution PAN (m) 15 Spatial Resolution MULTI (m) 3090...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Acetylene Ester from Aster spinosus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...STUDIES RELATED TO NATURALLY-OCCURING ACETYLENE COMPOUNDS .6...knowl-edge of the structures of naturally-occurring acetylenes may...ultra-violet or other radiation, or heat was applied to the...conditions which might have arisen naturally can be approximated by thermodynamic...

Jeffrey C. Spitzer; Cornelius Steelink

1964-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

22

Phenology, nutrient composition, digestibility and utilization of heath aster (Aster ericoides L.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and then appeared to remain relatively constant for the remainder of tne study. The in vitro coefficients of digestion (COD) varied from Sl%%d to 73%%d in leaves, and 60% to 25% in stems. Percentages of ash ranged from 8. 7% to 13. 5%%d in leaves and 2. 4% to ll...

Kallah, Muhammad Sani

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Aster Watches The World'S Volcanoes- A New Paradigm For Volcanological...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

backward-looking visible channel telescope for stereo-photogrammetric observations. The spatial resolutions are 15 mpixel in the visible, 30 mpixel in the near-IR, and 90 m...

24

ASTERS Teacher Training will not be offered during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, endurance tests, and creative tasks. P. O. Box 8039 Statesboro, GA 30460 912-871-1149 912-871-1777 (fax form, visit www.georgiasouthern.edu/garden/ For more information, contact Kathy Tucker at 912-871

Hutcheon, James M.

25

Control of Willow Baccharis and Spiny Aster With Pelleted Herbicides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feral hogs Sus scrofa Whitstailed deer Odocoileus virginianus 7. . i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors thank J. Wright, Agua Dulce; Tom O'Connor, Jr., Victoria; and H. M. Fagan, Refugio, for providing assistance and land use for this re- search project... Feral hogs Sus scrofa Whitstailed deer Odocoileus virginianus 7. . i ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The authors thank J. Wright, Agua Dulce; Tom O'Connor, Jr., Victoria; and H. M. Fagan, Refugio, for providing assistance and land use for this re- search project...

Mutz, J.L.; Scifres, C.J.; Mohr, W.C.; Drawe, D.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Impact of ALD Coating on Li/Mn-rich Cathode Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

27

Surface preparation for ALD of High-k dielectrics on InGaAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ultra high-vacuum (UHV) system chamber. The scanninga) topology and (b) CPD of UHV cleaved InAs(110). (c) LineCurrent TMA Trimethyl Aluminum UHV Ultra High Vacuum xi V

Melitz, Wilhelm

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Surface Reactivity of Copper Precursors for Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) on Metal Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions by using ainside an ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with X-rayand under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) condition, hence atomically

MA, QIANG

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Environmental Management Directorate Fiscal Year 2000 Budget Submittal (FY00-02) Michael Schlender, EM ALD March 6, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Science Associates Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop May 9 and 10, 2007 Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 2 BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL BGRR Location at BNL Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy BGRR Complex BGRR Complex Brookhaven Science Associates U.S. Department of Energy 4 BGRR General Background BGRR General Background  First reactor built for peacetime research on the atom  Located in the center of BNL site  Accomplished great science from 1950 to 1968  All fuel removed in 1972  BNL Science Museum 1977 to 1997  Decommissioning efforts began in 1997 upon discovery of contaminated water in below-ground ducts Brookhaven Science Associates

30

EFFECT OF AL2O3 ALD NANOCOATINGS ON THE THERMO-MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF AU/SI MEMS STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subjected to thermal holds and thermal cycling after release. Thin films attached to ceramic substrates various thermal and mechanical loading conditions. In the present study, we examine the thermo- mechanical experience in- plane stresses due to differences in the thermal expansion coefficients between adjacent

George, Steven M.

31

http://tinyurl.com/ald-michigan For more information, please email Dr. Khaled Mnaymneh at kmnay@lnf.umich.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Berkeley. He is the recipient of a U. S. Department of Energy EERE Postdoctoral Research Award (SunShot

Daly, Samantha

32

Comparative Study of Zn(O,S) Buffer Layers and CIGS Solar Cells Fabricated by CBD, ALD, and Sputtering: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Zn(O,S) thin films were deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD), atomic layer deposition, and sputtering. Composition of the films and band gap were measured and found to follow the trends described in the literature. CBD Zn(O,S) parameters were optimized and resulted in an 18.5% efficiency cell that did not require post annealing, light soaking, or an undoped ZnO layer. Promising results were obtained with sputtering. A 13% efficiency cell was obtained for a Zn(O,S) emitter layer deposited with 0.5%O2. With further optimization of process parameters and an analysis of the loss mechanisms, it should be possible to increase the efficiency.

Ramanathan, K.; Mann, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Pankow, J.; Li, J.; Scharf, J.; Mansfield, L. M.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Bis(cyclopentadienyl) zirconium(IV) amides as possible precursors for low pressure CVD and plasma-enhanced ALD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) of [ZrCp2(NMe2)2] (1), [ZrCp2(?2-MeNCH2CH2NMe)] (2), [ZrCp?2(NMe2)2] (3) and [ZrCp?2(NEt2)2] (4) (Cp=?5-cyclopentadienyl, Cp?=?5-monomethylcyclopentadienyl), onto glass substrates at 600C, afforded highly reflective and adhesive films of zirconium carbide and amorphous carbon. Powder XRD indicated that the films were largely amorphous, although small, broad peaks accounting for ZrC and ZrO2 were present, suggesting that the remaining carbon was due to amorphous deposits from the cyclopentadienyl ligands. SEM images showed an island-growth mechanism with distinct crevices between the concentric nodules. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) of compounds 1 and 2 showed that the precursors were not sufficiently stable or volatile to give a good rate of film growth.

Stephen E. Potts; Claire J. Carmalt; Christopher S. Blackman; Fawzi Abou-Chahine; Nomi Leick; W.M.M. Kessels; Hywel O. Davies; Peter N. Heys

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster ericoides cultivar Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Heredity doi:10.1093jheredesm075 Summary: into the Biogeography of the Southeastern North American Endemic, Ceratiola ericoides (Empetraceae) DORSET W. TRAPNELL... American...

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster frikartii Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sale Plant List (complete plant list on UDBG website: http:ag.udel.eduudbg) Light: sun full sun; ps part sun (requires some full sun); ptsh part shade (will not grow in...

36

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster dataset flyover Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SATELLITE-AND GROUND-BASED STEREO ANALYSIS OF CLOUDS Gabriela Seiz Summary: and numerical weather prediction models. For the satellite part, coincident images of MISR (on EOS...

37

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster satellite images Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SATELLITE-AND GROUND-BASED STEREO ANALYSIS OF CLOUDS Gabriela Seiz Summary: and numerical weather prediction models. For the satellite part, coincident images of MISR (on EOS...

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster terra satellite Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SATELLITE-AND GROUND-BASED STEREO ANALYSIS OF CLOUDS Gabriela Seiz Summary: and numerical weather prediction models. For the satellite part, coincident images of MISR (on EOS...

39

E-Print Network 3.0 - aster dataset zoom Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SATELLITE-AND GROUND-BASED STEREO ANALYSIS OF CLOUDS Gabriela Seiz Summary: and numerical weather prediction models. For the satellite part, coincident images of MISR (on EOS...

40

Relations between albedos and emissivities from MODIS and ASTER data over North African Desert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of incident solar energy reflected by the land surface in all directions. They determine the surface radiation map over the arid areas of Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia in North Africa at 30 second (about 1 km) and 2 in climate model deserts such as the Sahara. However, solar short- wave diffuse albedos vary by a factor

Zhou, Liming

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar-Thermal ALD Ferrite-Based Water Splitting Cycle - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Alan W. Weimer (Primary Contact), Darwin Arifin, Xinhua Liang, Victoria Aston and Paul Lichty University of Colorado Campus Box 596 Boulder, CO 80309-0596 Phone: (303) 492-3759 Email: alan.weimer@colorado.edu DOE Manager HQ: Sara Dillich Phone: (202) 586-7925 Email: Sara.Dillich@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-05GO15044 Project Start Date: March 31, 2005 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate the "hercynite cycle" feasibility for * carrying out redox. Initiate design, synthesis and testing of a nanostructured * active material for fast kinetics and transport.

42

RealReal--Time Chemical SensingTime Chemical Sensing for Advanced Process Control in ALDfor Advanced Process Control in ALD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Differential pumping Gas Inlet Gas Outlet 300 amu CIS mass-spec 35 µm orifice 5 Torr 100 mm wafer, substrate-heated Incomplete layer adsorption & reaction Multilayer adsorption & reaction Atomic Layer DepositionAtomic Layer Temperature-dependent growth Dose dependencies Incomplete layer adsorption & reaction Multilayer adsorption

Rubloff, Gary W.

43

New Ni Amidinate Source for ALD/CVD of NiNx, NiO and NiSi , Thiloma Perera1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be particularly important in memory as well as logic applications. Nickel silicide (NiSi) is emerging with a metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure, offer potential applications for the next generation nonvolatile

44

Nuclear Dependence of the Production of \\Upsilon Resonances at 800 GeV D. M. Alde, H. W. Baer, T. A. Carey, G. T. Garvey, A. Klein,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Y. B. Hsiung Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 M. R. Adams University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60680 R. Guo, D. M. Kaplan Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 R. L. Mc, particularly in connection with J=/ production in high­energy heavy ion collisions. 1\\Gamma6 Nuclear dependence

45

Fast Transporting ZnOTiO2 Coaxial Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Based on ALD-Modified SiO2 Aerogel Frameworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To circumvent this problem, we have explored here the idea of conformally coating the silicaZnO aerogel structures with very thin layers of more robust metal oxides such as Al2O3, ZrO2, or TiO2 to create doubly coaxial structures. ... JV characteristics of DSSCs featuring 25 ?m thick aerogel-based SiO2ZnO films compared to similar films with ca. 3 and 4 coatings of Al2O3 and TiO2, respectively: (a) light performance; (b) dark performance. ... Figure 7. Plot showing the effects of increased layers of TiO2 coats over 6 nm ZnO-coated silica aerogels with respect to charge lifetimes from OCVD measurements. ...

Vennesa O. Williams; Nak Cheon Jeong; Chaiya Prasittichai; Omar K. Farha; Michael J. Pellin; Joseph T. Hupp

2012-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

46

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Abstract The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and...

47

for research Annual report 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it obtained ISO 9001 certification, making it an exception among fishery databases. The Antea/Cuba. ASTER

48

Quartz crystal microbalance study of tungsten atomic layer deposition using WF6 and Si2H6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(disilane). In this paper, W ALD is explored using in situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) measurements for disilane exposures > 4?104 L. The W ALD growth rate was also weakly temperature

George, Steven M.

49

In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IPA is chosen as the oxygen source for the ALD in the MOCVD. Second, IPA will not react precursor pulse time. b Dependence of ALD Al2O3 growth rate on temperature. The pulse time for TMA and IPA

50

Study of charge-collecting interlayers for single-junction and tandem organic solar cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A hole-collecting interlayer layer for organic solar cells, NiO, processed by atomic layer deposition (ALD) was studied. ALD-NiO film offered a novel alternative to efficient (more)

Shim, Jae Won

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - asteroid patroclus thermal Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF THE INTERSTELLAR COSMIC-RAY SPECTRUM Summary: ) interactions with the solid rock and ice in Main Belt aster- oids (MBAs), Jovian and Neptunian Trojan asteroids... the Galactic...

52

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Chemical Functionalit...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials (metals, oxides) Atomic layer deposition (ALD) and surface sol-gel processing (SSG) for conformal functionalization of support surfaces (located outside of...

53

Atomic layer deposition of W on nanoporous carbon aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study the authors demonstrate the ability to apply precise conformal W coatings onto all surfaces of nanoporouscarbon aerogels using atomic layer deposition(ALD). The resulting material has a filamentous structure in which the W completely encapsulates the carbon aerogel strands. The material mass increases nonlinearly with W coating achieving a tenfold increase following ten ALD cycles. The aerogel surface area increases by nearly a factor of 2 after ten W ALD cycles. This conformal metalcoating of extremely high aspect ratio nanoporous materials by ALD represents a unique route to forming metal functionalized high surface area materials.

J. W. Elam; J. A. Libera; M. J. Pellin; A. V. Zinovev; J. P. Greene; J. A. Nolen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - atom layer scale Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DistributedSpatially Distributed Experimentation toExperimentation to Summary: properties Significance Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is widely sought for its atomic-scale...

55

Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cambridge Nanotech Atomic Layer Deposition A Cambridge Nanotech (USA) Savannah S200 atomic layer deposition (ALD) system was purchased for conformal growth of metal oxide films....

56

Activation of farnesoid X receptor attenuates hepatic injury in a murine model of alcoholic liver disease  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR attenuated alcohol-induced liver injury and steatosis. Activation of FXR attenuated cholestasis and oxidative stress in mouse liver. -- Abstract: Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a common cause of advanced liver disease, and considered as a major risk factor of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Hepatic cholestasis is a pathophysiological feature observed in all stages of ALD. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, and plays an essential role in the regulation of bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. However, the role of FXR in the pathogenesis and progression of ALD remains largely unknown. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli ethanol diet or an isocaloric control diet. We used a specific agonist of FXR WAY-362450 to study the effect of pharmacological activation of FXR in alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we demonstrated that FXR activity was impaired by chronic ethanol ingestion in a murine model of ALD. Activation of FXR by specific agonist WAY-362450 protected mice from the development of ALD. We also found that WAY-362450 treatment rescued FXR activity, suppressed ethanol-induced Cyp2e1 up-regulation and attenuated oxidative stress in liver. Our results highlight a key role of FXR in the modulation of ALD development, and propose specific FXR agonists for the treatment of ALD patients.

Wu, Weibin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhu, Bo; Peng, Xiaomin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhou, Meiling, E-mail: meilingzhou2012@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University and Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China) [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institutes of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Seeding Conformal Dielectrics on Graphene J. M. P. Alaboson, Q. H. Wang, J. D. Emery, A. L. Lipson, M. J. Bedzyk, J. W. Elam, M. J. Pellin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MRSEC Seeding Conformal Dielectrics on Graphene J. M. P. Alaboson, Q. H. Wang, J. D. Emery, A. L of graphene-based nanoelectronics requires the deposition of ultrathin and pinhole-free high-k dielectric layer deposition (ALD) of HfO2 and Al2O3 on graphene. Whereas identical ALD conditions lead

Shahriar, Selim

58

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNIVERSITY of CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ ATOMIC LAYER DEPOSITION OF ALUMINUM OXIDE A thesis submitted deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide on crystalline silicon and anodized aluminum substrates. A homemade ALD system is used with trimethylaluminum (TMA) and water as precursors to deposit uniform aluminum oxide

Belanger, David P.

59

Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition web coating with in situ monitoring of film thickness  

SciTech Connect

Spectral reflectometry was implemented as a method for in situ thickness monitoring in a spatial atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were grown on a moving polymer web substrate at 100?C using an atmospheric pressure ALD web coating system, with film growth of 0.110.13?nm/cycle. The modular coating head design and the in situ monitoring allowed for the characterization and optimization of the trimethylaluminum and water precursor exposures, purge flows, and web speed. A thickness uniformity of 2% was achieved across the web. ALD cycle times as low as 76?ms were demonstrated with a web speed of 1?m/s and a vertical gap height of 0.5?mm. This atmospheric pressure ALD system with in situ process control demonstrates the feasibility of low-cost, high throughput roll-to-roll ALD.

Yersak, Alexander S.; Lee, Yung C. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1045 Regent Drive, 422 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0422 (United States); Spencer, Joseph A.; Groner, Markus D., E-mail: mgroner@aldnanosolutions.com [ALD NanoSolutions, Inc., 580 Burbank Street, Unit 100, Broomfield, Colorado 80020 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Surface smoothing effect of an amorphous thin film deposited by atomic layer deposition on a surface with nano-sized roughness  

SciTech Connect

Previously, Lau (one of the authors) pointed out that the deposition of an amorphous thin film by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on a substrate with nano-sized roughness probably has a surface smoothing effect. In this letter, polycrystalline zinc oxide deposited by ALD onto a smooth substrate was used as a substrate with nano-sized roughness. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (XTEM) were used to demonstrate that an amorphous aluminum oxide thin film deposited by ALD can reduce the surface roughness of a polycrystalline zinc oxide coated substrate.

Lau, W. S., E-mail: liuweicheng@zju.edu.cn; Wan, X.; Xu, Y.; Wong, H. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Zhang, J. [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China)] [Zhejiang University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Luo, J. K. [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China) [Zhejiang University, Department of Information Science and Electronic Engineering, No. 38 Zheda Road, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute of Renewable Energy and Environment Technology, Bolton University, Deane Road, Bolton BL3 5 AB (United Kingdom)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multispectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Multispectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor ASTER Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes For this project, fused imagery was created using ASTER data and USGS Digital Orthophoto Quandrangles (DOQs). The ASTER data have a spatial resolution of 15 m for the visible to infrared and near_infrared bands, and 30 m for shortwave_infrared bands; with a cost of $85.00 per 60 x 60 km image. Thermal anomalies were mapped using ASTER kinetic temperature data

62

Douglas Jacobsen! NERSC Bioinformatics Computing Consultant  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring and Debugging Jobs on Genepool --- 1 --- February 1 2, 2 013 Checking on your jobs * You've m astered q sub a nd s ubmi9ed y our j obs - now w hat? * Monitoring j obs i...

63

R760 Review Microtubules, membranes and cytokinesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ring that contracts to divide the cell midway between the poles of the mitotic spindle. Despite. Microtubules of the bipolar spindle dictate the position of the cleavage plane midway between the two asters

Straight, Aaron

64

The Rudb?r Mw 7.3 earthquake of 1990 June 20; seismotectonics, coseismic and geomorphic displacements, and historic earthquakes of the western 'High-Alborz', Iran  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......digital topography and Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER...Lam P.S., Hassanzadeh J., 2006. Thermal Histories from the central Alborz Mountains...Kikuchi M., Kanamori H., 1990. On the Sudan, Iran, and Philippines earthquakes of......

Manuel Berberian; Richard Walker

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Performance of a NGS-based MCAO demonstrator: the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of a NGS-based MCAO demonstrator: the NGC3366 and NGC2346 simulations Venice 2001% of the energy. These quantities are com- puted using a measured C 2 n pro#12;le and for asterisms of natural

Tokovinin, Andrei A.

66

Exergy Analysis of Atomic Layer Deposition for Al2O3 Nano-film Preparation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper exergy analysis is applied on Atomic Layer Deposition...2O3...thin film to analyze the utilization and losses of exergy in ALD system. The exergies associated with ... work flow are calculated. Base...

Fenfen Wang; Tao Li; Hong-Chao Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Argonne-U. of C. Collaborative Seed Grant to Fund Novel PET System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steel Line Up Like Kin Stephenson is Interim ALD for Photon Sciences Students at Argonne on the FaST Track to New Skills How Did the Caterpillar Cross the Road? R&D 100...

68

The Island of Stone Statues1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Story of an Expedition."By Mrs. Scoreshy Routledge. Pp. xxi4o4; (London Sifton, Pratd, aLd Co;, Ltd., nd.) Price 31s. 6d. net. ...

EVERARDIM IM THURN

1920-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

In-situ deposition of high-k dielectrics on III-V compound semiconductor in MOCVD system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In situ deposition of high-k materials to passivate the GaAs in metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system was well demonstrated. Both atomic layer deposition (ALD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) methods ...

Cheng, Cheng-Wei, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

In situ study of HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition on InP(100)  

SciTech Connect

The interfacial chemistry of the native oxide and chemically treated InP samples during atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfO{sub 2} growth at 250 Degree-Sign C has been studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The In-oxide concentration is seen to gradually decrease on the native oxide and acid etched samples. No significant changes of the P-oxide concentrations are detected, while the P-oxides chemical states are seen to change gradually during the initial cycles of ALD on the native oxide and the chemically treated samples. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment strongly decreases In-oxide and P-oxide concentrations prior to ALD and maintains low concentrations during the ALD process.

Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

In situ study of the role of substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP  

SciTech Connect

The dependence of the self cleaning effect of the substrate oxides on substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} on various chemically treated and native oxide InP (100) substrates is investigated using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The removal of In-oxide is found to be more efficient at higher ALD temperatures. The P oxidation states on native oxide and acid etched samples are seen to change, with the total P-oxide concentration remaining constant, after 10 cycles of ALD HfO{sub 2} at different temperatures. An (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} S treatment is seen to effectively remove native oxides and passivate the InP surfaces independent of substrate temperature studied (200 C, 250 C and 300 C) before and after the ALD process. Density functional theory modeling provides insight into the mechanism of the changes in the P-oxide chemical states.

Dong, H.; Santosh, K.C.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; McDonnell, S.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

72

Gordon Research Conferences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Sintering of silicon nitride base ceramics...Corrosion ofalumina by steam." I August...Hot corrosion and erosion (Ger-ald H. Meier...Some uses of silicon compounds in organic...of dislocations in silicon." Deep levels...

Alexander M. Cruickshank

1979-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

73

Graphic update of automated logic diagrams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Automated Logic Diagram, or ALD, is a well defined document prepared by engineers to specify the design of a machine. 1 The document is coded for computer input by highly trained transcription personnel. Changes or corrections ...

Richard J. Uhlik

1968-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

a series of programs examining the bioethical issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Industrial Revolution in 1799, the Fenwick family grapples with the morality of stealing cadav- ers- alding the birth of the Industrial Age, the other the age of biotechnology--to juxtapose ethical

Huang, Jianyu

75

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Situ Reaction Mechanism Studies on Atomic Layer Deposition of AlxSiyOz from Trimethylaluminium, Hexakis(ethylamino)disilane, and Water ... The hexakis(ethylamino)disilane Si2(NHEt)6 precursor, also known as AHEAD, exhibits a high ALD growth rate (1 /cycle) with ozone as the oxygen source at temperatures ranging from 150 to 300 C,(28) thus appearing as a serious candidate for ALD of silicon oxide. ...

Yoann Tomczak; Kjell Knapas; Suvi Haukka; Marianna Kemell; Mikko Heikkil; Marcel Ceccato; Markku Leskel; Mikko Ritala

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Real-time Sensing for Process Dynamics and Metrology in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& prediction Nucleation & growth kinetics Comparison with ex-situ film charactern Direct observation of process-heated UHV ALD reactor Load-lock and ALD UHV chamber #12;5 L. Henn-Lecordier - AVS TF-TuA6 - 11/01/05 0 10 20 measurements Gas flow direction Exposure (s) SiH4/ WF6 15 / 20 s 8 / 6 s 10 / 8 s * Precursor depletion 5 / 4

Rubloff, Gary W.

77

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atomic Layer Deposition of Uniform Metal Coatings on Highly Porous Aerogel Substrates ... Figure 1 Bright-field transmission electron micrographs of the (a) uncoated and (b) W-coated alumina aerogel (6 ALD cycles), and the (c) uncoated and (b) W-coated germania aerogel (6 ALD cycles). ... For the alumina aerogel, the coating consists of crystalline W nanoparticles, ?2 nm in diameter, uniformly deposited on the surfaces of the nanoleaflets (Figure 1b). ...

Theodore F. Baumann; Juergen Biener; Yinmin M. Wang; Sergei O. Kucheyev; Erik J. Nelson; Joe H. Satcher, Jr.; Jeffrey W. Elam; Michael J. Pellin; Alex V. Hamza

2006-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

78

Rapid SiO2 Atomic Layer Deposition Using Tris(tert-pentoxy)silanol B. B. Burton,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperatures and higher TPS pressures. SiO2 ALD thicknesses of 125-140 ? were observed at the highest TPS requires high temperatures of >325 °C and large reactant exposure of >109 L (1 L ) 10-6 Torr s).4-7 However ALD films using liquid tris(tert-pentoxy)silanol (TPS). The SiO2 film thicknesses were determined

George, Steven M.

79

Paper deacidification and UV protection using ZnO atomic layer deposition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acid degradation of cellulosic paper in archival books periodicals and historic documents is a serious and widespread problem. Using acidic page samples from ?40 year old books we demonstrate that atomic layer deposition (ALD) ZnO can adjust and controllably neutralize the paper acid content. The paper samples were collected and analyzed in accordance with recognized Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry (TAPPI) test standards. The average pH of the starting paper was 3.7??0.4 and 4.4??0.1 as determined using the TAPPI surface probe and cold water extraction methods respectively. After 50 ALD ZnO cycles the same tests on the coated paper produced an average pH of 7.39??0.08 and 7.3??0.4 respectively. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the cellulose structure remained intact during ALD. Additional tests of recently printed newspaper samples coated with ALD ZnO also show that ALD can effectively prevent paper discoloration and embrittlement caused by UV sunlight photoexposure. While there are many known methods for paper preservation including others using diethyl zinc the control afforded by ALD provides attractive advantages over other known approaches for preservation of archival paper and other natural fibrous materials.

C. A. Hanson; C. J. Oldham; G. N. Parsons

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes For this project, fused imagery was created using ASTER data and USGS Digital Orthophoto Quandrangles (DOQs). The ASTER data have a spatial resolution of 15 m for the visible to infrared and near_infrared bands, and 30 m for shortwave_infrared bands; with a cost of $85.00 per 60 x 60 km image. Thermal anomalies were mapped using ASTER kinetic temperature data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Details Activities (6) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and the Airborne Visible/IR Image Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data were used to characterize hot spring deposits in the Lower, Midway, and Upper Geyser Basins of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field observations of these basins provided the critical ground-truth for comparison with the

82

Spindles and active vortices in a model of confined filament-motor mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robust self-organization of subcellular structures is a key principle governing the dynamics and evolution of cellular life. In fission yeast cells undergoing division, the mitotic spindle spontaneously emerges from the interaction of microtubules, motor proteins and the confining cell walls, and asters and vortices have been observed to self-assemble in quasi-two dimensional microtubule-kinesin assays. Their is no clear microscopic picture of the role of the active motors driving this pattern formation, and the relevance of continuum modeling to filament-scale structures remains uncertain. Here we present results of numerical simulations of a discrete filament-motor protein model confined to a pressurised cylindrical box. Stable spindles, nematic configurations, asters and high-density semi-asters spontaneously emerge, the latter pair having also been observed in cytosol confined within emulsion droplets. State diagrams are presented delineating each stationary state as the pressure, motor speed and motor de...

Head, David A; Gompper, Gerhard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Tunneling spectroscopy of superconducting MoN and NbTiN grown by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

A tunneling spectroscopy study is presented of superconducting MoN and Nb{sub 0.8}Ti{sub 0.2}N thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The films exhibited a superconducting gap of 2?meV and 2.4?meV, respectively, with a corresponding critical temperature of 11.5?K and 13.4?K, among the highest reported T{sub c} values achieved by the ALD technique. Tunnel junctions were obtained using a mechanical contact method with a Au tip. While the native oxides of these films provided poor tunnel barriers, high quality tunnel junctions with low zero bias conductance (below ?10%) were obtained using an artificial tunnel barrier of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the film's surface grown ex situ by ALD. We find a large critical current density on the order of 4??10{sup 6}?A/cm{sup 2} at T?=?0.8T{sub c} for a 60?nm MoN film and demonstrate conformal coating capabilities of ALD onto high aspect ratio geometries. These results suggest that the ALD technique offers significant promise for thin film superconducting device applications.

Groll, Nickolas R., E-mail: ngroll@anl.gov; Klug, Jeffrey A.; Claus, Helmut; Pellin, Michael J.; Proslier, Thomas, E-mail: proslier@anl.gov [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Cao, Chaoyue; Becker, Nicholas G.; Zasadzinski, John F. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States); Altin, Serdar [Fen Edebiyat Fakultesi, Fizik Bolumu, Inonu Universitesi, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Functionalization for Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Platinum Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect

Uniform metal deposition onto high surface area supports is a key challenge of developing successful efficient catalyst materials. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) circumvents permeation difficulties, but relies on gas-surface reactions to initiate growth. Our work demonstrates that modified surfaces within vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays, from plasma and molecular precursor treatments, can lead to improved catalyst deposition. Gas phase functionalization influences the number of ALD nucleation sites and the onset of ALD growth and, in turn, affects the uniformity of the coating along the length of the CNTs within the aligned arrays. The induced chemical changes for each functionalization route are identified by X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. The most effective functionalization routes increase the prevalence of oxygen moieties at defect sites on the carbon surfaces. The striking effects of the functionalization are demonstrated with ALD Pt growth as a function of surface treatment and ALD cycles examined by electron microscopy of the arrays and the individual CNTs. Finally, we demonstrate applicability of these materials as fuel cell electrocatalysts and show that surface functionalization affects their performance towards oxygen reduction reaction.

Dameron, A. A.; Pylypenko, S.; Bult, J. B.; Neyerlin, K. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Bochert, C.; Leong, G. J.; Frisco, S. L.; Simpson, L.; Dinh, H. N.; Pivovar, B.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) SWIR at Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: SWIR At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Kruse 2012) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique SWIR Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor MASTER, ASTER, AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding none Notes Analysis of the SWIR MASTER/ASTER data allow mapping of characteristic minerals associated with hot springs/mineral deposits, including carbonate, kaolinite, alunite, buddingtonite, muscovite, and hydrothermal silica. Mineral identification and the general distribution of specific minerals were verified utilizing ground spectral measurements and mineral maps produced from AVIRIS hyperspectral data.

86

watchlist  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Watch List for Native Prairie Plants Common Name Scientific Name Date Found Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii * INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans * LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius * SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum * CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata * NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea **u PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata **u SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula **u Forbs ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus * WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa * YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata * BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta ** COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum ** CUP-PLANT Silphium perfoliatum **u NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae ** PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum ** RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium ** STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida **

87

prairie plant list  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations List of Native Prairie Plant Illustrations Select the common name of the plant you want to view. Common Name Scientific Name Grasses BIG BLUESTEM Andropogon gerardii INDIAN GRASS Sorghastrum nutans LITTLE BLUESTEM Andropogon scoparius SWITCH GRASS Panicum virgatum CORD GRASS Spartina pectinata NEEDLEGRASS Stipa spartea PRAIRIE DROPSEED Sporobolus pectinata SIDE-OATS GRAMA Bouteloua curtipendula FORBS ROSINWEED Silphium integrifolium SAW-TOOTHED SUNFLOWER Helianthus grossesserratus WILD BERGAMOT Monarda fistulosa YELLOW CONEFLOWER Ratibida pinnata BLACK-EYED SUSAN Rudbeckia hirta COMPASS PLANT Silphium lactiniatum CUP PLANT Silphium perfoliatum NEW ENGLAND ASTER Aster novae-angilae PRAIRIE DOCK Silphium terebinthinaceum RATTLESNAKE MASTER Eryngium yuccifolium STIFF GOLDENROD Solidaga rigida

88

Growth mode evolution of hafnium oxide by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

HfO{sub 2} thin films were deposited using tetrakis-ethylmethylamido hafnium and H{sub 2}O as precursors on silicon by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The morphology and microstructures at different ALD cycles were characterized by atomic force microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Based on the heightheight correlation function and power spectral density function, quantitative analysis of surface morphologies was performed. Three characteristic dimensions (?{sub 1}, ?{sub 2}, and ?{sub 3}) corresponding to three surface structures, islands, local and global fluctuations, were identified. The evolution of ALD growth mode at range of the three critical scales was investigated, respectively. It suggests the transformation of growth mode from quasi two-dimensional layer-by-layer to three-dimensional island for global fluctuations.

Nie, Xianglong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Dayan, E-mail: madayan@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Xu, Kewei [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China and Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an 710065, Shaanxi (China)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

89

High performance organic field-effect transistors with ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly onto the organic semiconductor  

SciTech Connect

We have produced stable organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with an ultra-thin HfO{sub 2} gate insulator deposited directly on top of rubrene single crystals by atomic layer deposition (ALD). We find that ALD is a gentle deposition process to grow thin films without damaging rubrene single crystals, as results these devices have a negligibly small threshold voltage and are very stable against gate-bias-stress, and the mobility exceeds 1 cm{sup 2}/V s. Moreover, the devices show very little degradation even when kept in air for more than 2 months. These results demonstrate thin HfO{sub 2} layers deposited by ALD to be well suited as high capacitance gate dielectrics in OFETs operating at small gate voltage. In addition, the dielectric layer acts as an effective passivation layer to protect the organic semiconductor.

Ono, S., E-mail: shimpei@criepi.denken.or.jp [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Husermann, R. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan) [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Chiba, D. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan) [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, 4-1-8 Honcho Kawaguchi, Saitama 322-0012 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimamura, K.; Ono, T. [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)] [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Batlogg, B. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)] [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zurich, Zurich 8093 (Switzerland)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Aerogels as Porous Electron Collectors for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 3. Characterization of the aerogel films: (a) Thickness of films and (b) dye uptake measurement of D149 desorbed in DMF as a function of Sb doping in ATO aerogels and TiO2 coatings by ALD. ... Figure 4. SEM top views of a 15%Sb ATO aerogel without TiO2 coating at different magnifications (a,b) and of the aerogel with (c) 150 and (d,e) 300 cycles of TiO2; cross-section (f) of the sample shown in panel c. ... However, it was found that at 700 ALD cycles a clear peak for anatase TiO2 emerges, a phenomenon not observed for SnO2 samples coated by a similar ALD process (but using TiCl4 as a precursor) even at very thick TiO2 coatings. ...

Juan Pablo Correa Baena; Alexander G. Agrios

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Property transformation of graphene with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited directly by atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films are deposited directly onto graphene by H{sub 2}O-based atomic layer deposition (ALD), and the films are pinhole-free and continuously cover the graphene surface. The growth process of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films does not introduce any detective defects in graphene, suppresses the hysteresis effect and tunes the graphene doping to n-type. The self-cleaning of ALD growth process, together with the physically absorbed H{sub 2}O and oxygen-deficient ALD environment consumes OH{sup ?} bonds, suppresses the p-doping of graphene, shifts Dirac point to negative gate bias and enhances the electron mobility.

Zheng, Li; Cao, Duo; Wang, Zhongjian; Xia, Chao [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cheng, Xinhong, E-mail: xh-cheng@mail.sim.ac.cn; Yu, Yuehui [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, SIMIT, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shen, Dashen [University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

92

Surface modification of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by ozone via atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

The use of ozone as an oxidizing agent for atomic layer deposition (ALD) processes is rapidly growing due to its strong oxidizing capabilities. However, the effect of ozone on nanostructured substrates such as nitrogen-doped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) and pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (PCNTs) are not very well understood and may provide an avenue toward functionalizing the carbon nanotube surface prior to deposition. The effects of ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs and PCNTs using 10?wt. % ozone at temperatures of 150, 250, and 300?C are studied. The effect of ozone pulse time and ALD cycle number on NCNTs and PCNTs was also investigated. Morphological changes to the substrate were observed by scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller measurements were also conducted to determine surface area, pore size, and pore size distribution following ozone treatment. The graphitic nature of both NCNTs and PCNTs was determined using Raman analysis while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to probe the chemical nature of NCNTs. It was found that O{sub 3} attack occurs preferentially to the outermost geometric surface of NCNTs. Our research also revealed that the deleterious effects of ozone are found only on NCNTs while little or no damage occurs on PCNTs. Furthermore, XPS analysis indicated that ALD ozone treatment on NCNTs, at elevated temperatures, results in loss of nitrogen content. Our studies demonstrate that ALD ozone treatment is an effective avenue toward creating low nitrogen content, defect rich substrates for use in electrochemical applications and ALD of various metal/metal oxides.

Lushington, Andrew; Liu, Jian; Tang, Yongji; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9 (Canada)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Genesis and evolution of surface species during Pt atomic layer deposition on oxide supports characterized by in-situ XAFS analysis and water-gas shift reaction.  

SciTech Connect

Platinum atomic layer deposition (ALD) using MeCpPtMe{sub 3} was employed to prepare high loadings of uniform-sized, 1-2 nm Pt nanoparticles on high surface area Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2}, and SrTiO{sub 3} supports. X-ray absorption fine structure was utilized to monitor the changes in the Pt species during each step of the synthesis. The temperature, precursor exposure time, treatment gas, and number of ALD cycles were found to affect the Pt particle size and density. Lower-temperature MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorption yielded smaller particles due to reduced thermal decomposition. A 300 C air treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to PtO. In subsequent ALD cycles, the MeCpPtMe{sub 3} reduces the PtO to metallic Pt in the ratio of one precursor molecule per PtO. A 200 C H{sub 2} treatment of the adsorbed MeCpPtMe{sub 3} leads to the formation of 1-2 nm, metallic Pt nanoparticles. During subsequent ALD cycles, MeCpPtMe{sub 3} adsorbs on the support, which, upon reduction, yields additional Pt nanoparticles with a minimal increase in size of the previously formed nanoparticles. The catalysts produced by ALD had identical water-gas shift reaction rates and reaction kinetics to those of Pt catalysts prepared by standard solution methods. ALD synthesis of catalytic nanoparticles is an attractive method for preparing novel model and practical catalysts.

Setthapun, W.; Williams, W.; Kim, S.; Feng, H.; Elam, J.; Rabuffetti, F.; Poeppelmeier, K.; Stair, P.; Stach, E.; Ribeiro, F.; Miller, J.; Marshall, C.; Northwestern Univ.; Purdue Univ.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition  

SciTech Connect

We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

Proslier, Th. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Zasadzinski, J. [Illinois Institute of Technology; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB; Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Elam, J. W. [ANL; Norem, J. [ANL; Pellin, M. J. [ANL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nucleation and growth of MgO atomic layer deposition: A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry study  

SciTech Connect

The atomic layer deposition (ALD) of MgO thin films from bis(cyclopentadienyl) magnesium and H{sub 2}O was studied using in-situ real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), ex-situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction. It is found that the initial growth is not linear during the first ten cycles, and magnesium silicate forms spontaneously on the SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates at 250 C. Submonolayer sensitivity of SE is demonstrated by the analysis of each half-cycle and self-limiting adsorption, revealing characteristic features of hetero- and homo-MgO ALD processes.

Wang, Han; Fu, Kan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269. (United States)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Matematik Dnyas>, 2003 K>fl Tbitak Bilim dl (1979) sahibi, k>rk do-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> ayn> üniversiteden 1953'te ald>. 1960'da Ege ?niversitesi T>p Fakültesi'nde "yabanc> ma- tematik ve- l>flt>. Ege ?niversitesi'nde doçent (1965) ve profe- sör (1967) oldu. 1969-76 y>llar> aras>nda OD>rma Merke- zi'nde, 1995-97'de Gebze'de, Elektronik ve Krip- toloji Araflt>rma Merkezi'nde görev ald>. 1997

Sertöz, Ali Sinan

97

Master en Sistemas Telematicos e Informaticos Curso 2007-2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aster en Sistemas Telem´aticos e Inform´aticos Curso 2007-2008 Proyecto de fin de m varios constructivos, m´etodos de mejo- ra y otros mecanismos que necesitemos. De esta forma, indicaremos, constructivos, m´eto- dos de mejora, an´alisis num´erico, circuitos VLSI, dibujo de grafos, procesamien

Pantrigo Fernández, Juan José

98

Thermal inertia mapping and its application in mineral exploration: results from Mamandur polymetal prospect, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......detection, using infrared heating of the sand surface...cost effectively show oil field thermal anomalies. Oil Gas J. (2009) 107...inertia over western India oil fields using ASTER data...33(3):313-333. Price J.C. Thermal inertia......

D. Ramakrishnan; Rishikesh Bharti; K.D. Singh; M. Nithya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Support Vector Machines in Moderate Sub-pixel Snow Mapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Support Vector Machines in Moderate Sub-pixel Snow Mapping Hongen Zhang College of Environmental technique in sub-pixel snow mapping, support vector machines (SVMs). In practice, SVM method provided% as compared to the reference data from Aster image classification, which show that the support vector machines

California at Santa Barbara, University of

100

Photoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,n70460...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been described elsewhere.9 Methanol cluster anions were produced by passing argon through a reservoirPhotoelectron imaging of large anionic methanol clusters: ,,MeOH...n - ,,n?70­460... Aster Kammrath Electron solvation in methanol anion clusters, MeOH n - n 70­460 , is studied by photoelectron imaging. Two

Neumark, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wave propagation through fluid-filled inclusions of various shapes: interpretation of extensive-dilatancy anisotropy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......deviatoric stress field in the crust by processes such as subcritical crack growth (Atkinson...Expanded Abstracts, 56sh Ann. Int. SEG Mtg, Houston, pp. 476-479. Aster, R...Expanded Abstracts, 57th Ann. Int. SEG Mtg, New Orleans, pp. 646-649. Crampin......

Stuart Crampin

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Harnessing Chaperones to Generate Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Amyloid Aggregation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surfaces. Fig. 1. The combination of SLF-CR and FKBP inhibits aggregation of A...steric bulk. (B) The chemical structure of SLF-CR is shown with the targeting domain, CR, in red and the recruiting domain, SLF, in black. (C) Inhibition of A{beta...

Jason E. Gestwicki; Gerald R. Crabtree; Isabella A. Graef

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION of a significant financial contribution to the project, at no cost to the Califor nia Energy Commission cation of ASTER scenes, at no cost to the Commission. Mark Coolbaugh (Great Basin Center for Geothermal

104

Proceedings of EARSeL-LISSIG-Workshop Observing our Cryosphere from Space, Bern, March 11 13, 2002 43 EARSeL eProceedings No. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Colorado, 449 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309- 0449, U.S.A., www.nsidc.org ABSTRACT The optical sensor: the outburst flood from the moraine lake Dig Tsho, Khumbu Himal, of 1985 was reconstructed from an ASTER DEM with good agreement to the actual flood. INTRODUCTION Presently, the USGS-led project Global Land Ice

Raup, Bruce H.

105

Multiple fluvial processes detected by riverside seismic and infrasound monitoring of a controlled flood in the Grand Canyon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experiment (CFE) in the Grand Canyon to show that three types of fluvial processes can be monitored from as the dominant seismic source between 15 and 45 Hz. Two lower-frequency seismic bands also excited by the CFE and infrasound responses to the CFE. Citation: Schmandt, B., R. C. Aster, D. Scherler, V. C. Tsai, and K

Tsai, Victor C.

106

LS Directorate Science Advisory Committee (SAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) Charter The Photon Sciences Science Advisory Committee (SAC) is responsible for advising the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences on issues related to the scientific utilization of Photon Sciences facilities and on developments required to achieve and maintain the highest possible scientific productivity. In keeping with this, the SAC will provide advice on the following topics: Scientific output and utilization of Photon Sciences facilities Long-term scientific directions Planning, development, and operation of Photon Sciences facilities Policies and procedures relevant to user access and utilization of scientific facilities Members are appointed by the ALD for three-year terms, renewable by mutual consent. The Chair of the Photon Sciences Users' Executive Committee will be an ex-officio member of the SAC. In general, the full SAC will meet at least annually. The ALD, in consultation with the chair of the SAC, may call additional SAC meetings as necessary. The output of the SAC will consist of a confidential report of their findings and recommendations conveyed in a written report submitted to the ALD shortly after each SAC meeting.

107

Books Received  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Mental Health. Reflections and Explorations. Marvin Karno and Don-ald...408 pp., illus. $22. Benchmark Papers in Electrical Engineering...tell you about the fantastic cost saving and convenietnce of...grade objectives 4x to 100x oil. Has adjust-able light intensity...

1974-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - aloe vera calendula Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Ald) and McKeague and Day (1966) (Feo and Alo). The soil pH was measured in 0.01 M CaCl2 (p Source: Sparks, Donald L. - Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of...

109

Biotechnology at the Cutting Edge - Keasling  

SciTech Connect

Jay Keasling, Berkeley Lab ALD for Biosciences and CEO of the Joint BioEnergy Institute, appears in a video on biotechnology at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. The video is part of en exhibit titled "Science in American Life," which examines the relationship between science, technology, progress and culture through artifacts, historical photographs and multimedia technology.

Keasling, Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Surface modification of Au/TiO2 catalysts by SiO2 via atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was utilized for the surface engineering of metallic nanoparticles to tame their sintering problems and catalytic activities. We chose the surface modification of gold nanocatalysts as an example to demonstrate the concept of this ALD-based approach. Herein, an active Au/TiO{sub 2} catalyst was modified by amorphous SiO{sub 2} via ALD, and the samples were characterized by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), scanning (SEM-EDX) and transmission electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (TEM-EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetry/differential thermogravimetry (TG/DTG), and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation and H{sub 2} oxidation were tested with respect to the pretreatment temperature and SiO{sub 2} content. A significant sintering resistance and changes in catalytic activities were observed. The difference between the SiO{sub 2}/Au/TiO{sub 2} samples prepared by gas-phase ALD and solution-phase chemical grafting was discussed.

Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fabrication of inverted opal ZnO photonic crystals by atomic layer deposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fabrication of inverted opal ZnO photonic crystals by atomic layer deposition M. Scharrer, X. Wu, A method to fabricate so-called "inverted opal" structures which have the long-range order, high filling into opal or inverted opal backbones.3,5,13,14 Recently, atomic layer deposition ALD has been pro- posed

Cao, Hui

112

In Situ Cycle-by-Cycle Flash Annealing of Atomic Layer Deposited Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Furthermore, these large thermal budget heating methods may overheat ALD reactor components such as the chamber O-ring. ... For example, the electrochemical properties of TiO2 have been shown to be dependent on the crystalline phase, with anatase TiO2 having desirable performance in photoelectrochemical applications such as dye-sensitized solar cells and photocatalysis. ...

Michael C. Langston; Neil P. Dasgupta; Hee Joon Jung; Manca Logar; Yu Huang; Robert Sinclair; Fritz B. Prinz

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

113

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Central Data Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPS), Phase II Radionuclide NESHAPS Reviewer Database: GS00T99ALD0203 Task Order Number: T0002AJM038 #12;U.S. EPA CDX NESHAPS, R-NESHAPS Database User Guide ii Revision History Change Record Version Number Description of Change Change Effective Date Change

114

Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone  

SciTech Connect

In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1??0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175300?C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Initiation of atomic layer deposition of metal oxides on polymer substrates by water plasma pretreatment  

SciTech Connect

The role of surface hydroxyl content in atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide (AO) on polymers is demonstrated by performing an atomic layer deposition of AO onto a variety of polymer types, before and after pretreatment in a plasma struck in water vapor. The treatment and deposition reactions are performed in situ in a high vacuum chamber that is interfaced to an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer to prevent adventitious exposure to atmospheric contaminants. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to follow the surface chemistries of the polymers, including theformation of surface hydroxyls and subsequent growth of AO by ALD. Using dimethyl aluminum isopropoxide and water as reactants, ALD is obtained for water-plasma-treated poly(styrene) (PS), poly(propylene) (PP), poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), and poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN). For PS, PP, and PEN, initial growth rates of AO on the native (untreated) polymers are at least an order of magnitude lower than on the same polymer surface following the plasma treatment. By contrast, native PVA is shown to initiate ALD of AO as a result of the presence of intrinsic surface hydroxyls that are derived from the repeat unit of this polymer.

Steven Brandt, E.; Grace, Jeremy M. [Eastman Kodak Company, 1999 Lake Avenue, Rochester, New York 14650-2022 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sensors and Actuators B 163 (2012) 136145 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sensors and Actuators B 163 (2012) 136­145 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/snb An ALD aluminum oxide passivated Surface Acoustic Wave sensor for early biofilm detection Young Wook Kima,b, , Saeed Esmaili

Rubloff, Gary W.

117

AAAS Chicago Meeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in their own fields. Other featured...Congeners (fusel oil, alde-hydes...radiography of production parts, and...the entire cumulative case-history...television production. We will also...products and production tech-niques...rotor and a field-align-ing...Association, Illinois Chapter Booth...

Raymond L. Taylor

1959-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Simple Way to Engineer MetalSemiconductor Interface for Enhanced Performance of Perovskite Organic Lead Iodide Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple Way to Engineer MetalSemiconductor Interface for Enhanced Performance of Perovskite Organic Lead Iodide Solar Cells ... School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China ... However, ALD technique has the problems of strict working environment like vacuum and high cost precursors. ...

Yuzhuan Xu; Jiangjian Shi; Songtao Lv; Lifeng Zhu; Juan Dong; Huijue Wu; Yin Xiao; Yanhong Luo; Shirong Wang; Dongmei Li; Xianggao Li; Qingbo Meng

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ENVIRONMENT, SAFETY & HEALTH DIVISION 22 July 2011 SLAC-I-730-0A05L-001-R000 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management, supervisors, and points of contact; and laser lab program managers, system laser safety officers (SLSOs), the laser safety officer (LSO), associate laboratory directors (ALDs), and Occupational Health and Purchasing. 2 Why High-power lasers (Class 3B and Class 4) used at SLAC can damage the eye and burn skin

Wechsler, Risa H.

120

Nanotube Fabrication byNanotube Fabrication by Anodic Aluminum Oxide,Anodic Aluminum Oxide,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanotube Fabrication byNanotube Fabrication by Anodic Aluminum Oxide,Anodic Aluminum Oxide, Self-regulating phenomena in materials science: Self-assembly of nanopores during anodic oxidation of aluminum (AAO) Self combined anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanostructures with atomic layer deposition (ALD) to fabricate

Rubloff, Gary W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATOMIC-LAYER-DEPOSITED ALUMINUM OXIDE FOR THE SURFACE PASSIVATION OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY SILICON SOLAR to those measured on reference cells passivated by an aluminum-annealed thermal SiO2, while those of the Al of aluminum ox- ide (Al2O3) grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) pro- vide an excellent level of sur

122

For More Information: http://www.nuc.berkeley.edu/ or 510-642-4077 The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory (ORNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy, multi-program research and development (R&D) laboratory capabilities are described, and the presentation focuses on the range of nuclear R&D programs. As ALD, Dr. Icenhour leads three research divisions (Fusion and Materials for Nuclear Systems, Nuclear

Zakhor, Avideh

123

Biocompatibility of atomic layer-deposited alumina thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These results sug- gest that patterning a substrate with hydrophilic and hydro- phobic groups can control cell and excellent dielectric properties for bio- micro electro mechanical systems (Bio-MEMS) in sensors, actuators of atomic layer-deposited (ALD) alumina (Al2O3) and hydro- phobic coatings. While these coatings

George, Steven M.

124

Plasma Processing for Crystallization and Densification of Atomic Layer Deposition BaTiO3 Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We adopted an ultrathin blocking layer of PEALD Al2O3 (10 cycles, 1 nm in thickness) for the leakage current suppression between BTO (5 nm) and Si substrate (Figure S2). ... For Al2O3 deposition, we used the plasma-enhanced ALD reactor (FlexAl) by Oxford Instruments. ...

Jihwan An; Takane Usui; Manca Logar; Joonsuk Park; Dickson Thian; Sam Kim; Kihyun Kim; Fritz B. Prinz

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

125

Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic layer deposited protective coatings for micro-electromechanical systems$ Nils D. Hoivika of thin-®lm materials to protect MEMS devices from electrical breakdown, mechanical wear and stiction. Electrostatic testing of the coated MEMS cantilever beams revealed that the ALD Al2O3 ®lms prevented electrical

George, Steven M.

126

Effective passivation of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As by HfO{sub 2} surpassing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via in-situ atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

High {kappa} gate dielectrics of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on molecular beam epitaxy-grown In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As pristine surface using in-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) without any surface treatment or passivation layer. The ALD-HfO{sub 2}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface showed notable reduction in the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}), deduced from quasi-static capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage (G-V) at room temperature and 100 Degree-Sign C. More significantly, the midgap peak commonly observed in the D{sub it}(E) of ALD-oxides/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As is now greatly diminished. The midgap D{sub it} value decreases from {>=}15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {approx}2-4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-HfO{sub 2}. Further, thermal stability at 850 Degree-Sign C was achieved in the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As, whereas C-V characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As degraded after the high temperature annealing. From in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectra, the AsO{sub x}, which is not the oxidized state from the native oxide, but is an induced state from adsorption of trimethylaluminum and H{sub 2}O, was found at the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface, while that was not detected at the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface.

Chang, Y. H.; Chiang, T. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Liu, Y. T.; Lin, H. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pi, T. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

NONE

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Waterless TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition using titanium tetrachloride and titanium tetraisopropoxide  

SciTech Connect

The surface chemistry for TiO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD) typically utilizes water or other oxidants that can oxidize underlying substrates such as magnetic disks or semiconductors. To avoid this oxidation, waterless or oxidant-free surface chemistry can be used that involves titanium halides and titanium alkoxides. In this study, waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD was accomplished using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl{sub 4}) and titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP). In situ transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) studies were employed to study the surface species and the reactions during waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD. At low temperatures between 125 and 225??C, the FTIR absorbance spectra revealed that the isopropoxide species remained on the surface after TTIP exposures. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then removed the isopropoxide species and deposited additional titanium species. At high temperatures between 250 and 300??C, the isopropoxide species were converted to hydroxyl species by ?-hydride elimination. The observation of propene gaseous reaction product by quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS) confirmed the ?-hydride elimination reaction pathway. The TiCl{sub 4} exposures then easily reacted with the hydroxyl species. QMS studies also observed the 2-chloropropane and HCl gaseous reaction products and monitored the self-limiting nature of the TTIP reaction. Additional studies examined the waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD growth at low and high temperature. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements observed growth rates of ?3?ng/cm{sup 2} at a low temperature of 150??C. Much higher growth rates of ?15?ng/cm{sup 2} were measured at a higher temperature of 250??C under similar reaction conditions. X-ray reflectivity analysis measured a growth rate of 0.55 0.05?/cycle at 250??C. X-ray photoelectron depth-profile studies showed that the TiO{sub 2} films contained low Cl concentrations <1 at. %. This waterless TiO{sub 2} ALD process using TiCl{sub 4} and TTIP should be valuable to prevent substrate oxidation during TiO{sub 2} ALD on oxygen-sensitive substrates.

Anderson, Virginia R.; Cavanagh, Andrew S.; Abdulagatov, Aziz I. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Gibbs, Zachary M. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0424 (United States); George, Steven M., E-mail: Steven.George@Colorado.Edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 and Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0427. (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Mapped present-day borate evaporites in Teels and Rhodes Marsh with ASTER satellite imagery References C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin (2006) Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=511018"

130

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Detection of Surface Temperature Anomalies in the Coso Geothermal Field Using Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We use thermal infrared (TIR) data from the spaceborne ASTER instrument to detect surface temperature anomalies in the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. The identification of such anomalies in a known geothermal area serves as an incentive to apply similar markers and techniques to areas of unknown geothermal potential. We carried out field measurements concurrently with the collection of ASTER images. The field

131

Definition: SRT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SRT SRT Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png SRT The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) was an international research effort that obtained digital elevation models on a near-global scale from 56° S to 60° N, to generate the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth prior to the release of the ASTER GDEM in 2009.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) is an international research effort that obtained digital elevation models on a near-global scale from 56° S to 60° N, to generate the most complete high-resolution digital topographic database of Earth prior to the release of the ASTER GDEM in 2009. SRTM consisted of a specially modified radar system that flew on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour during the 11-day

132

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding Unknown Notes Mapped present-day borate evaporites in Teels and Rhodes Marsh with ASTER satellite imagery References C. Kratt, M. Coolbaugh, Wendy Calvin (2006) Remote Detection Of Quaternary Borate Deposits With Aster Satellite Imagery As A Geothermal Exploration Tool Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Kratt,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=511014"

133

LBA-ECO Data Sets Released, January 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

announces the release of two data sets associated with the announces the release of two data sets associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The data set entitled "LBA-ECO TG-07 Forest Structure Measurements for GLAS Validation: Santarem 2004" provides the results of GLAS (the Geoscience Laser Altimer System) forest structure validation surveys conducted along transects at the Santarem and Sao Jorge forest sites. The data set entitled "LBA-ECO LC-23 ASTER and MODIS Fire Data Comparison for Brazil: 2003-2004" provides data associated with MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) fire maps generated using two different algorithms and compared against fire maps produced by ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer). One

134

Suburban recreation subdivisions in Montgomery County, Texas - a case study analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

degree of ':!ASTER OF SCIENCE Yiay 1969 Najor Subject: Recreation and Resource:; Development bjj CA&. - j1i?' ~, ' jc' Vc', 71 c. . ', i '. r~ e3 a: t ~ . ", ~. ": r, d c:onte~' & v: r'r ABSTRACT Suburban Recreation Subdivisions in Montgomery... affect subdivision development in Montgomery County, Texas, and through a case study, to examine some of the relationships among the factors concerning recreation facilities and population characteristics in a recrea- tion subdivision. Specific...

Watt, Carson Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Use of Satellite Remote Sensing in Monitoring Saltcedar Control along the Lower Pecos River, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In 1999 through 2004, herbicides were sprayed from helicopters along some sections of the river to reduce saltcedar infestation. Here we describe a simple methodology based on satellite remote sensing for monitoring the impact of the saltcedar control... measures. Data from the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) obtained in 1999 through 2004 over a section of the Pecos near Mentone, Texas were used for the present...

Nagihara, Seiichi; Hart, Charles R.

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

136

Consolidation of continuously reinforced concrete pavements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSOLIDATION OF CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENTS A Thesis by DAN PARKER MINN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A & M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of ASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1984 M aj... or Subject: Civil Engineering CONSOLIDATION OF CONTINUOUSLY REINFORCED CONCRETE PAVEMENTS A Thesis by DAN PARKER WINN Approved as to style and content by: W. B. Ledbetter (Chairman of Committee) eor e Stukhart (M ember) P&r~ ~ Mikael P. J. Olsen...

Winn, Dan Parker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

The effect of threadfin shad introduction on growth rates of largemouth bass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'1ASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 11ajor Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Science THE EFFECT OF THREADFIN SHAD INTRODUCTION ON GROWTH RATES OF LARGEMOUTH BASS A Thesis by ALBERT EUGENE BIVINGS, IV Approved as to style and content by: (C (Chairman... Nethodist University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Raphael E. Quinn A 15 ha farm pond in northeast Texas was treated with a chemical herbicide in the spring of 1973 to remove dense stands of aquatic vegetation and was subsequently stocked...

Bivings, Albert Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Releases of Exotic Parasitoids and Predators of the Russian Wheat Aphid, Diuraphis noxia (Kurdjumov), in the Texas Panhandle, 1987 - 1993.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parasitoids and hyperparasitoids, founder colonies were shipped to one of three laboratories to be cultured and increased. These laboratories were USDA/APHIS laboratories in Mission, Texas (parasitoids only) or Niles, Michigan (primarily predators... not provided by the shipper. This type of missing information i-: indicated by an aster isk in Table 1. The shipping laboratories are identified as Mis sion (USDA/APHIS at Mission, Texas), Niles (USDA/ APHIS at Niles, Michigan), Riverside (Uni versity...

Michels, G.J.; Whitaker-Deerberg, R.L.; Gilstrap, F.E.; McKinnon, L.K.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Analysis of static and wave-induced pore pressures in marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF STATIC AND WAVE-INDUCED PORE PRESSURES IN MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by GARRETT EDWIN WILLIAMS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALII University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of I1ASTER DF... SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject. : Civil Engineering ANALYSIS OF STATIC AND WAVE-INDUCED PORE PRESSURES IN MARINE SEDIMENTS A Thesis by GARRETT EDWIN WILLIAMS Approved as to style and content by: Wayne A. Dunlap (CE)(Chairm of Committee) Harry...

Williams, Garrett Edwin

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geology of the Carlos-East area, Grimes County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LIBRARY ' ' A &M COLLEGE OF TEYJ5 '4, GEOLOGY OF TRE CARLOS EAST AREA ' *, , GRIIKS COUNTY, TEXAS ==, . :; A Thesii "?, :, WILLIAM' LAWRENCE WALTON 'I ' Submitted to thi Graduate School of the, . : Agricultural and Mechanical College... of Texas in ~ ' k '. -. . -. Partial fulflllnent of the, ' requireaents' for the' degree 'of ;i llASTER OF SCIENCE: 'k ' - Ltigor' Subgeht: 'Geology. r . - '7 r 'k GEOLOGY OP TBE, CARLOS-EAST AREA GRIEES COUNTY' TEXAS 'I ?ILLIAB u...

Walton, William Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

APS User News, Special Issue 72  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 SPECIAL ISSUE 72, September 8, 2011 Message from Eric Isaacs: Stephenson Named APS Director To the APS User Community, I'm extremely pleased to announce that Brian Stephenson has been appointed Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Photon Sciences, effective September 1, 2011. The directorate comprises three research and support divisions centered on Argonne's Advanced Photon Source (APS). As you know, Brian has been interim ALD for Photon Sciences since October 2010, proving his abilities to lead both the directorate and the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project effort. He is a recognized and widely known world leader in X-ray science with vast knowledge and expertise in synchrotrons, beamlines, and instrumentation. He received an R&D 100 award

142

Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A2BE Carbon Capture LLC A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Panorama Ave Boulder A2BE Carbon Capture LLC A2BE Carbon Capture LLC Panorama Ave Boulder Colorado Biofuels Developing technology for producing valuable fuel and food from CO2 using algal photosynthesis and bio harvesting http www algaeatwork com Rockies Area AC Solar Inc AC Solar Inc P O Box Florence Colorado Gateway Solar Solar and wind sales for residential http www acsolar com Rockies Area ALD Nanosolutions ALD Nanosolutions E Burbank Street Unit Broomfield Colorado http www aldnanosolutions com contact php Rockies Area Abengoa Solar Abengoa Solar W th Ave Lakewood Colorado Gateway Solar Solar developer http www abengoasolar com Rockies Area Abound Solar Abound Solar Rocky Mountain Avenue Suite Loveland Colorado Gateway Solar Thin film cadmium telluride solar modules http www abound

143

Argonne Breaks Ground on $34.5M MX Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences Stephenson Appointed ALD for Photon Sciences APS, Other DOE Labs Help Develop New Cancer Fighting Drug Paper on Fast Pharmaceuticals by APS Authors Featured in New Journal Art Scene Investigation: Picasso goes Nanotech Linda Young of APS Elected Vice Chair of DAMOP APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed Argonne Breaks Ground on $34.5M MX Research Facility SEPTEMBER 15, 2011 Bookmark and Share Artist's rendering of the Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (left in drawing). The Advanced Photon Source experiment hall is at right. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory broke ground on August 30, 2011, for a $34.5 million Advanced Protein

144

Argonne CNM: 2013 Colloquium Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Colloquium Series 3 Colloquium Series 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | Date Title December 18, 2013 "Monodisperse Carbon Nanomaterial Heterostructures," by Mark Hersam, Northwestern University, hosted by Tijana Rajh Abstract: Improvements in carbon nanomaterial monodispersity have yielded corresponding enhancements in the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, sensing, and energy technologies. However, in all of these cases, carbon nanomaterials are just one of many materials employed, suggesting that further device improvements can be achieved by focusing on the integration of disparate nanomaterials into heterostructures with well-defined interfaces. For example, organic self-assembled monolayers on graphene act as effective seeding layers for atomic layer deposited (ALD) dielectrics, resulting in metal-oxide-graphene capacitors with wafer-scale reliability and uniformity comparable to ALD dielectrics on silicon.

145

A Nonlinear Positive Extension of the Linear Discontinuous Spatial Discretization of the Transport Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution for the angular flux, ??(s), within the cell must be assumed. 2.2 LD Derivation The LD scheme assumes a linear angular flux distribution within each cell: ??(s)LD = aLDP0(s) + bLDP1(s) . (2.9) Applying the definitions of Eq. (2.6) and Eq. (2... entirely defined in terms of aLD, and bLD, which then completely defines ??(s)LD within cell i. Because the relationships in Eqs. (2.10) are linear, one can directly solve for aLD and bLD in terms of ?A,i,d and ?X,i,d making ?A,i,d and ?X,i,d the primary...

Maginot, Peter Gregory

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

146

In Situ Synchrotron Based X-ray Fluorescence and Scattering Measurements During Atomic Layer Deposition: Initial Growth of HfO2 on Si and Ge Substrates  

SciTech Connect

The initial growth of HfO{sub 2} was studied by means of synchrotron based in situ x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and grazing incidence small angle x-ray scattering (GISAXS). HfO{sub 2} was deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and H{sub 2}O on both oxidized and H-terminated Si and Ge surfaces. XRF quantifies the amount of deposited material during each ALD cycle and shows an inhibition period on H-terminated substrates. No inhibition period is observed on oxidized substrates. The evolution of film roughness was monitored using GISAXS. A correlation is found between the inhibition period and the onset of surface roughness.

K Devloo-Casier; J Dendooven; K Ludwig; G Lekens; J DHaen; C Detavernier

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Film properties of low temperature HfO{sub 2} grown with H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, or remote O{sub 2}-plasma  

SciTech Connect

A reduction of the deposition temperature is necessary for atomic layer deposition (ALD) on organic devices. HfO{sub 2} films were deposited by ALD on silicon substrates in a wide temperature range from 80 to 300?C with tetrakis[ethylmethylamino]hafnium as metal precursor and H{sub 2}O, O{sub 3}, or an remote O{sub 2}-plasma as oxygen source. Growth rate and density were correlated to electrical properties like dielectric constant and leakage current of simple capacitor structures to evaluate the impact of different process conditions. Process optimizations were performed to reduce film imperfections visible at lower deposition temperatures. Additionally, the influence of postdeposition annealing on the structural and electrical properties was studied.

Richter, Claudia, E-mail: Claudia.Richter@namlab.com; Schenk, Tony; Schroeder, Uwe [NaMLab gGmbH, Noethnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, Thomas [NaMLab gGmbH, Noethnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden, Germany and Institut fr Halbleiter und Mikrosystemtechnik, TU Dresden, Noethnitzerstr. 64, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

149

Atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on germanium-tin (GeSn) and impact of wet chemical surface pre-treatment  

SciTech Connect

GeSn is quickly emerging as a potential candidate for high performance Si-compatible transistor technology. Fabrication of high-? gate stacks on GeSn with good interface properties is essential for realizing high performance field effect transistors based on this material system. We demonstrate an effective surface passivation scheme for n-Ge{sub 0.97}Sn{sub 0.03} alloy using atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The effect of pre-ALD wet chemical surface treatment is analyzed and shown to be critical in obtaining a good quality interface between GeSn and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using proper surface pre-treatment, mid-gap trap density for the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GeSn interface of the order of 10{sup 12}?cm{sup ?2} has been achieved.

Gupta, Suyog, E-mail: suyog@stanford.edu; Chen, Robert; Harris, James S.; Saraswat, Krishna C. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

2003MayMFGS&T  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-Vol. 1 No. 3 3-Vol. 1 No. 3 Atomic Layer Deposition of Wear-Resistant Coatings for MicroElectroMechanical Devices F riction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices employing sliding contacts. While many tri- bological coating materials are available, most traditional surface coating processes are largely line-of-sight techniques and are unable to apply conformal coatings to the high aspect ratio (height/width) struc- tures such as gear hubs and teeth, typical of MEMS devices. We have demonstrated that thin, conformal, wear resistant coat- ings can be applied to silicon surface micromachined (SMM) structures by atomic layer deposition (ALD). ALD is a chemical vapor deposi- tion process that employs self-limit- ing surface reactions applied in a

151

LDRD Project 52523 final report :Atomic layer deposition of highly conformal tribological coatings.  

SciTech Connect

Friction and wear are major concerns in the performance and reliability of micromechanical (MEMS) devices. While a variety of lubricant and wear resistant coatings are known which we might consider for application to MEMS devices, the severe geometric constraints of many micromechanical systems (high aspect ratios, shadowed surfaces) make most deposition methods for friction and wear-resistance coatings impossible. In this program we have produced and evaluate highly conformal, tribological coatings, deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD), for use on surface micromachined (SMM) and LIGA structures. ALD is a chemical vapor deposition process using sequential exposure of reagents and self-limiting surface chemistry, saturating at a maximum of one monolayer per exposure cycle. The self-limiting chemistry results in conformal coating of high aspect ratio structures, with monolayer precision. ALD of a wide variety of materials is possible, but there have been no studies of structural, mechanical, and tribological properties of these films. We have developed processes for depositing thin (<100 nm) conformal coatings of selected hard and lubricious films (Al2O3, ZnO, WS2, W, and W/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanolaminates), and measured their chemical, physical, mechanical and tribological properties. A significant challenge in this program was to develop instrumentation and quantitative test procedures, which did not exist, for friction, wear, film/substrate adhesion, elastic properties, stress, etc., of extremely thin films and nanolaminates. New scanning probe and nanoindentation techniques have been employed along with detailed mechanics-based models to evaluate these properties at small loads characteristic of microsystem operation. We emphasize deposition processes and fundamental properties of ALD materials, however we have also evaluated applications and film performance for model SMM and LIGA devices.

Jungk, John Michael (University of Minnesota); Dugger, Michael Thomas; George, Steve M. (University of Colorado); Prasad, Somuri V.; Grubbs, Robert K.; Moody, Neville Reid; Mayer, Thomas Michael; Scharf, Thomas W.; Goeke, Ronald S.; Gerberich, William W. (University of Minnesota)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Atomic layer deposition of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} as a work function material in metal gate MOS devices  

SciTech Connect

As advanced silicon semiconductor devices are transitioning from planar to 3D structures, new materials and processes are needed to control the device characteristics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} films using hafnium chloride and trimethylaluminum precursors was combined with postdeposition anneals and ALD liners to control the device characteristics in high-k metal-gate devices. Combinatorial process methods and technologies were employed for rapid electrical and materials characterization of various materials stacks. The effective work function in metaloxidesemiconductor capacitor devices with the Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} layer coupled with an ALD HfO{sub 2} dielectric was quantified to be mid-gap at ?4.6?eV. Thus, Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} is a promising metal gate work function material that allows for the tuning of device threshold voltages (V{sub th}) for anticipated multi-V{sub th} integrated circuit devices.

Lee, Albert, E-mail: alee@intermolecular.com; Fuchigami, Nobi; Pisharoty, Divya; Hong, Zhendong; Haywood, Ed; Joshi, Amol; Mujumdar, Salil; Bodke, Ashish; Karlsson, Olov [Intermolecular, 3011 North First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Kim, Hoon; Choi, Kisik [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Technology Research Group, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12309 (United States); Besser, Paul [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, 1050 East Arques, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Synthesis of Pt?Pd Core?Shell Nanostructures by Atomic Layer Deposition: Application in Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation to Propylene  

SciTech Connect

Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was employed to synthesize supported Pt?Pd bimetallic particles in the 1 to 2 nm range. The metal loading and composition of the supported Pt?Pd nanoparticles were controlled by varying the deposition temperature and by applying ALD metal oxide coatings to modify the support surface chemistry. Highresolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed monodispersed Pt?Pd nanoparticles on ALD Al2O3 - and TiO2 -modi?ed SiO2 gel. X-ray absorption spectroscopy revealed that the bimetallic nanoparticles have a stable Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. Density functional theory calculations revealed that the most stable surface con?guration for the Pt? Pd alloys in an H2 environment has a Pt-core, Pd-shell nanostructure. In comparison to their monometallic counterparts, the small Pt?Pd bimetallic core?shell nanoparticles exhibited higher activity in propane oxidative dehydrogenation as compared to their physical mixture.

Lei, Y.; Liu, Bin; Lu, Junling; Lobo-Lapidus, Rodrigo J.; Wu, Tianpin; Feng, Hao; Xia, Xiaoxing; Mane, Anil U.; Libera, Joseph A.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Elam, J. W.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

154

Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear reactors (LWRS) is funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In addition to our ongoing work on environmentally assisted cracking and steam generator integrity, a major new multiyear program has been initiated to assess the performance of high-burnup fuel during loss-of-coolant accidents. The bulk of the NRC research work is carried out in four ET sections: Corrosion: Mechanics of Materials; Irradiation Performance: and Sensors, Instrumentation, and Nondestructive Evaluation. The Transportation of Hazardous Materials Section is the other main contributor; staff from that Section have worked closely with NRC staff to draft a new version of the NRC Standard Review Plan that will be used to provide guidance to NRC reviewers of applications for the renewal of nuclear plant licenses.

NONE

1997-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acronyms Acronyms ADEOS Advanced Earth Observing Satellite (Japan) AERONET Aerosol Robotic Network AirMISR Airborne MISR ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program ASTER Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer ATBD Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document AVHRR Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer AVIRIS Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer BRDF Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function CART Clouds and Radiation Testbed CERES Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System DAAC Distributed Active Archive Center EOS Earth Observing System EOSDIS EOS Data and Information System GCIP GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project GEWEX Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment GLI Global Imager GOES Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite

156

ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ix ix Acrononyms and Abbreviations Acronyms and Abbreviations ACARS Aerodynamic (Research Incorporated) Communication and Recording System ACSYS Arctic Climate System Study AER Atmospheric Environmental Research, Inc. AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer AFOSR Air Force Office of Scientific Research AGARD Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development ALFA AER Local Forecast and Assimilation (model) AMIP Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project ARCS Atmosphere Radiation and Cloud Stations ARCSS Arctic System Science (NSF) ARCSYM Arctic Regional Climate System Model ARINC Aerodynamic Research Incorporated Communication ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program AS anvil stratus ASTER Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research ASTEX Altantic Stratocumulus Transition EXperiment

157

Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Hyperspectral Imaging Activity Date Spectral Imaging Sensor AVIRIS Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes AVIRIS airborne hyperspectral imaging. References Melanie J. Hellman, Michael S. Ramsey (2004) Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hyperspectral_Imaging_At_Yellowstone_Region_(Hellman_%26_Ramsey,_2004)&oldid=400435"

158

Topological obstructions to a totally geodesic, Riemannian foliation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOPOLOGICAL OBSTRUC, IONS TO A TOTAL' Y GEODFSIC, RIEMANNIAN FOLIATION A Thesis by YINCEI'JT ED'AARD COLL, OUNIOR Subm1tted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fult1llment of the requirements for the degree of Ii...ASTER OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Mathematics TOPOLOGICAL OBSTRUCTIONS TO A TOTALLY GEODESIC RIEMANNIAN FOLIATION A Thesis by VINCENT EDWARD COLL, JUNIOR Approved as to style and content by. D. L. Johnson (Chairman of Committee) D. K. Friesen...

Coll, Vincent Edward

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

"'We Are Woman': Girl, Maiden, Matron in Aegean Art"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as Artemis. 6 The Tiryns ring also combines a depiction of the sun and a crescent moon above what I have termed a heaven line 7 that also includes asterisms (stars, shooting stars, or comets) or wheat ears. The acute form of the crescent moon suggests..., Levant 11 (1979) 167-71; ID., Highs and lows in the Holy Land: opium in Biblical times, Eretz-Israel. Archaeological, Historical and Geographic Studies 20 (1989) 148-54. All three articles are reprinted in R.S. MERRILLEES, On Opium, Pots, People...

Younger, John G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A mathematical model for the performance of the compressed-film, floating-deck, flat-plate solar-energy collector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE OP THE COMFR. . 'SSED-FILM PLOATING-DECK, PLAT-PLATE SOLAR-ENERGY COLI CTOR A Thesis HO-KAI CHAN Submitted to the Graduate Co1lege of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of 0he requirement... for the degree of FiASTER OP SCIENCE August 197~ MaJor SubJect: Chemical Engineering A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE PERFORMANCE OF THE COMPRESSED-FILM, FLOATING-DECK~ PLAT-PLATE SOLAR-ENERGY COLLECTOR A Thesis by HO-KAI CHAN Approved as to style...

Chan, Ho-Kai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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161

Effects of dietary phosphorus and high ambient temperature on egg shell quality in hens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF DIETARY PHOSPHORUS AND HIG11 AMB1ENT TEMPERATURE ON EGG SHELL QUALITY IN HENS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER ANTHONY BAI1EEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A@I University in Partial fuI. fillme ~t of the requirement... for the degree of F1ASTER OF SCIENCE May 19 79 Major Subject: Poultry Science EFFECTS OF DIETARY PHOSPHORUS AND HIGH AMBIENT TEMPERATURE ON EGG SHELL QUALITY IN HENS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER ANTHONY BAILEY Approved as to style and content by; ( hairm...

Bailey, Christopher Anthony

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A preliminary study of population dynamics of cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus) related to effects of malathion in a Texas coastal marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M'ASTER OF SCIENCE JANUARY 1970 Ma/or Subjeot WILDLIFE SCIENCE A PRELIMINARY STUDY OF POPULATION DYNAMICS QP C01TCR RATS (~St d ~RR td ) RRRA1RC 1C RPPRCTS OF MALATHION IN A TEXAS COASTAL MARSH A Thesis... Coastal Marsh. (January, 1970) Royce W. Jurries, B. S. , Texas A&M University; Directed by: Dr. J. M. Inglis A prsfiminary study of population dynamics of cotton rats (Rd~h d ~hdd 1d 1 1 1 t th ff t f ERR. h1R I conducted in Brazoria County, Texas...

Jurries, Royce Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Levels of job satisfaction and role perceptions held by extension agents of INTA'S Regional Parana in Argentina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LEVELS OF JOB SATISFACTION AND ROLE PERCEPTIONS BELD BY EXTENSION AGENTS OF INTA'S REGIONAL PARANA ZN ARGENTINA A Thesis FRANCISCO JOSE BLAHA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6N University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the decree of i%ASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1983 Major Subject: Agricultural Educat'on LEVELS OF JOB SATISFACTION AND ROLE PERCEPTIONS HELD BY EXTENSION AGENTS OF INTAiS REGIONAL PARANA IN ARGENTINA A Thesis by FRANCISCO JOSE BLAHA Approved as to style...

Blaha, Francisco Jose

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effect of copper and iron on the oxidative flavor deterioration of ice cream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of "ASTER CP SCIENCE Jhnuary I~ Nc )or Sub)catt Dairy &~actures EFFECT GF COFFER ARD IRON CR Tlm OXIDATIVE FLAVOR DETKRI/Z'TJ ' CF ICE CRE//P A Thesis Pi? Pbdul Hasid 'Pish Approved as to style and content by: I /'i'I /' ' / , r... Archihald (2? 3) reported results cf cariiar studies on the effect oi' feed and added coppex' or iron or. the coppex' and iron content of milk. Cn tne lamia of these earlier ?tudiss the effect of feeding supplemental copper and iron on the copper...

Miah, Md. Abdul Hamid

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hierarchical functional layers on high-capacity lithium-excess cathodes for superior lithium ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Li-excess layered Li[Li0.2Mn0.54Ni0.13Co0.13]O2 (LMNCO) nanoparticles are facilely synthesized using a surfactant-assisted dispersion method. Ultrathin and conformal oxide coatings are deposited on the surface of individual LMNCO nanoparticle via atomic layer deposition (ALD). The effect of oxide ALD coatings on improving electrochemical performance of LMNCO electrodes is evaluated and optimized via tuning the coating thickness and composition. In addition, we synthesize a novel coreshell structure cathode consisting of Li-excess LMNCO as core and Li-stoichiometric material as shell, and its electrochemical property is optimized by tailoring weight content and composition of shell materials. Finally, electrochemical performance of Li-excess cathode material can be maximized by surface modification with hierarch functional layers composed of 10wt.% LiCoO2 shell (?10nm thick) and 6ZrO2 ALD layers (?1nm thick), which delivers very high initial discharge capacities of 296.4, 259.8, 156.6 and 104.2mAhg?1 at 0.1C, 1C, 5C and 10C, and can retain 184.0mAhg?1 at 1C after 100 electrochemical cycles. Such remarkably improved cycleabilitiy and rate capability of nanoarchitected Li-excess layered cathode material can be attributed to the synergic effect from hierarchical functional coatings to reduce electrochemical polarization, structural degradation and side reactions during electrochemical cycling.

Jianqing Zhao; Saad Aziz; Ying Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Lipidomic changes in rat liver after long-term exposure to ethanol  

SciTech Connect

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the progression of ALD along with lipidomic changes in rats fed ethanol for 2 and 3 months to understand the mechanism, and identify possible biomarkers. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed 5% ethanol or caloric equivalent of maltose-dextrin in a Lieber-DeCarli diet. Animals were killed at the end of 2 and 3 months and plasma and livers were collected. Portions of the liver were fixed for histological and immunohistological studies. Plasma and the liver lipids were extracted and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A time dependent fatty infiltration was observed in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Mild inflammation and oxidative stress were observed in some ethanol-fed rats at 3 months. The multivariate and principal component analysis of proton and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy data of extracted lipids from the plasma and livers showed segregation of ethanol-fed groups from the pair-fed controls. Significant hepatic lipids that were increased by ethanol exposure included fatty acids and triglycerides, whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased. However, both free fatty acids and PC decreased in the plasma. In liver lipids unsaturation of fatty acyl chains increased, contrary to plasma, where it decreased. Our studies confirm that over-accumulation of lipids in ethanol-induced liver steatosis accompanied by mild inflammation on long duration of ethanol exposure. Identified metabolic profile using NMR lipidomics could be further explored to establish biomarker signatures representing the etiopathogenesis, progression and/or severity of ALD. - Highlights: > Long term exposure to ethanol was studied. > A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based lipidomic approach was used. > We examined the clustering pattern of the NMR data with principal component analysis. > NMR data were compared with histology and immunohistochemistry data. > Biochemical parameters were compared with the observed NMR lipid data.

Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kondraganti, Shakuntala [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S. [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Shakeel Ansari, G.A., E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, 77555 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ThinFilms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Films Thin Films Manufacturing Technologies The Thin Film laboratory provides a variety of vapor deposition processes and facilities for cooperative research and development. Available capabilities include electron beam evaporation, sputter deposition, reactive deposi- tion processes, atomic layer deposition (ALD) and specialized techniques such as focused ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition. Equipment can be reconfigured for prototyping, or it can be dedicated to long-term research, development and manufacturing. Most sputter and evaporative deposition systems are capable of depositing multiple materials. Deposition capabilities and expertise * Deposition of a large variety of thin film mate- rials * Multiple sputter deposition systems - Capable of depositing four materials in a

168

Information Solutions: Database Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Database Applications Database Applications Argonne DOE-BES Central User Facility: A-Z People Query Data Warehouse Edits Registration | Registration Processing Security Admin Beamline Component Database System to manage beamline components. Beamline Downtime Report - UES Floor coordinator's downtime entry and reporting system. Beamline Directory | Beamline Entry Administration Links to the beamline websites and to detailed information about the equipment, techniques and contact information of a beamline. Beamline Usage and Scheduling System Long term schedule query and edit. Beamline schedule query and edit. Watchman and PSS data. Budget Proposal System Allows user to submit budget proposals via the web. Beamline Statistics Menu Query, entry and reporting of beamline statistics for ALD use only.

169

Manufacturing Science and Technology: Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thin Films Thin Films PDF format (189 kb) Multi Layer Thin Films Multi Layer Thin Films Planetary Sputtering SystemsPlanetary Sputtering Systems Planetary Sputtering Systems The Thin Film laboratory within Manufacturing Science & Technology provides a variety of vapor deposition processes and facilities for cooperative research and development. Available capabilities include electron beam evaporation, sputter deposition, reactive deposition processes, atomic layer deposition (ALD) and specialized techniques such as focused ion beam induced chemical vapor deposition. Equipment can be reconfigured for prototyping or it can be dedicated to long-term research, development and manufacturing. Most sputter and evaporative deposition systems are capable of depositing multiple materials.

170

Atomic Layer Deposition Preparation of Pd Nanoparticles on a Porous Carbon Support for Alcohol Oxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ALD-prepared catalyst was characterized by atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) (ICP-AES, Varian Liberty series II), X-ray diffraction, (XRD) (PanAnalytical XPert Pro), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) (SSX-100), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (Tecnai 12 Bio Twin with LaB6 gun at 120 kV), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) (JEOL JSM-7500FA). ... CNB-E project through the Multidisciplinary Institute of Digitalization and Energy (MIDE) program and Academy of Finland are acknowledged for financial support. ...

Emma Rikkinen; Annukka Santasalo-Aarnio; Sanna Airaksinen; Maryam Borghei; Ville Viitanen; Jani Sainio; Esko I. Kauppinen; Tanja Kallio; A. Outi I. Krause

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

Role of osteopontin in hepatic neutrophil infiltration during alcoholic steatohepatitis  

SciTech Connect

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a major complication of heavy alcohol (EtOH) drinking and is characterized by three progressive stages of pathology: steatosis, steatohepatitis, and fibrosis/cirrhosis. Alcoholic steatosis (AS) is the initial stage of ALD and consists of fat accumulation in the liver accompanied by minimal liver injury. AS is known to render the hepatocytes increasingly sensitive to toxicants such as bacterial endotoxin (LPS). Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH), the second and rate-limiting step in the progression of ALD, is characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, neutrophil infiltration, and neutrophil-mediated parenchymal injury. However, the pathogenesis of ASH is poorly defined. It has been theorized that the pathogenesis of ASH involves interaction of increased circulating levels of LPS with hepatocytes being rendered highly sensitive to LPS due to heavy EtOH consumption. We hypothesize that osteopontin (OPN), a matricellular protein (MCP), plays an important role in the hepatic neutrophil recruitment due to its enhanced expression during the early phase of ALD (AS and ASH). To study the role of OPN in the pathogenesis of ASH, we induced AS in male Sprague-Dawley rats by feeding EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks. AS rats experienced extensive fat accumulation and minimal liver injury. Moderate induction in OPN was observed in AS group. ASH was induced by feeding male Sprague-Dawley rats EtOH-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for 6 weeks followed by LPS injection. The ASH rats had substantial neutrophil infiltration, coagulative oncotic necrosis, and developed higher liver injury. Significant increases in the hepatic and circulating levels of OPN was observed in the ASH rats. Higher levels of the active, thrombin-cleaved form of OPN in the liver in ASH group correlated remarkably with hepatic neutrophil infiltration. Finally, correlative studies between OPN and hepatic neutrophil infiltration was corroborated in a simple rat peritoneal model where enhanced peritoneal fluid neutrophil infiltration was noted in rats injected OPN intraperitoneally. Taken together these data indicate that OPN expression induced during ASH may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of ASH by stimulating neutrophil transmigration.

Apte, Udayan M. [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Banerjee, Atrayee [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); McRee, Rachel [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Wellberg, Elizabeth [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States); Ramaiah, Shashi K. [Department of Pathobiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A and M University, MS4467, College Station, TX 77843-4467 (United States)]. E-mail: sramaiah@cvm.tamu.edu

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Molecular Layer Deposition on Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

They were fabricated by compressing a CNT aerogel produced as an output from a chemical vapor deposition furnace. ... The CNT3 specimens may be harder in general to coat due to their smaller diameter in comparison to the other materials. ... (1) Data tables for mechanical test results parallel and perpendicular to the CNT sheet orientation; (2) additional SEM and TEM images of coated CNT materials; (3) additional EDS spectra of MLD coatings on CNTs, and comparison to Al2O3 ALD coating on CNTs. ...

Joseph J. Brown; Robert A. Hall; Paul E. Kladitis; Steven M. George; Victor M. Bright

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

173

Pulsed Zeeman spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wheel was attached to the wavei( ngth indicator and was used to interrupt the light striking a small photodiode. The output voltage from the photodiode was used to provide calibration points on the recorder. Photomultiplier An Amperex 56UVP... Vertical: 2 mv/cm Horizontal: 5 microseconds/cm 23 Phc tographic Measurements ~A. Ald t p t 1 pbd. db spectra of ruby as in Fig. l. A photodiode with a risetime of four nanoseconds was used to position the magneti. c field pulse in order...

Cullen, Raymond Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

Inorganic Hollow Nanotube Aerogels by Atomic Layer Deposition onto Native Nanocellulose Templates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First we show a preparation method for titanium dioxide, zinc oxide, and aluminum oxide nanotube aerogels based on atomic layer deposition (ALD) on biological nanofibrillar aerogel templates, that is, nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), also called microfibrillated cellulose (MFC) or nanocellulose. ... Inorganic layer thickness data (S1), larger SEM micrographs of single nanocellulose fibrils (S2), several samples demonstrating differences in preparation methods (S3, S4) and different coatings (S5?S7), XRD data for a TiO2 nanotube film (S8). ... Fabrication of Transparent-Conducting-Oxide-Coated Inverse Opals as Mesostructured Architectures for Electrocatalysis Applications: A Case Study with NiO ...

Juuso T. Korhonen; Panu Hiekkataipale; Jari Malm; Maarit Karppinen; Olli Ikkala; Robin H. A. Ras

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Biexciton emission from single isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen pairs in GaAs  

SciTech Connect

We have studied photoluminescence (PL) from individual isoelectronic traps formed by nitrogen-nitrogen (NN) pairs in GaAs. Sharp emission lines due to exciton and biexciton were observed from individual isoelectronic traps in nitrogen atomic-layer doped (ALD) GaAs. The binding energy of biexciton bound to individual isoelectronic traps was approximately 8 meV. Both the exciton and biexciton luminescence lines show completely random polarization and no fine-structure splitting. These results are desirable to the application to the quantum cryptography used in the field of quantum information technology.

Takamiya, Kengo; Fukushima, Toshiyuki; Yagi, Shuhei; Hijikata, Yasuto; Yaguchi, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saitama University, 255 Shimo-Okubo, Sakura-ku , Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Kuboya, Shigeyuki; Onabe, Kentaro [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Katayama, Ryuji [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

176

Remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZnO for thin film electronic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a systematic approach to analyze the simultaneous impact of various reactant plasma parameters of remote plasma enhanced ALD (PEALD) on the ZnO thin film properties. Particular emphasis is placed on the film stoichiometry which affects the electrical properties of the thin film. Design of Experiment (DOE) is used to study the impact of the oxygen plasma parameters such as the RF power, pressure and plasma time to realize semiconductor quality of ZnO thin film. Based on the optimized plasma condition, staggered bottom-gate \\{TFTs\\} were fabricated and its electrical characteristics were measured.

S.M. Sultan; O.D. Clark; T.B. Masaud; Q. Fang; R. Gunn; M.M.A. Hakim; K. Sun; P. Ashburn; H.M.H. Chong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wetlands Research Program Bulletin. Volume 5. Number 1  

SciTech Connect

The city of Lincoln, Neb., was founded in the mid-18OOs along Salt Creek. During the last century, the saline marshes suffered extensive degradation through commercial and residential development, road construction, and agriculture. Today, Nebraska`s eastern saline wetlands are considered to be among the most restricted and imperiled ecosystems. Eastern Nebraska saline wetlands are regionally unique, located in floodplain swales and depressions within the Salt Creek and Rock Creek watersheds in Lancaster and southern Saunders counties. Water sources are a combination of discharge from the Dakota sandstone formation aquifer, precipitation, and overbank flooding. Salts are concentrated in the soil during dry periods. Vegetation in these wetlands is characterized by halophytes including spearscale (Atriplex subspicata), inland saltgrass (Distichlis spicata var. stricta), saltwort (Sa1icornia rubra), prairie bulrush (Scirpus mantimus var. paludosus), sea blite (Suaeda depressa), and narrow-leaved cattail (Typha angustifolia). Four plant species considered rare in Nebraska are saltmarsh aster (Aster subulatus var. ligulatus), seaside heliotrope (Heliotropium curassavicurn), saltwort, and Texas dropseed (Sporobolus texanus) can be found in the marshes along Salt Creek.

Gilbert, M.C.; Stutheit, R.G.; Davis, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Citation: D.E. Groom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

f f J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE THE f J (2220) Updated April 2000 by M. Doser (CERN). This state has been observed in J/ψ(1S) radiative decay into KK (K + K - and K 0 S K 0 S modes seen (BALTRUSAITIS 86D, BAI 96B)). An upper limit from DM2 for these modes (AUGUSTIN 88) is at the level at which observation is claimed. There are also indications for further decay modes (π + π - and pp (BAI 96B) and π 0 π 0 (BAI 98H)) in the same production process, although again at the level at which previous upper limits had been obtained (BALTRUSAITIS 86D). This was also seen in ηη (ALDE 86B), K 0 S K 0 S (ASTON 88D), and K + K - (ALDE 88 F), albeit with very low statistics. Its J P C is determined from the angular distributions of these observations. It is not seen in Υ radiative decays (BARU 89), B inclusive decays (BEHRENDS 84), nor in γγ (GODANG 97, ALAM 98C), which is not surprising, since

179

Catalytic nanoporous membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

180

Band alignment of HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy: Effect of SiH{sub 4} surface treatment  

SciTech Connect

The band-alignment of atomic layer deposited (ALD)-HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N was studied by high resolution x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements for both the non-passivated and SiH{sub 4} passivated AlGaN surfaces. The valence band offset and the conduction band offset for the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/Al{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}N interface were found to be 0.43?eV and 1.47?eV, respectively, for the non-passivated sample, and 0.59?eV and 1.31?eV, respectively, for the SiH{sub 4}-passivated sample. The difference in the band alignment is dominated by the band bending or band shift in the AlGaN substrate as a result of the different interlayers formed by the two surface preparations.

Samuel Owen, Man Hon, E-mail: m.owen.sg@ieee.org, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org; Amin Bhuiyan, Maruf; Zhou, Qian; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: m.owen.sg@ieee.org, E-mail: yeo@ieee.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Zhang, Zheng; Sheng Pan, Ji [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications  

SciTech Connect

Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

Dillon, A. C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geology and Geophysics of Geothermal Systems, Gregory Nash, 2005. A third objective was testing ASTER multispectral data for small-scale mapping of the geology of the northern Silver Peak Range, Nevada near the Fish Lake Valley geothermal field. References Patrick Laney (2005) Federal Geothermal Research Program Update - Fiscal Year 2004 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Multispectral_Imaging_At_Silver_Peak_Area_(Laney,_2005)&oldid=511017"

183

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Analyze if coupling remote sensing and field data is effective for determining geothermal areas Notes Thermal infrared (TIR) data from the spaceborne ASTER instrument was used to detect surface temperature anomalies in the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. The identification of such anomalies in a known geothermal area serves as an incentive to apply similar markers and techniques to areas of unknown geothermal potential. Field measurements

184

Cuttings Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Cuttings Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

185

Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kratt et al. (2006) demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec spectroradiometer and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals in the field. Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1).

186

Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Columbus Salt Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kratt et al. (2006) demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec spectroradiometer and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals in the field. Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1).

187

Multispectral Imaging At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Multispectral Imaging At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

188

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes IR remote sensing has located elevated surface temperatures (<12 degrees C above background) near Socorro Peak). A four-year compellation of ASTER satellite IR imaging was used. These images work on a 5-band, TIR processor

189

Southern African Data Sets Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thirteen new Southern African data thirteen new Southern African data sets. Originally offered on the second CD-ROM volume prepared for the Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) by the Goddard Space Flight Center, these data sets contain meteorological, aerosol, atmospheric chemistry, and precipitation data. In addition, this data release includes a new data set that compares Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) and Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fire data from the dry season 2001. The SAFARI 2000 project was conducted during 1999-2001 to develop a better understanding of the earth-atmosphere-human system in southern Africa. These data sets focus primarily on the 2000 dry season— and September— the southern African region, defined as latitude 5° N to 35° S and

190

Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Teels Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Teels Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 192°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Teels_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=388168

191

Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Springs, Alaska Geothermal Project Springs, Alaska Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Pilgrim Hot Springs, Alaska Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description A combination of existing and innovative remote sensing and geophysical techniques will be used to site the two confirmation core holes. These include a suite of Landsat, Aster, and FLIR techniques using infrared radiation combined with a CSAMT/AMT resistivity survey, 4.5 m to 150 m temperature gradient holes, and 1980 convective heat loss calculations. These will be used in combination to determine the natural heat loss from the Pilgrim geothermal system and allow an order of magnitude estimate of the resource potential.

192

Multispectral Imaging At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multispectral Imaging At Brady Hot Springs Area Multispectral Imaging At Brady Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Brady Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

193

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Thermal And-Or Near Infrared Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Melanie J. Hellman, Michael S. Ramsey (2004) Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_And-Or_Near_Infrared_At_Yellowstone_Region_(Hellman_%26_Ramsey,_2004)&oldid=401329" Category: Exploration Activities

194

IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA) USING REMOTE SENSING AND FIELD DATA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SEARCH FOR THERMAL ANOMALIES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD (CALIFORNIA) USING REMOTE SENSING AND FIELD DATA Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We attempt to identify thermal anomalies using thermal infrared (TIR) data collected over the Coso Geothermal Power Project with the spaceborne ASTER instrument. Our analysis emphasizes corrections for thermal artifacts in the satellite images caused by topography, albedo, and

195

Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Multispectral Imaging At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Multispectral Imaging Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Kratt et al. (2006) demonstrate the effectiveness of using a field-portable ASD Fieldspec spectroradiometer and satellite-based Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and emitted Reflectance Radiometer (ASTER) imagery for mapping borate minerals in the field. Borate crusts that were partially mined during the 1800s were identified and mapped at Rhodes, Teels, and Columbus Marshes (playas), all in western Nevada (Figure 1).

196

Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Rhodes Marsh Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Rhodes Marsh Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Follow up (to ASTER satellite imaging) analysis of spring and well waters yielded geothermometer reservoir estimates up to 162°C References Mark F. Coolbaugh, Chris Kraft, Chris Sladek, Richard E. Zehner, Lisa Shevenell (2006) Quaternary Borate Deposits As A Geothermal Exploration Tool In The Great Basin Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Water_Sampling_At_Rhodes_Marsh_Area_(Coolbaugh,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=387552"

197

Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation > PROVE Validation > PROVE The Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) Project Overview The Prototype Validation Exercise (PROVE) was a mini field campaign conducted at the Jornada Experimental Range in the Chihuahuan Desert, near Las Cruces, New Mexico in May 1997. The goals of PROVE were to: Gain experience in the collection and use of field data for EOS product validation Develop protocols for coordination, measurement, and data archival Compile a synoptic land and atmospheric data set for testing algorithms The remote-sensing portion of PROVE involved investigators from three NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) instrument teams: MODIS (Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer) ASTER (Advanced Space-borne Thermal Emission and Reflectance Radiometer) MISR (Multi-Angle Imaging Spectro Radiometer)

198

C32, A Young Star Cluster in IC 1613  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Local Group irregular galaxy IC 1613 has remained an enigma for many years because of its apparent lack of star clusters. We report the successful search for clusters among several of the candidate objects identified many years ago on photographic plates. We have used a single HST WFPC2 pointing and a series of images obtained with the WIYN telescope under exceptional seeing conditions, examining a total of 23 of the previously published candidates. All but six of these objects were found to be either asterisms or background galaxies. Five of the six remaining candidates possibly are small, sparse clusters and the sixth, C32, is an obvious cluster. It is a compact, young object, with an age of less than 10 million years and a total absolute magnitude of M_V = -5.78+/-0.16 within a radius of 13 pc.

Ted K. Wyder; Paul W. Hodge; Andrew Cole

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

The influence of educational expenditures on educational attainment levels: a comparison of rural, urban, suburban, and metropolitan counties in the Southwest and Northeast United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The $1 la 0 0 V ro al 0 0 V c' I rrl cfog 0 I 4 a al 4 td 4J 0 ai 0 g td Ql QI j1 U 0 Ja V CQ Ot '0 Ql 4J V Ql QI c' 0 Ql QJ IO 0 Ql 'Cl u Qj 4J 4 0 QJ 0 0 0 cd Ch IJ 0 0 Ql al 8 ttl 0 4J 0 0 CJ al '0 4. J aj 4... Lelsud l'. Pnsuor'h Submll. ted to the Grsdusto Colleg. of . 'uses A ll Uuiu. I. Jtv fu f srti!" . . ul TJ llm! ot. nf tie rcqv'rts! nt for the degree nf J1ASTER OF SCT !ECE December J. 97h Pic Jor S!!bject: So-ioJ! At- THE INFLUENCE OF EDUCATIONAL...

Bosworth, Leland D

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Collecting and analyzing deep-sea sediments from central Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLLECTING AiJD APsQ YFING DERP~EA SFIKIFGTG FRO. '4 CPATRQ BU F OF MK. l:CO A Toesis by WILLIAM ARTHUR bUi?V! Submittc8 to tbe Gr? us, e Coilore pf Texas Alii Universe ty 9n partial fulfil sent of the requirements for tbs de@ eo of v...ASTER OF SCIEi'iCE~ January lg'70 'ia, "', or Sub ject: G clerical Ooea". ogr apby COTM&TI?G PAD AEPLZ71liC . "iK" F--B0 SPEXYPiEIS FPOEE CE ~Tr'?K (iJLF OF i&~CO Thesis WILLIM AEGIS'BJR EyJElS Apu. evm3 ae to style a. "8 content by& hairman of Committee...

Burns, William Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ald en-lanc aster" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Core Analysis At Desert Peak Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Desert Peak Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Remote Sensing for Exploration and Mapping of Geothermal Resources, Wendy Calvin, 2005. Task 1: Detailed analysis of hyperspectral imagery obtained in summer of 2003 over Brady's Hot Springs region was completed and validated (Figure 1). This analysis provided a local map of both sinter and tufa deposits surrounding the Ormat plant, identified fault extensions not previously recognized from field mapping and has helped constrain where to put additional wells that were drilled at the site. Task 2: Initial analysis of Landsat and ASTER data for Buffalo Valley and Pyramid Lake was

202

FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT DOE/E~0575 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT FUNDAMENTAL FLUIDIZATION RESEARCH PROJECT DOE/E~0575 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT JANUARY 1994 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Morgantown Energy Technology Center P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 q e!" .t= I \, F= ··-0 Nov 1 5 19911a n V \) r I Iv,ASTER tJ :DISTRIBUTION OF THIS DOCUMENT IS UNL~ITe:> Jf DISCLAIMER This report was .. prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned

203

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RHIC Status & Plans RHIC Status & Plans Steve Vigdor NSAC Implementation Subcommittee Hearings Sept. 7, 2012 Upcoming Speakers & Topics: I. S. Vigdor (BNL ALD) - Facility status and plans; science accomplishments and goals; timeline for next decade; path to eRHIC II. U. Wiedemann (CERN) - - Theory drivers & view from LHC III. P. Sorensen (2008 George E. Valley Prize) - RHIC physics with soft probes IV. Y. Akiba (201 1 Nishina Memorial Prize) - RHIC physics with hard probes V. S. Vigdor - Take- away messages & answers to questions Incremental Upgrades ⇒ Dramatic Improvements in Collider Performance & Versatility 2 new colliding beam species in 2012 B h+v pickups Y h+v kickers B h+v kickers Y h+v pickups Measure deviations

204

APS Users Organization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APSUO APSUO By-Laws Steering Commitee Employment Meetings Compton Award Franklin Award APS Users Organization The APSUO is responsible for advising the APS Associate Laboratory Director in the following areas: The Organization will serve as an advocacy group for the Facility and its user community. The Organization will provide advice to the ALD on matters affecting the user community. The Organization will assure good communication between the APS user community and the APS management. APSUO By-Laws The by-laws upon which the APS User Organization is based. List of Steering Committee Members Steering committee for the APS Users Organization. Employment Bulletin Board APS-related employment opportunities. APSUO Steering Committee Meetings Minutes and presentations from the APSUO meetings.

205

PREPRINT  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

JC- 130518 JC- 130518 PREPRINT Synthesis, Scale-up and Characterization of 2,6-Diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-l-oxide (LLM-105) Philip F. Pagoria, Alexander R. Mitchell, Robert D. Schmidt Randall L. Simpson, Frank Garcia, Jerry W. Forbes Rosalind W. Swansiger, D. Mark Hoffman This paper was prepared for submittal to the JOWOG 9, Ald ermaston, England June 22-26,1998 April 27, 1998 This is a preprint of a paper intended for publication in a journal or proceedings Since changes may be made before publication, this preprint is made available with the understanding that it will not be cited or reproduced without the permission of the . author DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the

206

SOURCE_12_AUG_03.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cont'd. on page 6 Cont'd. on page 6 "If we build it they will come" has never been truer than when applied to the APS and its users. More than 5,000 members of the synchrotron radiation research community are signed up to carry out research at the APS. As the num- ber of APS users continues to grow, the facility is evolving, finding new ways (and improving on established practices) to better serve our client base. Whether these changes involve reorganizing divisions or technological innovation, the goal is always to provide an environment where users can make the most of their time here. In this first of a series, we look at ways the APS Operations Division (AOD) is responding to these challenges. As one of his performance goals for the APS, ALD Murray Gibson committed to allocating more of the FY03

207

APS SAC Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Scientific Advisory Committee Policy Adopted 1/21/2003 The Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) inherits and expands the role of the former Program Evaluation Board (PEB). It advises the Associate Laboratory Director for the APS (ALD/APS) with the following responsibilities: Scope To evaluate the scientific output and facility utilization for all APS sectors. To examine performance and recommend appropriate beamtime allocation for existing Collaborative Access Teams (CATs). To evaluate Letters of Intent and scientific proposals for new and reconstituted CATs. To provide advice to and review decisions by APS management on special operations support for CATs. To review proposals for Partner User access, a new access mode that will guarantee 10-30% the beam time per year on any sector for a finite

208

APS User News, Issue 76  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, February 21, 2012 6, February 21, 2012 CONTENTS DIRECTOR'S CORNER Special Announcement: George Srajer Appointed Project Director for the APS Upgrade and Deputy ALD USER MATTERS -- Registration Open for 2012 APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting: Our User Science Shapes the Future! -- CALLING ALL VIDEO MAKERS! Submit Your Films for the "Usies Awards"! -- LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops March 19-22, 2012 -- NUFO Goes To Washington! -- Tax Presentation Available BRIEFLY NOTED -- Recognitions and Honors -- Users Meeting Satellite Workshop: "SAXS Software Packages Irena and Nika" -- New Web Page Offers Quick Help Links for Users -- New Mural Graces the Wall near Viewing Area -- General User Proposal Deadline for 2012-2 Run: March 9, 2012 =====================================================

209

Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric Relaxation in Al2O3/TiO2 Nanolaminates Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition Giant Dielectric Constant Controlled by Maxwell-Wagner Dielectric Relaxation in Al2O3/TiO2 Nanolaminates Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition Nanolaminate consisting of Al2O3 and TiO2 oxide sublayers were synthesized, using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce individual layers with atomic scale control. The main goal of this work is to produce robust high dielectric constant layers based on biocompatible materials, such as Al2O3 and TiO2, suitable to fabricate high-capacitance capacitors for microchip embedded energy storage capacitor for implantable biomedical devices. However, these capacitors based on Al2O3/TiO2 nanolaminates can provide

210

Safety Overview Committee (SOC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter Safety Overview Committee (SOC) Charter 1. Purpose The Safety Overview Committee establishes safety policies and ad hoc safety committees. 2. Membership Membership will include the following individuals: APS Director APS Division Directors PSC ESH/QA Coordinator - Chair 3. Method The Committee will: Establish safety policies for the management of business within the APS. Create short-term committees, as appropriate, to address safety problems not covered by the existing committee structure. The committee chairperson meets with relevant safety representatives to discuss safety questions. 4. Frequency of Meetings Safety topics and policies normally are discussed and resolved during meetings of the Operations Directorate or the PSC ALD Division Directors. Otherwise, any committee member may request that a meeting be held of the

211

G I A. J. Brcslill, Director halt:: Protection Ci&ieerirG Divisio:l  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

G G I A. J. Brcslill, Director halt:: Protection Ci&ieerirG Divisio:l H. Glauberrrrr: iiealt;: Protection &;'ineeri::i: Division SURVEY OF IIOOD BUILDING DECO~iTX.fIi~ATIO.:i . 'L. KSH: 3G I viz&Led t.:e Hood Buildiiig on July 3, 1763 wit:. Lr. R. C;iamberli!: axd NY. F. M!sce of the &scac..zetts Institute of Teci:;iolozy, Occupational Medical Service, Mr. R. Hoxell, Massac::usetIs Insti.t.ule of Tec:fioloGy, Btlilding Maintenance, and NE. P. Russo of Cx-Rad, to perform a fhal radiatioi: survey of the site remairs. Tr.e building was completely denolisi:ed except for t e baseme:% vizlls a:.d sections of tiie colicrete flax. All ~buildir;;: materials aid debris assodiated witri the demolition p?&se ilad bee:: removed from '~:ie si.Le a;ld properly

212

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrogen Production via Chemical Looping Redox Cycles Using Atomic Layer Deposition-Synthesized Iron Oxide and Cobalt Ferrites ... Unlike solution and line-of-sight methods used to synthesize metal-substituted ferrites, including solution combustion synthesis,(6) aerial oxidation of aqueous suspensions,(5) sol?gel process,(8) laser molecular beam epitaxy,(21) sputtering,(22) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD),(23) ALD can produce conformal thin films on porous materials. ... The drop in peak H2 production rate is accompanied by a ?55% decrease in the total amount of H2 produced (see Table 1) and a similar decrease in the time required to achieve 95% conversion, suggesting a loss of accessible iron in this material. ...

Jonathan R. Scheffe; Mark D. Allendorf; Eric N. Coker; Benjamin W. Jacobs; Anthony H. McDaniel; Alan W. Weimer

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

213

Shape-selective catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch chemistry : atomic layer deposition of active catalytic metals. Activity report : January 1, 2005 - September 30, 2005.  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (FT) chemistry - specifically, the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to needing high activity, it is desirable that the catalysts have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. The broad goal is to produce diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Originally the goal was to prepare shape-selective catalysts that would limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected 'cage.' Such catalysts were prepared with silica-containing fractal cages. The activity was essentially the same as that of catalysts without the cages. We are currently awaiting follow-up experiments to determine the attrition strength of these catalysts. A second experimental stage was undertaken to prepare and evaluate active FT catalysts formed by atomic-layer deposition [ALD] of active components on supported membranes and particulate supports. The concept was that of depositing active metals (i.e. ruthenium, iron or cobalt) upon membranes with well defined flow channels of small diameter and length such that the catalytic activity and product molecular weight distribution could be controlled. In order to rapidly evaluate the catalytic membranes, the ALD coating processes were performed in an 'exploratory mode' in which ALD procedures from the literature appropriate for coating flat surfaces were applied to the high surface area membranes. Consequently, the Fe and Ru loadings in the membranes were likely to be smaller than those expected for complete monolayer coverage. In addition, there was likely to be significant variation in the Fe and Ru loading among the membranes due to difficulties in nucleating these materials on the aluminum oxide surfaces. The first series of experiments using coated membranes demonstrated that the technology needed further improvement. Specifically, observed catalytic FT activity was low. This low activity appeared to be due to: (1) low available surface area, (2) atomic deposition techniques that needed improvements, and (3) insufficient preconditioning of the catalyst surface prior to FT testing. Therefore, experimentation was expanded to the use of particulate silica supports having defined channels and reasonably high surface area. This later experimentation will be discussed in the next progress report. Subsequently, we plan to evaluate membranes after the ALD techniques are improved with a careful study to control and quantify the Fe and Ru loadings. The preconditioning of these surfaces will also be further developed. (A number of improvements have been made with particulate supports; they will be discussed in the subsequent report.) In support of the above, there was an opportunity to undertake a short study of cobalt/promoter/support interaction using the Advanced Photon Source (APS) of Argonne. Five catalysts and a reference cobalt oxide were characterized during a temperature programmed EXAFS/XANES experimental study with the combined effort of Argonne and the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) of the University of Kentucky. This project was completed, and it resulted in an extensive understanding of the preconditioning step of reducing Co-containing FT catalysts. A copy of the resulting manuscript has been submitted and accepted for publication. A similar project was undertaken with iron-containing FT catalysts; the data is currently being studied.

Cronauer, D. C. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Nanostructure templating using low temperature atomic layer deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for making nanostructures that are mechanically, chemically and thermally stable at desired elevated temperatures, from nanostructure templates having a stability temperature that is less than the desired elevated temperature. The methods comprise depositing by atomic layer deposition (ALD) structural layers that are stable at the desired elevated temperatures, onto a template employing a graded temperature deposition scheme. At least one structural layer is deposited at an initial temperature that is less than or equal to the stability temperature of the template, and subsequent depositions made at incrementally increased deposition temperatures until the desired elevated temperature stability is achieved. Nanostructure templates include three dimensional (3D) polymeric templates having features on the order of 100 nm fabricated by proximity field nanopatterning (PnP) methods.

Grubbs, Robert K. (Albuquerque, NM); Bogart, Gregory R. (Corrales, NM); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Picosun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Picosun Picosun Jump to: navigation, search Name Picosun Place Finland Product Picosun is an international equipment manufacturer with a world-wide sales and service organization. We develop and manufacture Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) reactors for micro- and nanotechnology applications. References Picosun[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Picosun is a company located in Finland . References ↑ "Picosun" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Picosun&oldid=349740" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

216

SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium Lance Cooley - FNAL Mike Pellin, Jim Norem - ANL Steve Sibener - UC John Zasadzinski, Thomas Prolier - IIT f ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 May 2007 SRF Materials Workshop @ FNAL energized 2 collaborations being reported here * Atomic layer deposition of conformal coatings onto cavities (Pellin, Zasadzinski, Prolier, Norem, Antoine/Wu/Cooley) - Directly probe surface superconductivity (SC) via 1.5 K STM + XPS surface composition - Nb oxidation layer proximity effects! - ALD Al 2 O 3 coated cavity first, for oxidation control; multilayer- coated cavity later - A new philosophy: build up, not etch down - First annealing results reveal oxidation vs

217

m005.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

270) 270) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.1. 1262 + 1 - 2 ± 8 ABLIKIM 06V BES2 e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 1275 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05 BES2 J/ψ → φ π + π - 1283 ± 5 ALDE 98 GAM4 100 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1278 ± 5 1 BERTIN 97C OBLX 0.0 p p → π + π - π 0 1272 ± 8 200k PROKOSHKIN 94 GAM2 38 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1269.7± 5.2 5730 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 e + e - → 5π 1283 ± 8 400 2 ALDE 87 GAM4 100 π - p → 4π 0 n 1274 ± 5 2 AUGUSTIN 87 DM2 J/ψ → γ π + π - 1283 ± 6 3 LONGACRE 86 MPS 22 π - p → n 2K 0 S 1276 ± 7 COURAU 84 DLCO e + e - → e + e - π + π - 1273.3± 2.3 4 CHABAUD 83 ASPK 17 π - p polarized 1280 ± 4 5 CASON 82 STRC 8 π + p → ∆ ++ π 0 π 0 1281 ± 7 11600 GIDAL 81 MRK2 J/ψ decay 1282 ± 5 6 CORDEN 79 OMEG 12-15 π - p → n 2π 1269 ± 4 10k

218

m005.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 f 2 (1270) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + ) f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS f 2 (1270) MASS NODE=M005M NODE=M005M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE 1275.1 ± 1.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.1. 1262 + 1 - 2 ± 8 ABLIKIM 06V BES2 e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 1275 ± 15 ABLIKIM 05 BES2 J/ψ → φ π + π - 1283 ± 5 ALDE 98 GAM4 100 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1278 ± 5 1 BERTIN 97C OBLX 0.0 p p → π + π - π 0 1272 ± 8 200k PROKOSHKIN 94 GAM2 38 π - p → π 0 π 0 n 1269.7 ± 5.2 5730 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 e + e - → 5π 1283 ± 8 400 2 ALDE 87 GAM4 100 π - p → 4π 0 n 1274 ± 5 2 AUGUSTIN 87 DM2 J/ψ → γ π + π - 1283 ± 6 3 LONGACRE 86 MPS 22 π - p → n 2K 0 S 1276 ± 7 COURAU 84 DLCO e + e - → e + e - π + π - 1273.3 ± 2.3 4 CHABAUD 83 ASPK 17 π - p polarized 1280 ± 4 5 CASON 82 STRC 8 π + p → ∆ ++ π 0 π 0 1281 ± 7 11600 GIDAL 81 MRK2 J/ψ decay 1282 ± 5 6 CORDEN 79 OMEG 12-15

219

MULTISCALE THERMAL-INFRARED MEASUREMENTS OF THE MAUNA LOA CALDERA, HAWAII  

SciTech Connect

Until recently, most thermal infrared measurements of natural scenes have been made at disparate scales, typically 10{sup {minus}3}-10{sup {minus}2} m (spectra) and 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} m (satellite images), with occasional airborne images (10{sup 1} m) filling the gap. Temperature and emissivity fields are spatially heterogeneous over a similar range of scales, depending on scene composition. A common problem for the land surface, therefore, has been relating field spectral and temperature measurements to satellite data, yet in many cases this is necessary if satellite data are to be interpreted to yield meaningful information about the land surface. Recently, three new satellites with thermal imaging capability at the 10{sup 1}-10{sup 2} m scale have been launched: MTI, TERRA, and Landsat 7. MTI acquires multispectral images in the mid-infrared (3-5{micro}m) and longwave infrared (8-10{micro}m) with 20m resolution. ASTER and MODIS aboard TERRA acquire multispectral longwave images at 90m and 500-1000m, respectively, and MODIS also acquires multispectral mid-infrared images. Landsat 7 acquires broadband longwave images at 60m. As part of an experiment to validate the temperature and thermal emissivity values calculated from MTI and ASTER images, we have targeted the summit region of Mauna Loa for field characterization and near-simultaneous satellite imaging, both on daytime and nighttime overpasses, and compare the results to previously acquired 10{sup {minus}1} m airborne images, ground-level multispectral FLIR images, and the field spectra. Mauna Loa was chosen in large part because the 4x6km summit caldera, flooded with fresh basalt in 1984, appears to be spectrally homogeneous at scales between 10{sup {minus}1} and 10{sup 2} m, facilitating the comparison of sensed temperature. The validation results suggest that, with careful atmospheric compensation, it is possible to match ground measurements with measurements from space, and to use the Mauna Loa validation site for cross-comparison of thermal infrared sensors and temperature/emissivity extraction algorithms.

L. BALICK; A. GILLESPIE; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_8-2-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uly uly 2 9---Aug. 2 , 2 013. Lab researchers Kim Cupps a nd A dam B ertsch a re a mong t hose u sing the 20---petaFLOPS Sequoia machine t o solve some of the b iggest s cientific p roblems. Today's s upercomputers a re m arvels o f c omputational p ower, a nd t hey a re b eing u sed t o t ackle s ome o f the w orld's b iggest s cientific p roblems. Current m odels a re t ens o f t housands o f t imes f aster t han t he a verage d esktop c omputer. T hey achieve t hese l ightning---fast s peeds v ia p arallel p rocessing, i n w hich m any c omputer p rocessors perform c omputations s imultaneously. S upercomputers a re u sed f or e verything f rom forecasting w eather t o m odeling t he h uman b rain. Testing n uclear w eapons h as b een b anned i n t he U nited S tates s ince 1 992, b ut s upercomputer simulations e nsure t hat t

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221

MTI Ground Truth Collection Ivanpah Dry Lake Bed, California, May, July, and August 2002  

SciTech Connect

A multi-agency collaboration successfully completed a series of ground truth measurements at the Ivanpah Dry Lake bed during FY 2002. Four collection attempts were made: two in May, one in July, and one in August. The objective was to collect ground-based measurements and airborne data during Multispectral Thermal Imager satellite overpasses. The measurements were to aid in the calibration of the satellite data and in algorithm validation. The Remote Sensing Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Los Alamos National Laboratory; and the University of Arizona participated in the effort. Field instrumentation included a sun photometer on loan from the University of Arizona and the Remote Sensing Laboratory's radiosonde weather balloon, weather station, thermal infrared radiometers, and spectral radiometer. In addition, three reflectance panels were deployed; certain tests used water baths set at two different temperatures. Local weather data as well as sky photography were collected. May presented several excellent days; however, it was later learned that tasking for the satellite was not available. A combination of cloud cover, wind, and dusty conditions limited useful data collections to two days, August 28 and 29. Despite less-than- ideal weather conditions, the data for the Multispectral Thermal Imager calibration were obtained. A unique set of circumstances also allowed data collection during overpasses of the LANDSAT7 and ASTER satellites.

David L. Hawley

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

CO.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

\j 7, b 6 - \j 7, b 6 - / :!otification of I:eeL i' lr Sor?!c POiYl Of ::cm2diS;L hcticr, - L.J. !hj:ont Pcl~c:x~i?rs and Co., IltZCptKlt~r, >!r:vr Jersey s. bleycrs, NE-90 EV/Efl has detor.nincd 3 portion of t!,e E.I. D~~TXXL~ h\:e:Y?O~ aid CO. f:icil.j.ty at Dccpwatcr, :!ew Jcrscy to k.c co;ltrzi::citnd vi-:.h rx~ionctive -."nc i dl],~ .&.-se*. 3s :I resul", Of ac-Livitics COEAiiCtCJJ .Lcor ti;c Ii:+il~iLt.tn1, i7ll~iricCr ?ii:;trict 251 ,1toilic Lncr:!y Coxl~iissioil. 1';~ consi.?cr thi 5 si'ic 191,~ pricrity 2s it is under coritrol of the E.I. h;w.75 Co. nnii rwt ncctis- sj tJ1.e to thd gi::teral ' pblic. hcloscd in a-;.F' . - .T- m The radiologic?. survey report for thz Z.J, Lui;ont i;o:,:c:;,ours and Co. facility, a:ld - The L.1. Dupont

223

Chemical Bonding, Interfaces and Defects in Hafnium Oxide/Germanium Oxynitride Gate Stacks on Ge (100)  

SciTech Connect

Correlations among interface properties and chemical bonding characteristics in HfO{sub 2}/GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge MIS stacks were investigated using in-situ remote nitridation of the Ge (100) surface prior to HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition (ALD). Ultra thin ({approx}1.1 nm), thermally stable and aqueous etch-resistant GeO{sub x}N{sub y} interfaces layers that exhibited Ge core level photoelectron spectra (PES) similar to stoichiometric Ge{sub 3}N{sub 4} were synthesized. To evaluate GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface defects, the density of interface states (D{sub it}) was extracted by the conductance method across the band gap. Forming gas annealed (FGA) samples exhibited substantially lower D{sub it} ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}) than did high vacuum annealed (HVA) and inert gas anneal (IGA) samples ({approx} 1x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}). Germanium core level photoelectron spectra from similar FGA-treated samples detected out-diffusion of germanium oxide to the HfO{sub 2} film surface and apparent modification of chemical bonding at the GeO{sub x}N{sub y}/Ge interface, which is related to the reduced D{sub it}.

Oshima, Yasuhiro; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Yun; /SLAC, SSRL; Kuzum, Duygu; /Stanford U.; Sugawara, Takuya; Saraswat, Krishna C.; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC, SSRL; McIntyre, Paul C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol: Enhanced methanol production in silica sol-gel matrices  

SciTech Connect

Strategies for effective conversion of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to methanol offer promising new technologies not only for recycling of the greenhouse gas but also for an efficient production of fuel alternatives. Partial hydrogenation of carbon dioxide has been accomplished by means of heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, and photocatalysis. Oxide-based catalysts are predominantly used for industrial fixation of carbon dioxide. A unique approach in this direction involves the use of enzymes as catalysts for conversion of carbon dioxide to methanol. The use of enzymes is particularly appealing since it provides a facile low-temperature route for generation of methanol directly from gaseous carbon dioxide. The authors report an enzymatically coupled sequential reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol by using a series of reactions catalyzed by three different dehydrogenases. Overall, the process involves an initial reduction of CO{sub 2} to formate catalyzed by formate dehydrogenase (F{sub ate}DH), followed by reduction of formate to formaldehyde by formaldehyde dehydrogenase (F{sub ald}DH), and finally formaldehyde is reduced to methanol by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). In this process, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) acts as a terminal electron donor for each dehydrogenase-catalyzed reduction.

Obert, R.; Dave, B.C.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

225

Subpixel monitoring of the seasonal snow cover with MODIS at 250m spatial resolution in the Southern Alps of New Zealand: Methodology and accuracy assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study describes a comprehensive method to produce routinely regional maps of seasonal snow cover in the Southern Alps of New Zealand (upper Waitaki basin) on a subpixel basis, and with the \\{MODerate\\} Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The method uses an image fusion algorithm to produce snow maps at an improved 250m spatial resolution in addition to the 500m resolution snow maps. An iterative approach is used to correct imagery for both atmospheric and topographic effects using daily observations of atmospheric parameters. The computation of ground spectral reflectance enabled the use of image-independent end-members in a constrained linear unmixing technique to achieve a robust estimation of subpixel snow fractions. The accuracy of the snow maps and performance of the algorithm were assessed carefully using eight pairs of synchronic MODIS/ASTER images. Pixel-based metrics showed that subpixel snow fractions were retrieved with a Mean Absolute Error of 6.8% at 250m spatial resolution and 5.1% after aggregation at 500m spatial resolution. In addition, a feature-based metric showed that 90% of the snowlines were depicted generally within 300m and 200m of their correct position for the 500-m and 250-m spatial resolution snow maps, respectively. A dataset of 679 maps of subpixel snow fraction was produced for the period from February 2000 to May 2007. These repeated observations of the seasonal snow cover will benefit the ongoing effort to model snowmelt runoff in the region and to improve the estimation and management of water resources.

Pascal Sirguey; Renaud Mathieu; Yves Arnaud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

m008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 f 1 (1285) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (1 + + ) f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS NODE=M008M NODE=M008M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.8. See the ideogram NEW below. [1282.1 ± 0.6 MeV OUR 2012 AVERAGE Scale factor = 1.7] 1281.16 ± 0.39 ± 0.45 1 LEES 12X BABR τ - → π - f 1 (1285) ν τ 1285.1 ± 1.0 + 1.6 - 0.3 2 ABLIKIM 11J BES3 J/ψ → ω(η π + π - ) 1281 ± 2 ± 1 AUBERT 07AU BABR 10.6 e + e - → f 1 (1285) π + π - γ 1276.1 ± 8.1 ± 8.0 203 BAI 04J BES2 J/ψ → γ γ π + π - 1274 ± 6 237 ABDALLAH 03H DLPH 91.2 e + e - → K 0 S K ± π ∓ + X 1280 ± 4 ACCIARRI 01G L3 1288 ± 4 ± 5 20k ADAMS 01B B852 18 GeV π - p → K + K - π 0 n 1284 ± 6 1400 ALDE 97B GAM4 100 π - p → η π 0 π 0 n 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97B OMEG 450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97C OMEG 450 p p → p p K 0 S K ± π ∓ 1280

227

m011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 b 1 (1235) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 + - ) b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS NODE=M011M NODE=M011M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5 ± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.6. See the ideogram below. 1225 ± 5 WEIDENAUER 93 ASTE p p → 2π + 2π - π 0 1235 ± 15 ALDE 92C GAM2 38,100 π - p → ω π 0 n 1236 ± 16 FUKUI 91 SPEC 8.95 π - p → ω π 0 n 1222 ± 6 ATKINSON 84E OMEG ± 25-55 γ p → ω π X OCCUR=2 1237 ± 7 ATKINSON 84E OMEG 0 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1239 ± 5 EVANGELIS... 81 OMEG - 12 π - p → ω π p 1251 ± 8 450 GESSAROLI 77 HBC - 11 π - p → π - ω p 1245 ± 11 890 FLATTE 76C HBC - 4.2 K - p → π - ω Σ + 1222 ± 4 1400 CHALOUPKA 74 HBC - 3.9 π - p 1220 ± 7 600 KARSHON 74B HBC + 4.9 π + p * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1190 ± 10 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 ± e + e - → 5π 1213 ± 5 ATKINSON

228

m008.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

285) 285) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (1 + + ) f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS f 1 (1285) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE 1281.9 ± 0.5 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.8. See the ideogram below. 1281.16± 0.39± 0.45 1 LEES 12X BABR τ - → π - f 1 (1285) ν τ 1285.1 ± 1.0 + 1.6 - 0.3 2 ABLIKIM 11J BES3 J/ψ → ω(η π + π - ) 1281 ± 2 ± 1 AUBERT 07AU BABR 10.6 e + e - → f 1 (1285) π + π - γ 1276.1 ± 8.1 ± 8.0 203 BAI 04J BES2 J/ψ → γ γ π + π - 1274 ± 6 237 ABDALLAH 03H DLPH 91.2 e + e - → K 0 S K ± π ∓ + X 1280 ± 4 ACCIARRI 01G L3 1288 ± 4 ± 5 20k ADAMS 01B B852 18 GeV π - p → K + K - π 0 n 1284 ± 6 1400 ALDE 97B GAM4 100 π - p → η π 0 π 0 n 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97B OMEG 450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1281 ± 1 BARBERIS 97C OMEG 450 p p → p p K 0 S K ± π ∓ 1280 ± 2 3 ANTINORI 95 OMEG 300,450 p p → p p 2(π + π - ) 1282.2 ± 1.5 LEE 94 MPS2 18 π - p →

229

m027.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 η(1405) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 - + ) A REVIEW GOES HERE - Check our WWW List of Reviews NODE=M027 η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS η(1405) MASS NODE=M027205 NODE=M027MX VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE 1408.8 ± 1.8 OUR AVERAGE Includes data from the 2 datablocks that follow this one. NEW Error includes scale factor of 2.1. See the ideogram below. [1408.9 ± 2.4 MeV OUR 2012 AVERAGE Scale factor = 2.3] WEIGHTED AVERAGE 1408.8±1.8 (Error scaled by 2.1) RATH 89 MPS 0.7 BAI 90C MRK3 0.6 BERTIN 95 OBLX 12.9 BERTIN 97 OBLX 0.1 CICALO 99 OBLX 0.6 ADAMS 01B B852 2.6 NICHITIU 02 OBLX ANDO 86 SPEC 5.0 AUGUSTIN 90 DM2 3.2 FUKUI 91C SPEC 27.1 BOLTON 92B MRK3 2.2 AMSLER 95F CBAR 0.0 ALDE 97B GAM4 6.4 MANAK 00A MPS 0.6 AMSLER 04B CBAR 3.4 AMSLER 04B CBAR ABLIKIM 11J BES3 6.4 ABLIKIM 12E BES3 0.3 ABLIKIM 12E BES3 0.0 χ 2 72.1 (Confidence Level < 0.0001)

230

m011.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 (1235) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 + - ) b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS b 1 (1235) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE 1229.5± 3.2 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.6. See the ideogram below. 1225 ± 5 WEIDENAUER 93 ASTE p p → 2π + 2π - π 0 1235 ± 15 ALDE 92C GAM2 38,100 π - p → ω π 0 n 1236 ± 16 FUKUI 91 SPEC 8.95 π - p → ω π 0 n 1222 ± 6 ATKINSON 84E OMEG ± 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1237 ± 7 ATKINSON 84E OMEG 0 25-55 γ p → ω π X 1239 ± 5 EVANGELIS... 81 OMEG - 12 π - p → ω π p 1251 ± 8 450 GESSAROLI 77 HBC - 11 π - p → π - ω p 1245 ± 11 890 FLATTE 76C HBC - 4.2 K - p → π - ω Σ + 1222 ± 4 1400 CHALOUPKA 74 HBC - 3.9 π - p 1220 ± 7 600 KARSHON 74B HBC + 4.9 π + p * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 1190 ± 10 AUGUSTIN 89 DM2 ± e + e - → 5π 1213 ± 5 ATKINSON 84C OMEG 0 20-70 γ p 1271 ± 11

231

m082.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 f J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Needs confirmation. See our mini-review in the 2004 edition of this NODE=M082 Review, PDG 04. f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS NODE=M082M NODE=M082M VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1 ± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2235 ± 4 ± 6 74 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - OCCUR=2 2230 + 6 - 7 ± 16 46 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K + K - OCCUR=3 2232 + 8 - 7 ± 15 23 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K 0 S K 0 S OCCUR=4 2235 ± 4 ± 5 32 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ p p 2209 + 17 - 15 ± 10 ASTON 88F LASS 11 K - p → K + K - Λ 2230 ± 20 BOLONKIN 88 SPEC 40 π - p → K 0 S K 0 S n 2220 ± 10 41 1 ALDE 86B GA24 38-100 π p → n η η ' 2230 ± 6 ± 14 93 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K + K - OCCUR=2 2232 ± 7 ± 7 23 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K 0 S K 0 S * * * We do not use the following

232

m082.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J J (2220) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (2 + + or 4 + + ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE Needs confirmation. See our mini-review in the 2004 edition of this Review, PDG 04. f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS f J (2220) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2231.1± 3.5 OUR AVERAGE 2235 ± 4 ± 6 74 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ π + π - 2230 + 6 - 7 ± 16 46 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K + K - 2232 + 8 - 7 ± 15 23 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ K 0 S K 0 S 2235 ± 4 ± 5 32 BAI 96B BES e + e - → J/ψ → γ p p 2209 + 17 - 15 ± 10 ASTON 88F LASS 11 K - p → K + K - Λ 2230 ± 20 BOLONKIN 88 SPEC 40 π - p → K 0 S K 0 S n 2220 ± 10 41 1 ALDE 86B GA24 38-100 π p → n η η ' 2230 ± 6 ± 14 93 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K + K - 2232 ± 7 ± 7 23 BALTRUSAIT...86D MRK3 e + e - → γ K 0 S K 0 S * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2223.9± 2.5 2 VLADIMIRSK...08

233

m033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ρ 5 (2350) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (5 - - ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE This entry was previously called U 1 (2400). See also ρ(2150), NODE=M033 f 2 (2150), ρ 3 (2250), f 4 (2300). ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS NODE=M033205 NODE=M033M π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n NODE=M033M3 NODE=M033M3 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 2330 ± 35 ALDE 95 GAM2 38 π - p → ω π 0 n NODE=M033M1 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * ∼ 2303 HASAN 94 RVUE p p → π π ∼ 2300 1 MARTIN 80B RVUE ∼ 2250 1 MARTIN 80C RVUE ∼ 2500 2 CARTER 78B CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → K - K + ∼ 2480 3 CARTER 77 CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → π π S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N NODE=M033M2 NODE=M033M2 VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data

234

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

235

m033.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 (2350) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (5 - - ) OMITTED FROM SUMMARY TABLE This entry was previously called U 1 (2400). See also ρ(2150), f 2 (2150), ρ 3 (2250), f 4 (2300). ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS ρ 5 (2350) MASS π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 2330± 35 ALDE 95 GAM2 38 π - p → ω π 0 n VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * ∼ 2303 HASAN 94 RVUE p p → π π ∼ 2300 1 MARTIN 80B RVUE ∼ 2250 1 MARTIN 80C RVUE ∼ 2500 2 CARTER 78B CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → K - K + ∼ 2480 3 CARTER 77 CNTR 0 0.7-2.4 p p → π π S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N S-CHANNEL N N VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN CHG COMMENT * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 2300± 45 4 ANISOVICH 02 SPEC 0.6-1.9 p p → ω π 0 , ω η π 0 , π + π - 2295±

236

Novel Dual-Functional Membrane for Controlling Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

CO{sub 2} captured from coal-fired power plants represents three-quarters of the total cost of an entire carbon sequestration process. Conventional amine absorption or cryogenic separation requires high capital investment and is very energy intensive. Our novel membrane process is energy efficient with great potential for economical CO{sub 2} capture. Three classes of microporous sol-gel derived silica-based membranes were developed for selective CO{sub 2} removal under simulated flue gas conditions (SFG), e.g. feed of 10% vol. CO{sub 22} in N{sub 2}, 1 atm total pressure, T = 50-60 C, RH>50%, SO2>10 ppm. A novel class of amine-functional microporous silica membranes was prepared using an amine-derivatized alkoxysilane precursor, exhibiting enhanced (>70) CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity in the presence of H{sub 2}O vapor, but its CO{sub 2} permeance was lagging (<1 MPU). Pure siliceous membranes showed higher CO{sub 2} permeance (1.5-2 MPU) but subsequent densification occurred under prolonged SFG conditions. We incorporated NiO in the microporous network up to a loading of Ni:Si = 0.2 to retard densification and achieved CO2 permeance of 0.5 MPU and CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} selectivity of 50 after 163 h exposure to SFG conditions. However, CO{sub 2} permeance should reach greater than 2.0 MPU in order to achieve the cost of electricity (COE) goal set by DOE. We introduced the atomic layer deposition (ALD), a molecular deposition technique that substantially reduces membrane thickness with intent to improve permeance and selectivity. The deposition technique also allows the incorporation of Ni or Ag cations by proper selection of metallorganic precursors. In addition, preliminary economic analysis provides a sensitivity study on the performance and cost of the proposed membranes for CO{sub 2} capture. Significant progress has been made toward the practical applications for CO{sub 2} capture. (1 MPU = 1.0 cm{sup 3}(STP){center_dot}cm-2{center_dot}min-1{center_dot}atm-1)

C. Brinker; George Xomeritakis; C.-Y. Tsai; Ying-Bing Jiang

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Liver proteomics in progressive alcoholic steatosis  

SciTech Connect

Fatty liver is an early stage of alcoholic and nonalcoholic liver disease (ALD and NALD) that progresses to steatohepatitis and other irreversible conditions. In this study, we identified proteins that were differentially expressed in the livers of rats fed 5% ethanol in a LieberDeCarli diet daily for 1 and 3 months by discovery proteomics (two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry) and non-parametric modeling (Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines). Hepatic fatty infiltration was significantly higher in ethanol-fed animals as compared to controls, and more pronounced at 3 months of ethanol feeding. Discovery proteomics identified changes in the expression of proteins involved in alcohol, lipid, and amino acid metabolism after ethanol feeding. At 1 and 3 months, 12 and 15 different proteins were differentially expressed. Of the identified proteins, down regulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (? 1.6) at 1 month and up regulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (2.1) at 3 months could be a protective/adaptive mechanism against ethanol toxicity. In addition, betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase 2 a protein responsible for methionine metabolism and previously implicated in fatty liver development was significantly up regulated (1.4) at ethanol-induced fatty liver stage (1 month) while peroxiredoxin-1 was down regulated (? 1.5) at late fatty liver stage (3 months). Nonparametric analysis of the protein spots yielded fewer proteins and narrowed the list of possible markers and identified D-dopachrome tautomerase (? 1.7, at 3 months) as a possible marker for ethanol-induced early steatohepatitis. The observed differential regulation of proteins have potential to serve as biomarker signature for the detection of steatosis and its progression to steatohepatitis once validated in plasma/serum. -- Graphical abstract: The figure shows the Hierarchial cluster analysis of differentially expressed protein spots obtained after ethanol feeding for 1 (13) and 3 (46) months. C and E represent pair-fed control and ethanol-fed rats, respectively. Highlights: ? Proteins related to ethanol-induced steatosis and mild steatohepatitis are identified. ? ADH1C and ALDH2 involved in alcohol metabolism are differentially expressed at 1 and 3 months. ? Discovery proteomics identified a group of proteins to serve as potential biomarkers. ? Using nonparametric analysis DDT is identified as a possible marker for liver damage.

Fernando, Harshica [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Wiktorowicz, John E.; Soman, Kizhake V. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Khan, M. Firoze [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States); Shakeel Ansari, G.A., E-mail: sansari@utmb.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Innovative Methodology for Detection of Fracture-Controlled Sweet Spots in the Northern Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

For two consecutive years, 2004 and 2005, the largest natural gas well (in terms of gas flow/day) drilled onshore USA targeted the Ordovician Trenton/Black River (T/BR) play in the Appalachian Basin of New York State (NYS). Yet, little data were available concerning the characteristics of the play, or how to recognize and track T/BR prospects across the region. Traditional exploration techniques for entry into a hot play were of limited use here, since existing deep well logs and public domain seismic were almost non-existent. To help mitigate this problem, this research project was conceived with two objectives: (1) to demonstrate that integrative traditional and innovative techniques could be used as a cost-effective reconnaissance exploration methodology in this, and other, areas where existing data in targeted fracture-play horizons are almost non-existent, and (2) determine critical characteristics of the T/BR fields. The research region between Seneca and Cayuga lakes (in the Finger Lakes of NYS) is on strike and east of the discovery fields, and the southern boundary of the field area is about 8 km north of more recently discovered T/BR fields. Phase I, completed in 2004, consisted of integrating detailed outcrop fracture analyses with detailed soil gas analyses, lineaments, stratigraphy, seismic reflection data, well log data, and aeromagnetics. In the Seneca Lake region, Landsat lineaments (EarthSat, 1997) were coincident with fracture intensification domains (FIDs) and minor faults observed in outcrop and inferred from stratigraphy. Soil gas anomalies corresponded to ENE-trending lineaments and FIDs. N- and ENE-trending lineaments were parallel to aeromagnetic anomalies, whereas E-trending lineaments crossed aeromagnetic trends. 2-D seismic reflection data confirmed that the E-trending lineaments and FIDs occur where shallow level Alleghanian salt-cored thrust-faulted anticlines occur. In contrast, the ENE-trending FIDs and lineaments occur where Iapetan rift faults have been episodically reactivated, and a few of these faults extend through the entire stratigraphic section. The ENE-trending faults and N-striking transfer zones controlled the development of the T/BR grabens. In both the Seneca Lake and Cayuga Lake regions, we found more FIDs than Landsat lineaments, both in terms of individual FIDs and trends of FIDs. Our fused Landsat/ASTER image provided more lineaments, but the structural framework inferred from these lineaments is incomplete even for the fused image. Individual lineaments may not predict surface FIDs (within 500m). However, an individual lineament that has been groundtruthed by outcrop FIDs can be used as a proxy for the trend of intense fracturing. Aeromagnetics and seismic reflection data across the discovery fields west of Keuka Lake demonstrate that the fields terminate on the east against northerly-striking faults that extend from Precambrian basement to, in some cases, the surface; the fields terminate in the west at N- and NW-striking faults. Seismic and well log data show that the fields must be compartmentalized, since different parts of the same field show different histories of development. T/BR fields south of the research area also terminate (on the east) against northerly-trending lineaments which we suggest mark faults. Phase II, completed in 2006, consisted of collection and analysis of an oriented, horizontal core retrieved from one of the T/BR fields in a graben south of the field area. The field is located along ENE-trending EarthSat (1997) lineaments, similar to that hypothesized for the study area. The horizontal core shows much evidence for reactivation along the ENE-trending faults, with multiple events of vein development and both horizontal and vertical stylolite growth. Horizontal veins that post- and pre-date other vein sets indicate that at least two orogenic phases (separated by unloading) affected vein development. Many of the veins and releasing bend features (rhombochasms) are consistent with strike-slip motion (oblique) along ENE-striking faults as a result

Robert Jacobi; John Fountain; Stuart Loewenstein; Edward DeRidder; Bruce Hart

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z