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1

Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Gas & Light Comm Water Gas & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Water Gas & Light Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Large Commercial Demand Commercial Residential Residential Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Wooden Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Wooden Pole Lighting

2

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

albany  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Albany, Oregon, Site (formerly the Albany, Oregon, Site (formerly the Albany Research Center Site) is located at 1450 Queen Avenue SW, approximately 23 miles south of Salem, Oregon. The site consists of three main areas: the Albany Research Center (ARC), which comprises a number of buildings in the northern and central sections of the site, a 2-acre inactive biomass research facility that occupies the center of the site, and a 14-acre open area in the back of the site. ARC was established in 1943 to investigate innovative approaches for developing strategic mineral resources and for conducting other activities relevant to metallurgical research in the United States. From 1948 to 1956, the U.S. Bureau of Mines melted, machined, welded, and alloyed thorium at the site for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later,

4

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

5

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

6

Albany Interim Landfill gas extraction and mobile power system: Using landfill gas to produce electricity. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Albany Interim Landfill Gas Extraction and Mobile Power System project served three research objectives: (1) determination of the general efficiency and radius of influence of horizontally placed landfill gas extraction conduits; (2) determination of cost and effectiveness of a hydrogen sulfide gas scrubber utilizing Enviro-Scrub{trademark} liquid reagent; and (3) construction and evaluation of a dual-fuel (landfill gas/diesel) 100 kW mobile power station. The horizontal gas extraction system was very successful; overall, gas recovery was high and the practical radius of influence of individual extractors was about 50 feet. The hydrogen sulfide scrubber was effective and its use appears feasible at typical hydrogen sulfide concentrations and gas flows. The dual-fuel mobile power station performed dependably and was able to deliver smooth power output under varying load and landfill gas fuel conditions.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models and approaches special for estimating rate decline and recovery of shale gas wells were developed. As the strategy of the horizontal well with multiple transverse fractures (MTFHW) was discovered and its significance to economic shale gas production was understood, rate decline and pressure transient analysis models for this type of well were developed to reveal the well behavior. In this thesis, we considered a Triple-porosity/Dual-permeability model and performed sensitivity studies to understand long term pressure drawdown behavior of MTFHWs. A key observation from this study is that the early linear flow regime before interfracture interference gives a relationship between summed fracture half-length and permeability, from which we can estimate either when the other is known. We studied the impact of gas desorption on the time when the pressure perturbation caused by production from adjacent transference fractures (fracture interference time) and programmed an empirical method to calculate a time shift that can be used to qualify the gas desorption impact on long term production behavior. We focused on the field case Well A in New Albany Shale. We estimated the EUR for 33 wells, including Well A, using an existing analysis approach. We applied a unified BU-RNP method to process the one-year production/pressure transient data and performed PTA to the resulting virtual constant-rate pressure drawdown. Production analysis was performed meanwhile. Diagnosis plots for PTA and RNP analysis revealed that only the early linear flow regime was visible in the data, and permeability was estimated both from a model match and from the relationship between fracture halflength and permeability. Considering gas desorption, the fracture interference will occur only after several centuries. Based on this result, we recommend a well design strategy to increase the gas recovery factor by decreasing the facture spacing. The higher EUR of Well A compared to the vertical wells encourages drilling more MTFHWs in New Albany Shale.

Song, Bo

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NETL: Albany, Oregon History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > About NETL > History > Albany Research Center History Home > About NETL > History > Albany Research Center History About NETL Albany, Oregon History Albany Research Center has a history rich in successful materials research and development. It was on March 17, 1943 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that the U. S. Bureau of Mines had selected a site in Albany, Oregon for the new Northwest Electro-development Laboratory. The original mission of the center was to find methods for using the abundant low-grade resources of the area, and to develop new metallurgical processes using the abundant electrical energy in the area. The name of the center was changed in 1945 to the Albany Metallurgy Research Center and was used through 1977 where the name was shortened to Albany Research Center. One of our first successes was the development

9

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

10

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

11

Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of New Albany Shale A. Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, S.D. Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on individual wells in a multi-well New Albany Shale gas reservoir in Western Kentucky that has a reasonable Albany Shale Gas -The New Albany Shale is predominantly an organic-rich brownish-black and grayish-black shale that is present in the subsurface throughout the Illinois Basin. The total gas content of the New

Mohaghegh, Shahab

12

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

14

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Microsoft PowerPoint - Albany Map.ppt [Compatibility Mode  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inn 1100 Price Rd. SE Albany, OR y Albany, OR 541-928-9595 3. Novak's Hungarian Restaurant 2306 Heritage Way SE Albany, OR 541 967 9488 Albany, OR 541-926-0679 9. Pizza Hut...

16

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non-precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membranes Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes development of novel hydrogen...

17

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Sampling (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples) Redirect page Jump to: navigation,...

18

Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water-Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Water-Gas Sampling edit Details Activities (21) Areas (18) Regions (1)...

19

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transport membrane (HTM) system separates H2 from coal-derived syngas after it has been produced via the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, which is a key part of this process. The...

20

EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method of making water gas  

SciTech Connect

The process of manufacturing water gas by alternate air and steam blasting is discussed. The process consists in providing two separate fuel beds of bituminous fuel in two intercommunicating water-gas generators; hot air blasting from the top part of the fuel bed in one generator to the top portion of the other fuel bed in the second generator; and blasting from the bottom part of the fuel bed in the first generator to the bottom part of the fuel bed in the second generator. By evolving volatile matter in the fuel bed in the first generator, and introducing secondary air between the fuel beds to burn the volatile matter and thereby facilitate the carbonization of raw fuel and to store heat in the fuel bed in the second generator, generation of water gas by steam blasting the heated fuel beds will result.

Evans, O.B.

1931-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas...

23

albany  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of buildings in the northern and central sections of the site, a 2-acre inactive biomass research facility that occupies the center of the site, and a 14-acre open area in...

24

Albany HTS Power Cable | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

development and demonstration of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) cable in the power grid in Albany, New York, including first-of-a-kind applications of a cable splice...

25

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, or Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, Natural Gas, or Liquid Hydrocarbon Flows Special Tests. Fluid Metrology ...

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Climatological Aspects of Radiation Fog Occurrence at Albany, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a detailed investigation of the local radiation fog climatology, carried out in support of our ongoing field program to study radiation fog mechanisms at Albany, New York. At Albany, a distinct radiation fog season is observed during ...

Michael B. Meyer; G. Garland Lala

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water Shale Gas...

29

NIST Signs Cooperative Agreement with U-Albany Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Signs Cooperative Agreement with U-Albany Nano College. From NIST Tech Beat: April 29, 2008. ...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

30

Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area aligns with the recommendations put forward in the SEAB Federal Research Report on Shale Gas, and efforts amongst Federal agencies to coordinate unconventional oil and gas...

32

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Core Laboratories CSX Gas Dart Oil & Gas Corporation Denbury Resources, Inc. Dominion Duke Energy Eastern Coal Council Edison Electric Institute Electric Power Research...

33

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

34

Microsoft Word - AlbanyEugene_ROD-MAP_060112.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Record of Decision June 2012 1 Bonneville Power Administration's Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Record of Decision June 2012 Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action Alternative from the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt (kV) No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0457, March 2012). The Proposed Action Alternative, which was identified as the agency's preferred alternative in the Final EIS, consists of rebuilding a 32-mile section of the existing Albany-Eugene 115-kV transmission line that extends from the Albany Substation in the City of Albany in Linn County, Oregon, to the Alderwood Tap

35

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a method to produce industrial chemicals by mineralization of co 2 captured from fossil fuel combustion flue gas. the beneficial use of co 2 will reduce greenhouse gas emissions...

36

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the related industries of CO 2 injection for enhanced oil recovery (CO 2 -EOR), natural gas storage, and natural gas pipelines will help to define the risks expected to be...

37

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Pittsburgh URS Corporation Virginia Tech Turbine Thermal Management The gas turbine is the workhorse of power generation, and technology advances to current...

38

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to provide comprehensive measurements of fuel flow conditions representative in modern gas turbine engines. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

39

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fields in Wyoming: Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity Background Increased attention is being placed on...

40

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as the horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing used for shale gas and shale oil production, have potential to impact the environment. Because these new drilling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

useable products and fuels while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. During photosynthesis, algae capture CO2 and sunlight to convert them into oxygen and biomass. Up to 99...

42

Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processes due to its flexibility to accommodate numerous feedstocks such as coal, biomass, and natural gas, and to produce a variety of products, including heat and...

43

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Schlumberger Carbon Services Spectra Energy Corporation Tenaska Taylorville, LLC Total Gas and Power Ventures USA, Inc. Vectren Corporation COST Total Project Value 28,948,987...

44

Albany, OR * Archorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

common to CO 2 storage and other subsurface energy needs (e.g. shale gas, tight oil, deepwater and ultra- deepwater, and unconventional fossil resources). This set of...

45

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geomechanical Impacts of Shale Gas Activities Background During hydraulic fracturing of unconventional resources,...

46

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-800-553-7681 Interdisciplinary Investigation of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Shale Gas Formations Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon...

47

Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline Companies...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Savings Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline Companies (South Carolina) Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline...

48

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies...

49

Gas Water Heater Energy Losses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analyses of storage-type water heaters. 2 TANK modelswater heater as part of the DOE rulemaking analysis. We used the most current version of this model--

Biermayer, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal-Seq III Consortium: Advancing the Science of CO 2 Sequestration in Coal Seam and Gas Shale Reservoirs Background Through its core research and development (R&D) program...

51

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide (co 2 ) emissions, and will help to maintain the nation's leadership in the export of gas turbine equipment. Project Description to date, the use of YaG materials as...

52

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are porous permeable clastic or carbonate rocks that have contained fluids such as brine, oil, or gas in the natural void spaces of the rocks. Unconventional storage types include...

53

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

types are porous permeable clastic or carbonate rocks that have fluids such as brine, oil, or gas in the natural void spaces of the rocks. Unconventional storage types include...

54

Clean Cities: Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition The Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition Contact Information Jennifer Ceponis 518-458-2161 jceponis@cdtcmpo.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Jennifer Ceponis Photo of Jennifer Ceponis Jennifer Ceponis has been the coordinator of Capital District Clean Communities Coalition since 2012. Ceponis is a Senior Transportation Planner at the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC), where she worked since 2008 on bicycle and pedestrian planning, transportation demand management programs and community planning. The Clean Communities Coalition

55

2000 TMS Annual Meeting Exhibitor: ALBANY RESEARCH CENTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albany Research Center is a U.S. government materials research and ... provide solutions to service-life problems through new materials technology, and ...

56

City of New Albany, Mississippi (Utility Company) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mississippi (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of New Albany Place Mississippi Utility Id 13412 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC...

57

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

could be reduced and additional pore space freed up to sequester CO 2 . However, the produced formation water is typically of low quality (typically due to elevated total...

58

THE NEGATIVE IMPACT OF COLD WATER...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEGATIVE IMPACT OF COLD WATER BYPASS ON SOLAR DOMESTIC HOT WATER SYSTEMS Final Report DRAFT Prepared for THE NEW YORK STATE ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY Albany, NY...

59

Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1998: Issues and Trends 181 Appendix C Economic Analysis of a Representative Deep-Water Gas Production Project

60

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Session 2A Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials  

Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials State of the art ... Novel methods for liquid permeability measurement of saturated ...

62

Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified...

63

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania Introduction states where other shale fields are already in full- fledged gas production. The abun- dance of water of precipita- tion. Water is a critical component of the process of removing natural gas from underground shale

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

64

Albany Researcher Gordon Holcomb Receives Engineer of the Year...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mines, which later became the Albany Research Center and is now NETL, in 1988. NETL is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory that produces technological solutions to...

65

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Albany_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oregon Oregon Albany, Oregon, Site FUSRAP Site albany Background-The Albany, Oregon, Site was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-The Albany Site is owned by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. Metallurgical research was conducted at this site for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration from 1948 to 1978. Activities involving radioactive thorium and uranium resulted in contamination of buildings, equipment, and soils. The U.S. Bureau of Mines remediated portions of the site from 1948 to 1978. DOE conducted additional remediation of buildings, equipment, and soils

66

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

Jackson, Robert B.

67

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R &D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

68

Albany County, New York ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albany County, New York ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Albany County, New York ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

69

A Percentage of Possible Sunshine Forecasting Experiment at Albany, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of two regression experiments to predict percentage of possible sunshine (PoPS) one day in advance at Albany, New York are described. For the one experiment, predictors are derived from Albany radiosonde observations, while the other ...

Alan M. Cope; Lance F. Bosart

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description:...

71

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

72

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings...

73

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota) < Back...

74

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities Semi-Annual Report" Report Type: Semi-Annual No:...

75

Process Optimization of Cast Alloy 718 for Water Cooled Gas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FOR WATER COOLED GAS TURBINE APPLICATION. G.K. Bouse+ and P.W. Schilke*. Gene@ Electric Company+ Materials and Processes Laboratory, and.

76

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift Configurations for IGCC Systems August 5, 2009 DOENETL-401080509 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

77

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 15, 2006 ... The Effect of Water on Natural Gas Desulfurization by Adsorption by Ambalavanan Jayaraman, Gokhan Alptekin, Margarita Dubovik, Robert...

79

EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 23.90-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 27.85-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon.

80

Albany, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albany, New York: Energy Resources Albany, New York: Energy Resources (Redirected from Albany, NY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.6525793°, -73.7562317° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6525793,"lon":-73.7562317,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Maranas, Costas

82

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR 57: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild a 32-mile section of the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line in Lane and Linn Counties, Oregon. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Record of Decision Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR

84

What is High Performance UnionCollegeAlbanyWorkshopon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is High Performance Computing? UnionCollegeAlbanyWorkshopon "High Performance Computing IN 47404 gcf@indiana.edu http://www.infomall.org #12;What is High Performance Computing? The meaning of this was clear 20 years ago when we were planning/starting the HPCC (High Performance Computing and Communication

Barr, Valerie

85

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of system cost Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $15.00/therm Provider Southwest Gas Corporation '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a rebate in the next program

86

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting considerations for electric

87

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

88

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

89

Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas Storage Water Heaters Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

90

Water-Gas Samples At International Geothermal Area, Mexico (Norman...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

91

Texas Gas Service- Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Texas Gas Service offers a flat rebate of $750 for its residential customers within the Austin and Sunset Valley city limits for the installation and purchase of a new solar water heater with...

92

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

93

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

94

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boilers is 80%. The maximum standby loss is specified usingrate. 8 There is no maximum standby loss specified for gas-of hot water use, standby losses are not a significant part

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY Albany, OR * Fairbanks,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama. The center will bolster national efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by developing cost-effective technologies to capture the carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) produced by...

96

Guidelines for Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Water Sampling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are being installed on coal-fired power plants in response to federal and state air pollution regulations limiting sulfur dioxide emissions. FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous waste stream that contains metals adsorbed from flue gas. At the same time, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is reviewing, and may tighten, water discharge limits on trace metals. Collection of accurate data on the trace metal composition of FGD water discharges is therefore esse...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

Identification of Unknown Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide (SO2) from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. In a wet FGD system, circulating water must be periodically blown down and treated to remove solids and dissolved chemicals. Along with SO2, other substances in flue gas may dissolve in water, including selenium (Se). In addition to the common selenium species selenite and selenate, past research has identified selenium-containing species that...

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

99

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WGS National Carbon Capture Center - Water-Gas Shift Tests to Reduce Steam Use Background In cooperation with Southern Company Services, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)...

100

City of Albany, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri (Utility Company) Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Albany Place Missouri Utility Id 228 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1210/kWh Commercial: $0.1190/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Albany,_Missouri_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409250

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R& R& D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

102

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: 30% of system cost or $3,000, whichever is less Small Commercial: 30% of system cost or $7,500, whichever is less Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County Facilities: 50% of system cost or $30,000, whichever is less Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential and Small Business: $14.50 per therm Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County

103

Combination gas producing and waste-water disposal well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, Raymond M. (McKeesport, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hot water system is energized by exhaust gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion of hydrocarbon fuels (natural gas or oil) results in the formation of carbon dioxide and water (water vapor). This water vapor contains approximately 1000 Btu/lb. as latent heat and amounts to 10% of all the heat input to the boiler (combustion). This means that for an 80% efficient boiler operation, 50% of the heat wasted in the flue gas is latent heat - which can only be recovered by condensing the water vapor. Since the dew point of the flue gases is approximately 130/sup 0/F, it is necessary to cool the gases to ambient temperature for complete heat recovery. By reducing these gases to within 10/sup 0/ of the incoming cold water, this Eldon Corporation heat reclaimer can achieve temperatures as low as 45/sup 0/ in winter.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Commercial Gas Water Heaters, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance and purchasing specifications for commercial gas water heaters under the FEMP-designated product program.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Title FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5514E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5514E Pagination 8 Date Published April 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5514E Abstract None Notes This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Attachment Size PDF 240.22 KB Google Scholar BibTex RIS RTF XML Alternate URL: http://eetd.lbl.gov/node/50317

108

Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Gas & Water Sys Electric Gas & Water Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys Place New York Utility Id 1343 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial (20 KW to 75 KW demand) Commercial Industrial (Over 75 KW demand) Industrial Outdoor Lighting (175W MV-150W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (250W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (400W MV/HPS) Lighting Residential Residential Small Commercial ( Under 20 KW demand) Commercial

109

Trace Metals Determination in Flue Gas Desulfurization Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers are used on coal-fired power plants to reduce sulfur dioxide emissions to air. While effective for this purpose, wet FGD scrubbers produce an aqueous blowdown stream that contains trace levels of metals adsorbed from flue gas. Power plant owners need to measure concentrations of these metals for purposes of process control, discharge monitoring, or design and operation of wastewater treatment systems. FGD water has proven to be a very difficult matrix to analyze a...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of Selenium Species in Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) is a process used in the electrical power industry to remove sulfur dioxide from flue gas produced by coal-fired power plants. The trace element selenium is found in coal and can become concentrated in the wastewater from the FGD process. Some chemical forms, or species, of selenium are more resistant to removal by water treatment processes than others; thus, understanding the speciation of selenium is important to designing effective wastewater treatment systems. In additi...

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Analysis of a duo-selecting membrane reactor for the water-gas shift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The water-gas shift reaction is an exothermic and reversible catalytic process that converts carbon monoxide and water (steam) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In regard to energy-related issues, the water-gas shift is part ...

Hardy, AliciA Jillian Jackson, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

113

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method  

SciTech Connect

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000{degrees}C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a high driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1000[degrees]C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

Bechtel, T.F.; Parsons, E.J. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blowout preventers are designed to shut in a well under pressure so that formation fluids that have moved into the wellbore can be contained and circulated out while continuous control of the well is maintained. Control Systems for the BOPs are of necessity highly efficient hydraulic systems. The objective is to operate functions, such as closing rams, on the BOP stack in as short a time as possible. Supplying enough volume of pressured hydraulic fluid to operate those emergency functions is essential. To have the necessary quantity of control fluid under pressure requires storing this fluid in accumulators. These accumulators operate by the expansion and compression of nitrogen gas that is separated from hydraulic fluid by either rubber bladders or pistons. Accumulators are used both on the surface and at the seafloor. As long as you use accumulators on the surface or in relatively shallow waters, you may not have a problem with the volume of hydraulic fluid capacity of gas charged accumulators. The problem may arise when the wellhead is at water depth of more than 3500 ft. In deep water drilling, the accumulators should be placed on the subsea blowout preventer stack to reduce hydraulic response times and provide a hydraulic power supply in case of interruption of surface communication. Accumulators are also used in subsea production control systems to provide local storage that allows smaller line sizes in control umbilicals. Hydraulic fluid capacity of an accumulator drops to 15% of its capacity on the surface and even less, depending on the water depth. A large number of accumulators are needed to perform BOP functions that could have been done by just a few of them on the surface or at relatively shallow water depth. Gas inside gas charged accumulators does not behave like an ideal gas as we go to very deep water, due to high hydrostatic pressure at that water depth. The higher the ambient pressure, the more the gas behaves like a real gas rather than an ideal gas and the lower the fluid capacity of the accumulators. Compressed gas has energy in it, and can release this energy at the time desired, that?s why it is used in accumulators. Now, we have to look for something that is able to store energy, but unlike the nitrogen, its functionality must not be affected by the increasing hydrostatic pressure of water as a function of water depth. Springs and heavy weights will be discussed as two options to replace nitrogen in accumulators. Efficient deep water accumulators would reduce the number of accumulators required in deepwater and cut the cost of the project. With the advent of such efficient accumulators, we can hope that one of the numerous problems of deepwater drilling has been solved and we can think of drilling in even deeper waters.

Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Untangling the water gas shift from Fischer-Tropsch: a Gordian knot. [185 references  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The water gas shift reaction is an integral part of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Although it may appear convenient to consider the water gas shift a separate reaction, in some cases, a detailed examination of the mechanism indicates theat the water gas shift and other synthesis gas reactions share several elementary reactions. Experimental support for the relevant elementary reactions for the water gas shift on metals, metal oxides, and in homogeneous solution is examined, from both surface and complex chemistry. Multiple paths leading to a net water gas shift reaction may be available; oxygen transfer and reaction through C-H-O intermediates may take place. 185 references, 6 tables.

Rofer-Depoorter, C.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

appliance_standards/residential/water_ pool_heaters_prelim_Star (2008). Energy star residential water heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Performance and purchasing specifications for whole-home gas water heaters under the FEMP-designated product program.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Confined boiling rates of liquefied petroleum gas on water  

SciTech Connect

Results of a program to measure the rate of boiling of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water surface and to develop an analytical model to describe the phenomena involved are reported. Primary emphasis was placed on liquid propane or LPG mixtures containing small quantities of ethane or butane or both. A few exploratory tests were, however, made with pure liquid ethane, ethylene, and n-butane. The investigation was conducted to provide quantitative data and analytical models to delineate the rate of vaporization, the spread rate and the degree of fractionation, should an LPG tanker suffer an accident leading to a major spill on water. For propane or LPG spills on water, immediately following the contact, violent boiling commenced. Ice quickly formed; in most cases, ice was even thrown onto the sidewalls of the vessel. In some instances sprays of water/ice and propane were ejected from the calorimeter. Within a few seconds, however, the interaction quieted and the surface was covered by a rough ice sheet. The LPG boiled on the surface of this ice, but large gas bubbles occasionally appeared under the ice shield and were trapped. The boiling rate decreased with time with a concomitant increase in the thickness of the ice shield. In the first second or two, very high boiling heat fluxes were experienced. The mass of LPG lost was approximately half that spilled originally. It is estimated that only 5 to 15% could have been ejected as liquid if the water loss is used as a reference. However, since the water surface is very agitated during this period, it is not possible to obtain reliable quantitative values of the boiling flux. Also, as noted, the mass lost in the very early time period was approximately proportional to the original mass of LPG used. It may be inferred that larger spills lead to more mixing and boiling before the ice shield prevents a direct contact between the LPG and the water.

Reid, R.C.; Smith, K.A.

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On Factors Controlling AirWater Gas Exchange in a Large Tidal River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Estuarine Research Federation 2011 Abstract Air­water gas exchange is an important process in aquatic Introduction In rivers and estuaries, knowledge of air­water gas exchange is important for evaluating how floating domes. The opportunistic gas method relies on gases in the water that either occurred naturally (e

Ho, David

124

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

125

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

126

Experimental study and parameterization of gas absorption by water drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass transfer between liquid drops and a continuous gas phase occurs in a large number of industrial processes and many engineering disciplines such as chemical and nuclear engineering, atmospheric sciences, environmental engineering, and so on. Liquid-phase mass-transfer coefficients are determined for the absorption of sulfur dioxide by water drops larger than 1.1 mm in dia. A local model based on the large eddy interfacial model proposed for Fortescue and Pearson (1967) is obtained by the characteristic interfacial scaling. In particular, the agitation process of the liquid phase in the interfacial region is characterized by the interfacial liquid friction velocity. Experiments of sulfur dioxide absorption and desorption from large individually free-falling water drops are also carried out in a 5-m rain shaft under various environmental conditions. These experimental results agree well with those from the local model characterizing the interfacial process in water drops greater than 1.1 mm in dia.

Amokrane, H.; Saboni, A.; Caussade, B. (CNRS, Toulouse (France). Inst. de Mecanique des Fluides)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Spin states of para-water and ortho-water molecule in gas and liquid phases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spin degrees of freedom of water molecule in gas and liquid state were investigated in order to provide a reasonable answer about the unsolved problem of a long-term behavior of water spin isomers. The approach used involves an assumption that molecules change their spin state from a pure state to a mixed one when they interact with some sorts of adsorbent surface. Some models and conceptions of the quantum information processing were used.

V. K. Konyukhov

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- matically increasing natural-gas extraction. In aquifers overlying the Marcellus and Utica shale formations of drinking water associated with shale- gas extraction. In active gas-extraction areas (one or more gas wells methane sources such as the Marcellus and Utica shales at the active sites and matched gas geochemistry

129

EIS-0438: Interconnection of the Proposed Hermosa West Wind Farm Project, Albany County, WY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed 300-megawatt Hermosa West Wind Farm Project, in Albany County, Wyoming, with DOEs Western Area Power Administrations existing Craig-Ault 345-kilovolt transmission line.

130

Recent Maximum Temperature Anomalies at Albany, New York: Fact or Fiction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis has been conducted of a suspected daily maximum temperature (DMT) bias introduced by the replacement of the National Weather Service (NWS) HO-63 bygrothermograph with a modernized HO-83 instrument at Albany, New York, on 6 February ...

Ronald W. Kessler; Lance F. Bosart; Robert S. Gaza

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas phase water in the surface layer of protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent observations of the ground state transition of HDO at 464 GHz towards the protoplanetary disk of DM Tau have detected the presence of water vapor in the regions just above the outer disk midplane (Ceccarelli et al 2005). In the absence of non-thermal desorption processes, water should be almost entirely frozen onto the grain mantles and HDO undetectable. In this Letter we present a chemical model that explores the possibility that the icy mantles are photo-desorbed by FUV (6eV water vapor above the disk midplane over the entire disk. Assuming a photo-desorption yield of 10^{-3}, the water abundance in this layer is predicted to be ~ 3 x 10^{-7} and the average H2O column density is ~ 1.6x 10^{15} cm^{-2}. The predictions are very weakly dependent on the details of the model, like the incident FUV radiation field, and the gas density in the disk. Based on this model, we predict a gaseous HDO/H2O ratio in DM Tau of ~1%. In addition, we predict the ground state transition of water at 557 GHz to be undetectable with ODIN and/or HSO-HIFI.

C. Dominik; C. Ceccarelli; D. Hollenbach; M. Kaufman

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

133

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperature to improve reaction kinetics. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. In the first year of the project, we prepared a series of nanostructured Cu- and Fe-containing ceria catalysts by a special gelation/precipitation technique followed by air calcination at 650 C. Each sample was characterized by ICP for elemental composition analysis, BET-N2 desorption for surface area measurement, and by temperature-programmed reduction in H{sub 2} to evaluate catalyst reducibility. Screening WGS tests with catalyst powders were conducted in a flow microreactor at temperatures in the range of 200-550 C. On the basis of both activity and stability of catalysts in simulated coal gas, and in CO{sub 2}-rich gases, a Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalyst formulation was selected for further study in this project. Details from the catalyst development and testing work are given in this report. Also in this report, we present H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat membranes of pure Pd and Pd-alloys over a wide temperature window.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Jerry Meldon; Xiaomei Qi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

calculated at a federal natural gas price of $.90 per thermaverage commercial price of natural gas using a discount

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space velocities. Equilibrium CO conversion at 400 C was measured at a space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1} with the 10{micro}m- thick Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} membrane operating under a pressure differential of 100 psi. No carbon deposition took place during operation. The performance of the coupled Cu-ceria catalyst/membrane system at 400 C was stable in {approx} 30 h of continuous operation. The overall conclusion from this project is that Cu-doped ceria catalysts are suitable for use in high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactors. CO{sub 2}-rich operation does not affect the catalyst activity or stability; neither does it affect hydrogen permeation through the Pd-Cu membrane. Operation in the temperature range of 400-430 C is recommended.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

138

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

139

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

140

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as methane clathrates or clathrate hydrates of natural gas, these substances are similar to ice accumulations of natural gas on Earth are in the form of gas hydrates (Collett, 1994) that occur mainly offshore water, concern over the potential hazard posed by gas hydrates has become an important issue. Chev- ron

Knapp, James Howard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

Victoria, University of

142

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Flux decay was observed for the Pd-Cu membrane above 500 C. From 350-450 C, an average hydrogen flux value of 0.2 mol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/s was measured over this Pd-alloy membrane. These results are in good agreement with literature data. In this year's report, we discuss reaction rate measurements, optimization of catalyst kinetics by proper choice of dopant oxide (lanthana) in ceria, long-term stability studies, and H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat, 10 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu membranes over a wide temperature window and in various gas mixtures. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was further improved, by proper selection of dopant type and amount. The formulation 10 at%Cu-Ce(30 at%La)Ox was the best; this was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The stability of catalyst performance was examined in 40-hr long tests. A series of hydrogen permeation tests were conducted in a small flat-membrane reactor using the 10 m{micro}-thick Pd-Cu membranes. Small inhibitory effects of CO and CO{sub 2} were found at temperatures above 350 C, while H{sub 2}O vapor had no effect on hydrogen permeation. No carbon deposition took place during many hours of membrane operation. The reaction extent on the blank (catalyst-free) membrane was also negligible. A larger flat-membrane reactor will be used next year with the catalyst wash coated on screens close coupled with the Pd-Cu membrane.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Analysis of Heating Systems and Scale of Natural Gas-Condensing Water Boilers in Northern Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, various heating systems and scale of the natural gas-condensing water boiler in northern zones are discussed, based on a technical-economic analysis of the heating systems of natural gas condensing water boilers in northern zones. The analysis shows that the low-temperature radiant floor heating system is more suitable for natural gas- condensing water boilers. It is more comfortable, more economical, and can save more energy than other heating systems.

Wu, Y.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ratio of produced gas to produced water from DOE's EDNA Delcambre No. 1 geopressured-geothermal aquifer gas well test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A paper presented by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) at the Third Geopressured-Geothermal Energy Conference hypothesized that the high ratio of produced gas to produced water from the No. 1 sand in the Edna Delcambre No. 1 well was due to free gas trapped in pores by imbibition over geological time. This hypothesis was examined in relation to preliminary test data which reported only average gas to water ratios over the roughly 2-day steps in flow rate. Subsequent public release of detailed test data revealed substantial departures from the previously reported computer simulation results. Also, data now in the public domain reveal the existence of a gas cap on the aquifier tested. This paper describes IGT's efforts to match the observed gas/water production with computer simulation. Two models for the occurrence and production of gas in excess of that dissolved in the brine have been used. One model considers the gas to be dispersed in pores by imbibition, and the other model considers the gas as a nearby free gas cap above the aquifier. The studies revealed that the dispersed gas model characteristically gave the wrong shape to plots of gas production on the gas/water ratio plots such that no reasonable match to the flow data could be achieved. The free gas cap model gave a characteristically better shape to the production plots and could provide an approximate fit to the data of the edge of the free gas cap is only about 400 feet from the well.Because the geological structure maps indicate the free gas cap to be several thousand feet away and the computer simulation results match the distance to the nearby Delcambre Nos. 4 and 4A wells, it appears that the source of the excess free gas in the test of the No. 1 sand may be from these nearby wells. The gas source is probably a separate gas zone and is brought into contact with the No. 1 sand via a conduit around the No. 4 well.

Rogers, L.A.; Randolph, P.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect

A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.

Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas...

149

Spreadsheets for Geothermal Water and Gas Geochemistry | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and plots four common ternaries, three3 "YT" gas geothermometer grids and two gas ratio geothermometer grids, mainly derived from the work of Werner Giggenbach. Typical...

150

Transmutation rates in the annulus gas of pressure tube water reactors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactor utilizes Pressure Tube (PT) fuel channel design and heavy water as a coolant. Fuel channel annulus gas acts as an (more)

Ahmad, Mohammad Mateen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

152

Water Jet Applications for Gas Turbine Manufacturing - State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Water Jet Applications for Gas Turbine Manufacturing - State of the Art ... Impact of Materials Selection on the Sustainability of Wind Energy.

153

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

154

Water-Gas Samples At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

155

Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado...

156

Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Water-Gas Samples At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

157

Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs...

158

Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass...

159

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/Fly Ash  

to fossil fuel burning power plants to control mineral precipitation in cooling water. Flue gas, which is 10% CO2, could be diverted into a plants cooling water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It was observed that many hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas wells exhibit transient linear flow behavior. A half-slope on a type curve represents this transient linear flow behavior. Shale gas wells show a significant skin effect which is uncommon in tight gas wells and masks early time linear behavior. Usually 70-85 percent of frac water is lost in the formation after the hydraulic fracturing job. In this research, a shale gas well was studied and simulated post hydraulic fracturing was modeled to relate the effect of frac water to the early significant skin effect observed in shale gas wells. The hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas well was described in this work by a linear dual porosity model. The reservoir in this study consisted of a bounded rectangular reservoir with slab matrix blocks draining into neighboring hydraulic fractures and then the hydraulic fractures feed into the horizontal well that fully penetrates the entire rectangular reservoir. Numerical and analytical solutions were acquired before building a 3D 19x19x10 simulation model to verify accuracy. Many tests were conducted on the 3D model to match field water production since initial gas production was matching the analytical solutions before building the 3D simulation model. While some of the scenarios tested were artificial, they were conducted in order to reach a better conceptual understanding of the field. Increasing the water saturation in the formation resulted in increasing water production while lowering gas production. Adding a fractured bottom water layer that leaked into the hydraulic fracture allowed the model to have a good match of water and gas production rates. Modeling trapped frac water around the fracture produced approximately the same amount of water produced by field data, but the gas production was lower. Totally surrounding the fracture with frac water blocked all gas production until some of the water was produced and gas was able to pass through. Finally, trapped frac water around the fracture as combined with bottom water showed the best results match. It was shown that frac water could invade the formation surrounding the hydraulic fracture and could cause formation damage by blocking gas flow. It was also demonstrated that frac water could partially block off gas flow from the reservoir to the wellbore and thus lower the efficiency of the hydraulic fracturing job. It was also demonstrated that frac water affects the square root of time plot. It was proven by simulation that the huge skin at early time could be caused by frac water that invades and gets trapped near the hydraulic fractures due to capillary pressure.

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Sound speed in liquidgas mixtures: Waterair and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sound speed of a two-phase fluid, such as a magma-gas, water-air, or water-steam mixture, is dramatically different from the sound speed of either pure component. In numerous geologic situations the sound speed of such two-phase systems may be of interest: in the search for magma reservoirs, in seismic exploration of geothermal areas, in prediction of P wave velocity decreases prior to earthquakes, and in inversion of crustal and upper mantle seismic records. Probably most dramatically, fluid flow characteristics during eruptions of volcanoes and geysers are strongly dependent on the sound speed of erupting two-phase (or multiphase) fluids. In this paper the sound speeds of water, air, steam, water-air mixtures, and water-steam mixtures are calculated. It is demonstrated that sound speeds calculated from classical acoustic and fluid dynamics analyses agree with results obtained from finite amplitude 'vaporization wave ' theory. To the extent that air and steam are represented as perfect gases with an adiabatic exponent , independent of temperature, their sound speeds vary in a simple manner directly with the square root of the absolute temperature. The sound speed of pure liquid water is a complex function of pressure and temperature and is given here to 8 kbar, 900C. In pure water at all pressures the sound speed attains a maximum value near 100C and decreases at higher temperatures; at high pressures the decrease is continuous, but at pressures below 1 kbar the sound speed reaches a minimum value in the

Susan Werner Kieffer

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Environmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

climatically important trace gas fluxes on regional and global scales, yet the magnitude of the transfer-generated turbulence in a shallow tidal sea, Nature, 400, 251­254. Raymond, P. A., and J. J. Cole (2001), Gas exchangeEnvironmental turbulent mixing controls on air-water gas exchange in marine and aquatic systems

Ho, David

164

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases detail within the context of shale gas drilling activities in New York, as well as their uses

Wang, Z. Jane

165

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

167

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Waterrequirement for FEMP-designated products is generally set at

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NETL: News Release - DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 20, 2007 July 20, 2007 DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key Milestones Cost-Effectively Treating Coproduced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies MORGANTOWN, WV - A research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making significant progress in developing new ways to treat and use water coproduced with oil and natural gas. The ultimate benefit is a two-for-one solution that expects to boost domestic energy supplies while enhancing the Nation's water supply. Coproduced water-some of which occurs naturally in subsurface formations, and some that is recovered following injection of water into an oil or gas reservoir to boost production-accounts for 98 percent of all waste generated by U.S. oil and natural gas operations. Produced-water volumes average nine barrels for each barrel of oil produced. Handling, treating, and safely disposing of this produced water has been a tough, costly challenge for oil and natural gas producers for decades. Much of the produced water has high concentrations of minerals or salts that make it unsuitable for beneficial use or surface discharge. An oilfield operator often must reinject such produced water into deep formations, sometimes resorting to costly trucking of the water to deep-injection well sites specially designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

169

National Grid (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Windows, Doors, & Skylights Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Multifamily: Free Energy Evaluation and hot water pipe insulation Boilers: $350-$560 Boiler Reset Controls: $70 Furnaces: $140-$420, depending on efficiency Indirect Water Heater: $210 7 Day Programmable Thermostats: $18 National Grid's High Efficiency Heating Rebates are offered to gas heating customers in the Upstate New York counties of Albany, Columbia, Fulton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Warren and Washington. All equipment must meet certain energy standards provided on the website. Applications are to be completed and sent in after equipment installation. Eligible

170

SOLAR TODAY WINTER 2012/13 ISSUE MANUSCRIPT Richard Perez, ASRC, University at Albany,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOLAR TODAY WINTER 2012/13 ISSUE MANUSCRIPT SmartFiT © Richard Perez, ASRC, University at Albany, Tom Thompson, Advanced Solar Products, Thomas E. Hoff, Clean Power Research, Lyle Rawlings, Advanced Solar Products, Ken Zweibel, GW Solar Institute, George Washington University Pradeep Haldar

Perez, Richard R.

171

Technical evaluation of the waste-to-oil process development facility at Albany, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The broad objective of ERDA's solar energy program at Albany, Oregon, is to develop biomass-to-synfuel technology in the Albany process development facility, which is now nearing completion. In the study reported here, the process development plant design was reevaluated, and a number of modifications and additions are recommended to facilitate and accelerate development of biomass conversion processes. Sketches of the recommended modifications and estimates of costs and installation time schedules have been provided. It has been found expedient to implement some of these modifications before construction is completed. Biomass-to-synfuel processes under development or under consideration elsewhere have been reviewed, and some have been identified that are appropriate for further development at Albany. Potential environmental impacts associated with the operation of the Albany, Oregon, facility were reviewed to identify the magnitude of the impacts and the effects of any resultant operational constraints. Two discrete environmental impact categories have been identified with respect to process development operation. These are (1) production, storage, and disposal of product oil and residual solid, liquid, and gaseous waste; and (2) disturbances to the local community. An assessment has been made of unit process waste discharges and mitigation procedures, environmental setting and community considerations, possible operational constraints, and monitoring programs.

Houle, E.H.; Ciriello, S.F.; Ergun, S.; Basuino, D.J.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

173

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Albany-Burnt Woods and Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 March 2009 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 Bonneville Power Administration March 2009 Bonneville Power Administration i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Need for and Purpose of Action ............................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction .....................................................................................................

174

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

175

Developing a water treatment system for Subsea Gas processing plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The petroleum industry is currently moving to meet the ever-rising demand for oil and gas production. As onshore fields become depleted and decline in production, (more)

Honer Badi M Nazhat, Dana

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Can Propagation of Gas Bubbles Lead to Detached Solidification? Experiments on Freezing of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The ampoules were ap- proximately 30-cm long and were filled to about 12 cm with water. The heater velocity versus heater temperature. The water was saturated with air and the ampoule was coated with TeflonCan Propagation of Gas Bubbles Lead to Detached Solidification? Experiments on Freezing of Water

Regel, Liya L.

177

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R compositions of the effluents reflect the composition of Marcellus Shale produced waters. The discharge to concentrations in Marcellus Shale produced waters. Nonetheless, 226 Ra levels in stream sediments (544-8759 Bq

Jackson, Robert B.

178

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

179

Development of Novel Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the objectives, technical barrier, approach, and accomplishments for the development of a novel water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor for hydrogen enhancement and CO reduction. We have synthesized novel CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with high CO{sub 2} permeabilities and high CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO selectivities by incorporating amino groups in polymer networks. We have also developed a one-dimensional non-isothermal model for the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor. The modeling results have shown that H{sub 2} enhancement (>99.6% H{sub 2} for the steam reforming of methane and >54% H{sub 2} for the autothermal reforming of gasoline with air on a dry basis) via CO{sub 2} removal and CO reduction to 10 ppm or lower are achievable for synthesis gases. With this model, we have elucidated the effects of system parameters, including CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2} permeability, sweep/feed flow rate ratio, feed temperature, sweep temperature, feed pressure, catalyst activity, and feed CO concentration, on the membrane reactor performance. Based on the modeling study using the membrane data obtained, we showed the feasibility of achieving H{sub 2} enhancement via CO{sub 2} removal, CO reduction to {le} 10 ppm, and high H{sub 2} recovery. Using the membrane synthesized, we have obtained <10 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product in WGS membrane reactor experiments. From the experiments, we verified the model developed. In addition, we removed CO{sub 2} from a syngas containing 17% CO{sub 2} to about 30 ppm. The CO{sub 2} removal data agreed well with the model developed. The syngas with about 0.1% CO{sub 2} and 1% CO was processed to convert the carbon oxides to methane via methanation to obtain <5 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product.

Ho, W. S. Winston

2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- SalemAlbany #2)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1- SalemAlbany #2) 1- SalemAlbany #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, within Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-140- SalemAlbany1)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0- SalemAlbany1) 0- SalemAlbany1) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #1 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion, Linn, and Benton County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

182

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unique Low Thermal Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Architectures-UES Background Gas turbine engines used in integrated gasification combined cycle power plants require...

183

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and are also stringent in order to avoid poisoning catalysts utilized in making liquids from fuel gas, electrodes in fuel cells, and selective catalytic reduction...

184

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can contribute to the reduction of overall greenhouse gas emissions from fossil power plants. One area of research is the development and characterization of multiple...

185

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. After only eight years from the time of...

186

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

gasifier; hot gas filtration; continuous ash depressurization systems; and various instrumentation, sampling, and controls systems. Only eight years after construction and...

187

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

capture technologies developed by the DOE program may also be applied to natural gas power plants after addressing the R&D challenges associated with the relatively low...

188

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and unknown samples. Analyses are used to characterize the fundamental properties of unconventional natural gas and oil reservoirs, ultra-deepwater and frontier-region...

189

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Country United States Headquarters Location Memphis, Tennessee Recovery Act Funding $5,063,469.00 Total Project Value $13112363 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Coordinates 35.1495343°, -90.0489801° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

190

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

191

Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff &...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

192

Water-Gas Samples At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

193

Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

194

Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

195

Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large (more)

Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Process for hydrogen isotope concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for hydrogen isotope exchange and concentration between liquid water and hydrogen gas, wherein liquid water and hydrogen gas are contacted, in an exchange section, with one another and with at least one catalyst body comprising at least one metal selected from Group VIII of the Periodic Table and preferably a support therefor, the catalyst body has a liquid-water-repellent, gas permeable polymer or organic resin coating, preferably a fluorinated olefin polymer or silicone coating, so that the isotope concentration takes place by two simultaneously occurring steps, namely, ##EQU1## WHILE THE HYDROGEN GAS FED TO THE EXCHANGE SECTION IS DERIVED IN A REACTOR VESSEL FROM LIQUID WATER THAT HAS PASSED THROUGH THE EXCHANGE SECTION.

Stevens, William H. (Deep River, CA)

1976-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

197

CERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

readings to be taken on humidified (non-reacted) gas, for subsequent conversion calculations. The reactorCERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh NexTech Materials, Ltd (motive and/or auxiliary) and stationary (residential) power applications. PEM fuel cells operate either

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

198

NUMERICAL STUDY OF CO-CURRENT WATER-DRY GAS FLOW IN GAS GATHERING SYSTEMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The optimum operation of the surface production system is one of the key elements needed for the successful operation of natural gas well facilities, particularly (more)

Fernandez Luengo, Juan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.) How will future transportation energy production impact water resource availability in the US? b.)...

200

Energy Efficient Condensing Side-arm Gas Water Heater - Energy ...  

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and ... thereby eliminating standby energy losses that occur when heat is transferred from the hot water to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Little analysis has been performed to assess the economic impacts of the...

202

June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect

Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

None

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

204

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO 2 -Binding Organic Liquids Gas Capture with Polarity-Swing-Assisted Regeneration Background The mission of the U.S. Department of EnergyNational Energy Technology Laboratory...

205

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of filter elements to remove ash from the syngas prior to it being utilized in a gas turbine or fuel cell. The elements are arranged in columns called "candles" and contained...

206

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C the South Caspian Sea, offshore Azerbaijan, document for the ®rst time in the deep water (up to 650 m Caspian Sea. The Absheron block, named after the nearby Absheron Peninsula in Azerbaijan, is situated

Knapp, Camelia Cristina

207

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTACT CONTACT Cathy Summers Director, Process Development Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Ave., SW Albany, OR 97321-2198 541-967-5844 cathy.summers@netl.doe.gov An Integrated Approach To Materials Development Traditional trial-and-error method in materials development is time consuming and costly. In order to speed up materials discovery for a variety of energy applications, an integrated approach for multi-scale materials simulations and materials design has

208

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

SciTech Connect

Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

209

Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline Companies (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation confers the rights and privileges of telegraph and telephone companies (S.C. Code 58-9) on pipeline and water companies, and contains several additional provisions pertaining to...

210

Gas Absorption into a Moving Spheroidal Water Drop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical and experimental studies have been carried out to describe the absorption of sulfur dioxide by moving spheroidal water drops under transient flow conditions. These investigations allow the determination of the rate at which SO2 is ...

H. Amokrane; B. Caussade

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incorporating tankless water heaters was one Incorporating tankless water heaters was one of many energy-efficiency recommendations Building America's research team IBACOS had for San Antonio builder Imagine Homes. Although tankless gas water heaters should save approximately 33% on hot water heating compared to a conventional storage water heater, actual energy savings vary significantly based on individual draw volume. Above 10 gallons per draw, the efficiency approaches the rated energy factor. The greatest savings occur at a daily use quantity of about 50 gallons. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.2 Energy Efficient Components Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance As improved thermal enclosures dramatically reduce heating and cooling loads,

212

A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters were installed. however a gas flow meters is hardly installed for individual heater. in this study, a simple method to estimate gas consumption of such appliances form temperature of exhaust gas and electric current was presented. experiments of japanese major hot water gas heaters were conducted change under conditions of various water flow rate at constant output temperature. the empirical equations, which related gas consumption to exhaust gas temperature and operative current, were obtained for each type of water heaters, each manufacturer and overall heaters. verification of the method was conducted at a commercial building. some thresholds to decide status of operation, such as anti-freeze operation, were set, and sufficient accuracy of around 10 % error was achieved.

Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

Rachel Henderson

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

215

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, R.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

219

Development Water, Gas, and Electric Energy Use Projection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. In addition to the sewage flow demand created by the building development, parking drainage and pool backwash may also create additional sanitary sewer flow. These additional flows are assumed to be negligible compared to the rest of the project. B. Sanitary Sewage Discharge 1. The daily sanitary sewer flow will be near the daily building cold water usage as detailed above.

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aalborg Universitet Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil &, B. (2013). Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas, 2013 #12;Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production

Yang, Zhenyu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

224

Distribution System Reliability Practices: Noteworthy Practices at Memphis Light, Gas and Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2010, EPRI initiated a multiyear effort to identify and illustrate noteworthy practices that utilities are using to meet the service reliability expectations of their customers. EPRI research focused on four host utilities: Ameren Corporation, Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Alabama Power Company, and We Energies. In 2011, EPRI completed research at American Electric Power Company (AEP) and initiated research with Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW) and Duke Energy. In 2012, EPRI ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field, Colombia. Experimental and simulation studies were conducted to achieve these objectives. The experimental study consisted of injecting reconstituted gas into a cell containing sand and "live" San Francisco oil. Experimental runs were made with injection of (i) the two field gases and their 50-50 mixture, (ii) the two field gases enriched with propane, and (iii) WAG with the two field gases enriched with propane. Produced oil volume, density, and viscosity; and produced gas volume and composition were measured and analyzed. A 1D 7-component compositional simulation model of the laboratory injection cell and its contents was developed. After a satisfactory history-match of the results of a WAG run, the prediction runs were made using the gas that gave the highest oil recovery in the experiments, (5:100 mass ratio of propane:Balcon gas). Oil production results from simulation were obtained for a range of WAG cycles and gas injection rate. The main results of the study may be summarized as follows. For all cases studied, the lowest oil recovery is obtained with injection of San Francisco gas, (60% of original oil-in-place OOIP), and the highest oil recovery (84% OOIP) is obtained with a WAG 7.5-7.5 (cycle of 7.5 minutes water injection followed by 7.5 minutes of gas injection at 872 ml/min). This approximately corresponds to WAG 20-20 in the field (20 days water injection followed by 20 days gas injection at 6.8 MMSCF/D). Results clearly indicate increase in oil recovery with volume of the gas injected. Lastly, of the three injection schemes studied, WAG injection with propane-enriched gas gives the highest oil recovery. This study is based on the one-dimensional displacement of oil. The three-dimensional aspects and other reservoir complexities that adversely affect oil recovery in reality have not been considered. A 3D reservoir simulation study is therefore recommended together with an economic evaluation of the cases before any decision can be made to implement any of the gas or WAG injection schemes.

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Catalytic membranes for facilitating the water-gas shift reaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed at furthering the development of a metal- membrane-based process for economically producing pure hydrogen from the raw gasifier stream. A related program is directed at developing a metal-membrane-based process for cleanly and efficiently removing hydrogen sulfide from the hot gas stream. Both of these processes would be accomplished at 500{degree}C to 800{degree}C and are based on a novel hydrogen-permeable composite-metal membrane. Specific program objectives include (1) design, fabrication, and demonstration of pre-prototype membrane modules; (2) improving the membrane composition to increase the hydrogen flux; (3) evaluating membrane lifetime; and (4) conducting engineering and economic analyses of the processes.

Edlund, D.J. [Bend Research, Inc., OR (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

104 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2011 Copyright 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach in modelling and simulation of shale gas reservoirs: application to New Albany Shale', Int. J. Oil104 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd. A new practical approach in modelling and simulation of shale gas reservoirs: application

Mohaghegh, Shahab

231

Water formation on bare grains: When the chemistry on dust impacts interstellar gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Water together with O2 are important gas phase ingredients to cool dense gas in order to form stars. On dust grains, H2 O is an important constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place, as revealed by hot core observations. The formation of water can occur on dust grain surfaces, and can impact gas phase composition. Aims. The formation of molecules such as OH, H2 O, HO2, H2 O2, as well as their deuterated forms and O2 and O3 is studied in order to assess how the chemistry varies in different astrophysical environments, and how the gas phase is affected by grain surface chemistry. Methods. We use Monte Carlo simulations to follow the formation of molecules on bare grains as well as the fraction of molecules released into the gas phase. We consider a surface reaction network, based on gas phase reactions, as well as UV photo-dissociation of the chemical species. Results. We show that grain surface chemistry has a strong impact on gas phase chemistry, and that this chemistry...

Cazaux, S; Marseille, M; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimentation and application of directional solvent extraction for desalination of seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently demonstrated directional solvent technique for desalination of water has been tested for desalting seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water. The premise behind directional solvent extraction is that when ...

Kleinguetl, Kevin (Kevin G.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

Elizabeth C. Chapman, Rosemary C. Capo, Brian W. Stewart,*, Carl S. Kirby, Richard W. Hammack, Karl T. Schroeder, and Harry M. Edenborn

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

Decarb/Desal: Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Flue Gas with Simultaneous Fresh Water Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If fossil fuels continue to be a major part of the world's energy supply, effective means must be developed to deal with the carbon emissions. Geologic sequestration of supercritical CO{sub 2} is expected to play a major role in mitigating this problem. Separating carbon dioxide from other gases is the most costly aspect of schemes for geologic sequestration. That cost is driven by the complexity and energy intensity of current chemical-stripping methods for separating carbon dioxide. Our experience in water treatment technology indicated that an entirely new approach could be developed, taking advantage of water's propensity to separate gases that ionize in water (like CO{sub 2}) from those that do not (like N{sub 2}). Even though water-based systems might not have the extreme selectivity of chemicals like substituted amines used in industrial systems today, they have the potential to tolerate NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulates while also producing clean drinking water as a valuable byproduct. Lower capital cost, broader range of applicability, environmental friendliness, and revenue from a second product stream give this approach the potential to significantly expand the worldwide application of carbon separation for geologic sequestration. Here we report results for separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas by two methods that simultaneously separate carbon dioxide and fresh water: ionic pumping of carbonate ions dissolved in water, and thermal distillation. The ion pumping method dramatically increases dissolved carbonate ion in solution and hence the overlying vapor pressure of CO{sub 2} gas, allowing its removal as a pure gas. We have used two common water treatment methods to drive the ion pumping approach, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis to produce pure CO{sub 2}. This novel approach to increasing the concentration of the extracted gas permits new approaches to treating flue gas, because the slightly basic water used as the extraction medium is impervious to trace acid gases that destroy existing solvents, and no pre-separation is necessary. Thermal distillation uses boiling water to steam strip solid sorbents - the steam is recovered as fresh water. We anticipate that our method will compete favorably with current chemical stripping systems used for CO{sub 2} separation at power plants, which incur a 35% energy penalty. Thus we expect to offer a dramatically improved solution for removing carbon from hydrocarbon combustion. Our method can be demonstrated on small sources, which will enable us to conduct the demonstrations required to build confidence in the method. If successful, we will be in a position to advance a follow-on proposal for a demonstration at the 10-MW scale.

Aines, R; Bourcier, W

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Chemical composition of water and gas from five nearshore subaqueous springs in Clear Lake, northern California  

SciTech Connect

In 1971 The Geysers-Clear Lake area was selected by the US Geological Survey geothermal research program as a region for extensive investigation. Under this program thermal water samples were first collected in December, 1974 during a winter of normal rainfall; the last samples were collected in February, 1977 during a period of drought. The drought exposed many springs which normally are submerged by Clear Lake. It was demonstrated that gas and water samples can be collected from shallow submerged springs relatively simply using a peristaltic, battery powered pump. Qualitatively sulfate, ammonia, chloride and lithium concentrations may be used to estimate the amount of lake water contamination. The gas sampling technique, using an inverted funnel and long tube to the surface only where visibility was greater than 2 to 3 m. Analyses of near surface compared to deeper submerged gas indicates air contamination in the near surface sample. Thus gas samples should be collected deep underwater or as near the spring vent or gas orifice as possible.

Thompson, J.M.; Sims, J.D.; Yadav, S.; Rymer, M.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

RELAP5/MOD3 modeling of water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas  

SciTech Connect

The capability of the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code to analyze water hammer transients due to water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas is investigated. The code-calculated results have been compared with those obtained from simple ideal analytical models. Good agreement is obtained between the calculation and analytical results in the initial period of the transient during which the water column or slug retains its sharp interface and suffers from little breakup or dissipation. As the transient proceeds, the code-calculated hydrodynamic loads are generally less than those implied by the analytical models. This is most likely due to the breakup of the water phase, which is not taken into account in the analytical models. Effects of time step and mesh sizes have also been studied. The results show that the usual Courant time limit applies. Finally, a sample calculation, corresponding to a water hammer transient in a typical Westinghouse four-loop reactor head vent system piping, is presented. The transient is induced by the opening of a relief valve and accelerating a trapped water slug through the pipeline. Hydrodynamic loads (i.e., force-time curves) on various pipe segments have been evaluated by appropriate postprocessing of the transient results. The calculated peak forces at selected pipe segments compare favorably with those estimated from the analytical models.

Yeung, W.S.; Shirkov, J.; Seifaee, F. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas Samples Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1). References David Norman, Nigel Blarney, Lynne Kurilovitch (2002) New

239

Preliminary Modeling, Testing, and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's gas tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional gas storage tank water heaters, but savings depends on the draw pattern. A one-node model incorporating heat exchanger mass is used to address this and other issues. Key model parameters are determined from least-squares regression on short-term data, including burner efficiency, thermal capacitance, and thermal loss coefficient. The calibrated model agrees with data to ~5% on Qgas, with temperature RMS deviation of ~4..deg..C. Efficiency with a standard realistic draw is 71%, compared to 81% predicted from standard energy-factors. Adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater solves issues of oscillations with solar pre-heat, low-flow and hot-water-delay issues. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal data protocols for model parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine  

SciTech Connect

This study is developing a comprehensive study of what is involved in the desalination of oil field produced brine and the technical developments and regulatory changes needed to make the concept a commercial reality. It was originally based on ''conventional'' produced water treatment and reviewed (1) the basics of produced water management, (2) the potential for desalination of produced brine in order to make the resource more useful and available in areas of limited fresh water availability, and (3) the potential beneficial uses of produced water for other than oil production operations. Since we have begun however, a new area of interest has appeared that of brine water treatment at the well site. Details are discussed in this technical progress report. One way to reduce the impact of O&G operations is to treat produced brine by desalination. The main body of the report contains information showing where oil field brine is produced, its composition, and the volume available for treatment and desalination. This collection of information all relates to what the oil and gas industry refers to as ''produced water management''. It is a critical issue for the industry as produced water accounts for more than 80% of all the byproducts produced in oil and gas exploration and production. The expense of handling unwanted waste fluids draws scarce capital away for the development of new petroleum resources, decreases the economic lifetimes of existing oil and gas reservoirs, and makes environmental compliance more expensive to achieve. More than 200 million barrels of produced water are generated worldwide each day; this adds up to more than 75 billion barrels per year. For the United States, the American Petroleum Institute estimated about 18 billion barrels per year were generated from onshore wells in 1995, and similar volumes are generated today. Offshore wells in the United States generate several hundred million barrels of produced water per year. Internationally, three barrels of water are produced for each barrel of oil. Production in the United States is more mature; the US average is about 7 barrels of water per barrel of oil. Closer to home, in Texas the Permian Basin produces more than 9 barrels of water per barrel of oil and represents more than 400 million gallons of water per day processed and re-injected.

David B. Burnett

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coating Issues in Coal-Derived Synthesis Coating Issues in Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas/Hydrogen-Fired Turbines-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background The Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading research on the reliable operation of gas turbines when fired with synthesis gas (syngas) and hydrogen-enriched fuel gases with respect to firing temperature and fuel impurity levels (water vapor, sulfur, and condensable species). Because syngas is derived from coal, it contains more carbon and more impurities than natural gas. In order to achieve the desired efficiency, syngas-fired systems need to operate at very high temperatures but under combustion conditions necessary to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO X ) emissions. ORNL's current project is focused on understanding the performance of high-

243

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

244

A simulation study to verify Stone's simultaneous water and gas injection performance in a 5-spot pattern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water alternating gas (WAG) injection is a proven technique to enhance oil recovery. It has been successfully implemented in the field since 1957 with recovery increase in the range of 5-10% of oil-initially-in-place (OIIP). In 2004, Herbert L. Stone presented a simultaneous water and gas injection technique. Gas is injected near the bottom of the reservoir and water is injected directly on top at high rates to prevent upward channeling of the gas. Stone's mathematical model indicated the new technique can increase vertical sweep efficiency by 3-4 folds over WAG. In this study, a commercial reservoir simulator was used to predict the performance of Stone's technique and compare it to WAG and other EOR injection strategies. Two sets of relative permeability data were considered. Multiple combinations of total injection rates (water plus gas) and water/gas ratios as well as injection schedules were investigated to find the optimum design parameters for an 80 acre 5-spot pattern unit. Results show that injecting water above gas may result in better oil recovery than WAG injection though not as indicated by Stone. Increase in oil recovery with SSWAG injection is a function of the gas critical saturation. The more gas is trapped in the formation, the higher oil recovery is obtained. This is probably due to the fact that areal sweep efficiency is a more dominant factor in a 5-spot pattern. Periodic shut-off of the water injector has little effect on oil recovery. Water/gas injection ratio optimization may result in a slight increase in oil recovery. SSWAG injection results in a steady injection pressure and less fluctuation in gas production rate compared to WAG injection.

Barnawi, Mazen Taher

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

BC Technologies

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fragrant Gardens and Converging Waters: Ottoman Governance in Seventeenth-Century Damascus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Eighteenth Centuries (Albany, New York: State UniversityCenturies. Albany: State University of New York Press,and Gender. Albany: State University of New York Press,

Taylor, Malissa Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NETL: Gasification- Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center is testing commercial water-gas shift (WGS) catalysts from multiple vendors in support of developing WGS reactor systems which will reduce the cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from the production of syngas using coal. These tests have revealed that steam-to-carbon monoxide (CO) ratios can be reduced, resulting in a substantial increase in the net power output and significantly reducing the cost of electricity from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture. Several commercially available WGS catalysts have been tested, and the results are being provided to the manufacturers to aid them in specifying future WGS systems for IGCC plants incorporating CO2 capture.

249

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

250

Breach and safety analysis of spills over water from large liquefied natural gas carriers.  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, at the request of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) prepared a report, ''Guidance on the Risk and Safety Analysis of Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spills Over Water''. That report provided framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. The report also presented the general scale of possible hazards from a spill from 125,000 m3 o 150,000 m3 class LNG carriers, at the time the most common LNG carrier capacity.

Hightower, Marion Michael; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Attaway, Stephen W.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

Carl R.F. Lund

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Development of an advanced water-gas shift conversion system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed initial exploratory research to investigate the chemistry and use of a pressurized aqueous catalyst system for conducting the water-gas shift reaction. The research was done under sponsorship of the USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center. A 1.0 liter continuous bench scale reactor system was built and operated to investigate water-gas shift chemistry at high pressure. Details regarding the chemistry of the aqueous, base-catalyzed system in both batch and continuous reactors are presented for a temperature range of 200 to 350/sup 0/C and pressures from 500 to 3000 psig. The catalyst choice is sodium carbonate at a concentration of 6% in water, but any material which can generate hydroxide ions at the process conditions will effectively catalyze the reaction. This report summarizes the results of the bench-scale research on the concept and presents a discussion of optimum operating conditions, pressure effects and limitations, kinetic data, effects of gas flow rates, catalyst type, and preliminary concept evaluation. 16 refs., 29 figs., 8 tabs.

Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Elliott, D.C.; Butner, R.S.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation 50 Wolf Road, Albany, New York 12233  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

State Department of Environmental Conservation State Department of Environmental Conservation 50 Wolf Road, Albany, New York 12233 Thomas Cl Jorling Commisbioner August 13, 1993 W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. Designation 8 Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J Dear Alexander: f ., Thank you for sending me the enclosed February 19, 1991 letter from Mr. R. Sorum of Afrimet Indussa to Mr. Andrew Wall, III, a former employee of a U.S. Department of Energy contracts We are examining its contents relative to more recent statemen by representatives of this corporation and will discuss this issue in the future with you. I am particularly interested in the last sentence of the first page of this letter.

255

DOE/EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project EA (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings DOE/EA-1636 Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Albany- Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. This project involves replacing wood pole structures on the existing Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and along a portion of the existing Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1636) evaluating the proposed project and its alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the

256

Assessments of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemented in the dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP) simulation system. Comparisons of the DSNP simulations incorporating these models with experiments and with calculations using the time-dependent neutronics and temperature dynamics code were made to validate the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit showed that the maximum water concentration increase in the reactor core was deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the HTR-module power plant showed that the water inventory in the primary circuit was limited to {approx}3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress would lead to a fast power excursion, which would be inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. The integrity of the fuel elements, because the safety-relevant temperature limit of 1600 deg. C is not reached in any case, is not challenged.

Zhang Zuoyi [Tsinghua University (China); Dong Yujie [Tsinghua University (China); Scherer, Winfried [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany)

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

258

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the first two years of this project, we focused on the membrane synthesis, characterization and optimization. In the past year, we have concentrated on the product development for improving the efficiency of hydrogen recovery from coal gasifier off-gas via water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction. A mathematical simulation study has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed rector for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the hydrogen selected membrane have been experimentally demonstrated using a pilot-scale tubular membrane under a simulated WGS environment. For the remaining period of this project, we will conduct experimental study using the hydrogen selective membrane to verify the performance projected by the mathematical simulation.

Paul K.T. Liu

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-04NT15510 Final Report A Systems Approach has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due

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261

The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeO{sub x}, 8 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft{sup 2} based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special in

Thomas Barton; Tiberiu Popa

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

A catalytic membrane reactor for facilitating the water-gas shift reaction at high temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed toward the development of a metal-membrane-based process for the economical production of hydrogen at elevated temperature by the reaction of carbon monoxide with steam--i.e., the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. Key to achieving this objective is the development of an inexpensive and durable metal-membrane module. The specific program objectives include the following: design, fabrication, and demonstration of prototype membrane modules; improving the membrane composition to increase the hydrogen flux; demonstrating that membrane lifetime {ge}2 years is likely to be achieved; and conducting engineering and economic analyses of the process. Results to date are given and discussed.

Edlund, D.J.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Assessment of a water-cooled gas-turbine concept. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A program for development of Ultra-High Temperature (UHT) 2800/sup 0/F firing temperature, water-cooled turbine technology began in 1967. In 1973 it was decided to design and build a full-scale gas turbine to demonstrate the feasibility and evaluate the performance and economics of a complete utility-size machine. The preliminary design phase, performed from June 1974 to March 1975 is reported here with information on the definition of the baseline cycle for the UHT machine in a combined cycle power plant; turbine aerodynamics; design of turbine, its cooling system, and the combustor; materials selection; controls; cost estimates; heat flux experiments, and program planning. (LCL)

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels

P. K. Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Mitigation Action Plan (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project DOE/EA-1636 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all of the integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. The purpose of this MAP is to explain how the mitigation measures will be

268

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift for Carbon Capture Final Final Report .doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Alternate Water Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift Configurations for IGCC Systems August 5, 2009 DOE/NETL-401/080509 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

269

Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in aNuclear Waste Repository  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository forspent fuel and high-level waste, leads to hydrogen gas generation in thebackfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-termrepository safety. Previous modeling studies used a constant H2generation rate. However, iron corrosion and H2 generation rates varywith time, depending on factors such as water chemistry, wateravailability, and water contact area. To account for these factors andfeedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to ironcorrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena thatare driven by gas pressure buildup and water consumption. Resultsindicate that if H2 generation rates are dynamically calculated based ona chemistry model, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup are muchsmaller compared to a simulation in which the coupling between flow andreactive transport mechansism is neglected.

Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renew- ablecom- bined space/water heaters, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Design of Advanced Engineering Design of Advanced Hydrogen-Carbon Dioxide Palladium and Palladium/Alloy Composite Membrane Separations and Process Intensification Background Technologies for pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and economical hydrogen (H2) production will contribute to the development of a stable and sustainable U.S. energy sector. The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce electricity, hydrogen, fuels, and/or chemicals from coal and coal/biomass-mixtures in an environmentally responsible manner. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is a key part of this process for production of H2. The application of H2 separation technology can facilitate the production of high-purity H2 from gasification-based systems, as well as allow for process

273

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment Model for Predicting Integrated Assessment Model for Predicting Potential Risks to Groundwater and Surface Water Associated with Shale Gas Development Background The EPAct Subtitle J, Section 999A-999H established a research and development (R&D) program for ultra-deepwater and unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resources. This legislation identified three program elements to be administered by a consortium under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Complementary research performed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is a fourth program element of this cost-shared program. NETL was also tasked with managing the consortium: Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA). Historically, the Complementary R&D Program being carried out by NETL's ORD has focused

274

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Electric General Electric Background GE Power & Water, along with GE Global Research Center, has an ongoing U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) program to develop gas turbine technology for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). GE is broadening this development effort, along with expanding applicability to industrial applications such as refineries and steel mills under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines with industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

275

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foamed Wellbore Cement Foamed Wellbore Cement Stability under Deep Water Conditions Background Foamed cement is a gas-liquid dispersion that is produced when an inert gas, typically nitrogen, is injected into a conventional cement slurry to form microscopic bubbles. Foamed cements are ultralow-density systems typically employed in formations that are unable to support annular hydrostatic pressure exerted by conventional cement slurries. More recently, the use of foamed cement has expanded into regions with high-stress environments, for example, isolating problem formations typical in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to its light-weight application, foamed cement has a unique resistance to temperature and pressure-induced stresses. Foamed cement exhibits superior fluid

276

Impacts from oil and gas produced water discharges on the gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shallow water areas of the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf experience low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) each summer. The hypoxic zone is primarily caused by input of nutrients from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate the growth of phytoplankton, which leads to reduction of the oxygen concentration near the sea floor. During the renewal of an offshore discharge permit used by the oil and gas industry in the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified the need to assess the potential contribution from produced water discharges to the occurrence of hypoxia. The EPA permit required either that all platforms in the hypoxic zone submit produced water samples, or that industry perform a coordinated sampling program. This paper, based on a report submitted to EPA in August 2005 (1), describes the results of the joint industry sampling program and the use of those results to quantify the relative significance of produced water discharges in the context of other sources on the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. In the sampling program, 16 facilities were selected for multiple sampling - three times each at one month intervals-- and another 34 sites for onetime sampling. The goal of the sampling program was to quantify the sources and amount of oxygen demand associated with a variety of Gulf of Mexico produced waters. Data collected included direct oxygen demand measured by BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) and TOC (total organic carbon) and indirect oxygen demand measured by nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitrate, nitrate, and TKN [total Kjeldahl nitrogen]) and phosphorus (total phosphorus and orthophosphate). These data will serve as inputs to several available computer models currently in use for forecasting the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. The output of each model will be compared for consistency in their predictions and then a semi-quantitative estimate of the relative significance of produced water inputs to hypoxia will be made.

Parker, M. E.; Satterlee, K.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division; ExxonMobil Production Co.; Shell Offshore

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] Fischer-Tropsch catalyst was operated simultaneously with a Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst in a slurry reactor for over 400 hours. The process conditions were held constant at a temperature of 240[degrees]C, a pressure of 0.79 MPa, and a 1.1 H[sub 2]/CO feed of 0.065 Nl/min-g.cat. The Fischer-Tropsch activity remained constant at the level predicted by the operation of the Co/MgO/SiO[sub 2] catalyst alone. The water-gas-shift reaction was near equilibrium. The hydrocarbon product distribution of the combined catalyst system was stable and matched that of the CO/MgO/SiO[sub 2] operating alone under similar conditions. The combined catalyst system exhibited a high selectivity to n-alkanes. Neither catalysts's operation appeared to have a detrimental effect on that of the other, showing promise for future option.

Chanenchuk, C.A.; Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst (CO/MgO/silica) was reduced and slurried in combination with reduced Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst. Combined catalyst system was run at fixed process conditions for more than 400 hours. The system showed stable selectivity. The Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] water-gas-shift catalyst remained reasonably active in the presence of the cobalt catalyst. Hydrocarbon selectivity of the cobalt and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]0[sub 3] catalyst system compared favorably to selectivity of iron-based catalysts. Methane selectivity was slightly higher for the cobalt-based system, but C[sub 5][sup +] selectivity was essentially the same. The hydrocarbon product distribution appeared to exhibit a double-a behavior. a[sub 1] was near 0.80 which is higher than that of iron catalysts, while a[sub 2] was calculated to be 0.86 which is somewhat lower than would be typical for an iron-based catalyst.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combustion of ultrafine coal/water mixtures and their application in gas turbines: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using coal-water fuels (CWF) in gas turbine combustors has been demonstrated in recent pilot plant experiments. The demands of burning coal-water fuels with high flame stability, complete combustion, low NO/sub x/ emission and a resulting fly ash particle size that will not erode turbine blades represent a significant challenge to combustion scientists and engineers. The satisfactory solution of these problems requires that the variation of the structure of CWF flames, i.e., the fields of flow, temperature and chemical species concentration in the flame, with operating conditions is known. Detailed in-flame measurements are difficult at elevated pressures and it has been proposed to carry out such experiments at atmospheric pressure and interpret the data by means of models for gas turbine combustor conditions. The research was carried out in five sequential tasks: cold flow studies; studies of conventional fine-grind CWF; combustion studies with ultrafine CWF fuel; reduction of NO/sub x/ emission by staged combustion; and data interpretation-ignition and radiation aspects. 37 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

Toqan, M.A.; Srinivasachar, S.; Staudt, J.; Varela, F.; Beer, J.M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Forced Dispersion of Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Clouds with Water Spray Curtain Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been, and will continue to be, tremendous growth in the use and distribution of liquefied natural gas (LNG). As LNG poses the hazard of flammable vapor cloud formation from a release, which may result in a massive fire, increased public concerns have been expressed regarding the safety of this fuel. In addition, regulatory authorities in the U.S. as well as all over the world expect the implementation of consequence mitigation measures for LNG spills. For the effective and safer use any safety measure to prevent and mitigate an accidental release of LNG, it is critical to understand thoroughly the action mechanisms. Water spray curtains are generally used by petro-chemical industries to prevent and mitigate heavier-than-air toxic or flammable vapors. It is also used to cool and protect equipment from heat radiation of fuel fires. Currently, water spray curtains are recognized as one of the economic and promising techniques to enhance the dispersion of the LNG vapor cloud formed from a spill. Usually, water curtains are considered to absorb, dilute, disperse and warm a heavier-than-air vapor cloud. Dispersion of cryogenic LNG vapor behaves differently from other dense gases because of low molecular weight and extremely low temperature. So the interaction between water curtain and LNG vapor is different than other heavier vapor clouds. Only two major experimental investigations with water curtains in dispersing LNG vapor clouds were undertaken during the 1970s and 1980s. Studies showed that water spray curtains enhanced LNG vapor dispersion from small spills. However, the dominant phenomena to apply the water curtain most effectively in controlling LNG vapor were not clearly demonstrated. The main objective of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of water spray curtains in controlling the LNG vapor clouds from outdoor experiments. A research methodology has been developed to study the dispersion phenomena of LNG vapor by the action of different water curtains experimentally. This dissertation details the research and experiment development. Small scale outdoor LNG spill experiments have been performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field at Texas A&M University. Field test results regarding important phenomena are presented and discussed. Results have determined that the water curtains are able to reduce the concentration of the LNG vapor cloud, push the vapor cloud upward and transfer heat to the cloud. These are being identified due to the water curtain mechanisms of entrainment of air, dilution of vapor with entrained air, transfer of momentum and heat to the gas cloud. Some of the dominant actions required to control and disperse LNG vapor cloud are also identified from the experimental tests. The gaps are presented as the future work and recommendation on how to improve the experiments in the future. This will benefit LNG industries to enhance its safety system and to make LNG facilities safer.

Rana, Morshed A.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis Capacity Background Establishing the geochemistry of surface and ground waters requires an arsenal of techniques devoted to determining the constituents these waters contain and the environment in which they exist. Many standard techniques have been developed over the years, and new ones continue to be explored as more complex matrices and harsher environments are encountered. Deep geologic storage of carbon dioxide and the development of unconventional oil and gas resourses are two areas of current concern where the study of geochemical processes is challenging due to the complex nature of the natural samples, and where routine analytical techniques are being pushed to their limits. The facilities at NETL include both conventional and cutting-edge instrumentation

282

Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR?¢????s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument?¢????s robustness in a real-world situation.

Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Refractory Research Group - U.S. DOE, Albany Research Center [Institution Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The refractory research group at the Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of conducting materials research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, and more recently, within the U.S. Dept. of Energy. When under the U.S. Bureau of Mines, research was driven by national needs to develop substitute materials and to conserve raw materials. This mission was accomplished by improving refractory material properties and/or by recycling refractories using critical and strategic materials. Currently, as a U.S. Dept of Energy Fossil Energy field site, research is driven primarily by the need to assist DOE in meeting its vision to develop economically and environmentally viable technologies for the production of electricity from fossil fuels. Research at ARC impacts this vision by: Providing information on the performance characteristics of materials being specified for the current generation of power systems; Developing cost-effective, high performance materials for inclusion in the next generation of fossil power systems; and Solving environmental emission and waste problems related to fossil energy systems. A brief history of past refractory research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the current refractory research at ARC, and the equipment and capabilities used to conduct refractory research at ARC will be discussed.

Bennett, James P.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Patterns of water and heat flux across a biome gradient from tropical forest to savanna in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albany, New York, USA. Department of Earth System Science,State University of New York at Albany, Albany, NY 12203,Research Center, State University of New York at Albany,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Alpha and gamma radiation effects on air-water systems at high gas/liquid ratios  

SciTech Connect

Radiolysis tests were conducted on air-water systems to examine the effects of radiation on liquid phase chemistry under high gas/liquid volume (G/L) ratios that are characteristic of an unsaturated nuclear waste repository setting. Test parameters included temperatures of 25, 90, and 200{degrees}C; gamma vs. alpha radiation; dose rates of {approximately}3500 and 50,000 rad/h; and G/L ratios of 10 and 100. Formate, oxalate, and total organic carbon contents increased during irradiation of the air-water systems in gamma and alpha tests at low-dose rate ({approximately}3500 rad/h). Increases in organic components were not observed for tests run at 200{degrees}C or high-dose rates (50,000 rad/h). In the tests where increases in organics occurred, the formate and oxalate were preferentially enriched in solutions that were rinsed from the test vessel walls. Nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is the dominant anion produced during the radiolysis reactions. Significant nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) also occurs in some high-dose rate tests, with the reduced form of nitrogen possibly resulting from reactions with the test vessels. These results indicate that nitrogen acids are being produced and concentrated in the limited quantities of solution present in the tests. Nitrate + nitrite production varied inversely with temperature, with the lowest quantities being detected for the higher temperature tests. The G(NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} + NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) values for the 25, 90, and 200{degrees}C experiments with gamma radiation are 3.2 {+-} 0.7, 1.3 {+-} 1.0, and 0.4 {+-} 0.3, respectively. Thus, the elevated temperatures expected early in the life of a repository may counteract pH decreases resulting from nitrogen acid production. Little variation was observed in G values as a function of dose rate or gas/liquid ratio.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bates, J.K.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Wetland treatment of oil and gas well waste waters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Constructed wetlands are small on-site systems that possess three of the most desirable components of an industrial waste water treatment scheme: low cost, low maintenance and upset resistance. The main objective of the present study is to extend the knowledge base of wetland treatment systems to include processes and substances of particular importance to small, on-site systems receiving oil and gas well wastewaters. A list of the most relevant and comprehensive publications on the design of wetlands for water quality improvement was compiled and critically reviewed. Based on our literature search and conversations with researchers in the private sector, toxic organics such as Phenolics and b-naphthoic acid, (NA), and metals such as CU(II) and CR(VI) were selected as target adsorbates. A total of 90 lysimeters equivalent to a laboratory-scale wetland were designed and built to monitor the uptake and transformation of toxic organics and the immobilization of metal ions. Studies on the uptake of toxic organics such as phenol and b-naphthoic acid (NA) and heavy metals such as Cu(II) and Cr(VI), the latter two singly or as non-stoichiometric mixtures by laboratory-type wetlands (LWs) were conducted. These LWs were designed and built during the first year of this study. A road map and guidelines for a field-scale implementation of a wetland system for the treatment of oil and gas wastewaters have been suggested. Two types of wetlands, surface flow (SF) and sub surface flow (SSF), have been considered, and the relative merits of each configuration have been reviewed.

Kadlec, R.; Srinivasan, K.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to H{alpha} at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and H{alpha} intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e{sup -}{yields} O + H + e{sup -}.

Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forthe winter when the natural gas prices are lower compared toSep Oct Nov Dec Fig 11 Natural gas price forecast for 2010

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forwinter when the natural gas prices are lower compared to theannual prices. Nat. Gas Price (2007$ / MMBtu) New England

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Pacific Gas and Electric Companys Comments on the State Water Resources Control Boards Proposed Policy Water Quality Control Policy on the Use of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) supports the protection of Californias marine resources through development of a consistent statewide policy implementing Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act. As we have previously stated, we support efforts to transition away from once through cooling and have clearly demonstrated that support through the

Estuarine Waters; Power Plant Cooling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- chemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces- University of Wisconsin Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by

296

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells-West Virginia University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/ NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. West Virginia University's (WVU) project will establish the tolerance limits of contaminant

297

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Unraveling the Relationship among Structure, Surface Chemistry, and Oxygen Reduction-Boston University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture The Boston University (BU) project was competitively selected to acquire the fundamental

298

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Surface Chemistry and Cathode Surface Chemistry and Optimization Studies-Carnegie Mellon University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) project was selected to acquire the fundamental knowledge and understanding that will facilitate research and development to enhance

299

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Durability of Doped Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Based Cathode Materials under "Real World" Air Exposure Atmospheres- University of Connecticut Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO

300

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface-Modified Electrodes: Enhancing Surface-Modified Electrodes: Enhancing Performance Guided by In-Situ Spectroscopy and Microscopy- Stanford University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by mass and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliability and Durability of Materials Reliability and Durability of Materials and Components for SOFCs - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has a mission to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) project was selected to acquire the fundamental

302

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigations and Investigations and Rational Design of Durable High- Performance SOFC Cathodes- Georgia Institute of Technology Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/ NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of solid SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Cathode durability is critical to long-term SOFC performance for commercial deployment.

303

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unraveling the Role of Transport, Unraveling the Role of Transport, Electrocatalysis, and Surface Science in the SOFC Cathode Oxygen Reduction Reaction-Boston University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by

304

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Preliminary technical data report: WyCoalGas project water system. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas project, Converse County, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The WyCoalGas, Inc. Proposed coal gasification plant site is approximately 16 miles north of Douglas, Wyoming, located generally in Sections 27 and 34, T35N, R70W of the sixth prinicpal meridian. The plant site is located in typical high plateau plains of central Wyoming. Climate in the area is typical of semi-arid central Wyoming and is subject to wide variations in temperature. Precipitation in the area averages about 14 inches per year, of which about 10 inches fall during the April-September irrigation season. Projected water requirements at the plant site are 6020 acre-feet per year. Since the proposed plant site is not near any major streams or rivers, water must be transported to it. Water will be supplied from four sources - two surface water and two groundwater. The two surface water sources are LaPrele Reservoir and flood flows from the North Platte River with a 1974 appropriations date. LaPrele Reservoir is located approximately 14 miles west of Douglas, Wyoming, and is shown on Figure A-1. Water will be released from LaPrele Reservoir and flow down LaPrele Creek to the North Platte River. Water from the North Platte River will be diverted at a point in Section 7 of T33N, R71W. The LaPrele water and excess water from the North Platte will be pumped from the river and stored in Panhandle Reservoir No. 1, which is also referred to as Combs Reservoir. A pipeline will convey water from Panhandle Reservoir No. 1 to the coal gasification plant site. The two groundwater sources are located north of Douglas and west of Douglas.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

308

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market research on solar water heaters. National Renewablespace heaters, and solar water heaters, as well as other

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

312

Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

314

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Convergence of a Finite Volume Scheme for Gas Water Flow in a Multi-Dimensional Porous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A classical model for water-gas flows in porous media is considered. The degenerate coupled system of equations obtained by mass conservation is usually approximated by finite volume schemes in the oil reservoir simulations. The convergence properties of these schemes are only known for incompressible fluids. This chapter deals with construction and convergence analysis of a finite volume scheme for compressible and immiscible flow in porous media. In comparison with incompressible fluid, compressible fluids requires more powerful techniques. We present a new result of convergence in a two or three dimensional porous medium and under the only modification that the density of gas depends on global pressure.

Bendahmane, Mostafa; Saad, Mazen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

SIC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. SiC macro-porous membranes have been successfully fabricated via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder. Also, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was prepared via our CVD/I technique. This composite membrane demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers and sol-gel techniques. Building upon the positive progress made in the membrane development study, we conducted an optimization study to develop an H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment. In addition, mathematical simulation has been performed to compare the performance of the membrane reactor (MR) vs conventional packed bed reactor for WGS reaction. Our result demonstrates that >99.999% conversion can be accomplished via WGS-MR using the hydrogen selective membrane developed by us. Further, water/CO ratio can be reduced, and >97% hydrogen recovery and <200 ppm CO can be accomplished according to the mathematical simulation. Thus, we believe that the operating economics of WGS can be improved significantly based upon the proposed MR concept. In parallel, gas separations and hydrothermal and long-term-storage stability of the hydrogen selected membrane have been experimentally demonstrated using a pilot-scale tubular membrane under a simulated WGS environment.

Paul K.T. Liu

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

Comparison of intergrated coal gasification combined cycle power plants with current and advanced gas turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two recent conceptual design studies examined ''grass roots'' integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) plants for the Albany Station site of Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation. One of these studies was based on the Texaco Gasifier and the other was developed around the British Gas Co.-Lurgi slagging gasifier. Both gasifiers were operated in the ''oxygen-blown'' mode, producing medium Btu fuel gas. The studies also evaluated plant performance with both current and advanced gas turbines. Coalto-busbar efficiencies of approximately 35 percent were calculated for Texaco IGCC plants using current technology gas turbines. Efficiencies of approximately 39 percent were obtained for the same plant when using advanced technology gas turbines.

Banda, B.M.; Evans, T.F.; McCone, A.I.; Westisik, J.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Potential of solar domestic hot water systems in rural areas for greenhouse gas emission reduction in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Application of solar energy for preparing domestic hot water is one of the easiest methods of utilization of this energy. At least part of the needs for warm tap water could be covered by solar systems. At present, mainly coal is used for water heating at dwellings in rural areas in Poland. Warm tap water consumption will increase significantly in the future as standards of living are improved. This can result in the growth of electricity use and an increase in primary fuel consumption. Present and future methods of warm sanitary water generation in rural areas in Poland is discussed, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are estimated. It is predicted that the emission of CO{sub 2} and NOx will increase. The emission of CO and CH{sub 4} will decrease because of changes in the structure of the final energy carriers used. The economic and market potentials of solar energy for preparing warm water in rural areas are discussed. It is estimated that solar systems can meet 30%-45% of the energy demand for warm water generation in rural areas at a reasonable cost, with a corresponding CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The rate of realization of the economic potential of solar water heaters depends on subsidies for the installation of equipment. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Skowronski, P. [Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency, Warsaw (Poland); Wisniewski, G. [Institute for Building, Mechanization and Electrification of Agriculture, Warsaw (Poland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical report summarizes our activities conducted in Yr II. In Yr I we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of preparing the hydrogen selective SiC membrane with a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. In addition, a SiC macroporous membrane was fabricated as a substrate candidate for the proposed SiC membrane. In Yr II we have focused on the development of a microporous SiC membrane as an intermediate layer between the substrate and the final membrane layer prepared from CVD. Powders and supported thin silicon carbide films (membranes) were prepared by a sol-gel technique using silica sol precursors as the source of silicon, and phenolic resin as the source of carbon. The powders and films were prepared by the carbothermal reduction reaction between the silica and the carbon source. The XRD analysis indicates that the powders and films consist of SiC, while the surface area measurement indicates that they contain micropores. SEM and AFM studies of the same films also validate this observation. The powders and membranes were also stable under different corrosive and harsh environments. The effects of these different treatments on the internal surface area, pore size distribution, and transport properties, were studied for both the powders and the membranes using the aforementioned techniques and XPS. Finally the SiC membrane materials are shown to have satisfactory hydrothermal stability for the proposed application. In Yr III, we will focus on the demonstration of the potential benefit using the SiC membrane developed from Yr I and II for the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction.

Paul K.T. Liu

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parametric Gasification of Oak Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Prepared under Task No. H2713B13 Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

322

Program on Technology Innovation - Use of Natural Peat to Remediate Contaminated Water at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the use of natural peat to remediate contaminated groundwater, including its potential use in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. Readers will find descriptions of peat's properties and the mechanisms by which it removes contaminants from water, results of laboratory and field studies using natural peat to remove specific environmental contaminants, and recommendations for modifications that can enhance peat's removal efficiency.

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

EVALUATION OF A METHOD USING COLLOIDAL GAS APHRONS TO REMEDIATE METALS-CONTAMINATED MINE DRAINAGE WATERS  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted in which three selected metals-contaminated mine drainage water samples were treated by chemical precipitation followed by flotation using colloidal gas aphrons (CGAs) to concentrate the precipitates. Drainage water samples used in the experiments were collected from an abandoned turn-of-the-century copper mine in south-central Wyoming, an inactive gold mine in Colorado's historic Clear Creek mining district, and a relatively modern gold mine near Rapid City, South Dakota. The copper mine drainage sample was nearly neutral (pH 6.5) while the two gold mine samples were quite acidic (pH {approx}2.5). Metals concentrations ranged from a few mg/L for the copper mine drainage to several thousand mg/L for the sample from South Dakota. CGAs are emulsions of micrometer-sized soap bubbles generated in a surfactant solution. In flotation processes the CGA microbubbles provide a huge interfacial surface area and cause minimal turbulence as they rise through the liquid. CGA flotation can provide an inexpensive alternative to dissolved air flotation (DAF). The CGA bubbles are similar in size to the bubbles typical of DAF. However, CGAs are generated at ambient pressure, eliminating the need for compressors and thus reducing energy, capital, and maintenance costs associated with DAF systems. The experiments involved precipitation of dissolved metals as either hydroxides or sulfides followed by flotation. The CGAs were prepared using a number of different surfactants. Chemical precipitation followed by CGA flotation reduced contaminant metals concentrations by more than 90% for the copper mine drainage and the Colorado gold mine drainage. Contaminant metals were concentrated into a filterable sludge, representing less than 10% of the original volume. CGA flotation of the highly contaminated drainage sample from South Dakota was ineffective. All of the various surfactants used in this study generated a large sludge volume and none provided a significant concentration factor with this sample. For the two samples where CGA flotation was effective, the separation was very rapid and the concentrate volume was reduced when compared to gravity separation under similar conditions. Effective separations were achieved with very low chemical dosages and low residence times, suggesting the possibility of economic viability for processes based on this concept. The CGA flotation experiments described in the following report were conducted to provide preliminary data with which to assess the technical feasibility of using the method for remediation of metals-contaminated mine drainage waters. The experiments were conducted using common, low-cost, precipitating reagents and CGA prepared from several surfactants. Results were evaluated in terms of metals concentration reduction, reagent consumption, and concentrate volume. The results of these preliminary experiments indicate that CGA flotation may be a useful tool for the treatment of some types of mine drainage.

R. Williams Grimes

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

325

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provided onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dewpoint and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 11 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

Kaaeid Lokhandwala

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

329

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery with waterflooding'*- Mark E.Johnson,2EllisA. Mona&: and Michael S. Watermad Accepted practice the optimal production strategy. Essentially, this strategy is to refrain from waterflooding until the minimum strategy to be optimal. THE GAS-WATERFLOOD RESERVOIR MODEL The mathematical details of the gas-waterflood

Waterman, Michael S.

330

Gas purification  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas having a high carbon dioxide content is contacted with sea water in an absorber at or near the bottom of the ocean to produce a purified natural gas.

Cook, C.F.; Hays, G.E.

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating  

SciTech Connect

Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with major water heater manufacturers that are offering pre-engineered forced air space heating combo systems. In this project, unlike standardized tests, laboratory tests were conducted that subjected condensing tankless and storage water heater based combo systems to realistic, coincidental space and domestic hot water loads with the following key findings: 1) The tankless combo system maintained more stable DHW and space heating temperatures than the storage combo system. 2) The tankless combo system consistently achieved better daily efficiencies (i.e. 84%-93%) than the storage combo system (i.e. 81%- 91%) when the air handler was sized adequately and adjusted properly to achieve significant condensing operation. When condensing operation was not achieved, both systems performed with lower (i.e. 75%-88%), but similar efficiencies. 3) Air handlers currently packaged with combo systems are not designed to optimize condensing operation. More research is needed to develop air handlers specifically designed for condensing water heaters. 4) System efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved only on days where continual and steady space heating loads were required with significant condensing operation. For days where heating was more intermittent, the system efficiencies fell below 90%.

Kingston, T.; Scott, S.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

STATE OF NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE THREE EMPIRE STATE PLAZA, ALBANY, NY 12223-1350  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE THREE EMPIRE STATE PLAZA, ALBANY, NY 12223-1350 www.dps.ny.gov PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSIO~ PETER McGOWAN GARRY A. BROWN General Counsel Chairman PATRICIA L. ACAMPORA MAUREEN F. HARRIS JACLYN A, BRILLING ROBERT E. CURRY JR. Secretary JAMES L. LAROCCA Commissioners January 31, 2012 FILED ELECTRONICALLY @ http://energy.gov/oelcongestion-study-2012 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. i0585 Re: Preparation ofthe 2012 Congestion Study Dear Sir or Madam: I am writing in response to the Notice of Regional Workshops and Request For Written Comments, 76 Federal Register No. 218, 70122 (November 10,2011). Enclosed please find the comments of

333

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. Winiarski. (1999). WHAM: Simplified tool for calculatingDepartment of Energy 2009b). WHAM yields total water heaterWater Heater Analysis Model (WHAM) method (Lutz et al. 1999)

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Winiarski, D. (1999). WHAM: Simplified tool for calculatingDepartment of Energy 2009b). WHAM yields total water-heaterWater Heater Analysis Model (WHAM) method (Lutz et al. 1999)

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Economic benefits of R and D on gas supply technologies. [Unconventioal natural gas resources which are tight sands, Devonian shale, coal seam gas, and gas co-produced with water  

SciTech Connect

Advanced natural gas supply technologies, if successful, could lower the average cost of gas to consumers by 18% and increase the expected gas demand by 2 quads/year by the year 2000. Advanced production techniques for unconventional gas will have by far the greatest impact on future gas prices, providing economic benefits of between $200 billion and $320 billion. Advanced SNG from coal will provide only a $9 billion benefit if unconventional gas meets all of its performance targets. However, higher demand and failure of unconventional gas R and D could raise the benefits of SNG research to $107 billion. SNG research provides a hedge value that increases the likelihood of receiving a positive payoff from gas supply R and D. Changing the performance goals for SNG research to emphasize cost reduction rather than acceleration of the date of commercialization would greatly increase the potential benefits of the program. 9 references, 8 figures, 5 tables.

Darrow, K.G.; Ashby, A.B.; Nesbitt, D.M.; Marshalla, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual report, August 1, 1990-July 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The research work, during the period of the report, can be divided into three main categories, the first category being the NE Hitchcock reservoir characterization review task. NE Hitchcock field production and log data were acquired. Well by well review of production was performed and cross-correlated with geologic interpretations. The second category is the reservoir selection task. In the process of selecting two water-drive gas reservoir candidates, over 150 fields located in the Rockies, New Mexico, West Texas, Mid Continent, Michigan and offshore Louisiana were searched. The reservoir selection criteria is: water-drive gas reservoir, location near a geologic outcrop (if possible), field size of 5-40 wells, and availability of core and modern well logs. Accordingly, the Vermejo/Moore-Hooper Fusselman and the Grand Isle PD sand fields were selected to be studied. The third category is the laboratory investigations. The task includes rock mechanical properties, phase behavior and sand control portions. In the rock mechanical properties segment, laboratory measurements were made on several Berea Core plugs. The equation of state and an empirical approach are being used to predict initial reservoir gas composition from current production data for the phase behavior part. The sand control part was completed with conclusions regarding the ability to predict the existence of plastic failure region of an unconsolidated sand near a wellbore. The project is continuing to accomplish its goals to evaluate different production management strategies on the two chosen water-drive gas reservoirs through reservoir engineering, geologic interpretation, experimental work and reservoir simulation studies.

Crafton, J.W.; Davis, D.; Graves, R.; Poettmann, F.; Thompson, R.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating appliances 3 , solar water heating, district heatingOther includes solar, wood, no heating c Electric resistance

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating appliances, 3 solar water heating, district heating,Other includes solar, wood, and no heating b Table 2 US

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration Institute 2008a). The efficiency of water heaters, depending on the rated volume and other design

Lekov, Alex B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refrigeration Institute 2008a). The efficiency of water heaters, depending on the rated volume and other design

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

342

Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II CD-ROM Atlas of Global Monthly Aerosols, Ozone, NO2, Water, Vapor, and Relative Humitidy (19851993)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual profile measurements from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument aboard the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite have been used to create latitude-longitude maps of monthly mean aerosols, ozone, water vapor, ...

D. Rind; X. Liao

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Considerations and Environmental Considerations and Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment- University of North Dakota Background Cooling airfoil leading edges of modern first stage gas turbine vanes presents a con- siderable challenge due to the aggressive heat transfer environment and efficiency penalties related to turbine hot gas path cooling. This environment is made more complex when natural gas is replaced by high hydrogen fuels (HHF) such as synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification with higher expected levels of impurities. In this project the University of North Dakota (UND) and The Ohio State University (OSU) will explore technology opportunities to improve the reliability of HHF gas turbines by analyzing the effects

347

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Turbines in Near-Zero Emissions Coal Power Plants-Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy Hy(DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading a project in partnership with gas turbine manufacturers and universities to develop a robust ultra-low emission combustor for gas turbines that burn high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from gasification of coal. A high efficiency and ultra-low emissions HHC fueled gas turbine is a key component of a near-zero emis- sions integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) clean coal power plant. This project is managed by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). NETL is researching advanced turbine technology with the goal of producing reliable,

348

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Performance calculations and research direction for a water enhanced regenerative gas turbine cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cycle has been conceived that combines compressor cooling, humidification, and regenerative air heating with the added enhancement of direct injection of water into the air flow. In this cycle it is proposed that a fine mist of water be injected into the compressor air stream and a spray or film of water into the regenerator air stream. Water injection into the compressor air flow realizes several benefits: it cools the air flow, reducing the power required for compression and increasing the potential for exhaust heat recovery; it adds mass to the air stream, increasing the power produced by expansion; and it reduces the amount of cooling bleed air required by increasing the specific heat and decreasing the temperature of the cooling air stream. The greatest benefit would be derived from spraying a fine mist of water directly into the existing air flow into or before the compressor so that cooling and compression would occur simultaneously. This may be accomplished by entraining the water droplets in the inlet air flow or by introducing the water in stages during compression. An alternative and less technically challenging approach is to extract the air stream to a saturation chamber and then reintroduce the air stream into the compressor. This approach is not as desirable because it would increase the equipment cost and add a significant pressure drop penalty. The second use of water in this cycle is in water-assisted regeneration.

Rogers, L.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Archer, D.H. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/residential/water_Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL 06).http://www1.eere.energy.gov/ buildings/appliance_standards/

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly ...  

The discovery represents a cost-effective way to utilize materials indigenous to fossil fuel burning power platns to control mineral precipitation is cooling water.

352

Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seds.html. USDOE. 2009. Residential Energy ConsumptionUSEPA) 2008. Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: FinalExperiences of residential consumers and utilities. Oak

Lekov, Alex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Iron-ceria Aerogels Doped with Palladium as Water-gas Shift Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels doped with 1% and 2% palladium (Pd) by weight have been synthesized, and their activities for the catalysis of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction have been determined. The aerogels were synthesized using propylene oxide as the proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation of a homogeneous alcoholic solution of cerium(III) chloride heptahydrate and iron(III) chloride hexahydrate precursor. Palladium was doped onto some of these materials by gas-phase incorporation (GPI) using ({eta}{sup 3}-allyl)({eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)palladium as the volatile Pd precursor. Water-gas shift catalytic activities were evaluated in a six-channel fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and reaction temperatures ranging from 150 to 350 C. Both 1% and 2% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels showed WGS activities that increased significantly from 150 to 350 C. The activities of 1% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels were also compared with that of the 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The WGS activity of 1% Pd on 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels is substantially higher (5 times) than the activity of 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The gas-phase incorporation results in a better Pd dispersion. Ceria aerogel provides a nonrigid structure wherein iron is not significantly incorporated inside the matrix, thereby resulting in better contact between the Fe and Pd and thus enhancing the WGS activity. Further, neither Fe nor Pd is reduced during the ceria-aerogel-catalyzed WGS reaction. This behavior contrasts with that noted for other Fe-based WGS catalysts, in which the original ferric oxide is typically reduced to a nonstoichiometric magnetite form.

Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Huffman, G; Eyring, E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Leads Collaborative Effort DOE Leads Collaborative Effort to Quantify Environmental Changes that Coincide with Shale Gas Development Background DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a joint industry/ government research project to document environmental changes that occur during the lifecycle of shale gas development. The research plan calls for one year of environmental monitoring before development takes place to establish baseline conditions and account for seasonal variations. Monitoring then will continue through the different stages of unconventional shale gas development including: road and pad construction, drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, and for at least one year of subsequent production operations. The study will take place at a Range Resources-Appalachia

355

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect on water and gas usage from cross-flow betweencontrols have on water and gas usage over a large number ofsystems, and their water and gas usage. Hourly schedules for

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Local and Regional Air on Local and Regional Air Quality Impacts of Oil and Natural Gas Development Goal The NETL research effort in improving the assessment of impacts to air quality from oil and gas exploration and production activities has the following goals: (1) using NETL's mobile air monitoring laboratory, conduct targeted on-site measurements of emissions from oil and gas production activities that may impact the environment and (2) use collected data in atmospheric chemistry and transport models to further understanding of local and regional air quality impacts. Background The development of shale gas and shale oil resources requires horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, two processes that have been known for many years but have only recently become common practice. In addition, fugitive atmospheric

357

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Filtration to Improve Single Filtration to Improve Single Crystal Casting Yield-Mikro Systems Background Single crystal (SX) nickel superalloys are a primary material choice for gas turbine hot gas path component castings because of their high resistance to deformation at elevated temperatures. However, the casting yields of these components need to be improved in order to reduce costs and encourage more widespread use within the gas turbine industry. Low yields have been associated with a number of process-related defects common to the conventional casting of SX components. One innovative improvement, advanced casting filter designs, has been identified as a potential path toward increasing the yield rates of SX castings for high-temperature gas turbine applications. Mikro Systems, Inc. (Mikro) proposes to increase SX casting yields by developing

358

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology- University of Texas at El Paso Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are protective layers of low thermal conductivity ceramic refractory material that protect gas turbine components from high temperature exposure. TBCs improve efficiency by allowing gas turbine components to operate at higher temperatures and are critical to future advanced coal-based power generation systems. Next generation gas turbine engines must tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of coal-derived synthesis gasses (syngas) with high hydrogen content. This will require TBCs to withstand surface temperatures much higher than those currently experienced by standard materials. In this project the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)

359

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent Technology Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Capture Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and practical CO 2 loading volumes. Current technologies that are effective at separating CO 2 from typical CO 2 -containing gas mixtures, such as coal-derived shifted synthesis gas (syngas), are both capital and energy intensive. Research and development is being conducted to identify technologies that will provide improved economics and

360

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Thermal Gas Turbine Thermal Performance-Ames Laboratory Background Developing turbine technologies to operate on coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), hydrogen fuels, and oxy-fuels is critical to the development of advanced power gener-ation technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle and the deployment of near-zero-emission type power plants with capture and separation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Degradation of TBC Systems in Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems- University of Pittsburgh Background The conditions inside integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, such as high steam levels from hydrogen firing, high carbon dioxide steam mixtures in oxy- fired systems, and different types of contaminants, introduce complexities associated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability that are currently unresolved. In this work the University of Pittsburgh will team with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST) to deter- mine the degradation mechanisms of current state-of-the-art TBCs in environments consisting of deposits and gas mixtures that are representative of gas turbines using coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas).

362

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High- Hydrogen Fuels-Pennsylvania State University Background Combustion dynamics is a major technical challenge to the development of efficient, low emission gas turbines. Current information is limited to single-nozzle combustors operating on natural gas and neglects combustors with configurations expected to meet operability requirements using a range of gaseous fuels such as coal derived synthesis gas (syngas). In this project, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) will use multiple-nozzle research facilities to recreate flow conditions in an actual gas turbine to study complicated interactions between flames that can aggravate the combustion dynamics in syngas-

363

Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With oak and pine feedstocks, the Gasification of Biomass to Hydrogen project maximizes hydrogen production using the Full Stream Reformer during water-gas shift fixed-bed reactor testing. Results indicate that higher steam-to-biomass ratio and higher thermal cracker temperature yield higher hydrogen concentration. NREL's techno-economic models and analyses indicate hydrogen production from biomass may be viable at an estimated cost of $1.77/kg (current) and $1.47/kg (advanced in 2015). To verify these estimates, NREL used the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), an integrated system of unit operations that investigates biomass thermochemical conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels and chemicals.

Hrdlicka, J.; Feik, C.; Carpenter, D.; Pomeroy, M.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Development of a gas backup heater for solar domestic hot-water systems. Final report, April 1978-April 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive program was undertaken to develop a unique gas fired backup for solar domestic hot water systems. Detailed computer design tools were written. A series of heat transfer experiments were performed to characterize the performance of individual components. A full scale engineering prototype, including the solar preheat tank and solar heat exchanger, was designed, fabricated and subjected to limited testing. Firing efficiency for the backup system was found to be 81.4% at a firing rate of 50,000 Btu/h. Long term standby losses should be negligible.

Morrison, D.J.; Grunes, H.E.; de Winter, F.; Armstrong, P.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Investigation of Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Coal Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Background Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes gasify coal, biomass, and mixtures of coal/ biomass to produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Positive benefits of these processes include the use of feedstocks from domestic sources and lower greenhouse gas production than can be achieved from using conventional petroleum-based fuels. However, syngas generated by coal and biomass co-gasification contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the water- gas-shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts used in the gas-to-liquid processes. While the effect of coal contaminants on FT processes is well studied, more research

367

Molecular studies of the structural properties of hydrogen gas in bulk water.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on our studies of the structural properties of a hydrogen molecule dissolved in liquid water. The radial distribution function, coordination number and coordination number distribution are calculated using different representations of the interatomic forces within molecular dynamics (MD), Monte Carlo (MC) and ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation frameworks. Although structural details differ in the radial distribution functions generated from the different force fields, all approaches agree that the average and most probable number of water molecules occupying the inner hydration sphere around hydrogen is 16. Furthermore, all results exclude the possibility of clathrate-like organization of water molecules around the hydrophobic molecular hydrogen solute.

Rempe, Susan L.; Sabo, Dubravko; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Martin, Marcus Gary

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Combined Passive Water Vapor Exchanger and Exhaust Gas Diffusion Barrier for Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells operating on hydrocarbon fuels require water vapor injection into the fuel stream for fuel reforming and the prevention of carbon fouling. Compared to active water recovery systems, a passive approach would eliminate the need for a separate water source, pumps, and actuators, and thus reduce parasitic thermal losses. The passive approach developed in this paper employs a capillary pump that recovers the water vapor from the exhaust, while providing a diffusion barrier that prevents exhaust gases from entering the fuel stream. Benchtop proof tests have proven the feasibility of the passive fuel humidifier concept, and have provided a calibration factor for a computational design tool that can be used for industrial applications

Williford, Rick E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hatchell, Brian K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Singh, Prabhakar (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

Simultaneous boiling and spreading of liquefied petroleum gas on water. Final report, December 12, 1978-March 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

An experimental and theoretical investigation was carried out to study the boiling and spreading of liquid nitrogen, liquid methane and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) on water in a one-dimensional configuration. Primary emphasis was placed on the LPG studies. Experimental work involved the design and construction of a spill/spread/boil apparatus which permitted the measurement of spreading and local boil-off rates. With the equations of continuity and momentum transfer, a mathematical model was developed to describe the boiling-spreading phenomena of cryogens spilled on water. The model accounted for a decrease in the density of the cryogenic liquid due to bubble formation. The boiling and spreading rates of LPG were found to be the same as those of pure propane. An LPG spill was characterized by the very rapid and violent boiling initially and highly irregular ice formation on the water surface. The measured local boil-off rates of LPG agreed reasonably well with theoretical predictions from a moving boundary heat transfer model. The spreading velocity of an LPG spill was found to be constant and determined by the size of the distributor opening. The maximum spreading distance was found to be unaffected by the spilling rate. These observations can be explained by assuming that the ice formation on the water surface controls the spreading of LPG spills. While the mathematical model did not predict the spreading front adequately, it predicted the maximum spreading distance reasonably well.

Chang, H.R.; Reid, R.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

PWR Primary-Side Gas Management in Advanced Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The designs for advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) have incorporated new water chemistry controls that have been developed over the past few decades to improve material and equipment reliability and fuel performance and to minimize radionuclide production and transport. It is important to ensure that the new designs operate within ranges that are considered safe based on current knowledge and that industry guidance for normal operation, startup, and shutdown are updated to account for expanding ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Evaluation of cover gas impurities and their effects on the dry storage of LWR (light-water reactor) spent fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purposes of this report are to (1) identify the sources of impurity gases in spent fuel storage casks; (2) identify the expected concentrations and types of reactive impurity gases from these sources over an operating lifetime of 40 years; and (3) determine whether these impurities could significantly degrade cladding or exposed fuel during this period. Four potential sources of impurity gases in the helium cover gas in operating casks were identified and evaluated. Several different bounding cases have been considered, where the reactive gas inventory is either assumed to be completely gettered by the cladding or where all oxygen is assumed to react completely with the exposed fuel. It is concluded that the reactive gas inventory will have no significant effect on the cladding unless all available oxygen reacts with the UO/sub 2/ fuel to produce U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ at one or two cladding breaches. Based on Zircaloy oxidation data, the oxygen inventory in a fully loaded pressurized water reactor cask such as the Castor-V/21 will be gettered by the Zircaloy cladding in about 1 year if the peak cladding temperature within the task is greater than or equal to300/sup 0/C. Only a negligible decrease in the thickness of the cladding would result. 24 refs., 4 tabs.

Knoll, R.W.; Gilbert, E.R.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Background Natural gas and crude oil provide two-thirds of our Nation's primary energy supply and will continue to do so for at least the next several decades, as the Nation transitions to a more sustainable energy future. The natural gas resource estimated to exist within the United States has expanded significantly, but because this resource is increasingly harder to locate and produce, new technologies are required to extract it. Under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the National Energy Technology Laboratory is charged with developing a complementary research program supportive of improving safety and minimizing the environmental impacts of activities related to unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production technology

373

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors and Control Sensors and Control CONTACTS Ben Chorpening Sensors & Controls Technical Team Coordinator 304-285-4673 benjamin.chorpening@netl.doe.gov Steven Woodruff Principal Investigator 304-285-4175 steven.woodruff@netl.doe.gov Michael Buric Co-Principal Investigator 304-285-2052 michael.buric@netl.doe.gov Raman Gas Composition Sensor System for Natural Gas and Syngas Applications Goal The goal of this project is to develop and test a Raman laser spectroscopy system for responsive gas composition monitoring, and to transfer the technology to industry for commercial implementation. The instrument provides state-of-the-art improvement of reduced size and increased sensitivity and sample rate to facilitate the process control

374

A shallow water model for dense gas simulation in urban areas  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of toxic chemicals are stored at industrial facilities and transported around the country via train and truck. In the event of an accidental release, many of these chemicals are released as heavier-than-air gases that stay low to the ground as they are transported by the wind . Breathing height concentrations can remain high due to reduced vertical mixing and hazard zone coverage area can be larger due to near-source gravitational slumping . A number of fast-response dense gas dispersion models have been developed and are routinely used to deal with heavier-than-air releases over unobstructed terrain. If a release were to occur in a built-up environment, however, the effects of buildings and other obstacles will significantly alter the initial spreading, the transport direction, and the amount of mixing of the dense gas cloud . We have developed a new fast-running dense gas dispersion model that is intended for handling releases in cities and at large industrial facilities. In this paper we describe the scheme employed and how the model has been integrated into the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) dispersion modeling system.

Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Mike D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gowardhan, Akshay [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brambilla, Sara [POLITECNICO DI MILANO; Manca, Davide [POLITECNICO DI MILANO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

376

Preliminary Modeling, Testing and Analysis of a Gas Tankless Water Heater  

SciTech Connect

Tankless water heaters offer significant energy savings over conventional storage-tank water heaters, because thermal losses to the environment are much less. Although standard test results are available to compare tankless heaters with storage tank heaters, actual savings depend on the draw details because energy to heat up the internal mass depends on the time since the last draw. To allow accurate efficiency estimates under any assumed draw pattern, a one-node model with heat exchanger mass is posed here. Key model parameters were determined from test data. Burner efficiency showed inconsistency between the two data sets analyzed. Model calculations show that efficiency with a realistic draw pattern is {approx}8% lower than that resulting from using only large {approx}40 liter draws, as specified in standard water-heater tests. The model is also used to indicate that adding a small tank controlled by the tankless heater ameliorates unacceptable oscillations that tankless with feedback control can experience with pre-heated water too hot for the minimum burner setting. The added tank also eliminates problematic low-flow cut-out and hot-water-delay, but it will slightly decrease efficiency. Future work includes model refinements and developing optimal protocols for parameter extraction.

Burch, J.; Thornton, J.; Hoeschele, M.; Springer, D.; Rudd, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Gas Scavenging of Soluble and Insoluble Organic Vapors by Levitated Water Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-millimeter-diameter drops of water were levitated with a standing acoustic wave centered in the jet of a small wind tunnel and the volume changes as the drop evaporates in the presence of 1-propanol vapor were measured. The results are ...

Mark Seaver; Amy Barrett

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rate of synthesis gas consumption over a cobalt FischerTropsch catalyst was measured in a well-mixed, continuous-flow, slurry reactor at 220 to 240[degrees]C, 0.5 to 1.5 MPa, H[sub 2]/CO feed ratios of 1.5 to 3.5 and conversions of 7 to 68% of hydrogen and 11 to 73% of carbon monoxide. The inhibiting effect of carbon monoxide was determined quantitatively and a Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type equation of the following form was found to best represent the results: -R[sub H[sub 2+Co

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residentialgas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations for residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Research into the Characterization of Brackish Water and Disposal of Desalination Reject Water in Saline Aquifers and Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brackish groundwater is a valuable drought-proof resource that is plentiful in much of Texas. If treated by available desalination technologies, brackish groundwater resources could help many regions of Texas cope with pressing water shortages. If put to non-potable uses such as waterflooding, streamflow augmentation, and landscape irrigation, brackish groundwater could free up substantial amounts of drinking water supplies now dedicated to these uses. In 2007, the Texas Legislature passed landmark legislation that should provide greatly expanded opportunities to beneficially use concentrates from the desalination of brackish groundwater or to streamline the disposal as a waste product. House Bill 2654 (passed in the 80th Legislative session) has the promise of making it substantially easier to manage concentrates that result from the desalination of brackish groundwater. The bill authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to issue a general statewide permit that allows disposal of nonhazardous brine from desalination operations into Class I injection wells. The bill also streamlines the process of using the concentrates in Class II injection wells for enhanced oil and gas recovery operations. However, more still needs to be done in two key areas: * Learning more about the chemical traits of brackish groundwater in specific circumstances to ensure that concentrates from desalting these resources are not a hazardous waste, * Continuing to develop and implement technologies and management strategies that make these programs most cost-efficient.

Jensen, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Design of Computational Materials Design of Castable SX Ni-based Superalloys for IGT Blade Components-QuesTek Innovations Background Higher inlet gas temperatures in industrial gas turbines (IGTs) enable improved thermal efficiencies, but creep-the tendency of materials to deform gradually under stress-becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. In order to raise inlet temperatures of IGTs, turbine blade materials are required to have superior creep rupture resistance. Nickel (Ni)-based single crystal (SX) blades have higher creep strength in comparison with directionally solidified blades and are widely used in aerospace engines. However, their use in IGTs, which require larger-size castings (two to three times the size needed in aerospace applications), is limited

383

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology to Mitigate Syngas Technology to Mitigate Syngas Cooler Fouling Background Coal gasification, in conjunction with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power production, is under development to increase efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with coal-based power production. However, coal gasification plants have not achieved their full potential for superior performance and economics due to challenges with reliability and availability. In particular, performance of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier has been an issue. The syngas cooler is a fire tube heat exchanger located between the gasifier and the gas turbine. The purpose of the syngas cooler is to cool the raw syngas from the gasifier and recover heat. Although

384

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies to Enable Robust, Studies to Enable Robust, Reliable, Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of Michigan Background The University of Michigan will perform experimental and computational studies which can provide an improved and robust understanding of the reaction kinetics and other fundamental characteristics of combustion of high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels that are vital to advancing HHC turbine design and to making coal gasification power plants environmentally sustainable and cost- competitive. The scope of work includes Rapid Compression Facility (RCF) studies of HHC ignition delay times and hydroxyl radical (OH) time-histories, flame speeds, and flammability limits. A range of temperatures, pressures, and test gas mixture compositions will

385

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Factors Influencing Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO2 Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

386

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Cooling Technology in Gas Turbines - Florida Turbine Technologies Background The Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT) spar-shell gas turbine airfoil concept has an internal structural support (the spar) and an external covering (the shell). This concept allows the thermal-mechanical and aerodynamic requirements of the airfoil design to be considered separately, thereby enabling the overall design to be optimized for the harsh environment these parts are exposed to during operation. Such optimization is one of the major advantages of the spar-shell approach that is not possible with today's conventional monolithic turbine components. The proposed design integrates a novel cooling approach based on Advanced Recircu-

387

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

29,759 29,759 PROJECT NUMBER FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Conversion and Fouling Background Coal and biomass gasification is an approach to cleaner power generation and other uses of these resources. Currently, the service life of gasifiers does not meet the performance needs of users. Gasifiers fail to achieve on-line availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications and 95 percent in applications such as chemical production. The inability to meet these goals has created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. Gasifier output is a hot gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), known as synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas cooler is one of the key components identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities

388

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Thermal Barrier Coatings for Operation in High Hydrogen Content Fueled Gas Turbines-Stony Brook University Background Traditional thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) will likely not be suitable in gas turbines used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. This is due to higher operating temperatures that will not only affect phase stability and sintering but will accelerate corrosive degradation phenomena. Coatings provide a framework to combat degradation issues and provide performance improvements needed for higher temperature environments. The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University, in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology, is investigating science and

389

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Through a Vacuum-assisted Infiltration- Materials and Systems Research, Inc. Background Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology promises to provide an efficient method to generate electricity from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), biofuels, and natural gas. The typical SOFC composite cathode (current source) possesses excellent performance characteristics but is subject to chemical stability issues at elevated temperatures both during manufacturing and power generation. Costs attributed to the cathode and its long-term stability issues are a current limitation of SOFC technologies. These must be addressed before commercial SOFC power generation can be realized. Materials and Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) will develop a vacuum-assisted infiltration

390

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Comprehensive Monitoring Techniques to Verify the Integrity of Geological Storage Reservoirs Containing Carbon Dioxide Background Research aimed at monitoring the long-term storage stability and integrity of carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations is one of the most pressing areas of need if geological storage is to become a significant factor in meeting the United States' stated objectives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The most promising geologic formations under consideration for CO2 storage are active and depleted oil and gas formations, brine formations, and deep, unmineable coal seams. Unfortunately, the long-term CO2 storage capabilities of these formations are not yet well understood. Primary Project Goal The goal of this effort is to develop

391

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Sciences Geological & Environmental Sciences Subsurface Experimental Laboratories Autoclave and Core Flow Test Facilities Description Researchers at NETL study subsurface systems in order to better characterize and understand gas-fluid-rock and material interactions that impact environmental and resource issues related to oil, gas, and CO2 storage development. However, studying the wide variety of subsurface environments related to hydrocarbon and CO2 systems requires costly and technically challenging tools and techniques. As a result, NETL's Experimental Laboratory encompasses multi-functional, state-of-the-art facilities that perform a wide spectrum of geological studies providing an experimental basis for modeling of various subsurface phenomena and processes. This includes, but is not

392

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Durability of Turbine Components through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls-University of Texas at Austin Background Gas turbine operation utilizing coal-derived high hydrogen fuels (synthesis gas, or syngas) requires new cooling configurations for turbine components. The use of syngas is likely to lead to degraded cooling performance resulting from rougher surfaces and partial blockage of film cooling holes. In this project the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in cooperation with The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) will investigate the development of new film cooling and endwall cooling designs for maximum performance when subjected to high levels of contaminant depositions. This project was competitively selected under the University Turbine Systems Research

393

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic properties related to fossil energy conversion and carbon dioxide decomposition. Non-thermal plasma is an ionized gas comprised of a mixture of charged particles (electrons, ions), active chemical radicals (O 3 , O, OH), and highly excited species that are known to accelerate reforming reactions in

394

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methanol Economy Methanol Economy Background Fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas are composed of hydrocarbons with varying ratios of carbon and hydrogen. Consumption of hydrocarbons derived from fossil fuels is integral to modern day life in the U.S. Hydrocarbons are used as fuels and raw materials in the transportation sector and in many industrial production processes including chemicals, petrochemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and rubber.

395

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conductivity, High Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments-University of Connecticut Background Improved turbine materials are needed to withstand higher component surface temperatures and water vapor content for successful development and deployment of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in particular are required to have higher surface temperature capability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to attack at high temperature by contaminants such as calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate (CMAS) and water vapor. There is also a concurrent need to address cost and availability issues associated with rare earth elements used in all low thermal conductivity TBCs.

397

An innovative catalyst system for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas-shift catalyst  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using a mechanical mixture of a Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for hydrocarbon synthesis in a slurry reactor has been established. Such a mixture can combine the superior product distribution from cobalt with the high activity for the WGS reaction characteristic of iron. Weight ratios of Co/MgO/SiO{sub 2} to Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} of 0.27 and 0.51 for the two catalysts were studied at 240{degrees}C, 0.79 MPa, and in situ H{sub 2}/CO ratios between 0.8 and 3.0. Each catalyst mixture showed stable Fischer-Tropsch activity for about 400 hours-on-stream at a level comparable to the cobalt catalyst operating alone. The Cu-ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst exhibited a very slow loss of activity under these conditions, but when operated alone it was stable in a slurry reactor at 200--220{degrees}C, 0.79--1.48 MPa, and H{sub 2}/CO in situ ratios between 1.0 and 2.0. The presence of the water-gas-shift catalyst did not affect the long-term stability of the primary Fischer-Tropsch selectivity, but did increase the extent of secondary reactions, such as l-alkene hydrogenation and isomerization.

Satterfield, C.N.; Yates, I.C.; Chanenchuk, C.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Characteristics of Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Mixed Fuels Background Domestically abundant coal is a primary energy source and when mixed with optimum levels of biomass during the production of liquid fuels may have lower carbon footprints compared to petroleum fuel baselines. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to liquid fuels by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting research focused on using coal and biomass to produce clean and affordable power, fuels and chemicals. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is partnering with Leland Stanford Junior

400

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility in an Underground Mine in the Keweenaw Basalts Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies is necessary in preparation for future commercial deployment. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCUS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Processes Electrochemical Processes for CO2 Capture and Conversion to Commodity Chemicals Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the

402

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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r r oj e c t Fac t s Advanced Research Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments Background Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is central to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensors that can function under the

403

Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

SiC-BASED HYDROGEN SELECTIVE MEMBRANES FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrogen selective membrane as a membrane reactor (MR) can significantly improve the power generation efficiency with a reduced capital and operating cost for the waster-gas-shift reaction. Existing hydrogen selective ceramic membranes are not suitable for the proposed MR due to their poor hydrothermal stability. In this project we have focused on the development of innovative silicon carbide (SiC) based hydrogen selective membranes, which can potentially overcome this technical barrier. During Year I, we have successfully fabricated SiC macro porous membranes via extrusion of commercially available SiC powder, which were then deposited with thin, micro-porous (6 to 40{angstrom} in pore size) films via sol-gel technique as intermediate layers. Finally, an SiC hydrogen selective thin film was deposited on this substrate via our CVD/I technique. The composite membrane thus prepared demonstrated excellent hydrogen selectivity at high temperature ({approx}600 C). More importantly, this membrane also exhibited a much improved hydrothermal stability at 600 C with 50% steam (atmospheric pressure) for nearly 100 hours. In parallel, we have explored an alternative approach to develop a H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane via pyrolysis of selected pre-ceramic polymers. Building upon the positive progress made in the Year I preliminary study, we will conduct an optimization study in Year II to develop an optimized H{sub 2} selective SiC membrane with sufficient hydrothermal stability suitable for the WGS environment.

Unknown

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ethanol synthesis and water gas shift over bifunctional sulfide catalysts. Final technical progress report, September 12, 1991--December 11, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to investigate sulfur-resistant catalysts for the conversion of synthesis gas having H{sub 2}/CO {le} 1 into C{sub 1}--C{sub 4} alcohols, especially ethanol, by a highly selective and efficient pathway, while also promoting the water gas shift reaction (WGSR). The catalysts chosen are bifunctional, base-hydrogenation, sulfur-tolerant transition metal sulfides with heavy alkali, e.g. Cs{sup +}, promoter dispersed on their surfaces. The modes of activation of H{sub 2} and CO on MoS{sub 2} and alkali-doped MoS{sub 2} were considered, and computational analyses of the thermodynamic stability of transition metal sulfides and of the electronic structure of these sulfide catalysts were carried out. In the preparation of the cesium-promoted MoS{sub 2} catalysts, a variety of preparation methods using CsOOCH were examined. In all cases, doping with CsOOCH led to a lost of surface area. The undoped molybdenum disulfide catalyst only produced hydrocarbons. Cs-doped MoS{sub 2} catalysts all produced linear alcohols, along with smaller amounts of hydrocarbons. With a 20 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, temperature, pressure, and flow rate dependences of the synthesis reactions were investigated in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}S in the H{sub 2}/CO = 1/1 synthesis gas during short term testing experiments. It was shown that with a carefully prepared 10 wt% CsOOCH/MoS{sub 2} catalyst, reproducible and high alcohol synthesis activity could be obtained. For example, at 295 C with H{sub 2}/CO = 1 synthesis gas at 8.3 MPa and with GHSV = 7,760 l/kg cat/hr, the total alcohol space time yield was ca 300 g/kg cat/hr (accompanied with a hydrocarbon space time yield of ca 60 g/kg cat/hr). Over a testing period of ca 130 hr, no net deactivation of the catalyst was observed. 90 refs., 82 figs., 14 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Deemer, M.; Richards-Babb, M.; Carr, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (??target area?), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

J. Daniel Arthur

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Demonstration of CO2 Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Background Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes, among other sources, are linked to global climate change. Advancing development of technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for extended periods is of great importance. Advanced carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer significant potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) program, the U.S. Department

409

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Siemens Energy Siemens Energy Background Siemens Energy, along with numerous partners, has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop hydrogen turbines for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Siemens Energy is expanding this program for industrial applications such as cement, chemical, steel, and aluminum plants, refineries, manufacturing facilities, etc., under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines for industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

410

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Reducing Uncertainties in Model Reducing Uncertainties in Model Predictions via History Matching of CO2 Migration and Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Fate at the Sleipner Project, Norwegian North Sea Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is todevelop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations

411

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Molecular Separations Using Micro- Molecular Separations Using Micro- Defect Free Ultra-Thin Films Background Current methods for separating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from methane (CH 4 ) in fuel gas streams are energy and cost-intensive. Molecular sieve membrane development for carbon capture has been pursued for several decades because of the potential these membranes have for high selectivity while using less energy than cryogenic separation methods and greater flux (permselectivity) than is possible from polymeric membranes. However, the adoption of molecular sieve membrane technology has been hindered by high production costs and the micro-defect fissures that always accompany this type of membrane when fabricated using conventional techniques. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has

412

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Laboratory Scale Liquids Production Laboratory Scale Liquids Production and Assessment: Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels Background A major problem with the production of liquid fuels from coal is that the production process and subsequent combustion of the fuel generate excessive greenhouse gases over the entire production and usage lifecycle. Adding lignocellulosic biomass (as a raw feed material) along with coal has the potential to reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions to below those of petroleum products. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex) has developed an innovative thermo-chemical process capable of converting coal and biomass to transportation fuel ready for blending. The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Altex to

413

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Efficiency Efficiency Molten Bed Oxy- Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO 2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

414

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Alternative Low-Cost Process for Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications-Tennessee Technological University Background One of the material needs for the advancement of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is the development of low-cost effective manufacturing processes for application of coating architectures with enhanced performance and durability in coal derived synthesis gas (syngas)/hydrogen environments. Thermal spray technologies such as air plasma spray (APS) and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) are currently used to fabricate thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for large land- based turbine components. In this research Tennessee Technological University (TTU) will develop metal chromium-aluminum-yttrium (MCrAlY; where M = nickel [Ni], cobalt

415

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO2 Capture Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while

416

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines CONTACTS Richard A. Dennis Technology Manager, Turbines National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4515 richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov Travis Shultz Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1370 travis.shultz@netl.doe.gov Jacob A. Mills Principal Investigator Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc 1701 Military Trail Suite 110 Jupiter, FL 33458-7887 561-427-6349 jmills@fttinc.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 06/28/2012 08/13/2015 COST Total Project Value $1,149,847 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,149,847 / $0 AWARD NUMBER SC0008218 Air-Riding Seal Technology for Advanced Gas Turbine Engines-Florida Turbine

417

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Statistical Analysis of CO2 Exposed Wells Statistical Analysis of CO2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage through the Development of an Integrated Neural-Genetic Algorithm Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

418

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion of CO2 in Commercial Conversion of CO2 in Commercial Materials using Carbon Feedstocks Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

419

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background Pennsylvania State University is teaming with Princeton University to enhance scientific understanding of the underlying factors affecting combustion for turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants operating on synthesis gas (syngas). The team is using this knowledge to develop detailed, validated combustion kinetics models that are useful to support the design and future research and development needed to transition to fuel flexible operations, including high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from coal syngas, the product of gasification of coal. This project also funda- mentally seeks to resolve previously reported discrepancies between published ex-

420

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Preparation and Testing of Corrosion- Preparation and Testing of Corrosion- and Spallation-Resistant Coatings- University of North Dakota Background The life of turbine components is a significant issue in gas fired turbine power systems. In this project the University of North Dakota (UND) will advance the maturity of a process capable of bonding oxide-dispersion strengthened alloy coatings onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts. This will substantially improve the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of parts with and without thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). This project is laboratory research and development and will be performed by UND at their Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) facility and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Some thermal cycle testing will occur at Siemens Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory - Los Alamos National Laboratory - Advancing the State of Geologic Sequestration Technologies towards Commercialization and Pre-Combustion Capture Goals Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to aid in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) - the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent injection into deep geologic formations for permanent storage - is one option that is receiving considerable attention. NETL is devoted to improving geologic carbon sequestration technology by funding research projects aimed at removing barriers to commercial-scale

422

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials for Robust Repair Materials for Robust Repair of Leaky Wellbores in CO2 Storage Formations Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

423

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livermore National Laboratory Livermore National Laboratory - Advancing the State of Geologic Sequestration Technologies towards Commercialization Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in order to reduce green-house gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO 2 by injecting and permanently storing it in underground geologic formations. NETL is working to advance geologic carbon sequestration technology by funding research projects that aim to accelerate deployment and remove barriers to commercial-scale carbon sequestration. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

424

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications-Clean Energy Systems Background Clean Energy Systems (CES), with support from Siemens Energy and Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT), has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop an oxy-fuel combustor for highly efficient near zero emission power plants. CES is expanding this development for an industrial-scale, oxy-fuel reheat combustor- equipped intermediate-pressure oxy-fuel turbine (IP-OFT) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Through the design, analysis, and testing of a modified Siemens SGT-900 gas turbine, the team will demonstrate a simple-cycle oxy-fuel system. ARRA funding is accelerating advancement in OFT technology for

425

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Passive Wireless Acoustic Wave Sensors Passive Wireless Acoustic Wave Sensors for Monitoring CO 2 Emissions for Geological Sequestration Sites Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO 2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO

426

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Criteria for Flame- Criteria for Flame- holding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of California, Irvine Background The gas turbine community must develop low emissions systems while increasing overall efficiency for a widening source of fuels. In this work, the University of California, Irvine (UCI) will acquire the fundamental knowledge and understanding to facilitate the development of robust, reliable, and low emissions combustion systems with expanded high hydrogen content (HHC) fuel flexibility. Specifically, understanding flashback and the subsequent flameholding tendencies associated with geometric features found within combustor fuel/air premixers will enable the development of design guides to estimate flame holding tendencies for lean, premixed emission combustion systems

427

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

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Enhanced Analytical Simulation Tool for Enhanced Analytical Simulation Tool for CO2 Storage Capacity Estimation and Uncertainty Quantification Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

428

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactive Transport Models with Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

429

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Prototype Commercial a Prototype Commercial Gasifier Sensor Background Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental performance of fossil fuel based electric power production. During the IGCC process, coal and/or biomass is gasified at high temperature and pressure to form synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of contaminants such as hydrogen sulfide. The syngas can be used to produce power, chemicals, and/or fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Gasification Technologies Program is focused on enhancing the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of

430

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Methods for CO 2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effective- ness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely af fecting energy use or hindering economic grow th. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO 2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO

431

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that

432

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

433

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Concrete Products Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

434

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Structure for CO2 Reforming Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

435

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available CO2 capture and storage significantly reduces efficiency of the power cycle. The aim of the ACS program is to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near zero emissions of other flue gas pollutants.

436

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background In this congressionally directed project, the Earth and Mineral Science (EMS) Energy Institute at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) focuses on the development of fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents to support the production of electricity from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) via solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). PSU will use the fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents developed under this work to transform and clean ADG and ULSD into a syngas stream suitable as a feedstock for SOFCs. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), whose mission is to advance energy options to fuel

437

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines using a Hierarchical Validation Approach- University of Texas at Austin Background The focus of this project is the development of advanced large eddy simulation (LES)-based combustion modeling tools that can be used to design low emissions combustors burning high hydrogen content fuels. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) will develop models for two key topics: (1) flame stabilization, lift- off, and blowout when fuel-containing jets are introduced into a crossflow at high pressure, and (2) flashback dynamics of lean premixed flames with detailed description of flame propagation in turbulent core and near-wall flows. The jet- in-crossflow (JICF) configuration is widely used for rapid mixing of reactants

438

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

439

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbine Thermal Management-NETL-RUA Turbine Thermal Management-NETL-RUA Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching advanced turbine technology with the goal of producing reliable, affordable, and environmentally friendly electric power in response to the nation's increasing energy challenges. With the Hydrogen Turbine Program, NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of technologies to achieve power production from high-hydrogen-content fuels derived from coal that is clean, efficient, and cost-effective, and minimizes carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, and will help maintain the nation's leadership in the export of gas turbine equipment. The NETL Regional University Alliance (RUA) is an applied research collaboration that

440

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low Rank Coal in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (biomass, petroleum coke, etc.) produces synthesis gas (syngas), which can be cleaned and used to produce electricity and a variety of commercial products that support the U.S. economy, decrease U.S. dependence on oil imports, and meet current and future environmental emission standards. The major challenge is cost, which needs to be reduced to make integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology competitive. An IGCC plant combines a combustion turbine operating on a gasified fuel stream--syngas--with a steam turbine to capture what would otherwise be waste heat. Currently, the estimated cost of power from IGCC is higher than

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441

Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah??s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah??s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ?? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of