Sample records for albany water gas

  1. Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    time shift that can be used to qualify the gas desorption impact on long term production behavior. We focused on the field case Well A in New Albany Shale. We estimated the EUR for 33 wells, including Well A, using an existing analysis approach. We...

  2. Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

  3. Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgoura Hills,OesteAkrongProject(EC-LEDS) |

  4. Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models...

  5. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  6. EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon. Additional information is available at the...

  7. Process Intensification with Integrated Water-Gas-Shift Membrane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intensification with Integrated Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor Process Intensification with Integrated Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor water-gas-shift.pdf More Documents &...

  8. Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale The University of Oxford http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/joec Key Words Shale gas, hydraulic fracture, groundwater contamination, transport in porous media Overview Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale

  9. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

  10. Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProducts (VAP) VAP7-0973ManagedStrategic GrowthAlbany-Eugene-Rebuild-Project Sign

  11. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

  12. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cold water to the water heater and hot water from the waterinduced draft water heaters, water heaters with flue designsInput Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tank

  13. Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a hot water heater...

  14. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 163, January 1, 2005. Battelle, Assessment of Technologymodel, TANK, was developed by Battelle for the Gas Research93/0186. Prepared by Battelle for Gas Research Institute

  15. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Input Screens SCREEN D1: WATER HEATER SPECIFICATIONS 1. Tankthe house. Supply pipe – this is the water heater inlet pipewith refills the water heater with cold water Note: The TANK

  16. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    air. For a storage tank water heater, the greater the hotthe water heater with cold water Note: The TANK program usesof a natural draft tank type water heater can be without

  17. Dynamic characteristics of gas-water interfacial plasma under water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, S. J.; Zhang, Y. C.; Ke, B.; Ding, F.; Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Zhu, X. D. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-water interfacial plasmas under water were generated in a compact space in a tube with a sandglass-like structure, where two metal wires were employed as electrodes with an applied 35 kHz ac power source. The dynamic behaviors of voltage/current were investigated for the powered electrode with/without water cover to understand the effect of the gas-water interface. It is found that the discharge exhibits periodic pulsed currents after breakdown as the powered electrode is covered with water, whereas the electrical current reveals a damped oscillation with time with a frequency about 10{sup 6} Hz as the powered electrode is in a vapor bubble. By increasing water conductivity, a discharge current waveform transition from pulse to oscillation presents in the water covering case. These suggest that the gas-water interface has a significant influence on the discharge property.

  18. The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students Kristen Melnyk­Elsner Kimball education outreach program, the Albany Particle Tower (APT) has been made available online to students who to run the detector and analyze real time data. Introduction The Albany Particle Tower is a Cosmic Ray

  19. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including oil and gas fields, unmineable deep coal seams, brine formations, and natural gas hydrates. The data obtained from laboratory tests of various rock types under a...

  20. Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR® program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  1. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data and modeling tools needed to predict and quantify potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other...

  2. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

  3. Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas Pennsylvania, ex- amining natural gas concentrations and isotopic signatures with proximity to shale gas wells this transformation, with shale gas and other unconventional sources now yielding more than one- half of all US

  4. Storage Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Site EnvironmentalEnergySafelyVirtualStephanie Price Stephanie PriceStoller PrimeGas Water

  5. Albany, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand Telephone CoStatutes:AlbanyOhio: Energy

  6. Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting...

  7. Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration...

  8. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas space heating and water-heating technologies. USheating and gas water-heating technology characterizationspace and water-heating technologies. It also shows that

  9. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas space heating and water heating technologies. 3.Heating and Gas Water Heating Technology Characterizationspace and water heating technologies. It also shows that

  10. A study of water driven oil encroachment into gas caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritch, Harlan J

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (frequently thin and commonly referred to as an oil rim). Prior to the introduction of sound conservation practices, large quantities of gas were often produced and vented by operators seeking to induce a flow of oil into wells initially productive only.... : "The Prediction of Oil Recovery by Water Flood, " Seconder Recover of Oil in the United States, API (1950), Second Edition, 160. Elliott, J. K. : "The Effect of Initial Gas Content and Distribution on the Residual Gas Content of Cores after Water...

  11. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  12. University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012...

  13. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam...

  14. EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon.

  15. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas...

  16. Southwest Gas Corporation- Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas is offering rebates to Nevada customers for solar water heating systems installed in private residential, small business, public and other properties. Rebates are based on the amount...

  17. Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

  18. Texas Gas Service- Residential Solar Water Heating Rebate Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Texas Gas Service offers a flat rebate of $750 for its residential customers within the Austin and Sunset Valley city limits for the installation and purchase of a new solar water heater with...

  19. Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

  20. Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

  1. Analysis of Water Flowback Data in Gas Shale Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldaif, Hussain

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of both shale gas reservoirs and hydraulic fractures are usually estimated by analyzing hydrocarbon production data while water data is typically ignored. This study introduces a new method to estimate the effective fracture volume...

  2. A study of water driven oil encroachment into gas caps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritch, Harlan J

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF WATER DRIVEN OIL ENCROACHMENT INTO GAS CAPS LIBRARY A S I COLLEGE OF TEXAS A Thesis By HARLAN J. RITCH ~ ~ ~ Submitted to the Graduate School oi' the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1958 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A STUDY OF WATER DRIVEN OIL ENCROACHMENT INTO GAS CAPS A Thesis By HARLAN J. RITCH Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  3. Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas. This publication fo- cuses mostly on Pennsylvania because it has the most Marcellus drilling activity of any state

  4. Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang , Jeremy Manno and Ignacio E. Grossmann Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA Carrizo Oil & Gas and multiple scenarios from historical data. Two examples representative of the Marcellus Shale play

  5. Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

  6. Albany County, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand Telephone CoStatutes:Albany County,Albany

  7. Management of produced water in oil and gas operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chirag V.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment of the producing well. The development of effective produced water management strategies poses a big challenge...

  8. Determination of the effect of gas viscosity upon gas flow in permeable media containing water and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, Richard Joseph

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?ateredeaturated Natural Gas Visoositiss at Varieua PPISSQreao ~ ~ ~ o e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 32 VI Ns~tura+ed gitrogen Viscosities 0't Varieue h%00uraee ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ eel 33 VII Das Wbili... pressure to 1500 ysi per yccryoses of flew work~ tho viscosities af aitrogen aud tho natural gas wbou saturated with water vapor were also detercdcmd Sco basis yerpese of this pre)set was te dsteruine ths offset of the vtsoosQy of a gas nyon the web...

  9. Commercial Gas Water Heaters, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance and purchasing specifications for commercial gas water heaters under the FEMP-designated product program.

  10. Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gieg, Lisa

    1 Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry (Education Paper) Seyyed Ghaderi ................................................................................................................................18 Shale Gas ................................................................................................................................................19 How much water is used in deep shale gas development

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    around 25% of the gas water heating market by 2015. DOE alsoSpace Heating and Water Heating Market Characterization Thespace heating and water heating market differs significantly

  12. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condensing furnaces and water heaters and power vent waterheater, electric water heaters and furnaces, which includeResidential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States

  13. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star Residential Water Heaters: Final criteria analysis.gas furnaces and water heaters in US new constructioncondensing furnace and water heater and the pay-back period

  14. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make-up water for successive fracs. RFW, however, contains dissolved salts, suspended sediment and oils that may interfere with fracking fluids and/or clog fractures. This would lead to impaired well productivity. The major technical constraints to recycling RFW involves: identification of its composition, determination of industry standards for make-up water, and development of techniques to treat RFW to acceptable levels. If large scale RFW recycling becomes feasible, the industry will realize lower transportation and disposal costs, environmental conflicts, and risks of interruption in well development schedules.

  15. Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Sigurd Arild

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    implicit model. The model is thoroughly tested for both coning and other problems, including both gas and oil. It was very stable, allowing a maximum saturation change per timestep as high as 10 per cent. The condition simulated was a well in the center... of 10. The Behavior of the Injected Gas Gas was injected at different depths below the initial gas/water contact. The perforation interval for injection was 20 feet for all tests, and the r ate of injection varied, depending on the investigation. 24...

  16. Analysis of a duo-selecting membrane reactor for the water-gas shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, AliciA Jillian Jackson, 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-gas shift reaction is an exothermic and reversible catalytic process that converts carbon monoxide and water (steam) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In regard to energy-related issues, the water-gas shift is part ...

  17. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  18. Slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Viani, Brian

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A slurried solid media for simultaneous water purification and carbon dioxide removal from gas mixtures includes the steps of dissolving the gas mixture and carbon dioxide in water providing a gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture; adding a porous solid media to the gas, carbon dioxide, water mixture forming a slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media; heating the slurry of gas, carbon dioxide, water, and porous solid media producing steam; and cooling the steam to produce purified water and carbon dioxide.

  19. Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  20. Water augmented indirectly-fired gas turbine systems and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, Thomas F. (Lebanon, PA); Parsons, Jr., Edward J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An indirectly-fired gas turbine system utilizing water augmentation for increasing the net efficiency and power output of the system is described. Water injected into the compressor discharge stream evaporatively cools the air to provide a higher driving temperature difference across a high temperature air heater which is used to indirectly heat the water-containing air to a turbine inlet temperature of greater than about 1,000.degree. C. By providing a lower air heater hot side outlet temperature, heat rejection in the air heater is reduced to increase the heat recovery in the air heater and thereby increase the overall cycle efficiency.

  1. Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haugen, Sigurd Arild

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONTROL O' NATEP, CONING IN GAS RESERVOIRS BY INJECTII4G CAS INTO THE AQUIFER A Thesis by SIGURD ARILD HAUGEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... Member May 1980 I~SGi9". p ABSTRACT Control of Water Coninc ir, Gas Reservoirs by Injecting Gas into the Aquifer (May 1980) Sigurd Arild Haugen, Dis. Ing. , Roga)and Regional College Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. A. Morse The production...

  2. Water Extraction from Coal-Fired Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce C. Folkedahl; Greg F. Weber; Michael E. Collings

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program was to develop a liquid disiccant-based flue gas dehydration process technology to reduce water consumption in coal-fired power plants. The specific objective of the program was to generate sufficient subscale test data and conceptual commercial power plant evaluations to assess process feasibility and merits for commercialization. Currently, coal-fired power plants require access to water sources outside the power plant for several aspects of their operation in addition to steam cycle condensation and process cooling needs. At the present time, there is no practiced method of extracting the usually abundant water found in the power plant stack gas. This project demonstrated the feasibility and merits of a liquid desiccant-based process that can efficiently and economically remove water vapor from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants to be recycled for in-plant use or exported for clean water conservation. After an extensive literature review, a survey of the available physical and chemical property information on desiccants in conjunction with a weighting scheme developed for this application, three desiccants were selected and tested in a bench-scale system at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC). System performance at the bench scale aided in determining which desiccant was best suited for further evaluation. The results of the bench-scale tests along with further review of the available property data for each of the desiccants resulted in the selection of calcium chloride as the desiccant for testing at the pilot-scale level. Two weeks of testing utilizing natural gas in Test Series I and coal in Test Series II for production of flue gas was conducted with the liquid desiccant dehumidification system (LDDS) designed and built for this study. In general, it was found that the LDDS operated well and could be placed in an automode in which the process would operate with no operator intervention or adjustment. Water produced from this process should require little processing for use, depending on the end application. Test Series II water quality was not as good as that obtained in Test Series I; however, this was believed to be due to a system upset that contaminated the product water system during Test Series II. The amount of water that can be recovered from flue gas with the LDDS is a function of several variables, including desiccant temperature, L/G in the absorber, flash drum pressure, liquid-gas contact method, and desiccant concentration. Corrosion will be an issue with the use of calcium chloride as expected but can be largely mitigated through proper material selection. Integration of the LDDS with either low-grade waste heat and or ground-source heating and cooling can affect the parasitic power draw the LDDS will have on a power plant. Depending on the amount of water to be removed from the flue gas, the system can be designed with no parasitic power draw on the power plant other than pumping loads. This can be accomplished in one scenario by taking advantage of the heat of absorption and the heat of vaporization to provide the necessary temperature changes in the desiccant with the flue gas and precipitates that may form and how to handle them. These questions must be addressed in subsequent testing before scale-up of the process can be confidently completed.

  3. Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit

  4. CFD Validation of Gas Injection into Stagnant Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant water have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant water. Flow visualization data were obtained with a high-speed camera for the comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. The CFD model is validated with these experimental measurements at different gas flow rates. The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The acoustic signature aspect of this validation is particularly interesting since it has applicability to the injection of gas into liquid mercury, which is opaque.

  5. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Southworh. 2004. Heat pump water heater technology:gas tankless water heaters, heat pump water heaters,heat pump space heaters, and solar water heaters, as well as

  6. Produced Water Radioactivity Regulation Lax as Gas Wells' Tainted Water Hits Rivers, Ian Urbina, NYT, 2/26/11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Produced Water Radioactivity Regulation Lax as Gas Wells' Tainted Water Hits Rivers, Ian Urbina-rich drilling mud(?) Airborne (not water-dissolved) radon is responsible for the majority of the public exposure

  7. Impes modeling of volumetric dry gas reservoirs with mobile water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forghany, Saeed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . For abnormally or geopressured reservoirs, pressure gradients often approach values equal to the overburden pressure gradient (i.e., ~1.0 psi/ft). 8, 9 Among these types of dry gas reservoirs, in this study we will focus on volumetric reservoir. 1... properties of a given reservoir?s gas and water can handle pressures starting from standard conditions up to 4,000 psi and the units for this table are tabulated in Table 3.1. Table 3.1- Units for the PVT properties used in the input file Pressure...

  8. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    appliance_standards/residential/water_ pool_heaters_prelim_Star (2008). Energy star residential water heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

  9. Department of Computer Science, College of Computing and Information University at Albany --State University of New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Department of Computer Science, College of Computing and Information University at Albany -- State, Information Retrieval, Computational Social Science, Software Engineering, Database Systems, Distributed The Department of Computer Science at the University at Albany, State University of New York (UAlbany

  10. Experimental Study of Water Droplet Flows in a Model PEM Fuel Cell Gas Microchannel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Experimental Study of Water Droplet Flows in a Model PEM Fuel Cell Gas Microchannel by Grant Minor Experimental Study of Water Droplet Flows in a Model PEM Fuel Cell Gas Microchannel by Grant Minor B. Eng. Mgmt Committee Member, Mechanical Engineering). Abstract Liquid water formation and flooding in PEM fuel cell gas

  11. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  12. Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gakhar, Kush

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Excess water production is a major economic and environmental problem for the oil and gas industry. The cost of processing excess water runs into billions of dollars. Polymer gel technology has been successfully used in controlling water influx...

  13. Albany County, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand Telephone CoStatutes:Albany County, New

  14. Albany, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand Telephone CoStatutes:Albany

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Albany - OR 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d!Qwner*.AcidAlbany

  16. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  17. Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

  18. Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Sturt

    Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular review of shale gas drilling in New York State, as well as the most comprehensive collection of data

  19. AGGLOMERATION OF GAS HYDRATE IN A WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION: EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AGGLOMERATION OF GAS HYDRATE IN A WATER-IN-OIL EMULSION: EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDIES Ana of gas hydrates in water-in-oil emulsion is investigated at the laboratory pilot scale on a flow loop and a spread of the Chord Length Distribution (CLD) to larger chord length. Keywords: gas hydrates, flow loop

  20. Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

  1. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

  2. Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    States, oil and gas wastewater is managed through recycling of the wastewater for shale gas operationsImpacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The safe disposal of liquid wastes associated with oil and gas production

  3. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knapp, James Howard

    Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates in the deep water of the South Caspian Basin, Azerbaijan C) of this area, the presence of gas hydrates. Geophysical evidence for gas hydrates consists of a shallow (300, and is interpreted as the top of the gas hydrate layer. Similarly, a high-amplitude Rc

  4. Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

    2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

  5. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers by Aimy Ming Jii Bazylak Bachelor means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion State University) Abstract Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability

  6. National Grid (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    National Grid’s High Efficiency Heating Rebates are offered to gas heating customers in the Upstate New York counties of Albany, Columbia, Fulton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida,...

  7. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.heaters, hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks.

  8. Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services,...

  9. Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

  10. CenterPoint Energy (Gas)- Residential Heating and Hot Water Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage...

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiences of residential consumers and utilities. OakStar (2008). Energy Star Residential Water Heaters: Finalefficiency improvements for residential gas furnaces in the

  12. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  13. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  14. Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

  15. EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by BPA to rebuild a 32-mile section of the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line in Lane and Linn Counties, OR.

  16. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Gas Space and Water Heating Market and TechnologyThe U.S. central space heating market is dominated by forcedmarket the most common combination of water heating and

  17. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  18. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  19. Effect of GOR, Temperature, and Initial Water Saturation on Solution-Gas Drive in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Effect of GOR, Temperature, and Initial Water Saturation on Solution-Gas Drive in Heavy-Oil have carried out an extensive set of tests on solution-gas drive for a heavy oil to study the effects was approximately 16% and higher. Introduction Solution-gas drive from some heavy oil reservoirs in Canada, Ven

  20. Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

  1. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  2. Analysis of Heating Systems and Scale of Natural Gas-Condensing Water Boilers in Northern Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, various heating systems and scale of the natural gas-condensing water boiler in northern zones are discussed, based on a technical-economic analysis of the heating systems of natural gas condensing water boilers in northern zones...

  3. Analysis of Heating Systems and Scale of Natural Gas-Condensing Water Boilers in Northern Zones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.; Wang, S.; Pan, S.; Shi, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, various heating systems and scale of the natural gas-condensing water boiler in northern zones are discussed, based on a technical-economic analysis of the heating systems of natural gas condensing water boilers in northern zones...

  4. THEORY OF THREE-PHASE FLOW APPLIED TO WATER-ALTERNATING-GAS ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the key to this improvement. 1. Introduction In secondary oil recovery, water or gas is injectedTHEORY OF THREE-PHASE FLOW APPLIED TO WATER-ALTERNATING-GAS ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY D. MARCHESIN, we show that this theory can be applied to increase the rate of oil recovery, during certain

  5. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  6. The displacement of gas by oil in the presence of connate water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dardaganian, Stephen Garabed

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mixed stream of oil and gas. The mobile gas phase established within the core was then dis- placed by an oil flood. The assumption was made that the residual gas saturation within the oil bank would be the same as that which would occur within a... water bank resulting from a waterflood. The results indicate that the residual gas saturation within and behind the oil bank increases as the gas saturation prior to the flood increases. The relationship between the initial and residual gas...

  7. A Simple Method to Continuous Measurement of Energy Consumption of Tank Less Gas Water Heaters for Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamaha, M.; Fujita, M.; Miyoshi, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy consumptions of hot water supply in restaurants or residential houses are large amount, guidelines for optimal design are not presented. measurements of energy consumption of tank less gas water heaters very difficult unless gas flow meters...

  8. FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resistance and heat pump water heaters are not covered.other than commercial heat pump water heaters). 10CFR431.110

  9. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States Government or any agency thereof." Abstract Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas...

  10. Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric)- Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Memphis Light, Gas and Water (MLGW), in partnership with the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), offers a variety of energy efficient incentives to non-residential customers. The program provides...

  11. EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    including oil and gas fields, unmineable deep coal seams, brine formations, and natural gas hydrates. The data obtained from laboratory tests of various rock types under a...

  13. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  14. A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fredericks, Alan D

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF PLATES Plate Page I Front Oblique View of Ampoule Flushing and Sealing Apparatus . 15 2 Side View of Ampoule Flushing and Sealing Apparatus . 17 3 Ampoule Crushing Apparatus 4 Two Position Gas Valve 5 Carbon Dioxide Analysis Apparatus 29 37 45... is passed through an infrared analyzer using nitrogen as a carrier gas. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a shipboard method for determining the concentration of dissolved organic carbon in sea water samples. Sea water was sealed in glass...

  15. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  16. Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

  17. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas for electrical shock. NOTIFY University Police. What should I do if I smell natural or propane gas? LEAVE/Repair line, 7-6333, or CALL the Campus University Police or Security at (561) 297-3500 or 911

  18. Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen,*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen cosmetic and food products (such as whipped cream) or in oil recovery processes. Depending on the a of oil droplets and gas bubbles and show that the oil can have two very different roles, either

  19. The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane contamination is usually due to natural causes; however, it can also be the result of drilling activities, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases

  20. Gas exchange and water relations of evergreen and deciduous tropical savanna trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Gas exchange and water relations of evergreen and deciduous tropical savanna trees G. Goldstein1 F savannas with pro- nounced wet/dry seasonality and well- drained soils are characterized by the presence the rainless period (Medina, 1982; Sarmiento et al., 1985). The purpose of this study was to investi- gate gas

  1. Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zhenyu

    Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production Zhenyu Campus, Niels Bohrs Vej 8, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark (e-mail: yang@et.aau.dk). Maersk Oil A/S, Kanalen 1, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark (e-mail: Jens.Peter.Stigkaer@maerskoil.com) Ramboll Oil & Gas A/S, Willemoesgade

  2. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashok S. Damle; J. Vernon Cole

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  3. Development of Novel Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, W. S. Winston

    2004-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the objectives, technical barrier, approach, and accomplishments for the development of a novel water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor for hydrogen enhancement and CO reduction. We have synthesized novel CO{sub 2}-selective membranes with high CO{sub 2} permeabilities and high CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}/CO selectivities by incorporating amino groups in polymer networks. We have also developed a one-dimensional non-isothermal model for the countercurrent WGS membrane reactor. The modeling results have shown that H{sub 2} enhancement (>99.6% H{sub 2} for the steam reforming of methane and >54% H{sub 2} for the autothermal reforming of gasoline with air on a dry basis) via CO{sub 2} removal and CO reduction to 10 ppm or lower are achievable for synthesis gases. With this model, we have elucidated the effects of system parameters, including CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} selectivity, CO{sub 2} permeability, sweep/feed flow rate ratio, feed temperature, sweep temperature, feed pressure, catalyst activity, and feed CO concentration, on the membrane reactor performance. Based on the modeling study using the membrane data obtained, we showed the feasibility of achieving H{sub 2} enhancement via CO{sub 2} removal, CO reduction to {le} 10 ppm, and high H{sub 2} recovery. Using the membrane synthesized, we have obtained <10 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product in WGS membrane reactor experiments. From the experiments, we verified the model developed. In addition, we removed CO{sub 2} from a syngas containing 17% CO{sub 2} to about 30 ppm. The CO{sub 2} removal data agreed well with the model developed. The syngas with about 0.1% CO{sub 2} and 1% CO was processed to convert the carbon oxides to methane via methanation to obtain <5 ppm CO in the H{sub 2} product.

  4. July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

  5. June 2011 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis were conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analyses. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743. Produced water samples were not collected at locations 30-039-30161 and 30-039-21744 because of the lack of water. Samples were not collected from location 30-039-29988 because the well was shut-in.

  6. Analysis of Water Flowback Data in Gas Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldaif, Hussain

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    it at different reservoir conditions. For this purpose, several simulation cases were run. The results of the simulation runs were compared with the production data from several Fayetteville gas wells. Different conclusions were obtained from these comparisons...

  7. A Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    . Sc = /D denotes the Schmidt number, the ratio of kinematic viscosity of water and the tracersA Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas Transfer Kerstin Richter1 of exchange hap- pens with an exponent of 1/2 and links this fraction with a physical property of the wave

  8. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex; Franco, Victor; Meyers, Steve

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential space and water heating accounts for over 90percent of total residential primary gas consumption in the United States. Condensing space and water heating equipment are 10-30percent more energy-efficient than conventional space and water heating. Currently, condensing gas furnaces represent 40 percent of shipments and are common in the Northern U.S. market. Meanwhile, manufacturers are planning to develop condensing gas storage water heaters to qualify for Energy Star? certification. Consumers, installers, and builders who make decisions about installing space and water heating equipment generally do not perform an analysis to assess the economic impacts of different combinations and efficiencies of space and water heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential life-cycle economic and energy savings of installing space and water heating equipment combinations. Drawing on previous and current analysis conducted for the United States Department of Energy rulemaking on amended standards for furnaces and water heaters, this paper evaluates the extent to which condensing equipment can provide life-cycle cost-effectiveness in a representative sample of single family American homes. The economic analyses indicate that significant energy savings and consumer benefits may result from large-scale introduction of condensing water heaters combined with condensing furnaces in U.S. residential single-family housing, particularly in the Northern region. The analyses also shows that important benefits may be overlooked when policy analysts evaluate the impact of space and water heating equipment separately.

  9. Liquefied Gas Over Water : An Exprimental Approach at Mdium Scale to assess gas/water interactions and vapor dispersion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    fire) or an explosion (overpressure added to flash fire effects), instantaneous vaporisation delayed hazardous phenomena may occur, like ignition of the spilled gas leading to a fire (jet fire, pool

  10. Determination of the effect of gas viscosity upon gas flow in permeable media containing water and gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, Richard Joseph

    1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of Alanlts ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 46 Gsndlnaionso ~ ~ , o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 49 50 kdtSN... uovoaout of gas menses whish eaecncpass a naaber af porose and in whish tho gas phase is oouttnaoaa. Lhycid sataraticms af tho oore wore obtained bf fractional OMdPOtiT1t7 RMHIMMhth 4 1 pFOMIM INllillt tl Mll I MS straeted to obtain the satoratinu...

  11. The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The problem may arise when the wellhead is at water depth of more than 3500 ft. In deep water drilling, the accumulators should be placed on the subsea blowout preventer stack to reduce hydraulic response times and provide a hydraulic power supply in case...

  12. Reclamation of potable water from mixed gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R; Bischoff, Brian L; Debusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for separating a liquid from a mixed gas stream can include a wall, a mixed gas stream passageway, and a liquid collection assembly. The wall can include a first surface, a second surface, and a plurality of capillary condensation pores. The capillary condensation pores extend through the wall, and have a first opening on the first surface of the wall, and a second opening on the second surface of the wall. The pore size of the pores can be between about 2 nm to about 100 nm. The mixed gas stream passageway can be in fluid communication with the first opening. The liquid collection assembly can collect liquid from the plurality of pores.

  13. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced melt-water, film boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomenological model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe the gas-sparging enhanced film boiling heat transfer between a molten pool of corium and an overlying water layer. The model accounts for thermal radiation across the vapor film, bulk liquid subcooling, interfacial area enhancement due to sparging gas, and melt entrainment into the overlying water layer. In this paper, the modeling approach is described, and a comparison with the lead-Freon 11 and lead-water film boiling experiment data of Greene is made. Predictions are then made for the case of film boiling over corium in the presence of sparging concrete decomposition gases. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project is titled 'Identification, Verification, and Compilation of Produced Water Management Practices for Conventional Oil and Gas Production Operations'. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is the principal investigator and the IOGCC has partnered with ALL Consulting, Inc., headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, in this project. State agencies that also have partnered in the project are the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, the Montana Board of Oil and Gas Conservation, the Kansas Oil and Gas Conservation Division, the Oklahoma Oil and Gas Conservation Division and the Alaska Oil and Gas Conservation Commission. The objective is to characterize produced water quality and management practices for the handling, treating, and disposing of produced water from conventional oil and gas operations throughout the industry nationwide. Water produced from these operations varies greatly in quality and quantity and is often the single largest barrier to the economic viability of wells. The lack of data, coupled with renewed emphasis on domestic oil and gas development, has prompted many experts to speculate that the number of wells drilled over the next 20 years will approach 3 million, or near the number of current wells. This level of exploration and development undoubtedly will draw the attention of environmental communities, focusing their concerns on produced water management based on perceived potential impacts to fresh water resources. Therefore, it is imperative that produced water management practices be performed in a manner that best minimizes environmental impacts. This is being accomplished by compiling current best management practices for produced water from conventional oil and gas operations and to develop an analysis tool based on a geographic information system (GIS) to assist in the understanding of watershed-issued permits. That would allow management costs to be kept in line with the specific projects and regions, which increases the productive life of wells and increases the ultimate recoverable reserves in the ground. A case study was conducted in Wyoming to validate the applicability of the GIS analysis tool for watershed evaluations under real world conditions. Results of the partnered research will continue to be shared utilizing proven methods, such as on the IGOCC Web site, preparing hard copies of the results, distribution of documented case studies, and development of reference and handbook components to accompany the interactive internet-based GIS watershed analysis tool. Additionally, there have been several technology transfer seminars and presentations. The goal is to maximize the recovery of our nation's energy reserves and to promote water conservation.

  15. DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, Jesse [SUNY Albany; Jain, Vivek

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

  16. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

  17. 1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenstrom, Michael K.

    1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important = CL (CL + HcVG) (6) where CL = liquid phase concentration, VL = liquid volume, CG = gas phase concentration, VG = gas volume, Hc = dimensionless Henry's law coefficient and M = mass of gas. Now use two

  18. Diagnosis of "fizz-gas" and gas reservoirs in deep-water environment De-hua Han, X RPL, Houston Unversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pressure (shallow depth gas modulus is much less than 0.1 GPa. Even few percent volume fraction are a result of complicated geological processes which form a reservoir. Introduction "Fizz-water" or "Fizz-gasMixture of brine (50000ppm) & gas (0.78) 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 0 20 40 60 80 10 Brine Volume

  19. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas activity: a west of Shetland case study industry and government identified sponge grounds in areas of interest to the oil and gas sector

  20. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford Cartwright Project description: Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale) formations has triggered

  1. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  2. Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline Companies (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation confers the rights and privileges of telegraph and telephone companies (S.C. Code 58-9) on pipeline and water companies, and contains several additional provisions pertaining to...

  3. Water Withdrawals for Development of Marcellus Shale Gas in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    is the fracking fluid (also called drilling return wa- ter, drilling wastewater, flowback, or produced- ing (fracking), the portion of water withdrawals related to mining is likely to rise. The information

  4. Effects of Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Jeffrey Morris; Patrick Richards; Joel Mason

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstrating effective treatment technologies and beneficial uses for oil and gas produced water is essential for producers who must meet environmental standards and deal with high costs associated with produced water management. Proven, effective produced-water treatment technologies coupled with comprehensive data regarding blending ratios for productive long-term irrigation will improve the state-of-knowledge surrounding produced-water management. Effective produced-water management scenarios such as cost-effective treatment and irrigation will discourage discharge practices that result in legal battles between stakeholder entities. The goal of this work is to determine the optimal blending ratio required for irrigating crops with CBNG and conventional oil and gas produced water treated by ion exchange (IX), reverse osmosis (RO), or electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) in order to maintain the long term physical integrity of soils and to achieve normal crop production. The soils treated with CBNG produced water were characterized with significantly lower SAR values compared to those impacted with conventional oil and gas produced water. The CBNG produced water treated with RO at the 100% treatment level was significantly different from the untreated produced water, while the 25%, 50% and 75% water treatment levels were not significantly different from the untreated water. Conventional oil and gas produced water treated with EDR and RO showed comparable SAR results for the water treatment technologies. There was no significant difference between the 100% treated produced water and the control (river water). The EDR water treatment resulted with differences at each level of treatment, which were similar to RO treated conventional oil and gas water. The 100% treated water had SAR values significantly lower than the 75% and 50% treatments, which were similar (not significantly different). The results of the greenhouse irrigation study found the differences in biomass production between each soil were significant for Western Wheatgrass and Alfafla. The Sheridan sandy loam soil resulted in the highest production for western wheatgrass and alfalfa while the X-ranch sandy loam had the lowest production rate for both plants. Plant production levels resulting from untreated CBNG produced water were significantly higher compared to untreated conventional oil and gas produced water. However, few differences were found between water treatments. The biomass produced from the greenhouse study was analyzed for elemental composition and for forage value. Elemental composition indentified several interesting findings. Some of the biomass was characterized with seemly high boron and sodium levels. High levels of boron found in some of the biomass was unexpected and may indicate that alfalfa and western wheatgrass plants may have been impacted by either soil or irrigation water containing high boron levels. Plants irrigated with water treated using EDR technology appeared to contain higher levels of boron with increased levels of treatment. Forage evaluations were conducted using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. The data collected show small differences, generally less than 10%, between produced water treatments including the no treatment and 100% treatment conditions for each plant species studied. The forage value of alfalfa and western wheatgrass did not show significant tendencies dependent on soil, the amount of produced water treatment, or treatment technology.

  5. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: • An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. • Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. • Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. • Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. • Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. • Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. • Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. • Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  6. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

  7. Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Malinchak, R.M.

    1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

  8. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

  9. Development and Validation of a Gas-Fired Residential Heat Pump Water Heater - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Garrabrant; Roger Stout; Paul Glanville; Janice Fitzgerald; Chris Keinath

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For gas-fired residential water heating, the U.S. and Canada is predominantly supplied by minimum efficiency storage water heaters with Energy Factors (EF) in the range of 0.59 to 0.62. Higher efficiency and higher cost ($700 - $2,000) options serve about 15% of the market, but still have EFs below 1.0, ranging from 0.65 to 0.95. To develop a new class of water heating products that exceeds the traditional limit of thermal efficiency, the project team designed and demonstrated a packaged water heater driven by a gas-fired ammonia-water absorption heat pump. This gas-fired heat pump water heater can achieve EFs of 1.3 or higher, at a consumer cost of $2,000 or less. Led by Stone Mountain Technologies Inc. (SMTI), with support from A.O. Smith, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI), and Georgia Tech, the cross-functional team completed research and development tasks including cycle modeling, breadboard evaluation of two cycles and two heat exchanger classes, heat pump/storage tank integration, compact solution pump development, combustion system specification, and evaluation of packaged prototype GHPWHs. The heat pump system extracts low grade heat from the ambient air and produces high grade heat suitable for heating water in a storage tank for domestic use. Product features that include conventional installation practices, standard footprint and reasonable economic payback, position the technology to gain significant market penetration, resulting in a large reduction of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions from domestic hot water production.

  10. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  11. Criteria for displacement by gas versus water in oil reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Larry Dean

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the problem. Croes and SchwarzIp stud1ed the eff1c1ency of water flooding and presented results show1ng effic1ency and water cut as a function of total production for a range of v1scosity rat1os between I and 500. They also used the1r results to compare... of the oil in place at various values of the displac1ng fluid-to-oil ratio (DFOR)* was used as the measure of displacement effic1ency. This procedure was used for two reasons. F1rst, economic limits may be established based on DFOR. Recovery at various...

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division. Current research projects will further advance the existing suite of reservoir simulation codes and adapt them to the problem of natural gas production from shale...

  13. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division. Current research projects will further advance the existing suite of reservoir simulation codes and adapt them to the problem of natural gas pro-duction from shale...

  14. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis By H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte...

  15. Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

  16. Recoverable natural gas reserves from Jurassic Norphlet Formation, Alabama coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.; Hamilton, R.P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, 11 Norphlet gas fields have been established in offshore Alabama. These fields are part of a deep Jurassic gas trend that extends across southern Mississippi and Alabama into the Gulf of Mexico. Recoverable gas reserves of 4.9-8.1 tcf are estimated for the Norphlet Formation in Alabama's coastal waters. Proven gas reserves are estimated to be 3.7-4.6 tcf and potential reserves are estimated to be 1.2-3.5 tcf. The natural gas is trapped in a series of generally east-west-trending salt anticlines. The mechanism of structure formation appears to be salt flowage that has formed broad, low-relief anticlines, most of which are faulted, and many of which are related to small-scale growth faults. Salt movement is the critical factor in the formation of these petroleum traps. The primary Norphlet reservoir lithofacies are eolian dune and interdune sandstones that range in thickness from 140 to over 600 ft in Alabama's coastal waters. Gas pay can exceed 280 ft in thickness. Porosity is principally secondary, developed as a result of decementation and grain dissolution. Jurassic Smackover algal carbonate mudstones were the main source for the Norphlet hydrocarbons. The seal for the gas is the nonpermeable upper portion of the Norphlet Formation. The overlying lower Smackover carbonates are also nonpermeable and may serve as part of the seal.

  17. Management of produced water in oil and gas operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chirag V.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    of oil present in the sample. For example, the calibration factor obtained for samples containing kerosene is different from the calibration factor obtained for samples containing diesel. However according to EPA, if the analyzer is calibrated...) for analysis which reduces the chances of inaccuracy because the larger the amount of sample the higher the chances of good representation of the original sample. 6 In this work TOC-700 was used to analyze kerosene-water emulsions. To match TOC...

  18. Experimentation and application of directional solvent extraction for desalination of seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinguetl, Kevin (Kevin G.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently demonstrated directional solvent technique for desalination of water has been tested for desalting seawater and shale gas 'frac' flowback water. The premise behind directional solvent extraction is that when ...

  19. Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2012 1 Copyright 2012 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    production from shale formations. Examples of three case studies in Lower Huron and New Albany shale Reservoir Modelling of Oil and Gas Producing Shale Reservoirs; Case Studies, Int. J. Oil, Gas, and Coal Enterprises Ltd. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of Oil and Gas Producing Shale Reservoirs; Case

  20. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth C. Chapman,† Rosemary C. Capo,† Brian W. Stewart,*,† Carl S. Kirby,‡ Richard W. Hammack,§

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of ?375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?Sr SW = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?Sr SW is the deviation of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 104); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  1. Geochemical and Strontium Isotope Characterization of Produced Waters from Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Elizabeth C; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Kirby, Carl S.; Hammack, Richard W.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Edenborn, Harry M.

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing of the Middle Devonian Marcellus Shale, a major gas-bearing unit in the Appalachian Basin, results in significant quantities of produced water containing high total dissolved solids (TDS). We carried out a strontium (Sr) isotope investigation to determine the utility of Sr isotopes in identifying and quantifying the interaction of Marcellus Formation produced waters with other waters in the Appalachian Basin in the event of an accidental release, and to provide information about the source of the dissolved solids. Strontium isotopic ratios of Marcellus produced waters collected over a geographic range of 375 km from southwestern to northeastern Pennsylvania define a relatively narrow set of values (?{sub Sr}{sup SW} = +13.8 to +41.6, where ?{sub Sr}{sup SW} is the deviation of the {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio from that of seawater in parts per 10{sup 4}); this isotopic range falls above that of Middle Devonian seawater, and is distinct from most western Pennsylvania acid mine drainage and Upper Devonian Venango Group oil and gas brines. The uniformity of the isotope ratios suggests a basin-wide source of dissolved solids with a component that is more radiogenic than seawater. Mixing models indicate that Sr isotope ratios can be used to sensitively differentiate between Marcellus Formation produced water and other potential sources of TDS into ground or surface waters.

  2. Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Production | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural PublicRatesAbout Us >Waste toWater

  3. CORQUENCH: A model for gas sparging-enhanced, melt-water, film-boiling heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M.T.; Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In evaluation of severe-accident sequences for water-cooled nuclear reactors, molten core materials may be postulated to be released into the containment and accumulate on concrete. The heatup and decomposition of concrete is accompanied by the release of water vapor and carbon dioxide gases. Gases flowing through the melt upper surface can influence the rates of heat transfer to water overlying the melt. In particular, the gas flow through the interface can be envisioned to enhance the heat removal from the melt. A mechanistic model (CORQUENCH) has been developed to describe film-boiling heat transfer between a molten pool and an overlying coolant layer in the presence of sparging gas. The model favorably predicts the lead-Feron 11 data of Greene and Greene et al. for which the calculations indicate that area enhancement in the conduction heat transfer across the film is the predominant mechanism leading to augmentation in the heat flux as the gas velocity increases. Predictions for oxidic corium indicate a rapid increase in film-boiling heat flux as the gas velocity rises. The predominant mode of heat transfer for this case is radiation, and the increase in heat flux with gas velocity is primarily a result of interfacial area enhancement of the radiation component of the overall heat transfer coefficient. The CORQUENCH model has been incorporated into the MELTSPREAD-1 computer code{sup 6} for the analysis of transient spreading in containments.

  4. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  5. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas Physical Plant (772) 242-2246 M - F 8a - 5p (954) 762-5040 HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours University Police. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  6. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded natural

  7. Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Methane contamination of drinking water accompanying gas-well drilling and hydraulic fracturing (received for review January 13, 2011) Directional drilling and hydraulic-fracturing technologies are dra of energy use (1­5). Directional drilling and hydrau- lic-fracturing technologies are allowing expanded

  8. Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the upstream oil and gas industry has dealt with some of the most challenging metering applications. One of these is the measurement of water percentage at the point of allocation. It is an essential requirement when test separators...

  9. Hydraulic Properties of Rice and the Response of Gas Exchange to Water Stress1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiller, Volker

    Hydraulic Properties of Rice and the Response of Gas Exchange to Water Stress1 Volker Stiller*, H.R.L.) We investigated the role of xylem cavitation, plant hydraulic conductance, and root pressure-specific photosynthetic rate, leaf diffusive conductance, and soil-leaf hydraulic conductance that were associated

  10. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division Water-gas shift catalysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division Water-gas shift catalysis Sara Yu Choung Engineering Division Argonne National Laboratory Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies 2003 Merit Review Berkeley, CA May 19-22, 2003 #12;Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division

  11. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including whole-home gas tankless water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  12. OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0 en TheResult

  13. Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

    2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

  14. Molecular Density Functional Theory for water with liquid-gas coexistence and correct pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Sergiievskyi, Volodymyr; Borgis, Daniel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solvation of hydrophobic solutes in water is special because liquid and gas are almost at coexistence. In the common hypernetted chain approximation to integral equations, or equivalently in the homogenous reference fluid of molecular density functional theory, coexistence is not taken into account. Hydration structures and energies of nanometer-scale hydrophobic solutes are thus incorrect. In this article, we propose a bridge functional that corrects this thermodynamic inconsistency by introducing a metastable gas phase for the homogeneous solvent. We show how this can be done by a third order expansion of the functional around the bulk liquid density that imposes the right pressure and the correct second order derivatives. Although this theory is not limited to water, we apply it to study hydrophobic solvation in water at room temperature and pressure and compare the results to all-atom simulations. With this correction, molecular density functional theory gives, at a modest computational cost, quantita...

  15. The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soemarso, Christophorus

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure data. Consequently, reliable imbibition laboratory test data are required. The effects of relative permeability, water and gas, and capillary pressure on the ultimate gas recovery were also in- vestigated. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The author' wishes... decrease in initial gas saturation when the desaturation process was used. So, in general, the residual gas saturation is higher when the test is obtained by the resaturation process. His findings supported Osoba s previous work showing that a...

  16. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  17. Dutch gas plant uses polymer process to treat aromatic-saturated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-processing plant in Harlingen, The Netherlands, operated by Elf Petroland has been running a porous-polymer extraction process since 1994 to remove aromatic compounds from water associated with produced natural gas. In the period, the unit has removed dispersed and dissolved aromatic compounds to a concentration of <1 ppm with energy consumption of only 17% that of a steam stripper, according to Paul Brooks, general manager for Akzo Nobel`s Macro Porous Polymer-Extraction (MPPE) systems. The paper describes glycol treatment the MPPE separation process, and the service contract for the system.

  18. Oil production from thin oil columns subject to water and gas coning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, Kwok Kit

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO MATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KMOK KIT CHAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO WATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KWOK KIT CHAI Approved as to style and content by airman of o t ee Member Member Head o Department May 1981 ABSTRACT Oil...

  19. Oil production from thin oil columns subject to water and gas coning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, Kwok Kit

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO MATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KMOK KIT CHAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO WATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KWOK KIT CHAI Approved as to style and content by airman of o t ee Member Member Head o Department May 1981 ABSTRACT Oil...

  20. Determination of tritium activity in environmental water samples using gas analyzer techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salsman, John Matthew

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    undesirable when looking for low levels of tritium activity in water. In general, gas analyzer techniques consist of dispersing the radioactive material in some type of gaseous medium and then pressurizing the system with this gas. The analyzer then uses... by reaction with gaseous hydrogen. The vapor HTO is formed readily, as shown by. Equation 2, and is the most commonly encountered form of tritium in the environment. HT + 820 H2 + HTO (2) The accumulation of tritium on the Earth occurs both naturally...

  1. TREATMENT OF PRODUCED OIL AND GAS WATERS WITH SURFACTANT-MODIFIED ZEOLITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn E. Katz; R.S. Bowman; E.J. Sullivan

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry accounts for a significant waste stream in the United States. It is by some estimates the largest single waste stream in the country, aside from nonhazardous industrial wastes. Characteristics of produced water include high total dissolved solids content, dissolved organic constituents such as benzene and toluene, an oil and grease component, and chemicals added during the oil-production process. While most of the produced water is disposed via reinjection, some must be treated to remove organic constituents before the water is discharged. Current treatment options are successful in reducing the organic content; however, they cannot always meet the levels of current or proposed regulations for discharged water. Therefore, an efficient, cost-effective treatment technology is needed. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been used successfully to treat contaminated ground water for organic and inorganic constituents. In addition, the low cost of natural zeolites makes their use attractive in water-treatment applications. This report summarizes the work and results of this four-year project. We tested the effectiveness of surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for removal of BTEX with batch and column experiments using waters with BTEX concentrations that are comparable to those of produced waters. The data from our experimental investigations showed that BTEX sorption to SMZ can be described by a linear isotherm model, and competitive effects between compounds were not significant. The SMZ can be readily regenerated using air stripping. We field-tested a prototype SMZ-based water treatment system at produced water treatment facilities and found that the SMZ successfully removes BTEX from produced waters as predicted by laboratory studies. When compared to other existing treatment technologies, the cost of the SMZ system is very competitive. Furthermore, the SMZ system is relatively compact, does not require the storage of potentially hazardous chemicals, and could be readily adapted to an automated system.

  2. Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

  3. Coalbed Methane Procduced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BC Technologies

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water associated with coalbed methane (CBM) production is a significant and costly process waste stream, and economic treatment and/or disposal of this water is often the key to successful and profitable CBM development. In the past decade, advances have been made in the treatment of CBM produced water. However, produced water generally must be transported in some fashion to a centralized treatment and/or disposal facility. The cost of transporting this water, whether through the development of a water distribution system or by truck, is often greater than the cost of treatment or disposal. To address this economic issue, BC Technologies (BCT), in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Petroleum Environmental Consortium (IPEC), proposed developing a mechanical unit that could be used to treat CBM produced water by forming gas hydrates at the wellhead. This process involves creating a gas hydrate, washing it and then disassociating hydrate into water and gas molecules. The application of this technology results in three process streams: purified water, brine, and gas. The purified water can be discharged or reused for a variety of beneficial purposes and the smaller brine can be disposed of using conventional strategies. The overall objectives of this research are to develop a new treatment method for produced water where it could be purified directly at the wellhead, to determine the effectiveness of hydrate formation for the treatment of produced water with proof of concept laboratory experiments, to design a prototype-scale injector and test it in the laboratory under realistic wellhead conditions, and to demonstrate the technology under field conditions. By treating the water on-site, producers could substantially reduce their surface handling costs and economically remove impurities to a quality that would support beneficial use. Batch bench-scale experiments of the hydrate formation process and research conducted at ORNL confirmed the feasibility of the process. However, researchers at BCT were unable to develop equipment suitable for continuous operation and demonstration of the process in the field was not attempted. The significant achievements of the research area: Bench-scale batch results using carbon dioxide indicate >40% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor was converted to hydrate in a single pass; The batch results also indicate >23% of the feed water to the hydrate formation reactor (>50% of the hydrate formed) was converted to purified water of a quality suitable for discharge; Continuous discharge and collection of hydrates was achieved at atmospheric pressure. Continuous hydrate formation and collection at atmospheric conditions was the most significant achievement and preliminary economics indicate that if the unit could be made operable, it is potentially economic. However, the inability to continuously separate the hydrate melt fraction left the concept not ready for field demonstration and the project was terminated after Phase Two research.

  4. Breach and safety analysis of spills over water from large liquefied natural gas carriers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hightower, Marion Michael; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, at the request of the Department of Energy, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) prepared a report, ''Guidance on the Risk and Safety Analysis of Large Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Spills Over Water''. That report provided framework for assessing hazards and identifying approaches to minimize the consequences to people and property from an LNG spill over water. The report also presented the general scale of possible hazards from a spill from 125,000 m3 o 150,000 m3 class LNG carriers, at the time the most common LNG carrier capacity.

  5. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  6. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

  7. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte... of the petroleum industry there has been a continually increasing search for more economical and more efficient methods for increasing the primary recovery from an oil reservoir. Better production practices, including pressure maintenance programs using both...

  8. Low cost power augmentation by water injection on dual fuel gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Statler, W.O.; McReynolds, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is {open_quotes}common knowledge{close_quotes} that the power output of a combustion turbine (gas turbine) can be increased by as much as ten percent above the {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} output by injecting water into the combustion zone. This enhancement is particularly useful during periods of high inlet air temperature when the turbine output is lowered due to the reduced air flow of the lower density hot air. The additional mass flow of water will partially offset the reduction of air mass flow. The specific heat of the water vapor (roughly twice that of air) allows increased fuel (and output) at approximately twice the rate of that which would result if the air mass flow were increased by a lower inlet air temperature. It is often a big step from {open_quotes}common knowledge{close_quotes} to actual practice and that step is the subject of this paper. In the summer of 1994 the Lincoln Electric System (L.E.S.), a public utility serving Lincoln, Nebraska ran operational tests on their 1974 G.E. MS-7001B gas turbine with water injection on natural gas fuel. The results proved the {open_quotes}common knowledge{close_quotes} in that the {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} power was increased by approximately 9% above the {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} power when the water/fuel mass flow ratio was held to a fairly conservative 1.2/1.0. Further testing, in August of 1995, confirmed these results. Test set for October, 1995, will check the injection system while operating on oil fuel. In this case, the water injection is intended as a NOx reduction measure only with the water/fuel ratio being held to a maximum of 0.5/1.0. The {open_quotes}wet{close_quotes} power is expected to increase by 4%. The utility is also planning tests on a similar system being installed on a Westinghouse model 251 gas turbine.

  9. Trace element chemistry of coal bed natural gas produced water in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Jackson; K.J. Reddy [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department of Renewable Resources

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed natural gas (CBNG) produced water is usually disposed into nearby constructed disposal ponds. Geochemistry of produced water, particularly trace elements interacting with a semiarid environment, is not clearly understood. The objective of this study was to collect produced water samples at outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds and monitor pH, iron (Fe), aluminum (Al), chromium (Cr), manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), boron (B), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), cadmium (Cd), and barium (Ba). Outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds were sampled from five different watersheds including Cheyenne River (CHR), Belle Fourche River (BFR), Little Powder River (LPR), Powder River (PR), and Tongue River (TR) within the Powder River Basin (PRB), Wyoming from 2003 to 2005. Paired tests were conducted between CBNG outfalls and corresponding disposal ponds for each watershed. Results suggest that produced water from CBNG outfalls is chemically different from the produced water from corresponding disposal ponds. Most trace metal concentrations in the produced water increased from outfall to disposal pond except for Ba. In disposal ponds, Ba, As, and B concentrations increased from 2003 to 2005. Geochemical modeling predicted precipitation and dissolution reactions as controlling processes for Al, Cu, and Ba concentrations in CBNG produced water. Adsorption and desorption reactions appear to control As, Mo, and B concentrations in CBNG water in disposal ponds. Overall, results of this study will be important to determine beneficial uses (e.g., irrigation, livestock/wildlife water, and aquatic life) for CBNG produced water in the PRB, Wyoming. 18 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

  11. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  12. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficient gas water heating appliance to market; a plan toefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and to planefficient gas water heating appliance to market; and 3) to

  13. Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karapataki, Christina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

  14. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Albany Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, M T; Truesdell, D B

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Albany 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle, Massachusetts, New York, Connecticut, Vermont, and New Hampshire, was evaluated to a depth of 1500 m for uranium favorability using National Uranium Resource Evaluation criteria. Areas of favorable geology and aeroradioactivity anomalies were examined and sampled. Most Triassic and Jurassic sediments in the Connecticut Basin, in the central part of the quadrangle, were found to be favorable for sandstone uranium deposits. Some Precambrian units in the southern Green Mountains of Vermont were found favorable for uranium deposits in veins in metamorphic rocks.

  15. Albany County, Wyoming ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEEAisin Seikiand Telephone CoStatutes:Albany County,

  16. WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl R.F. Lund

    2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

  17. Molecular mechanism of the hydration of Candida antarctica1 lipase B in gas phase: water adsorption isotherms and molecular2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Molecular mechanism of the hydration of Candida antarctica1 lipase B in gas phase: water and selectivity of enzymes in organic solvents or33 in gas phase. The molecular mechanism of the hydration - 2919" DOI : 10.1002/cbic.200900544 #12;2 ABSTRACT32 Hydration is a major determinant of activity

  18. LASER TRIGGERED GAS SWITCHES UTILIZING BEAM TRANSPORT THROUGH 1 MO-cm DEIONIZED WATER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Lehr, Jane [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; Blickem, James R.; Wallace, Zachariah R.; Anaya, Victor Jr; Corley, John P; Lott, John; Hodge, Keith; Zameroski, Nathan D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the successful attempts to trigger high voltage pressurized gas switches by utilizing beam transport through 1 MO-cm deionized water. The wavelength of the laser radiation was 532 nm. We have investigated Nd: YAG laser triggering of a 6 MV, SF6 insulated gas switch for a range of laser and switch parameters. Laser wavelength of 532 nm with nominal pulse lengths of 10 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) were used to trigger the switch. The laser beam was transported through 67 cm-long cell of 1 MO-cm deionized water constructed with anti reflection UV grade fused silica windows. The laser beam was then focused to form a breakdown arc in the gas between switch electrodes. Less than 10 ns jitter in the operation of the switch was obtained for laser pulse energies of between 80-110 mJ. Breakdown arcs more than 35 mm-long were produced by using a 70 cm focusing optic.

  19. Secondary atomization of coal-water fuels for gas turbine applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, T.U.; Kang, S.W.; Beer, J.M.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main research objective was to determine the effectiveness of the CWF treatments on atomization quality when applied to an ultrafine coal-water fuel (solids loading reduced to 50%) and to gas turbine operating conditions (atomization at elevated pressures). Three fuel treatment techniques were studied: (1) heating of CWF under pressure to produce steam as the pressure drops during passage of the CWF through the atomizer nozzle, (2) absorption of CO/sub 2/ gas in the CWF to produce a similar effect, and (3) a combination of the two treatments above. These techniques were expected to produce secondary atomization, that is, disruptive shattering of CWF droplets subsequent to their leaving the atomizing nozzle, and to lead to better burnout and finer fly ash size distribution. A parallel objective was to present quantitative information on the spray characteristics (mean droplet size, radial distribution of droplet size, and spray shape) of CWF with and without fuel treatment, applicable to the design of CWF-burning gas turbine combustors. The experiments included laser diffraction droplet size measurements and high-speed photographic studies in the MIT Spray Test Facility to determine mean droplet size (mass median diameter), droplet size distribution, and spray shape and angle. Three systems of atomized sprays were studied: (1) water sprays heated to a range of temperatures at atmospheric pressure; (2) CWF sprays heated at atmospheric pressure to different temperatures; and (3) sprays at elevated pressure. 31 refs., 47 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  1. Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

  2. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al2O3, with 8 wt% Cr2O3, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe2O3. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeOx, 8 wt% Cr2O3, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft2 based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of iv exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special interest is that the flux is highest at the start of each e

  3. Investigation of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sand packs containing oil, water, and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gore, David Eugene

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of EASTER OF SCIENCE August, lBSS Najor Subject: Petroleum Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE THERNAI CONDUCTIVITY OF UNCONSOI IDATED SAND PACKS CONTAINING OII, WATER, AND GAS A Thesis By David E, Gore APProved as to style... expressed in degrees Fahrenheit, and, at 0 oF, , the abscissa would become ini'inite. This restriction does not limit the application of the data to petroleum reservoirs as the tem- perature normally encountered is in excess of 100 oF. The reservoir...

  4. Water-Steel Canister Interaction and H2 Gas Pressure Buildup in aNuclear Waste Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Senger, Rainer; Finstele, Stefan

    2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository forspent fuel and high-level waste, leads to hydrogen gas generation in thebackfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-termrepository safety. Previous modeling studies used a constant H2generation rate. However, iron corrosion and H2 generation rates varywith time, depending on factors such as water chemistry, wateravailability, and water contact area. To account for these factors andfeedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to ironcorrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena thatare driven by gas pressure buildup and water consumption. Resultsindicate that if H2 generation rates are dynamically calculated based ona chemistry model, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup are muchsmaller compared to a simulation in which the coupling between flow andreactive transport mechansism is neglected.

  5. A model of vapor-liquid equilibria for acid gas-alkanolamine-water systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austgen, D.M. Jr.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A physico-chemical model was developed for representing liquid phase chemical equilibria and vapor-liquid (phase) equilibria of H{sub 2}SCO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water systems. The equilibrium composition of the liquid phase is determined by minimization of the Gibbs free energy. Activity coefficients are represented with the Electrolyte-NRTL equation treating both long-range electrostatic interactions and short-range binary interactions between liquid phase species. Vapor phase fugacity coefficients are calculated using the Redlich-Kwong-Soave Equation of State. Adjustable parameters of the model, binary interaction parameters and carbamate stability constants, were fitted on published binary system alkanolamine-water and ternary system (H{sub 2}S-alkanolamine-water, CO{sub 2}-alkanolamine-water) VLE data. The Data Regression System of ASPEN PLUS, based upon the Maximum Likelihood Principle, was used to estimate adjustable parameters. Ternary system measurements used in parameter estimation ranged in temperature from 25 to 120{degree}C in alkanolamine concentration from 1 to 5 M, in acid gas loading from 0 to 1.5 moles per mole alkanolamine, and in acid gas partial pressure from 0.1 to 1,000 kPa. Maximum likelihood estimates of ternary system H{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} equilibrium partial pressures and liquid phase concentrations were found to be in good agreement with measurements for aqueous solutions of monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), diglycolamine (DGA), and methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) indicating that the model successfully represents ternary system data. The model was extended to represent CO{sub 2} solubility in aqueous mixtures of MDEA with MEA or DEA. The solubility was measured at 40 and 80{degree}C over a wide range of CO{sub 2} partial pressures. These measurements were used to estimate additional binary parameters of the mixed solvent systems.

  6. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market research on solar water heaters. National Renew- ablecom- bined space/water heaters, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

  7. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market research on solar water heaters. National Renewabletankless combined space/water heaterds, solar water heaters,combined solar space/water heater, electric water heaters

  8. Research and development of a high efficiency gas-fired water heater. Volume 2. Task reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilakis, A.D.; Pearson, J.F.; Gerstmann, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and development of a cost-effective high efficiency gas-fired water heater to attain a service efficiency of 70% (including the effect of exfiltration) and a service efficiency of 78% (excluding exfiltration) for a 75 GPD draw at a 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, with a stored water to conditioned air temperature difference of 80/sup 0/F, are described in detail. Based on concept evaluation, a non-powered natural draft water heater was chosen as the most cost-effective design to develop. The projected installed cost is $374 compared to $200 for a conventional unit. When the project water heater is compared to a conventional unit, it has a payback of 3.7 years and life cycle savings of $350 to the consumer. A prototype water heater was designed, constructed, and tested. When operated with sealed combustion, the unit has a service efficiency of 66.4% (including the effect of exfiltration) below a burner input of 32,000 Btu/h. In the open combustion configuration, the unit operated at a measured efficiency of 66.4% Btu/h (excluding exfiltration). This compares with a service efficiency of 51.3% for a conventional water heater and 61% for a conventional high efficiency unit capable of meeting ASHRAE 90-75. Operational tests showed the unit performed well with no evidence of stacking or hot spots. It met or exceeded all capacity or usage tests specified in the program test plan and met all emission goals. Future work will concentrate on designing, building, and testing pre-production units. It is anticipated that both sealed combustion and open draft models will be pursued.

  9. Sweeney LUBRICATION OF STEAM, GAS AND WATER TURBINES IN POWER GENERATION- A CHEVRONTEXACO EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter James Sweeney

    On 9 October 2001 two US oil companies Chevron and Texaco merged. Their long-term joint venture operation, known as Caltex (formed in 1936 and operating in East and Southern Africa, Middle East, Asia and Australasia), was incorporated into the one global energy company. This global enterprise will be highly competitive across all energy sectors, as the new company brings together a wealth of talents, shared values and a strong commitment to developing vital energy resources around the globe. Worldwide, ChevronTexaco is the third largest publicly traded company in terms of oil and gas reserves, with some 11.8 billion barrels of oil and gas equivalent. It is the fourth largest producer, with daily production of 2.7 million barrels. The company also has 22 refineries and more than 21,000 branded service stations worldwide. This paper will review the fundamentals of lubrication as they apply to the components of turbines. It will then look at three turbine types, steam, gas and water, to address the different needs of lubricating oils and the appropriate specifications for each. The significance of oil testing both for product development and in-service oil monitoring will be reviewed, together with the supporting field experience of ChevronTexaco. The environmental emissions controls on turbines and any impact on the lubricants will be discussed. Finally, the trends in specifications for lubricating oils to address the modern turbines designs will be reviewed. Key Words: geothermal, lubrication, turbines, in-service testing 1.

  10. TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

  11. Combustion of ultrafine coal/water mixtures and their application in gas turbines: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toqan, M.A.; Srinivasachar, S.; Staudt, J.; Varela, F.; Beer, J.M.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using coal-water fuels (CWF) in gas turbine combustors has been demonstrated in recent pilot plant experiments. The demands of burning coal-water fuels with high flame stability, complete combustion, low NO/sub x/ emission and a resulting fly ash particle size that will not erode turbine blades represent a significant challenge to combustion scientists and engineers. The satisfactory solution of these problems requires that the variation of the structure of CWF flames, i.e., the fields of flow, temperature and chemical species concentration in the flame, with operating conditions is known. Detailed in-flame measurements are difficult at elevated pressures and it has been proposed to carry out such experiments at atmospheric pressure and interpret the data by means of models for gas turbine combustor conditions. The research was carried out in five sequential tasks: cold flow studies; studies of conventional fine-grind CWF; combustion studies with ultrafine CWF fuel; reduction of NO/sub x/ emission by staged combustion; and data interpretation-ignition and radiation aspects. 37 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. The Functional Potential of Microbial Communities in Hydraulic Fracturing Source Water and Produced Water from Natural Gas Extraction Characterized by Metagenomic Sequencing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Bibby, Kyle J.; Lipus, Daniel; Hammack, Richard W.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial activity in produced water from hydraulic fracturing operations can lead to undesired environmental impacts and increase gas production costs. However, the metabolic profile of these microbial communities is not well understood. Here, for the first time, we present results from a shotgun metagenome of microbial communities in both hydraulic fracturing source water and wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing. Taxonomic analyses showed an increase in anaerobic/facultative anaerobic classes related to Clostridia, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Epsilonproteobacteria in produced water as compared to predominantly aerobic Alphaproteobacteria in the fracturing source water. The metabolic profile revealed a relative increase in genes responsible formore »carbohydrate metabolism, respiration, sporulation and dormancy, iron acquisition and metabolism, stress response and sulfur metabolism in the produced water samples. These results suggest that microbial communities in produced water have an increased genetic ability to handle stress, which has significant implications for produced water management, such as disinfection.« less

  13. Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of New Albany Shale A. Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, S.D. Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 125859 Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of New Albany Shale A. Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, S-cellular model. Top-Down intelligent reservoir modeling(TDIRM) starts by analyzing the production data using

  14. Increasing gas hydrate formation temperature for desalination of high salinity produced water with secondary guests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cha, Jong-Ho [ORISE; Seol, Yongkoo [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a new gas hydrate-based desalination process using water-immiscible hydrate formers; cyclopentane (CP) and cyclohexane (CH) as secondary hydrate guests to alleviate temperature requirements for hydrate formation. The hydrate formation reactions were carried out in an isobaric condition of 3.1 MPa to find the upper temperature limit of CO2 hydrate formation. Simulated produced water (8.95 wt % salinity) mixed with the hydrate formers shows an increased upper temperature limit from ?2 °C for simple CO2 hydrate to 16 and 7 °C for double (CO2 + CP) and (CO2 + CH) hydrates, respectively. The resulting conversion rate to double hydrate turned out to be similar to that with simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Hydrate formation rates (Rf) for the double hydrates with CP and CH are shown to be 22 and 16 times higher, respectively, than that of the simple CO2 hydrate at the upper temperature limit. Such mild hydrate formation temperature and fast formation kinetics indicate increased energy efficiency of the double hydrate system for the desalination process. Dissociated water from the hydrates shows greater than 90% salt removal efficiency for the hydrates with the secondary guests, which is also improved from about 70% salt removal efficiency for the simple hydrates.

  15. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR�¢����s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument�¢����s robustness in a real-world situation.

  16. The effect on recovery of the injection of alternating slugs of gas and water at pressures above the bubble point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Givens, James Wilson

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separator G Wet Test Meter FIGURE I H I I K Oil Tank Core Graduated Cylinder Thermal Expansion Chamber L Live Oil Storage Tank M Natural Gas Cylinder CORE SATURATING AND FLOODING APPARATUS The fluids produced from the core flowed into a... transparent separator F, made of Lucite, where the gas and liquids were allowed to separate at atmospheric conditions. The gas passed from the top oi' the separator to a wet test geter G, where it was measured. The liquids, oil and water, were drained from...

  17. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

  18. Hazards to nuclear power plants from large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spills on water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kot, C.A.; Eichler, T.V.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Pape, R.; Srinivasan, M.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hazards to nuclear power plants arising from large spills of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on water transportation routes are treated by deterministic analytical procedures. Global models, which address the salient features of the LNG spill phenomena are used in the analysis. A coupled computational model for the combined LNG spill, spreading, and fire scenario is developed. To predict the air blast environment in the vicinity of vapor clouds with pancake-like geometries, a scalable procedure using both analytical methods and hydrocode calculations is synthesized. Simple response criteria from the fire and weapons effects literature are used to characterize the susceptibility of safety-related power plant systems. The vulnerability of these systems is established either by direct comparison between the LNG threat and the susceptibility criteria or through simple response calculations. Results are analyzed.

  19. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    11 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 forNov Dec Fig 11 Natural gas price forecast for 2010 Figure 12Florida Fig 12 Natural gas price forecast from 2010 to 2030

  20. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Florida Fig. 11 Natural gas price forecast for 2010 Jan FebMMBtu) Fig. 12 Natural gas price forecast from 2010 to 203011 shows the monthly natural gas price forecast for 2010 for

  1. Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maryn, S.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

  2. Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, R.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

  3. Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

  4. WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 ± 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup –3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 ± 0.02) × 10{sup 19} cm{sup –2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup –4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

  5. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the water contact to a unit rate of water influx. For constant water influx rates, the relationship between pressure, flow rate, and the aquifer influence function is given by p - p(t) = q F(t) Terms are defined in the Nomenclature. The pressure... points taken from a continuous curve. See Fig. l. Inspection of the above equations reveals that if the pressure vector and the water flow rate vector are known, then the aquifer influence function vector can be calculated. The pressure vector...

  6. Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

  7. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condensing tankless com- bined space/water heaters, solarmarket research on solar water heaters. National Renew- ablewater heaters, combined solar space/water heater, electric

  8. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heaterds, solar water heaters, combined solar space/watermarket research on solar water heaters. National Renewableheaters, combined space heating and water heating appliances 3 , solar

  9. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star Residential Water Heaters: Final criteria analysis.2004. Heat pump water heater technology: Experiences ofmarket research on solar water heaters. National Renewable

  10. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004). Heat pump water heater technology: Experiences ofStar Residential Water Heaters: Final criteria analysis.market research on solar water heaters. National Renewable

  11. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. (2004). Heat pump water heater technology: Experiencesstar residential water heaters: Final criteria analysis.market research on solar water heaters. National Renew- able

  12. Tomographic Imaging of Water Injection and Withdrawal in PEMFC Gas Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gostick, J. T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    show a small amount of residual water remaining at the mostdifferences between residual water saturations in these twoof water penetration, lateral spreading or residual phase

  13. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condensing furnaces and water heaters and power-vent waterstar residential water heaters: Final criteria analysis.market research on solar water heaters. National Renew- able

  14. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. (2004). Heat pump water heater technology: Experienceslarger market for heat pump water heaters (US Department offurnace or heat pump and electric water heater (26%; US

  15. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  16. The influence of free gas saturation on water flood performance - variations caused by changes in flooding rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dandona, Anil Kumar

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through 19. These 4. 0 FIGURE I ATER -OIL CAPILLARY PRESSURE CURVE W CA 0 I IJJ IK Pn 2. 0 CA UJ lL CL K o IO 0 . 20 . 40 . 60 . 80 I. O WATER SATURATION - FRACTION OF PORE VOLUME IO 0 . 20 . 40 . 60 . 80 I. O GAS SATURATION - FRACTION... injection of 0. 25 pore volumes of water. Except for the very low rates, all gas present in the system is trapped. At high water 0 u H 0 0 0 4J g 0 I-I I-1 M 0 z 0 0 Ql QJ 0 3 0 4J cd Q 'O QJ Q Ql 4J cd Q cc V Id 0 0 4J 0 cd O ca Ql...

  17. Integrated Water Gas Shift Membrane Reactors Utilizing Novel, Non Precious Metal Mixed Matrix Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraris, John

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles of zeolitic imidazolate frameworks and other related hybrid materials were prepared by modifying published synthesis procedures by introducing bases, changing stoichiometric ratios, or adjusting reaction conditions. These materials were stable at temperatures >300 °C and were compatible with the polymer matrices used to prepare mixed- matrix membranes (MMMs). MMMs tested at 300 °C exhibited a >30 fold increase in permeability, compared to those measured at 35 °C, while maintaining H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity. Measurements at high pressure (up to 30 atm) and high temperature (up to 300 °C) resulted in an increase in gas flux across the membrane with retention of selectivity. No variations in permeability were observed at high pressures at either 35 or 300 °C. CO{sub 2}-induced plasticization was not observed for Matrimid®, VTEC, and PBI polymers or their MMMs at 30 atm and 300 °C. Membrane surface modification by cross-linking with ethanol diamine resulted in an increase in H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity at 35 °C. Spectrometric analysis showed that the cross-linking was effective to temperatures <150 °C. At higher temperatures, the cross-linked membranes exhibit a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity similar to the uncross-linked polymer. Performance of the polybenzimidazole (PBI) hollow fibers prepared at Santa Fe Science and Technology (SFST, Inc.) showed increased flux o to a flat PBI membrane. A water-gas shift reactor has been built and currently being optimized for testing under DOE conditions.

  18. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

  19. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  20. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat pump space heaters, and solar water heaters, as well asmarket research on solar water heaters. National Renewable

  1. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    market research on solar water heaters. National Renewablespace heaters, and solar water heaters, as well as other

  2. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  3. Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It was observed that many hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas wells exhibit transient linear flow behavior. A half-slope on a type curve represents this transient linear flow behavior. Shale gas wells show a significant skin effect which...

  4. Fabrication of gas turbine water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware employing plasma spray process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schilke, Peter W. (4 Hempshire Ct., Scotia, NY 12302); Muth, Myron C. (R.D. #3, Western Ave., Amsterdam, NY 12010); Schilling, William F. (301 Garnsey Rd., Rexford, NY 12148); Rairden, III, John R. (6 Coronet Ct., Schenectady, NY 12309)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the method for fabrication of water-cooled composite nozzle and bucket hardware for high temperature gas turbines, a high thermal conductivity copper alloy is applied, employing a high velocity/low pressure (HV/LP) plasma arc spraying process, to an assembly comprising a structural framework of copper alloy or a nickel-based super alloy, or combination of the two, and overlying cooling tubes. The copper alloy is plamsa sprayed to a coating thickness sufficient to completely cover the cooling tubes, and to allow for machining back of the copper alloy to create a smooth surface having a thickness of from 0.010 inch (0.254 mm) to 0.150 inch (3.18 mm) or more. The layer of copper applied by the plasma spraying has no continuous porosity, and advantageously may readily be employed to sustain a pressure differential during hot isostatic pressing (HIP) bonding of the overall structure to enhance bonding by solid state diffusion between the component parts of the structure.

  5. Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hook, Bruce David

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Lands and Mrnkova, 1966). Singhal et al. (1981a, b) studied DBT desulfurization at 558-623K, 3. 1 MPa, in the gas phase over a standard CoO-MoO, /7-AlsO, catalyst. Both of these mechanisms are consistent with the generalized mechanism for HDS...HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  6. The displacement of gas by oil in the presence of connate water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dardaganian, Stephen Garabed

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    residual gas saturation 7 percent of pore space greater than the study utiliaing the higher viscosity oil. Except for the variations resulting from the extreme fluid viscosity ratios, the results closely agreed. The major difference could well... mixed stream of oil and gas. The mobile gas phase established within the core was then dis- placed by an oil flood. The assumption was made that the residual gas saturation within the oil bank would be the same as that which would occur within a...

  7. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption and Energy Efficiency (2010) 3:203–222 91% of all residential gas 1 consumption in the USA (

  8. Refractory Research Group - U.S. DOE, Albany Research Center [Institution Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, James P.

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refractory research group at the Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of conducting materials research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, and more recently, within the U.S. Dept. of Energy. When under the U.S. Bureau of Mines, research was driven by national needs to develop substitute materials and to conserve raw materials. This mission was accomplished by improving refractory material properties and/or by recycling refractories using critical and strategic materials. Currently, as a U.S. Dept of Energy Fossil Energy field site, research is driven primarily by the need to assist DOE in meeting its vision to develop economically and environmentally viable technologies for the production of electricity from fossil fuels. Research at ARC impacts this vision by: • Providing information on the performance characteristics of materials being specified for the current generation of power systems; • Developing cost-effective, high performance materials for inclusion in the next generation of fossil power systems; and • Solving environmental emission and waste problems related to fossil energy systems. A brief history of past refractory research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the current refractory research at ARC, and the equipment and capabilities used to conduct refractory research at ARC will be discussed.

  9. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

  10. The sweet spot of forward osmosis: Treatment of produced water, drilling wastewater, and other complex and difficult liquid streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM, USA c Hydration Technology Innovations, Albany, OR, USA d, and especially oil and gas (O&G) exploration and production wastewaters. High salt concentrations, decentralized Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Desalination 333 (2014) 23­35 Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 303 273

  11. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325°C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700şC) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

  12. Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. Finally an economic analysis, including capital and operational...

  13. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F. Southworh. (2004). Heat pump water heater technology:a larger market for heat pump water heaters (U.S. Departmentfurnace or heat pump and electric water heater (26%). (U.S.

  14. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space heating and water-heating market characterization Thespace heating and water-heating market differs significantlyThe US central space heating market is dominated by forced

  15. Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

  16. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieffer, F.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

  17. Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Tom

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

  18. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and discharge to conserve water resources and reduce the negative environmental impact associated with discharging wastewater into the environment. Wastewater treatment enables providing water with specifications suitable for either recycle in the same... process or reuse in other ways within the process or outside the process. Therefore, water treatment and recycle/reuse contribute to addressing both of the aforementioned water problems: fresh water sacristy and environmental impact of wastewater...

  19. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaaeid Lokhandwala

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions was conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute partially supported the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. During the course of this project, MTR has sold thirteen commercial units related to the field test technology. Revenue generated from new business is already more than four times the research dollars invested in this process by DOE. The process is ready for broader commercialization and the expectation is to pursue the commercialization plans developed during this project, including collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  20. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Baker; R. Hofmann; K.A. Lokhandwala

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions would convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system has been designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and will be installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  1. Field Demonstration of a Membrane Process to Recover Heavy Hydrocarbons and to Remove Water from Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Baker; T. Hofmann; K. A. Lokhandwala

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world high-pressure conditions is being conducted to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system was designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and installed and operated at BP Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute is partially supporting the field demonstration and BP-Amoco helped install the unit and provides onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system meets pipeline specifications for dew point and BTU value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. During the course of this project, MTR has sold 13 commercial units related to the field test technology, and by the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for broader commercialization. A route to commercialization has been developed during this project and involves collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

  2. Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the respiratory system near the outside of the organism, the gas consumed (oxygen or carbon dioxide meta- bolic and exchange systems. carbon dioxide | oxygen | respiration | temperature | scaling All for specific taxa, we integrate properties common to all terrestrial gas exchangers into a universal model

  3. Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Kehua

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide...

  4. Economics of Condensing Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters Potential in Residential Single Family Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for water heaters includes maintenance for draining the tankgas water heaters could spill over into the more common tankwater heater includes the cost of changes to the heat exchanger and the tank.

  5. Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. This thesis evaluated the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation...

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Gas-Fired Tankless and Storage Water Heater Approaches to Combination Water and Space Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kingston, T.; Scott, S.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Homebuilders are exploring more cost effective combined space and water heating systems (combo systems) with major water heater manufacturers that are offering pre-engineered forced air space heating combo systems. In this project, unlike standardized tests, laboratory tests were conducted that subjected condensing tankless and storage water heater based combo systems to realistic, coincidental space and domestic hot water loads with the following key findings: 1) The tankless combo system maintained more stable DHW and space heating temperatures than the storage combo system. 2) The tankless combo system consistently achieved better daily efficiencies (i.e. 84%-93%) than the storage combo system (i.e. 81%- 91%) when the air handler was sized adequately and adjusted properly to achieve significant condensing operation. When condensing operation was not achieved, both systems performed with lower (i.e. 75%-88%), but similar efficiencies. 3) Air handlers currently packaged with combo systems are not designed to optimize condensing operation. More research is needed to develop air handlers specifically designed for condensing water heaters. 4) System efficiencies greater than 90% were achieved only on days where continual and steady space heating loads were required with significant condensing operation. For days where heating was more intermittent, the system efficiencies fell below 90%.

  7. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering WATER AND GAS CONING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM...

  8. B.Jhne and E. Monahan (eds.), Air-Water GasTransfer, 1995 by AEON Verlag I Physical and Chemical Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    of the Influence of Marine Biota on the Carbon Dioxide Ocean- Atmosphere Exchange in High Latitudes P. Prinos M Mixing in the Upper Ocean and Air-Sea Gas Transfer đ #12;B.Jähne and E. Monahan (eds.), Air-Water Gas. Hwang Spatial Measurements of Small-Scale Ocean Waves J. Klinke B. Jähne Measurements of Short Ocean

  9. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water heater includes the cost of changes to the heat exchanger and the tank.water heaters, included in options 3 and 6, are not yet available for residential storage-tankand water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and limited availability of power-vent and condensing storage-tank

  10. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water heater includes the cost of changes to the heat exchanger and the tank.water heaters, included in Options 3 and 6, are not yet available for residential storage tankand water heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and limited availability of power vent and condensing storage-tank

  11. Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

  12. Southwest Gas Corporation- Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a...

  13. Iron-ceria Aerogels Doped with Palladium as Water-gas Shift Catalysts for the Production of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bali, S.; Huggins, F; Ernst, R; Pugmire, R; Huffman, G; Eyring, E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels doped with 1% and 2% palladium (Pd) by weight have been synthesized, and their activities for the catalysis of water-gas shift (WGS) reaction have been determined. The aerogels were synthesized using propylene oxide as the proton scavenger for the initiation of hydrolysis and polycondensation of a homogeneous alcoholic solution of cerium(III) chloride heptahydrate and iron(III) chloride hexahydrate precursor. Palladium was doped onto some of these materials by gas-phase incorporation (GPI) using ({eta}{sup 3}-allyl)({eta}{sup 5}-cyclopentadienyl)palladium as the volatile Pd precursor. Water-gas shift catalytic activities were evaluated in a six-channel fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure and reaction temperatures ranging from 150 to 350 C. Both 1% and 2% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels showed WGS activities that increased significantly from 150 to 350 C. The activities of 1% Pd-doped 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels were also compared with that of the 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The WGS activity of 1% Pd on 4.5% iron oxide-95.5% cerium oxide aerogels is substantially higher (5 times) than the activity of 1% Pd-doped ceria aerogel without iron. The gas-phase incorporation results in a better Pd dispersion. Ceria aerogel provides a nonrigid structure wherein iron is not significantly incorporated inside the matrix, thereby resulting in better contact between the Fe and Pd and thus enhancing the WGS activity. Further, neither Fe nor Pd is reduced during the ceria-aerogel-catalyzed WGS reaction. This behavior contrasts with that noted for other Fe-based WGS catalysts, in which the original ferric oxide is typically reduced to a nonstoichiometric magnetite form.

  14. Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    sampling probe or a sampling port on the pipeline. Then, the oil and water are separated using a centrifuge. Finally, the volume of the separated water is measured and the water-cut of the sample is calculated based on the total volume of the liquid... pipeline; 2. The oil/water monitor generates the current or electrical signal transmit to a zero-&- span adjuster; 3. From the zero-&-span adjuster, the data is transmitted from analog to digital at converter and calculator and to a comparator. 4...

  15. Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in US new construction market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water heaters in US new construction market Alex B. Lekov &single-family home construction rep- resents a significantequipment. In the new construction market, the choice of

  16. Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrdlicka, J.; Feik, C.; Carpenter, D.; Pomeroy, M.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With oak and pine feedstocks, the Gasification of Biomass to Hydrogen project maximizes hydrogen production using the Full Stream Reformer during water-gas shift fixed-bed reactor testing. Results indicate that higher steam-to-biomass ratio and higher thermal cracker temperature yield higher hydrogen concentration. NREL's techno-economic models and analyses indicate hydrogen production from biomass may be viable at an estimated cost of $1.77/kg (current) and $1.47/kg (advanced in 2015). To verify these estimates, NREL used the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), an integrated system of unit operations that investigates biomass thermochemical conversion to gaseous and liquid fuels and chemicals.

  17. Guidance on risk analysis and safety implications of a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) spill over water.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellman, Gerald William; Melof, Brian Matthew; Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Hightower, Marion Michael; Covan, John Morgan; Gritzo, Louis Alan; Irwin, Michael James; Kaneshige, Michael Jiro; Morrow, Charles W.

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recognized standards exist for the systematic safety analysis of potential spills or releases from LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) storage terminals and facilities on land, no equivalent set of standards or guidance exists for the evaluation of the safety or consequences from LNG spills over water. Heightened security awareness and energy surety issues have increased industry's and the public's attention to these activities. The report reviews several existing studies of LNG spills with respect to their assumptions, inputs, models, and experimental data. Based on this review and further analysis, the report provides guidance on the appropriateness of models, assumptions, and risk management to address public safety and property relative to a potential LNG spill over water.

  18. An Itegrated Approach to Water Treatment in Oil and Gas Industry via Thermal Membrane Distillation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsayed, Nesreen Ahmed Abdelmoez Mohamed

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    an increasing level of interest in the area of high-purity separation especially in water treatment. It is driven primarily by heat which creates a vapor-pressure difference across a porous hydrophobic membrane. Hot produced water and excess low-level heat from...

  19. Tritium Recovery from Solid Breeder Blanket by Water Vapor Addition to Helium Sweep Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamura, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yasunori; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the solid breeder blanket of fusion reactor, bred tritium is planned to be extracted from the blanket as HT by passing of H{sub 2}-added sweep gas in general. In that case, tritium leakage by permeation to coolant can not be ignored. So, the application of H{sub 2}O-added sweep gas is discussed, with which tritium leakage to coolant can be much reduced. As the result of discussion, H{sub 2}O-added sweep gas is probable method of tritium recovery. For the further detailed discussion, it is important to enrich the data correlated to the interaction of H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, breeder, multiplier and structures.

  20. Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    , Rochester, NY 14627 Edited by Thure E. Cerling, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, and approved August 12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have? Against a backdrop of naturally occur- ring salt- and gas-rich groundwater, we identified eight discrete

  1. MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterman, Michael S.

    Alamos ScientificLaboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545. Conservation Division, U.S.Geological Survey E. Johnson, EUisA. Monash, and Michael S. Waterman INTRODUCTION Enhanced recovery of oil and gas that production from newly discovered reserves may not yield as much petroleum as was anticipated. In spite

  2. Separation of Carbon Dioxide from Nitrogen and Water in Flue Gas Streams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mera, Hilda 1989-

    2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    are determined by the mean-square displacement method derived by Albert Einstein. The diffusion coefficients of each component in the flue gas are analyzed to examine the effect of temperature in diffusion coefficients and study the motion of the gases in the MOF...

  3. The distribution and association of trace elements in the bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, G.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and association of trace elements in bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe x-ray fluorescence (EMP-XRF), liquid chromatography, ultra-violet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The kerogen was found to contain several HCl/HF resistant minerals (determined by XRD), including pyrite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, rutile, and anatase, and the neoformed mineral ralstonite. Kerogens (prepared at UNOCAL, CA) which were fractionated in an aqueous ZnBr[sub 2] solution were found to contain [approximately]20% less acid-resistant minerals than traditional' HCl/HF isolated kerogens and were contaminated with Zn and Br. Kerogens (prepared at the University of Munich) treated with SnCl[sub 2]/H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] at 150-270[degrees]C (Kiba) and/or SnCl[sub 2]/HCl at 110[degrees]C were found to contain <10% of their original pyrite/marcasite (FeS[sub 2]), but were contaminated with large amounts of Sn. The Kiba treatment also appeared to demetallate Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins. The inorganic and organic associations of trace elements in New Albany kerogen were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue ([approximately]85% FeS[sub 2]) obtained through density separations. The degree of association of several elements (As, Co, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, and Se) with FeS[sub 2] was determined through the analysis of individual mineral grains by EMP-XRF and by analysis of the mineral residue treated with dilute HNO[sub 3] to remove FeS[sub 2]. These studies indicated that essentially all of the V and [approximately]95% of the Ni present in New Albany kerogen is organically associated. Methods which are designed to account for the inorganic associations of trace elements in kerogens, including methods based on physical methods of separation, chemical removal of FeS[sub 2], EMP-XRF and low temperature ashing, are compared.

  4. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  5. Performance of Gas-fired Water Heaters in a 10-home Field Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

  6. Estimating Phospholipid Membrane Water Partition Coefficients Using Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tcaciuc, Alexandra Patricia

    Recent studies have shown that membrane–water partition coefficients of organic chemicals can be used to predict bioaccumulation and type I narcosis toxicity more accurately than the traditional K[subscript OW]-based ...

  7. Anisotropic Heat and Water Transport in a PEFC Cathode Gas Diffusion Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    reaction ORR in the cathode CL to recombine with oxygen and producing water and waste heat. Despite amount of waste heat as it does electric power output. Furthermore, PEFCs tolerate only a small

  8. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Gas Well Drilling and Water Resources Regulated by the Pennsylvania Oil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    used in drilling and fracking · Recent increase in permit fee to fund new DEP enforcement · Permit fluids ­ return fluids from fracking ­ mixture of water, sand and chemicals Production fluids ­ fluids, manganese, barium, arsenic, etc.) Surfactants/detergents Total suspended solids Oil/Grease Fracking

  10. New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkouh, Ahmad

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................ 91  7.2 Four Well Pads ....................................................................................................... 91  7.3 Five Well Pads... to be created instead and water flow have the normal high slope of higher than 1. .............................................................................. 90 Fig. 64. A map of all wells in the four wells pad. The production of the well FF-18 is divided...

  11. Forced Dispersion of Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Clouds with Water Spray Curtain Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rana, Morshed A.

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    .............................................................................................................................. 211 xv LIST OF FIGURES Page Fig. 1. Densities of methane (vapor) and air at different temperatures. .......................... 2 Fig. 2. Temperature and specific gravity of methane, air and methane-air mixture at atmospheric... on methane concentration downwind of the LNG pool ..................................................................................................... 37 Fig. 10. Methane concentrations downwind of the LNG pool, with and without water spray...

  12. Condensing Heating and Water Heating Equipment Workshop Location: Washington Gas Light Appliance Training Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space DataEnergyCompressedOil, and Gas Sectors

  13. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    step in developing a realistic degradation term for tankless water heatersstep (water draw event) in the simulation. Instantaneous Gas Water Heater

  14. Comprehensive Lifecycle Planning and Management System For Addressing Water Issues Associated With Shale Gas Development In New York, Pennsylvania, And West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Daniel Arthur

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop a modeling system to allow operators and regulators to plan all aspects of water management activities associated with shale gas development in the target project area of New York, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia (â??target areaâ?ť), including water supply, transport, storage, use, recycling, and disposal and which can be used for planning, managing, forecasting, permit tracking, and compliance monitoring. The proposed project is a breakthrough approach to represent the entire shale gas water lifecycle in one comprehensive system with the capability to analyze impacts and options for operational efficiency and regulatory tracking and compliance, and to plan for future water use and disposition. It will address all of the major water-related issues of concern associated with shale gas development in the target area, including water withdrawal, transport, storage, use, treatment, recycling, and disposal. It will analyze the costs, water use, and wastes associated with the available options, and incorporate constraints presented by permit requirements, agreements, local and state regulations, equipment and material availability, etc. By using the system to examine the water lifecycle from withdrawals through disposal, users will be able to perform scenario analysis to answer "what if" questions for various situations. The system will include regulatory requirements of the appropriate state and regional agencies and facilitate reporting and permit applications and tracking. These features will allow operators to plan for more cost effective resource production. Regulators will be able to analyze impacts of development over an entire area. Regulators can then make informed decisions about the protections and practices that should be required as development proceeds. This modeling system will have myriad benefits for industry, government, and the public. For industry, it will allow planning all water management operations for a project or an area as one entity to optimize water use and minimize costs subject to regulatory and other constraints. It will facilitate analysis of options and tradeoffs, and will also simplify permitting and reporting to regulatory agencies. The system will help regulators study cumulative impacts of development, conserve water resources, and manage disposal options across a region. It will also allow them to track permits and monitor compliance. The public will benefit from water conservation, improved environmental performance as better system wide decisions are made, and greater supply of natural gas, with attendant lower prices, as costs are reduced and development is assisted through better planning and scheduling. Altogether, better economics and fewer barriers will facilitate recovery of the more than 300 trillion cubic feet of estimated recoverable natural gas resource in the Marcellus Shale in a manner that protects the environment.

  15. Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:Water

  16. Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump to:Water2003)

  17. Feasibility and Treatment of Oil and Gas Produced Water as a Medium for Nannochloropsis Salina cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dean, Cynthia A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoshida, Thomas M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Steichen, Seth A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Laur, Paul A. [Eldorado Biofuels; Visolay, Alfonz [VM Technologies

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Some conclusions of this paper are: (1) How much PW is available - (a) Lots, but probably not enough to support the largest estimates of algae production needed, (b) Diluent water is likely needed to support cultivation in some cases, (c) An assessment of how much PW is really available for use is needed; (2) Where is it available - (a) In many places near other resources (land, CO{sub 2}, sunlight, nutrients) and infrastructure (pipelines, refineries, disposal operations/wells); (3) Is the water chemistry acceptable for use - (a) Yes, in many cases with minimal treatment, (b) Additional constituents of value exist in PW for media; (4) Does it need treatment prior to use - (a) Yes, it may often need treatment for organics, some metals, and biological contaminants, (b) Source control and monitoring can reduce need for treatment; (5) How much does it cost to treat it - (a) If desalination is not needed, from <$0.01-$0.60 per m3 is a starting estimate; and (6) Can you grow algae in it - (a) Yes, but we need more experimentation to optimize field conditions, media mixing, and algae types.

  18. Robust Low-Cost Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor for High-Purity Hydrogen Production form Coal-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Torkelson; Neng Ye; Zhijiang Li; Decio Coutinho; Mark Fokema

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details work performed in an effort to develop a low-cost, robust water gas shift membrane reactor to convert coal-derived syngas into high purity hydrogen. A sulfur- and halide-tolerant water gas shift catalyst and a sulfur-tolerant dense metallic hydrogen-permeable membrane were developed. The materials were integrated into a water gas shift membrane reactor in order to demonstrate the production of >99.97% pure hydrogen from a simulated coal-derived syngas stream containing 2000 ppm hydrogen sulfide. The objectives of the program were to (1) develop a contaminant-tolerant water gas shift catalyst that is able to achieve equilibrium carbon monoxide conversion at high space velocity and low steam to carbon monoxide ratio, (2) develop a contaminant-tolerant hydrogen-permeable membrane with a higher permeability than palladium, (3) demonstrate 1 L/h purified hydrogen production from coal-derived syngas in an integrated catalytic membrane reactor, and (4) conduct a cost analysis of the developed technology.

  19. International Lige Colloquium on Ocean Dynamics, GAS TRANSFER AT WATER SURFACES, May 2 -6 2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    2005 Estimation of air-sea gas and heat fluxes from infrared imagery and surface wave measurements and much higher heat fluxes. In addition, the infrared imagery analysis reveals potentially significant the infrared images. It is also shown that the difference in the surface boundary conditions for heat and gas

  20. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

  1. Asbestiform tremolite within the Holocene late pyroclastic deposits of Colli Albani volcano (Latium, Italy): Occurrence and crystal-chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Della Ventura, Giancarlo; Bellatreccia, Fabio; De Benedetti, Arnaldo A; Mottana, Annibale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work relates the occurrence and the characterization of fibrous tremolite within the latest pyroclastic deposits of the Colli Albani (Alban Hills) volcano, to the south-east of Rome (Italy). These mineralizations were observed during a systematic rock-sampling undertaken to complete the geological survey for the new 1:50 000 map of this volcanic area. The examined specimens were collected inside distal deposits correlated to the last Albano Maar activity, which are geographically located within the boundaries of the Nemi community. Tremolite occurs within both carbonate ejecta and the host pyroclastic rocks. It shows up as whitish to light gray coloured aggregates of crystals with fibrous aspect and sericeous brightness. Due to the extremely small crystal dimensions, never exceeding 0.5 micron in diameter, the micro-chemical composition of the fibres could be obtained only by combining P-XRD, SEM-EDX and FTIR methods. Infrared spectroscopy, in particular, proved to be a valuable technique to characterize...

  2. Liquid Metal Processing and Casting Experiences at the U.S. Department of Energy's Albany Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we will discuss some of the early pioneering work as well as some of our more recent research. The Albany Research Center (ARC) has been involved with the melting and processing of metals since it was established in 1942. In the early days, hardly anything was known about melting refractory or reactive metals and as such, virtually everything had to be developed in-house. Besides the more common induction heated air-melt furnaces, ARC has built and/or utilized a wide variety of furnaces including vacuum arc remelt ingot and casting furnaces, cold wall induction furnaces, electric arc furnaces, cupola furnaces and reverberatory furnaces. The melt size of these furnaces range from several grams to a ton or more. We have used these furnaces to formulate custom alloys for wrought applications as well as for such casting techniques as spin casting, investment casting and lost foam casting among many. Two early spin-off industrializations were Wah Chang (wrought zirconium alloys for military and commercial nuclear applications) and Oremet (both wrought and cast Ti). Both of these companies are now part of the ATI Allegheny Ludlum Corporation.

  3. Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

  4. Phase I: the pipeline-gas demonstration plant. Demonstration plant engineering and design. Volume 18. Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contract No. EF-77-C-01-2542 between Conoco Inc. and the US Department of Energy provides for the design, construction, and operation of a demonstration plant capable of processing bituminous caking coals into clean pipeline quality gas. The project is currently in the design phase (Phase I). This phase is scheduled to be completed in June 1981. One of the major efforts of Phase I is the process and project engineering design of the Demonstration Plant. The design has been completed and is being reported in 24 volumes. This is Volume 18 which reports the design of Plant Section 2700 - Waste Water Treatment. The objective of the Waste Water Treatment system is to collect and treat all plant liquid effluent streams. The system is designed to permit recycle and reuse of the treated waste water. Plant Section 2700 is composed of primary, secondary, and tertiary waste water treatment methods plus an evaporation system which eliminates liquid discharge from the plant. The Waste Water Treatment Section is designed to produce 130 pounds per hour of sludge that is buried in a landfill on the plant site. The evaporated water is condensed and provides a portion of the make-up water to Plant Section 2400 - Cooling Water.

  5. Impact of Contaminants Present in Coal-Biomass Derived Synthesis Gas on Water-gas Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Co-gasification of biomass and coal in large-scale, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants increases the efficiency and reduces the environmental impact of making synthesis gas ("syngas") that can be used in Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes for producing transportation fuels. However, the water-gas shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts used in these processes may be poisoned by multiple contaminants found in coal-biomass derived syngas; sulfur species, trace toxic metals, halides, nitrogen species, the vapors of alkali metals and their salts (e.g., KCl and NaCl), ammonia, and phosphorous. Thus, it is essential to develop a fundamental understanding of poisoning/inhibition mechanisms before investing in the development of any costly mitigation technologies. We therefore investigated the impact of potential contaminants (H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, HCN, AsH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, HCl, NaCl, KCl, AS{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}OH, KNO{sub 3}, HBr, HF, and HNO{sub 3}) on the performance and lifetime of commercially available and generic (prepared in-house) WGS and FT catalysts; ferrochrome-based high-temperature WGS catalyst (HT-WGS, Shiftmax 120�, Süd-Chemie), low-temperature Cu/ZnO-based WGS catalyst (LT-WGS, Shiftmax 230�, Süd-Chemie), and iron- and cobalt-based Fischer-Trospch synthesis catalysts (Fe-FT & Co-FT, UK-CAER). In this project, TDA Research, Inc. collaborated with a team at the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) led by Dr. Burt Davis. We first conducted a detailed thermodynamic analysis. The three primary mechanisms whereby the contaminants may deactivate the catalyst are condensation, deposition, and reaction. AsH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, HCl, NH{sub 3} and HCN were found to have a major impact on the Fe-FT catalyst by producing reaction products, while NaCl, KCl and PH{sub 3} produce trace amounts of deposition products. The impact of the contaminants on the activity, selectivity, and deactivation rates (lifetime) of the catalysts was determined in bench-scale tests. Most of the contaminants appeared to adsorb onto (or react with) the HT- and LT-WGS catalysts were they were co-fed with the syngas: � 4.5 ppmv AsH{sub 3} or 1 ppmv PH{sub 3} in the syngas impacted the selectivity and CO conversion of both catalysts; � H{sub 2}S slowly degraded both WGS catalysts; - A binary mixture of H{sub 2}S (60 ppmv) and NH{sub 3} (38 ppmv) impacted the activity of the LT-WGS catalyst, but not the HT-WGS catalyst � Moderate levels of NH{sub 3} (100 ppmv) or HCN (10 ppmv) had no impact � NaCl or KCl had essentially no effect on the HT-WGS catalyst, but the activity of the LT-WGS catalyst decreased very slowly Long-term experiments on the Co-FT catalyst at 260 and 270 °C showed that all of the contaminants impacted it to some extent with the exception of NaCl and HF. Irrespective of its source (e.g., NH{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, or HNO{sub 3}), ammonia suppressed the activity of the Co-FT catalyst to a moderate degree. There was essentially no impact the Fe-FT catalyst when up to 100 ppmw halide compounds (NaCl and KCl), or up to 40 ppmw alkali bicarbonates (NaHCO{sub 3} and KHCO{sub 3}). After testing, BET analysis showed that the surface areas, and pore volumes and diameters of both WGS catalysts decreased during both single and binary H2S and NH3 tests, which was attributed to sintering and pore filling by the impurities. The HT-WGS catalyst was evaluated with XRD after testing in syngas that contained 1 ppmv PH{sub 3}, or 2 ppmv H{sub 2}S, or both H{sub 2}S (60 ppmv) and NH{sub 3} (38 ppmv). The peaks became sharper during testing, which was indicative of crystal growth and sintering, but no new phases were detected. After LT-WGS tests (3-33 ppmv NH{sub 3} and/or 0-88 ppmv H{sub 2}S) there were a few new phases that appeared, including sulfides. The fresh Fe-FT catalyst was nanocrystalline and amorphous. ICP-AA spectroscopy and other methods (e.g., chromatography) were used to analyze for

  6. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

  7. Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ; B. S. , The George Vashington University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Larry D. Piper This work presents an accurate and simple method of estimating the critical oi. l production rate for both two phase (oil-water or oil-gas) and three phase... The author would like to express his sincere appreciation to the following indivi. duels who, by their assistance and valuable suggestions, made this work possible. Professor Larry D. Piper for his guidance in outlining the goals of the project...

  8. Using Airborne Geophysics to Improve the Management of Produced Water from Coal Bed Natural Gas Extraction in the Powder River Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, J.I.; Lipinski, B.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Ackman, T.E.; Harbert, W.P. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana has seen a boom in drilling for coalbed natural gas (CBNG), the natural gas contained in coal seams. Large quantities of water are coproduced during the extraction process. The water is currently managed by land application (irrigation), returned to shallow groundwater aquifers via infiltration basins, directly discharged to ephemeral or perennial streams, or injected into the deep subsurface via injection wells. At present, there are over 28,000 CBNG wells permitted or drilled in the PRB and it is estimated that another 50,000 to 100,000 new wells will be drilled in the future. Produced water management is a major challenge to the oil and gas industry as well as federal and state regulators. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of airborne electromagnetic (AEM) methods for the large-scale mapping of vadose zone properties. The base maps derived from the AEM data show the location of conductive anomalies within the vadose zone. These conductive anomalies have been identified as conditions related to soil properties, geologic features, saturated areas, and seepage zones. In the PRB, the data can be used to identify suitable locations for constructing impoundments in areas that avoid highly conductive soils where infiltrating water may leach salts through the vadose zone and into shallow aquifers. Hydrologic changes within the vadose zone were evaluated by completing an AEM survey in 2003 and 2004 over two coincident spatial areas. The data were analyzed to determine statistical relationships between the data sets, in particular data outliers which may represent areas of significant change between each year. Some outliers plot near areas of CBNG development. Ultimately, it is hoped that the information from these surveys will identify cost effective treatment or disposal options for produced water that address both production and environmental issues.

  9. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculationsheat loss testing; part load performance curves for instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss calculations

  10. A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

  11. High-purity hydrogen gas from the reaction between BOF steel slag and water in the 473e673 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German

    . Iron reduction is achieved witha reducing gas (generally,a gas mixture ofH2 and CO produced by coal reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2013.03.163 #12;agent such as coke, in a blast furnace

  12. Process for the elimination of waste water produced upon the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of wash solution containing organic oxygen-carrier, with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diemer, P.; Brake, W.; Dittmer, R.

    1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for the elimination of waste water falling out with the desulfurization of coking oven gas by means of an organic oxygen carrier-containing washing solution with simultaneous recovery of elemental sulfur. The waste water is decomposed in a combustion chamber in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures between about 1000/sup 0/ and 1100/sup 0/ C. under such conditions that the mole ratio of H/sub 2/S:SO/sub 2/ in the exhaust gas of the combustion chamber amounts to at least 2:1. Sulfur falling out is separated and the sensible heat of the exhaust gas is utilized for steam generation. The cooled and desulfurized exhaust gas is added to the coking oven gas before the pre-cooling. Sulfur falling out from the washing solution in the oxidizer is separated out and lead into the combustion chamber together with the part of the washing solution discharged as waste water from the washing solution circulation. Preferred embodiments include that the sulfur loading of the waste water can amount to up to about 370 kg sulfur per m/sup 3/ waste water; having the cooling of sulfur-containing exhaust gas leaving the combustion chamber follow in a waste heat boiler and a sulfur condenser heated by pre-heated boiler feed water, from which condenser sulfur is discharged in liquid state.

  13. Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide- Polyethylenimine- Dextran Sulfate Polymer Gel System as a Water Shut-Off Agent in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayakumar, Swathika 1986-

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies such as horizontal wells and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have made ultra-low permeability shale and tight gas reservoirs productive but the industry is still on the learning curve when it comes to addressing various production...

  14. Description of the Science Plan for the April 1995 CoOP Experiment, `Gas Transfer in Coastal Waters',

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    of air-sea gas-transfer rates are essential for understand- ing the global cycles of carbon dioxide that intended to measure both atmospheric and ocean-mixed layer properties. 1 Introduction Accurate estimates

  15. An energy equivalency analysis of trade-offs between thermal efficiency and standby loss requirements for commercial gas service water heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Jarnagin, R.E.; Keller, J.M.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE) Standing Standard Project Committee 90.1 has approved an addendum (90.lb) to ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989. The addendum specifies an increase in the minimum thermal efficiency requirement (from 77% to 78%), accompanied by an easing of the standby loss requirements, for commercial gas-fired service water heaters. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performed an energy equivalency analysis to assess the impact of trade-offs between the improved thermal efficiency and the less stringent standby loss requirements. The analysis objective was to estimate whether the energy savings during firing would offset the increased energy losses during standby periods. The primary focus of this report is to summarize the major results of the analysis and provide a recommendation for minimum energy-efficiency commercial gas-fired service water heaters. Limitations to the availability of detailed performance and energy-use data for these commercial water heaters are also pointed out.

  16. Report on Produced Water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    purposes include water for hydraulic fracturing at oil and gas sites, water for power generation, dust control, and fire control. To initiate production Johnston et al....

  17. Research into the Characterization of Brackish Water and Disposal of Desalination Reject Water in Saline Aquifers and Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brackish groundwater is a valuable “drought-proof” resource that is plentiful in much of Texas. If treated by available desalination technologies, brackish groundwater resources could help many regions of Texas cope with pressing water shortages...

  18. Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Tankless Electric) Water Heaters (Tankless Electric) Water Heater, Tankless Electric - v1.0.xlsx More Documents & Publications Tankless Gas Water Heaters Water Heaters (Storage...

  19. Pulse studies to decipher the role of surface morphology in CuO/CeO? nanocatalysts for the water gas shift reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhao, Fuzhen [South-Central Univ. for Nationalities, Wuhan, Hubei (China); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Liu, Zongyuan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, Wenqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yao, Siyu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Si, Rui [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnston-Peck, Aaron C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Martinez-Arias, Arturo [Inst. de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Hanson, Jonathan C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Senanayake, Sanjaya D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H?O ? CO?) was studied over CuO/CeO? catalysts with two different ceria particle morphohologies, in the form of nanospheres (ns) and nanocubes (nc). To understand the strong dependence of the WGS reaction activity on the ceria nanoshapes, pulses of CO (without and with water vapor) were employed during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absoprtion near edge structure (XANES) measurements done to characterize the catalysts. The results showed that CuO/CeO? (ns) exhibited a substantially better activity than CuO/CeO? (nc). The higher activity was associated with the unique properties of CuO/CeO? (ns), such as the easier reduction of highly dispersed CuO to metallic Cu, the stability of metallic Cu and a larger concentration Ceł? in CeO? (ns).

  20. Pulse studies to decipher the role of surface morphology in CuO/CeO? nanocatalysts for the water gas shift reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Zhao, Fuzhen; Liu, Zongyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Yao, Siyu; Si, Rui; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Martinez-Arias, Arturo; Hanson, Jonathan C.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H?O ? CO?) was studied over CuO/CeO? catalysts with two different ceria particle morphohologies, in the form of nanospheres (ns) and nanocubes (nc). To understand the strong dependence of the WGS reaction activity on the ceria nanoshapes, pulses of CO (without and with water vapor) were employed during in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absoprtion near edge structure (XANES) measurements done to characterize the catalysts. The results showed that CuO/CeO? (ns) exhibited a substantially better activity than CuO/CeO? (nc). The higher activity was associated with the unique properties of CuO/CeO? (ns), suchmore »as the easier reduction of highly dispersed CuO to metallic Cu, the stability of metallic Cu and a larger concentration Ceł? in CeO? (ns).« less

  1. Journal of Power Sources 171 (2007) 268274 Effect of cathode gas diffusion layer on water transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transport and cell performance in direct methanol fuel cells C. Xua, T.S. Zhaoa,, Y.L. Heb a Department methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is not only to attain better cell performance, but also to achieve better water performance. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cells; Water crossover

  2. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CEC). 2000. California Natural Gas Analysis and Issues.2002. Average Price of Natural Gas Sold to Electric Utilityfor investments in natural gas and renewables to complement

  3. Influence of wettability on liquid water transport in gas diffusion layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza Chraibi; L. Ceballos; M. Prat; Michel Quintard; Alexandre Vabre

    2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management is a key factor that limits PEFC's performance. We show how insights into this problem can be gained from pore-scale simulations of water invasion in a model fibrous medium. We explore the influence of contact angle on the water invasion pattern and water saturation at breakthrough and show that a dramatic change in the invasion pattern, from fractal to compact, occurs as the system changes from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Then, we explore the case of a system of mixed wettability, i.e. containing both hydrophilic and hydrophobic pores. The saturation at breakthrough is studied as a function of the fraction of hydrophilic pores. The results are discussed in relation with the water management problem, the optimal design of a GDL and the fuel cell performance degradation mechanisms. We outline how the study could be extended to 3D systems, notably from binarised images of GDLs obtained by X ray microtomography.

  4. Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG)...

  5. Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Whole-Home Gas Tankless Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition...

  6. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Industrial Natural Gas Combustion (Unspecified) COlb/MMcf Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - WaterHeating Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - Space Heating NO

  7. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Industrial Natural Gas Combustion (Unspecified) CO lb/MMcf Commercial Natural Gas Combustion - Water HeatingCommercial Natural Gas Combustion - Space Heating NO X CO

  8. Effect of Channel Materials on the Behavior of Water Droplet Emerging From GDL into PEMFC Gas Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    (stainless steel, copper, graphite composite, polycarbonate) that are commercially used in PEMFC to evaluate the liquid water removal by conducting both experimental studies (in situ and ex situ) as well

  9. Comparison of the metal porphyrin distribution in bitumens isolated intact New Albany shale with those from the bitumen of the demineralized shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Concha, M.A.; Quirke, J.M.E. (Florida International Univ., Miami (USA)); Beato, B.; Yost, R.A. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA)); Mercer, G; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been major developments in the structure determination of the porphyrins isolated from crude oils or from the bitumen obtained by solvent extraction of oil shale. However, there has been few reports on the nature of the porphyrin residues in oil shale after previous solvent extraction. In this paper the authors present electron ionization and chemical ionization mass spectrometric analyses of the Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrin mixtures isolated from the Henryville bed of the New Albany shale which was previously solvent-extracted and demineralized (HCl/HF). They compare the distributions and substitution patterns for the porphyrins isolated from the treated shale with the corresponding mixtures obtained by the usual method of solvent extraction of the intact shale. They discuss the significance of the results in terms of the interaction of the bound porphyrins and the inorganic matrix.

  10. Impact of Natural Gas Appliances on Pollutant Levels in California Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullen, Nasim A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    used to power your water heater? a. Natural Gas b. Propaneranges, furnaces and water heaters. The most common gasof gas heaters or water heaters within the home (indicating

  11. Albany, California Mailing address

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    to management. Guidelines are given to managers for sustaining soil health and productive forests. Retrieval. Proceedings of the California Forest Soils Council conference on forest soils biology and forest management Terms: soil biota, mycorrhizae, nitrogen fixation, soil fauna, truffles, forest management Technical

  12. New Mexico Gas Company- Commercial Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Mexico Gas Company Commercial Energy Efficiency programs provide energy savings for businesses using natural gas for cooking and water heating. Prescriptive incentives for specified...

  13. Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 202-Small General Service Standard...

  14. NSTAR (Gas)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NSTAR Gas offers incentives for their commercial customers to save energy in existing facilities. Rebates are for high efficiency gas space heating equipment, water heating equipment, infrared...

  15. Water absorption in Galactic translucent clouds: conditions and history of the gas derived from Herschel/HIFI PRISMAS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flagey, N; Lis, D C; Gerin, M; Neufeld, D; Sonnentrucker, P; De Luca, M; Godard, B; Goicoechea, J R; Monje, R; Phillips, T G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of nine transitions of \\hho and \\hheo towards six high-mass star-forming regions, obtained as part of the PRISMAS Key Program. Water vapor in translucent clouds is detected in absorption along every sightline. We derive the column density of \\hho or \\hheo for the lower energy level of each transition observed. The total water column density is about a few $10^{13} \\rm{cm^{-2}}$. We find that the abundance of water relative to hydrogen nuclei is $1\\times10^{-8}$ in agreement with models for oxygen chemistry with high cosmic ray ionization rates. Relative to \\hh, the abundance of water is remarkably constant at $5\\times10^{-8}$. The abundance of water in excited levels is at most 15%, implying that the excitation temperature $T_{ex}$ in the ground state transitions is below 10 K. The column densities derived from the two ortho ground state transitions indicates that $T_{ex}\\simeq5$ K and that the density $n($\\hh$)$ in the clouds is $\\le10^4 \\rm{cm^{-3}}$. For most clouds we...

  16. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied, using CO2 as the transferred species and sodium hydroxide as the alkaline agent in water. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the parametric dependencies. The experimental data were empirically correlated.

  17. Determination of the Effect of Coal/Biomass-Derived Syngas Contaminants on the Performance of Fischer-Tropsch and Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, Jason; Cooper, Matthew; Farmer, Justin; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, nearly all liquid fuels and commodity chemicals are produced from non-renewable resources such as crude oil and natural gas. Because of increasing scrutiny of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions produced using traditional fossil-fuel resources, the utilization of alternative feedstocks for the production of power, hydrogen, value-added chemicals, and high-quality hydrocarbon fuels such as diesel and substitute natural gas (SNG) is critical to meeting the rapidly growing energy needs of modern society. Coal and biomass are particularly attractive as alternative feedstocks because of the abundant reserves of these resources worldwide. The strategy of co-gasification of coal/biomass (CB) mixtures to produce syngas for synthesis of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels offers distinct advantages over gasification of either coal or biomass alone. Co-feeding coal with biomass offers the opportunity to exploit economies of scale that are difficult to achieve in biomass gasification, while the addition of biomass to the coal gasifier feed leverages proven coal gasification technology and allows CO{sub 2} credit benefits. Syngas generated from CB mixtures will have a unique contaminant composition because coal and biomass possess different concentrations and types of contaminants, and the final syngas composition is also strongly influenced by the gasification technology used. Syngas cleanup for gasification of CB mixtures will need to address this unique contaminant composition to support downstream processing and equipment. To investigate the impact of CB gasification on the production of transportation fuels by FT synthesis, RTI International conducted thermodynamic studies to identify trace contaminants that will react with water-gas-shift and FT catalysts and built several automated microreactor systems to investigate the effect of single components and the synergistic effects of multiple contaminants on water-gas-shift and FT catalyst performance. The contaminants investigated were sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbonyl sulfide (COS), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), and combinations thereof. This report details the thermodynamic studies and the individual and multi-contaminant results from this testing program.

  18. Lipase hydration state in the gas phase: Sorption isotherm measurements and inverse gas chromatography.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lipase hydration state in the gas phase: Sorption isotherm measurements and inverse gas Rochelle, Cedex 01, France. Keywords: Water, Lipase, Adsorption, Inverse Gas Chromatography, Solid/Gas@univ-lr.fr Fax : +33 5 46 45 82 65 Abbreviations: IGC, Inverse Gas Chromatography aW, water thermodynamic

  19. Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst. [Quarterly] report, June 30, 1988--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu/MnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H{sub 2}/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

  20. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  1. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, Nicida L. (Sugar Land, TX); Parmeswar, Ravi (Marlton, NJ); Brinkmeyer, Alan D. (Tulsa, OK); Honarpour, Mehdi (Bartlesville, OK)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample.

  2. Method and apparatus utilizing ionizing and microwave radiation for saturation determination of water, oil and a gas in a core sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maerefat, N.L.; Parmeswar, R.; Brinkmeyer, A.D.; Honarpour, M.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for determining the relative permeabilities of gas, water and oil in a core sample has a microwave emitter/detector subsystem and an X-ray emitter/detector subsystem. A core holder positions the core sample between microwave absorbers which prevent diffracted microwaves from reaching a microwave detector where they would reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the microwave measurements. The microwave emitter/detector subsystem and the X-ray emitter/detector subsystem each have linear calibration characteristics, allowing one subsystem to be calibrated with respect to the other subsystem. The dynamic range of microwave measurements is extended through the use of adjustable attenuators. This also facilitates the use of core samples with wide diameters. The stratification characteristics of the fluids may be observed with a windowed cell separator at the outlet of the core sample. The condensation of heavy hydrocarbon gas and the dynamic characteristics of the fluids are observed with a sight glass at the outlet of the core sample. 11 figs.

  3. Assistance to Oil and Gas State Agencies and Industry through Continuation of Environmental and Production Data Management and a Water Regulatory Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grunewald, Ben; Arthur, Dan; Langhus, Bruce; Gillespie, Tom; Binder, Ben; Warner, Don; Roberts, Jim; Cox, D.O.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant project was a major step toward completion of the Risk Based Data Management System (RBDMS) project. Additionally the project addresses the needs identified during the projects initial phases. By implementing this project, the following outcomes were sought: (1) State regulatory agencies implemented more formalized environmental risk management practices as they pertain to the production of oil and gas, and injection via Class II wells. (2) Enhancement of oil and gas production by implementing a management system supporting the saving of abandoned or idle wells located in areas with a relatively low environmental risk of endangering underground sources of drinking water (USDWs) in a particular state. (3) Verification that protection of USDWs is adequate and additional restrictions of requirements are not necessary in areas with a relatively low environmental risk. (4) Standardization of data and information maintained by state regulatory agencies and decrease the regulatory cost burden on producers operating in multiple states, and (5) Development of a system for electronic data transfer among operators and state regulatory agencies and reduction of overall operator reporting burdens.

  4. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M W of geothermal, and 3 M W of landfill gas. The wind powerwind, geothermal, and landfill gas generators, provide theRISK: SUMMARY advance. Landfill gas and geothermal resources

  5. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 101-Residential Service rate are eligible for these...

  6. Piedmont Natural Gas- Residential Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates on high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters, tank water heaters and furnaces. Customers on the 201-Residential Service Rate or 221-Residential Service...

  7. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaand Assessment” in Water Heating Rulemaking TechnicalG. Smith, Tankless Gas Water Heaters: Oregon Market Status,

  8. affect gas exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were Ho, David 15 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF WIND AND RAIN ON THE GAS TRANSFER Geosciences Websites Summary: AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE:...

  9. activity gas exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were Ho, David 13 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF WIND AND RAIN ON THE GAS TRANSFER Geosciences Websites Summary: AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE:...

  10. affects gas exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were Ho, David 15 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF WIND AND RAIN ON THE GAS TRANSFER Geosciences Websites Summary: AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE:...

  11. PSNC Energy (Gas)- Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PSNC offers rebates to customers who purchase energy-efficient natural gas water heaters or natural gas furnaces. The rebate is available only when existing natural gas-fired water heating or...

  12. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

  13. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Shiaguo (Champaign, IL); Lu, Yonggi (Urbana, IL); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud (Champaign, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  14. An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    An Investigation of Ammonia Extraction from Liquid Manure Using a Gas-Permeable Membrane Summary Pollution of air, soil and water caused by excessive ammonia (NH3) emission and deposition from animal by extracting it from liquid manure and potentially using the recovered NH3 as fertilizer. For this purpose, lab

  15. INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF RESIDENTIAL GAS USE AND CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    people sharing a gas water heater or stove. All of thesefuel are inefficient as water heaters during summer monthsbetween central water heaters, the kind most common in North

  16. System for treating produced water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

  17. computed seismic speeds and attenuation in rocks with partial gas ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, J. E.

    At the gas-oil or gas-water contact in a homo- geneous ... Shale stringers may seal off local pockets of gas ... During production of a field, gas may ..... 3(1 - US)/

  18. REMEDIAT1NG AT MANUFACTURED GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Catherine A.

    , comhusti- hle gas manufactured Pfrom coke, coal, and oil 1 served as the major gas- eous fuel for urban for the three primary gas production meth- ods: coal carbonization, carbureted water gas production, and oil gas, and metals. Tar resid- uals were produced from the vola- tiIe component of bituminous coals in coal

  19. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests....

  20. Albany, OR Anchorage, AK Morgantown, WV Pittsburgh, PA Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    --SEM-COM Company Background the challenge in developing a high-temperature seal material for solid oxide fuel cells efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (co2 ) capture. Project Description se with dissimilar (non-matching) cte properties; (2) a glass-ceramic material with a cte as high as 18 ppm

  1. Southwest Gas Corporation- Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to residential customers in Arizona who purchase and install energy efficient natural gas tankless water heaters, clothes dryers, windows, attic...

  2. Southwest Gas Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to residential customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas tankless water heaters, clothes dryers, windows and smart low-flow...

  3. Southwest Gas Corporation- Commercial Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southwest Gas Corporation (SWG) offers rebates to commercial customers in Nevada who purchase energy efficient natural gas equipment. Eligible equipment includes clothes washers, storage water...

  4. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  5. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hr) 2. Pilot Input Rate (Btu/hr) 3. Excess Air (%) 4. Off-atm) 14. Higher Heating Value (Btu/SCF) 1028.0 15. SpecificProtection Tubes R (hr*ft2*F/Btu)? Fitting Emissivity SCREEN

  6. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  7. Trinity Gas to explore for gas in Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trinity Gas Corp. officials signed an agreement on May 20, 1997, with the Cauca Valley Corp. (CVC) allowing Trinity to use CVC data to explore for natural gas in the Cauca Valley of Colombia. CVC, Colombia`s Valle del Cauca water resources and environmental division, is evaluating Colombia`s underground water reserves to protect, control and preserve fresh water aquifers, some of which contain natural gas pockets that cause blowouts in farmers` water wells. Preparations now are underway for drilling Trinity`s first well at the Palmira 1 site on the San Jose Hacienda, the largest privately owned sugar cane plantation in the valley. Trinity also entered into an agreement with the Cauca Valley Natural Gas and Electricity Project to furnish natural gas, generated electricity and energy fuel for the industrial district in the region. According to this contract, many valley residents will have electric service for the first time.

  8. Application of microturbines to control emissions from associated gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Darren D.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for controlling the emission of associated gas produced from a reservoir. In an embodiment, the system comprises a gas compressor including a gas inlet in fluid communication with an associated gas source and a gas outlet. The gas compressor adjusts the pressure of the associated gas to produce a pressure-regulated associated gas. In addition, the system comprises a gas cleaner including a gas inlet in fluid communication with the outlet of the gas compressor, a fuel gas outlet, and a waste product outlet. The gas cleaner separates at least a portion of the sulfur and the water from the associated gas to produce a fuel gas. Further, the system comprises a gas turbine including a fuel gas inlet in fluid communication with the fuel gas outlet of the gas cleaner and an air inlet. Still further, the system comprises a choke in fluid communication with the air inlet.

  9. Water Heating Requirements – Overview Page 5-1 5. Water Heating Requirements 5.1 Overview 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    . Electric heat pump water heaters, however, are closer to the efficiency of typical gas systems, because

  10. Investigating Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard Jr., Ronald A.

    2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    substances. It covers most of the earth?s surface, sometimes to a depth of more than a mile. It exists as a colorless gas in the atmosphere. It caps the poles with ice and occurs in the snows of winter. Liquid water fills brooks, streams, rivers, lakes, ponds...

  11. Oklahoma Natural Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To encourage customers to install high-efficiency natural gas equipment in homes, Oklahoma Natural Gas offers rebates to residential customers and builders for furnace, water heating, or space...

  12. Piedmont Natural Gas- Commercial Equipment Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Piedmont Natural Gas offers rebates to commercial customers for purchasing and installing high-efficiency natural gas tankless water heaters. Customers on the 102-Small General Service and 152...

  13. A Water Conservation Scenario for the Residential and Industrial Sectors in California: Potential Saveings of Water and Related Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benenson, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Residential Hot Water Heaters. Berkeley, CA: Lawrenceelectricity savings because gas hot water heaters are moreprevalent than electric water heaters in California. Bathing

  14. Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule," FederalTesting of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance," DavisInc. , "T-K2 Instantaneous Water Heater Installation Manual

  15. Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Products: Test Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule,"Testing of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance," DavisInc. , "T-K2 Instantaneous Water Heater Installation Manual

  16. NEW YORK STATE WATER RESOURCES INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    ://wri.eas.cornell.edu Email: nyswri@cornell.edu Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling of Marcellus Shale gas development on drinking water supplies. It is intended for landowners and private

  17. SCE&G (Gas)- Residential EnergyWise Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G) provides energy efficiency incentives to home owners in its service territory. Natural gas customers are eligible for rebates on water heaters, gas logs,...

  18. A Systems Framework for Assessing Plumbing Products-Related Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Alison

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andEnvironment: Tankless Water Heaters. Coughlin, K. (2006).Compatibility with tankless water heaters Water waste with

  19. Seeking prospects for enhanced gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, M.G.; Randolph, P.L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Institute of Gas Technology's (IGT) ongoing research on unconventional natural gas sources, a methodology to locate gas wells that had watered-out under over-pressured conditions was developed and implemented. Each year several trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas are produced from reservoirs that are basically geopressured aquifers with large gas caps. As the gas is produced, the gas-water interface moves upward in the sandstone body trapping a portion of gas at the producing reservoir pressure. The methodology for identifying such formations consisted of a computer search of a large data base using a series of screening criteria to select or reject wells. The screening criteria consisted of depth cutoff, minimum production volume, minimum pressure gradient, and minimum water production. Wells chosen by the computer search were further screened manually to seek out those wells that exhibited rapid and large increases in water production with an associated quick decline in gas production indicating possible imbibition trapping of gas in the reservoir. The search was performed in an attempt to characterize the watered-out geopressured gas cap resource. Over 475 wells in the Gulf Coast area of Louisiana and Texas were identified as possible candidates representing an estimated potential of up to about 1 Tcf (2.83 x 10/sup 10/ m/sup 3/) of gas production through enhanced recovery operations. A process to determine the suitability of a watered-out geopressured gas cap reservoir for application of enhanced recovery is outlined. This paper addresses the identification of a potential gas source that is considered an unconventional resource. The methodology developed to identify watered-out geopressured gas cap wells can be utilized in seeking other types of watered-out gas reservoirs with the appropriate changes in the screening criteria. 12 references, 2 figures, 5 tables.

  20. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas-fired power plants, which will increase California'spower plants, which will presumably increase California'sin California is PG&E's Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant,

  1. Comparing the risk profiles of renewable and natural gas electricity contracts: A summary of the California Department of Water Resources contracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachrach, Devra; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Golove, William

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of natural gas prices, renewable resources in general have aSince the use of renewable resources decreases fuel priceof its electricity from renewable resources under long-term

  2. Field application of an interpretation method of downhole temperature and pressure data for detecting water entry in horizontal/highly inclined gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Achinivu, Ochi I.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the oil and gas industry today, continuous wellbore data can be obtained with high precision. This accurate and reliable downhole data acquisition is made possible by advancements in permanent monitoring systems such as downhole pressure...

  3. Gas Permeability of Fractured Sandstone/Coal Samples under Variable Confining Pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weiqun; Li, Yushou; Wang, Bo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    argillite under con?nement: gas and water testing. Phys.Gascoyne, M. , Wuschke, D.M. : Gas migration through water-fractured rock: results of a gas injection test. J.

  4. air-sea gas exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were Ho, David 49 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE COMBINED EFFECTS OF WIND AND RAIN ON THE GAS TRANSFER Geosciences Websites Summary: AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE:...

  5. Bubble columns for condensation at high concentrations of noncondensable gas: Heat-transfer model and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, G. Prakash

    Carrier gas based thermodynamic cycles are common in water desalination applications. These cycles often require condensation of water vapor out of the carrier gas stream. As the carrier gas is most likely a noncondensable ...

  6. Researching power plant water recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A range of projects supported by NETl under the Innovations for Existing Plant Program are investigating modifications to power plant cooling systems for reducing water loss, and recovering water from the flue gas and the cooling tower. This paper discusses two technologies showing particular promise condense water that is typically lost to evaporation, SPX technologies' Air2Air{sup trademark} condenses water from a cooling tower, while Lehigh University's process condenses water and acid in flue gas. 3 figs.

  7. Solar Water Heating Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beginning in the fall of 2003, Energy Trust of Oregon's Solar Water Heating (SWH) Incentive Program offers incentives to customers of Pacific Power, PGE, NW Natural Gas and Cascade Natural Gas who...

  8. LHCB RICH gas system proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosteels, Michel; Haider, S

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both LHCb RICH will be operated with fluorocarbon as gas radiator. RICH 1 will be filled with 4m^3 of C4F10 and RICH 2 with 100m^3 of CF4. The gas systems will run as a closed loop circulation and a gas recovery system within the closed loop is planned for RICH 1, where the recovery of the CF4 will only be realised during filling and emptying of the detector. Inline gas purification is foreseen for the gas systems in order to limit water and oxygen impurities.

  9. Supersonic coal water slurry fuel atomizer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Balsavich, John (Foxborough, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supersonic coal water slurry atomizer utilizing supersonic gas velocities to atomize coal water slurry is provided wherein atomization occurs externally of the atomizer. The atomizer has a central tube defining a coal water slurry passageway surrounded by an annular sleeve defining an annular passageway for gas. A converging/diverging section is provided for accelerating gas in the annular passageway to supersonic velocities.

  10. Xcel Energy (Gas)- Residential Conservation Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel Energy offers its Wisconsin residential natural gas customers rebates for high efficiency heating equipment. Currently, rebates are available for tankless and storage water heaters, furnaces,...

  11. Efficiency United (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Efficiency United program is intended to provide assistance and incentives to customers who employ energy efficient measures. Programs offer rebates on natural gas water heaters, clothes...

  12. Questar Gas- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides rebates to its business customers for installing energy efficient food service equipment, laundry equipment, HVAC and water heating equipment, and certain weatherization...

  13. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  14. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andhot water from the water heater to each end-use locationMixed Temperature Water Water Heater Drain Indoor Boundary

  15. Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Gas Tankless Water Heaters. Center for Energy andof water at the water heater and at several end-use pointsshowerhead, entering the water heater and leaving the water

  16. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an accidental release was calculated for a release of about 1,500 Ci HTO that occurred in October 1954. The likely dose for this release was probably less than 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem), but, because of many unknowns (e.g., release-specific meteorological and accidental conditions) and conservative assumptions, the uncertainty was very high. As a result, the upper confidence limit on the predictions, considered a dose that could not have been exceeded, was estimated to be 2 mSv (200 mrem). The next highest dose, from the 1970 accidental release of about 290,000 Ci (10,700 TBq) HT when wind speed and wind direction were known, was one-third as great. Doses from LLNL accidental releases were well below regulatory reporting limits. All doses, from both routine and accidental releases, were far below the level (3.6 mSv [360 mrem] per year) at which adverse health effects have been documented in the literature.

  17. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  18. Coal beneficiation by gas agglomeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheelock, Thomas D.; Meiyu, Shen

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  19. Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

    2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

  20. Water Heating Requirements Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Heating Requirements ­ Overview Page 5-1 5 Water Heating Requirements 5.1 Overview 5.1.1 Water Heating Energy Water heating energy use is an important end use in low-rise residential buildings. Roughly 90 percent of California households use natural gas fueled water heaters, typically storage gas

  1. Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traynor, G.W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Furnace (2) Heater (35) Water Heater (32) ~ Space u.. c:Emissionsfrom Gas-fired Water Heaters, Report No. 1507,gas furnaces and water heaters," JAPCA 31:1268 (1981). Table

  2. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  3. Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those processing or extracting coal or gas. The purpose of the...

  4. I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

  5. UWIG Forecasting Workshop -- Albany (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the importance of good forecasting for variable generation, the different approaches used by industry, and the importance of validated high-quality data.

  6. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plants The path to energy security for the United States includes responsible coal combustion. Half of our nation's electricity is produced from coal, and the country has...

  7. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science....

  8. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing CO2 emissions without...

  9. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer...

  10. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that can be directly applied to individual wells using measurements from borehole logging tools. Models for leakage risk of wells can be developed that use collected data...

  11. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PARTNERS Geological Survey of Alabama Rice University Schlumberger SECARB Alabama Power Company Southern Company PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 12082009 08142013 COST...

  12. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - is developing a comprehensive reservoir simulator for modeling non-isothermal multiphase flow and transport of CO 2 in saline aquifers under varying temperature and pressure...

  13. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will identify specific risks such as induced seismicity and seismic hazards, caprock integrity, lateral CO 2 migration and existing well leakage paths. FE0001922 August 2012...

  14. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation and risk assessment, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2 geologic storage sites....

  15. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effective application of these MVA technologies will ensure the safety of geologic storage projects with respect to both human health and the environment, and can provide the...

  16. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    successful in furthering an understanding of the mechanisms controlling CO 2 extended coal bed methane recovery (ECBM) as a byproduct of CO 2 storage in deep, unmineable coal...

  17. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO 2 Storage Background Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer the...

  18. Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Triassic Newark Basin of New York & New Jersey for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide Background Carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies offer the potential for reducing...

  19. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), which was enacted to create new jobs, spur economic activity, and promote long-term economic growth. This research...

  20. Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    injection zone(s); (3) improving efficiency of storage operations; and (4) developing Best Practices Manuals (BPMs). The overall project objective is to characterize the RSU and...

  1. Albany, Oregon, Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111 ~IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIJ~~ 0001

  2. NREL and Industry Advance Low-Cost Solar Water Heating R&D (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Rhotech develop cost-effective solar water heating prototype to rival natural gas water heater market.

  3. Our Environment in Hot Water: Comparing Water Heaters, A Life Cycle Approach Comparing Tank and Tankless Water Heaters in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Alison

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study on Eco-Design of Water Heaters, Van Holstein en Kemnaon Eco-Design of Water Heaters”, Task 5 Report, DefinitionTesting of Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance. Davis

  4. The LBNL Water Heater Retail Price Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex; Glover, Julie; Lutz, Jim

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    display the distribution of water heater models by fee typeelectric and gas-fired water heaters, respectively. DeliveryDistribution of Electric Water Heaters by Fee Type Figure B-

  5. Effect of Energy Efficiency Standards on Natural Gas Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnall, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a recently proposed water heater standard. The resultspurchases a new gas-fired water heater, she will maximizeefficiency standard for water heaters. 1.2 Overview of the

  6. High-pressure gas hydrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loveday, J. S.; Nelmes, R. J.

    It has long been known that crystalline hydrates are formed by many simple gases that do not interact strongly with water, and in most cases the gas molecules or atoms occupy 'cages' formed by a framework of water molecules. The majority...

  7. Water and Energy Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, James E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    produced water from production of crude oil, natural gas,the production and processing of each gallon of crude oil (production and processing of 1 gallon (3.8 liters) of crude oil

  8. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Stephen D. (Corrales, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  9. Effect of the cathode gas diffusion layer on the water transport behavior and the performance of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao , W.W. Yang Department Direct methanol fuel cell Passive operation Neat methanol operation a b s t r a c t The passive operation of a direct methanol fuel cell with neat methanol requires the water that is pro- duced at the cathode

  10. Fuel cell gas management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

    2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

  11. Impacts of Imported Liquefied Natural Gas on Residential Appliance Components: Literature Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lekov, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamentals of Gas Combustion. 2001: Washington, DC. 131Components A gas appliance combustion system accomplishestransfers energy from hot combustion gases to water or air

  12. Cr-free Fe-based metal oxide catalysts for high temperature water gas shift reaction of fuel processor using LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    lee, Joon Y.; Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kwan Young; Wang, Yong

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study was to identify the most suitable chromium-free iron-based catalysts for the HTS (high temperature shift) reaction of a fuel processor using LPG. Hexavalent chromium (Cr6+) in the commercial HTS catalyst has been regarded as hazardous material. We selected Ni and Co as the substitution for chromium in the Fe-based HTS catalyst and investigated the HTS activities of these Crfree catalysts at LPG reformate condition. Cr-free Fe-based catalysts which contain Ni, Zn, or Co instead of Cr were prepared by coprecipitation method and the performance of the catalysts in HTS was evaluated under gas mixture conditions (42% H2, 10% CO, 37% H2O, 8% CO2, and 3% CH4; R (reduction factor): about 1.2) similar to the gases from steam reforming of LPG (100% conversion at steam/carbon ratio = 3), which is higher than R (under 1) of typically studied LNG reformate condition. Among the prepared Cr-free Febased catalysts, the 5 wt%-Co/Fe/20 wt%-Ni and 5 wt%-Zn/Fe/20 wt%-Ni catalysts showed good catalytic activity under this reaction condition simulating LPG reformate gas.

  13. Analysis of Desalination Processes for Treatment of Produced Water for Re-use as Irrigation Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradt, Laura

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Produced water is a major side product of onshore oil and gas production. This water contains a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds and requires treatment for beneficial reuse. One option for the reuse of this water is irrigation. Treatment...

  14. A liquid water management strategy for PEM fuel cell stacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Trung; Knobbe, M. W.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas and water management are key to achieving good performance from a PEM fuel cell stack. Previous experimentation had found, and this experimentation confirms, that one very effective method of achieving proper gas and water management is the use...

  15. Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

  16. Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lead Performer: Thermolift - Stony Brook, NY Partners: -- New York State Energy Research & Development Authority - Albany, NY -- Stony Brook University - Stony Brook, NY -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN -- National Grid - Washington, DC -- Applied Thermodynamic Apparatus (ATA) - Ann Arbor, MI -- Fala Technologies - Kingston, NY -- LoDolce - Saugerties, NY

  17. A Resolution of the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany to Oppose the Current Practice of Hydraulic Fracturing and Support the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    -volume hydraulic fracturing ("fracking") is a recently- developed technology for extracting methane gas from shale, environmental, economic, and policy aspects of fracking in light of Unitarian Universalist principles; III that fracking endangers human health because it uses, without proper safeguards, toxic chemicals that are known

  18. Texas Gas Service- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Texas Gas Service offers an incentive for its residential customers within the Austin and Sunset Valley city limits to install new central furnaces, hydronic water heaters, high efficiency gas...

  19. PG&E (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers rebates for residential gas customers who install energy efficient furnaces or water heaters in homes. More information and applications for...

  20. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LANCE HAYS

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

  1. COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

  2. Gas cooling performance in disc winding of large-capacity gas-insulated transformer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakadate, M.; Toda, K.; Sato, K.; Biswas, D.; Nakagawa, C.; Yanari, T. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)] [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed the gas-cooling system of a 275 kV, 300 MVA class gas-insulated transformer. In this study model experiments in which gas flow was substituted by water flow equivalently and 2-dimensional numerical flow analyses and network analyses were conducted. In this paper the outline of the development and optimization condition to get high cooling performance in SF{sub 6} gas-disc winding system of the transformer are presented.

  3. Methane hydrate gas production: evaluating and exploiting the solid gas resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate gas could be a tremendous energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs and a system for coring hydrate reservoirs are also described.

  4. Surfactant process for promoting gas hydrate formation and application of the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rogers, Rudy E. (Starkville, MS); Zhong, Yu (Brandon, MS)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of storing gas using gas hydrates comprising forming gas hydrates in the presence of a water-surfactant solution that comprises water and surfactant. The addition of minor amounts of surfactant increases the gas hydrate formation rate, increases packing density of the solid hydrate mass and simplifies the formation-storage-decomposition process of gas hydrates. The minor amounts of surfactant also enhance the potential of gas hydrates for industrial storage applications.

  5. Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rapp, VH

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Heaters 7.0 Glossary of Abbreviations AGA American Gas Association ANSI American National Standards

  6. Water Resources Water Quality and Water Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water Resources TD 603 Lecture 1: Water Quality and Water Treatment CTARA Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay 2nd November, 2011 #12;OVERVIEW Water Quality WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TREATMENT PLANTS WATER TRE OVERVIEW OF THE LECTURE 1. Water Distribution Schemes Hand Pump

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system integration for efficient operation of the unit. High- Efficiency Natural Gas Steam Reformer looks to introduce innovative, compact natural gas steam reforming system and appliance quality hydrogen Natural Gas Water Gas Clean Up CO2 & Water CO2 Rejection/ Recovery Appliance Quality Hydrogen Compression

  8. Arkansas Water Resources Center Annual Technical Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    saline water, especially in the shallower Alluvial Aquifer, that has resulted from oil and gas operations corrosion and taste problems with dr

  9. Chesapeake Bay, Drilling for Oil or Gas Prohibited (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drilling for oil or gas in the waters or within 500 hundred feet from the shoreline of the Chesapeake Bay or any of its tributaries is prohibited.

  10. Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act regulates the construction, alteration, enlargement, abandonment and removal of horizontal wells and associated water and wastewater use and storage. The...

  11. Orange and Rockland Utilities (Gas)- Residential Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers purchasing energy efficient natural gas equipment. Rebates exist for furnaces, water boilers and controls, steam boilers,...

  12. Public Service Commission and Natural Gas Safety Standards (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes the state Public Service Commission, which has regulatory authority over the electric, gas, water, and telecommunications utilities. Section 386.572 of this legislation...

  13. Columbia Gas of Virginia- Business Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Virginia offers rebates to commercial customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient equipment. Water heaters, furnaces, boilers, controls, and infrared heaters are...

  14. CenterPoint Energy- Residential Gas Heating Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CenterPoint Energy offers gas heating and water heating equipment rebates to its residential customers. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, back-up furnace systems, hydronic heaters, storage...

  15. abscess gas formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these two wells enables angular ... Miller, Douglas E. 69 Characterizing water-in-oil emulsions with application to gas hydrate formation. Open Access Theses and...

  16. Montana-Dakota Utilities (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Montana-Dakota Utilities (MDU) offers several residential rebates on energy efficient measures and natural gas equipment. New furnaces, water heaters and programmable thermostats are eligible for a...

  17. Cascade Natural Gas- Conservation Incentives for Existing Homes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cascade Natural Gas offers a variety of incentives to residential customers for making energy efficiency improvements to existing homes. Eligible equipment includes furnaces, water heaters,...

  18. Questar Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides rebates for energy efficient appliances and heating equipment, and certain weatherization measures through the ThermWise program. This equipment includes clothes washers, water...

  19. Questar Gas- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides rebates to its business customers for installing energy efficient food service equipment, laundry equipment, HVAC and water heating equipment, and certain weatherization...

  20. Columbia Gas of Kentucky- Home Savings Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Columbia Gas of Kentucky offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase and installation of energy efficient appliances and equipment. Water heaters, furnaces and space heating equipment...

  1. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, Mark P. (Knoxville, TN); Kedl, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  2. Gas Purge in a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Puneet K. Sinha* and Chao-Yang Wang**,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA Gas purge intended to minimize residual water of residual water in a PEFC prior to engine shutdown. Minimal residual water ensued by gas purge fur- ther. In this work, we present a physical model describing water removal from a PEFC during gas purge. Various stages

  3. Washington Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington Gas provides a number of rebates to residential customers who utilize energy efficient equipment and measures in the home. Rebate are available for tankless water heaters, storage (tank)...

  4. Is My Water Safe? disaster may disrupt the electricity needed to pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Emergency water Your hot water heater or water pressure tank could supply many gallons of safe water during the water heater on again until the water system is back in service. Water from the toilet tank may be used an emergency. Before using water from the water heater, switch off the gas or elec- tricity that heats

  5. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.; Wise, M.B.

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer. 2 figs.

  6. In-situ continuous water monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid monitoring system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container by the flow of carrier gas into the liquid directing device. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectrometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  7. Economics of gobar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, A.; Shrestha, P.C.; Fulford, D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This series of reports follows a sequence necessary to start and run a biogas project. The first provides and introduction to biogas, its costs, and its yields. Its use will conserve forests, create clean, healthy fuel and fertilizer, and save Nepal foreign exchange. The feasibility study considered water and dung supply, degree of cooperation among the affected villagers, the need for the plant, and intangibles such as erosion control. The initial survey investigates the community social situation, needs, and cooperation. The Gobar Gas company had had personnel problems which decreased service, but the problems were being worked out. The project has been highly successful. The 11 Chinese plants worked well with no leaks from the cement but the gas valves leaked. The scum breaker also caused problems. The high quality plaster work required is the greatest hindrance.

  8. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  9. Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scown, Corinne Donahue

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Reuse, Part I. Oil & Gas Journal 1992, 90 (38), 86,Journal of Life Cycle Assessment 1997, 2 (4), 217-222. Profile of the Oil and Gas

  10. Corrosion in gas conditioning plants - An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearce, B.; Dupart, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1800's, fuel gases of various sorts (acetylene, blast furnace gas, flue water gas, carbureted water gas, coal gas, coke oven gas and producer gas) were transmitted at low pressures in pipelines and were conditioned for contaminate removal. The removal of such contaminates as H/sub 2/S was usually accomplished by solid absorbents such as iron oxide, a process that is still in use today. The discovery in the late 20's of a regenerative process employing alkanolamines was instrumental in rapid increase in the use of natural gas in large volumes. Also at this time, the development of wide diameter pipelines that could handle 500-700 psi gas pressure provided the means of handling these large volumes of gas. The protection of the pipeline from corrosion depended upon contaminate removal of water, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide. In the process of contaminant removal, the process equipment suffered severe corrosion damage. Corrosion test methods and inhibitors were applied to those early processes and have advanced from weep holes and coupons to the present way of electronic and physical test methods. The trend is away from the primary amine at either low strength or inhibited at high concentration to less corrosive, ''tailor-made'' solvents that can be designed or formulated to perform a given task at acceptable corrosion rates and at much lower energy levels.

  11. air-water interactions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HOT WATER & POOL REQUIREMENTS CEC-MECH-2C (Revised 0809) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION WATER SIDE SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS (Part 2 27 AIR-WATER GAS EXCHANGE: MECHANISMS GOVERNING THE...

  12. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  13. Ground Water Management Regulations (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules and regulations apply to the management of the state's ground water resources. In addition, the Commissioner of Conservation has recommended that oil and gas operators with an interest...

  14. Shale Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a eviequestionnairesMillionNovember 200061:WaterGas

  15. Feasibility of Using Measurements of Internal Components of Tankless Water Heaters for Field Monitoring of Energy and Water Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas supplied to the water heater and the electricity used bywater supplied to the water heater, and • use of resistanceTest Procedures for Water Heaters; Final Rule," Federal

  16. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Micheels, Ronald H. (Concord, MA)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  17. Water mist injection in oil shale retorting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, T.R.; Lyczkowski, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

    1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Water mist is utilized to control the maximum temperature in an oil shale retort during processing. A mist of water droplets is generated and entrained in the combustion supporting gas flowing into the retort in order to distribute the liquid water droplets throughout the retort. The water droplets are vaporized in the retort in order to provide an efficient coolant for temperature control.

  18. Water on Earth Source % of Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    of heat. High Heat Capacity · Water absorbs or releases more heat than many substances for each degree is lowered. · spread salt on streets in winter to prevent ice formation. High Heat Capacity · Water vapor in our environment. · On earth, water is found as a liquid, as a solid (ice) or as a gas (water vapor

  19. Water and Climate 1. Peter Rhines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , water absorbs great thermal energy when it changes phase: melt, evaporate,, and liberates than energy when it condenses, freezes #12;Water and Climate 1. As a gas, water absorbs great thermal energy when (Fresh Water) Syllabus · 1 The global hydrologic cycle · 2 Energy transport: radiation, circulation ocean

  20. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  1. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  2. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of SFG spectra of ice-like structure we conclude that surface hydroxides are formed and no liquid water is present on the surface. Other than model catalysis, gas phase anion photoelectron spectroscopy of the Cl + H{sub 2} van der Waals well, silicon clusters, germanium clusters, aluminum oxide clusters and indium phosphide clusters were studied. The spectra help to map out the neutral potential energy surfaces of the clusters. For aluminum oxide, the structures of the anions and neutrals were explored and for silicon, germanium and indium phosphide the electronic structure of larger clusters was mapped out.

  3. Toward Production From Gas Hydrates: Current Status, Assessment of Resources, and Simulation-Based Evaluation of Technology and Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, George J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the second involves gas and hydrate (Class 1G, water-poorpriorities for marine gas hydrates, Fire In The Ice, NETLCollett, T. , 1993, Natural gas hydrates of the Prudhoe Bay

  4. RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    Recovery and Salt Production - Jim Silva, GE Oil & Gas 9:30 a.m. Appalachian Shale and Barnett Area Water Shale Coalition 8:30 a.m. Meeting Overview & Agenda - Kent Perry, Vice President, Onshore Programs Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production - Yongchun Tang, PEER Institute Shale Gas

  5. Method for the production of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Escher, G.; Harjung, J.; Wenning, H.P.

    1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is claimed for the continuous production of synthesis gas comprising of carbon monoxide and hydrogen through the autothermal gasification of solid combustibles in a pressure reactor. The method involves the following: introducing into a screw machine containing two parallely ordered shafts, a finely divided solid combustible; moistening and intimately mixing the solid combustible with 2 to 30% by weight of water, degasing and compressing the moist solid combustible to a pressure higher than that of the reactor; adding the gas-tight compressed and moist solid combustible to a reaction chamber-through a burner where the combustible is brought into contact with the gasification medium; evaporating the water in the compressed and moist solid combustible and producing a comminuted dispersion of the solid combustible in the mixture of the gasification medium and water vapor; reacting the combustible dispersion to give a raw synthesis gas; and removing the raw synthesis gas from the reactor.

  6. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  7. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  8. Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coal, Petroleum coke, Biomass, Waste, etc. Gasifier Particulate Removal Air Separator Oxygen Air Steam - Transition to the Hydrogen Economy - CO2 capture and sequestration #12;Coal Gasification Technology Options&D Plan · Project falls within the Technical Objective to develop technology to produce pure H2 from coal

  9. water gas shift | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are extremely sensitive to sulfur and chloride poisoning and are normally not used in coal gasification plants. Sweet shift is normally not used for coal gasification...

  10. Water-Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTED Jump to: navigation,Area (Wood,Wall Turbine Jump

  11. Tankless Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,ZaleskiThis Decision considersTable 1: Points ofGinnyTheIllustrationThe

  12. How to Make Appliance Standards Work: Improving Energy and Water Efficiency Test Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of commercial water heaters and hot water supplyheat pump water heaters). http://edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/CSA 4.3- 2004 Gas Water Heaters - Volume III, Storage

  13. In-situ continuous water analyzing module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN); Wise, Marcus B. (Kingston, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-situ continuous liquid analyzing system for continuously analyzing volatile components contained in a water source comprises: a carrier gas supply, an extraction container and a mass spectrometer. The carrier gas supply continuously supplies the carrier gas to the extraction container and is mixed with a water sample that is continuously drawn into the extraction container. The carrier gas continuously extracts the volatile components out of the water sample. The water sample is returned to the water source after the volatile components are extracted from it. The extracted volatile components and the carrier gas are delivered continuously to the mass spectometer and the volatile components are continuously analyzed by the mass spectrometer.

  14. Oil/gas collector/separator for underwater oil leaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas collector/separator for recovery of oil leaking, for example, from an offshore or underwater oil well. The separator is floated over the point of the leak and tethered in place so as to receive oil/gas floating, or forced under pressure, toward the water surface from either a broken or leaking oil well casing, line, or sunken ship. The separator is provided with a downwardly extending skirt to contain the oil/gas which floats or is forced upward into a dome wherein the gas is separated from the oil/water, with the gas being flared (burned) at the top of the dome, and the oil is separated from water and pumped to a point of use. Since the density of oil is less than that of water it can be easily separated from any water entering the dome.

  15. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  16. Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the S4 and D2d water octamers in benzene-,,water...8 and benzene2-,,water...8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zwier, Timothy S.

    Resonant ion-dip infrared spectroscopy of the S4 and D2d water octamers in benzene-,,water...8 and benzene2-,,water...8 Christopher J. Gruenloh, Joel R. Carney, Fredrick C. Hagemeister, Caleb A. Arrington the hydrogen-bonding topologies of two isomers each of the benzene- water)8 and (benzene 2 water)8 gas

  17. Solar Water Heater Roadmap Leads Path to Market Expansion (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Innovative strategy to reduce installed cost of solar water heater systems can rival conventional natural gas water heaters in the marketplace.

  18. Measuring and moderating the water resource impact of biofuel production and trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerman, Kevin Robert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water  from   Production  of  Crude  Oil,  Natural  Gas,  water  required  for  production  of  crude  oil  through  consumption  for  production   of  crude  oil  in  the  

  19. California Solar Initiative- Low-Income Solar Water Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The program is only available to customers who currently heat their water with natural gas in the service territories of Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), San Diego Gas & Electric ...

  20. The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelleher, R.L.; O'Leary, T.J.; Shirk, I.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process removes sulfur dioxide from a flue by cold water scrubbing. Sulfur dioxide is significantly more soluable in cold water (35/sup 0/F to 60/sup 0/F) than in warm water (100/sup 0/F). Sulfur dioxide reacts in water similarly as carbon dioxide reacts in water, in that both gasses are released from the water as the temperature of the water increases. The researchers at the Gonzaga University developed this process from the observations and techniques used in studying the acid and aldehyde concentrations in flue gasses with varying of fuel to air ratios. The apparatus was fixed to a stationary engine and a gas/oil fired boiler. The flue gas was cooled to the dew point temperature of the air entering the combustion chamber on the pre-air heater. The system is described in two parts: the energies required for cooling in the scrubbing section and the energies required in the treatment section. The cold flue gas is utilized in cooling the scrubber section.