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1

Albany Water Gas & Light Comm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Gas & Light Comm Water Gas & Light Comm Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Water Gas & Light Comm Place Georgia Utility Id 230 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial Non-Demand Commercial Large Commercial Demand Commercial Residential Residential Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 1000 Watt Metal Halide Wooden Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Metal Pole Lighting Security Lights 150 HPSV Fixtures Wooden Pole Lighting

2

Deep, water-free gas potential is upside to New Albany shale play  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of the Illinois basin contains major accumulations of Devonian shale gas, comparable both to the Antrim shale of the Michigan basin and the Ohio shale of the Appalachian basin. The size of the resource originally assessed at 61 tcf has recently been increased to between 323 tcf and 528 tcf. According to the 1995 US Geological Survey appraisal, New Albany shale gas represents 52% of the undiscovered oil and gas reserves of the Illinois basin, with another 45% attributed to coalbed methane. New Albany shale gas has been developed episodically for over 140 years, resulting in production from some 40 fields in western Kentucky, 20 fields in southern Indiana, and at least 1 field in southern Illinois. The paper describes two different plays identified by a GRI study and prospective areas.

Hamilton-Smith, T. [Hamilton-Smith LLC, Lexington, KY (United States)

1998-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

New Albany shale gas flow starts in western Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the stratigraphy and lithology of the New Albany shale and how this affects the placement of gas recovery wells in the Greene County, Indiana area. It reviews the project planning aspects including salt water reinjection and well spacing for optimum gas recovery. It also briefly touches on how the wells were completed and brought on-line for production and distribution.

NONE

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

albany  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Albany, Oregon, Site (formerly the Albany, Oregon, Site (formerly the Albany Research Center Site) is located at 1450 Queen Avenue SW, approximately 23 miles south of Salem, Oregon. The site consists of three main areas: the Albany Research Center (ARC), which comprises a number of buildings in the northern and central sections of the site, a 2-acre inactive biomass research facility that occupies the center of the site, and a 14-acre open area in the back of the site. ARC was established in 1943 to investigate innovative approaches for developing strategic mineral resources and for conducting other activities relevant to metallurgical research in the United States. From 1948 to 1956, the U.S. Bureau of Mines melted, machined, welded, and alloyed thorium at the site for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and later,

5

Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utilization Project Biomass Facility Utilization Project Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility Facility Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Albany County, New York Coordinates 42.5756797°, -73.9359821° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5756797,"lon":-73.9359821,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Gas sales starting from Indiana`s fractured New Albany shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas issued 138 drilling permits from Dec. 1, 1994, through July 31, 1996, in 17 counties in a growing play for gas in Devonian New Albany shale in southern Indiana. The permits are active in the form of locations, drilling wells, wells in the completion process, and wells producing gas in the dewatering stage. Geologically in southwestern Indiana the New Albany shale exploration play is found in three provinces. These are the Wabash platform, the Terre Haute reef bank, and the Vincennes basin. Exploration permits issued on each of these geologic provinces are as follows: Wabash platform 103, Terra Haute reef bank 33, and Vincennes basin two. The authors feel that the quantity and effectiveness of communication of fracturing in the shale will control gas production and water production. A rule of thumb in a desorption reservoir is that the more water a shale well makes in the beginning the more gas it will make when dewatered.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. [Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Geologists, Fort Worth, TX (United States)

1996-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

7

Maintenance of high TDS in pore waters above the New Albany Shale of the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TDS content of interstitial waters above the Upper Devonian New Albany Shale of the Illinois Basin, mostly sodium and chloride, increases at an average rate of 15 wt%km[sup [minus]1]. Roughly 200 My have elapsed since the youngest marine rocks of wide horizontal extent [Pennsylvania] were deposited. Regardless of the original brine-forming mechanism, the maintenance of high TDS for such a long time span is problematic because upward diffusion above the New Albany Shale should have lowered TDS if no salt dissolved above the New Albany Shale. Groundwater flow at even small rates would have lowered TDS faster than the process of diffusion alone. Calculations which take into account the effects of vertical diffusion show that the present-day salinity gradient of waters above the New Albany Shale can be explained if: (1) the salinity gradient 200 My b.p. was at least thrice as high as at the present, or (2) salt dissolved above the New Albany Shale at an average rate of about 12 m of halite column over 200 My. The code PORFLOW was used to simulate flushing of brines in a generic basin 500 km wide, 1.5 km deep [the maximum depth of the New Albany Shale], with a low basin-wide topographic gradient of 0.06%.

Ranganathan, V. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Natural gas potential of the New Albany shale group (Devonian-Mississippian) in southeastern Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany shale group indicate that a 19-country area of southeastern Illinois is a favorable area to explore for gas in Devonian shale. Although gas shows in the shales have been encountered in several wells drilled in this area, no attempts were made to complete or evaluate a shale gas well until 1979. It is found that conventional rotary drilling with mud base drilling fluids likely causes extensive formation damage and may account for the paucity of gas shows and completion attempts in the Devonian shales; therefore, commercial production of shale gas in Illinois probably will require novel drilling completion techniques not commonly used by local operators. 16 refs.

Cluff, R.M.; Dickerson, D.R.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Workshop on gas potential of New Albany shale held in conjunction with the 1995 Ioga meeting in Evansville, Indiana on March 1, 1995. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop is intended to provide an overview of the organic lithofacies, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, and gas potential of the Devonian and Mississippian New Albany Shale in the Illinois Basin. In addition, the reservoir characteristics and completion technology for productive organic-rich Devonian shales in the Michigan and Appalachian Basins are also reviewed. Emphasis is being placed on how proven technologies together with appropriate geologic and geochemical information can be used to explore for gas in the New Albany Shale.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Pressure Transient Analysis and Production Analysis for New Albany Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas has become increasingly important to United States energy supply. During recent decades, the mechanisms of shale gas storage and transport were gradually recognized. Gas desorption was also realized and quantitatively described. Models...

Song, Bo

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

NETL: Albany, Oregon History  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > About NETL > History > Albany Research Center History Home > About NETL > History > Albany Research Center History About NETL Albany, Oregon History Albany Research Center has a history rich in successful materials research and development. It was on March 17, 1943 that President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that the U. S. Bureau of Mines had selected a site in Albany, Oregon for the new Northwest Electro-development Laboratory. The original mission of the center was to find methods for using the abundant low-grade resources of the area, and to develop new metallurgical processes using the abundant electrical energy in the area. The name of the center was changed in 1945 to the Albany Metallurgy Research Center and was used through 1977 where the name was shortened to Albany Research Center. One of our first successes was the development

14

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

15

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy University at Albany Students Head Back to a School Powered with Renewable Energy August 24, 2012 - 10:00am Addthis University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. University at Albany's new student housing center, Liberty Terrace, is the school's first LEED Gold certified facility. The building has high-efficiency lighting and uses 45 percent less water than a comparable building. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany. To help regulate Liberty Terrace's temperature, the school installed a geothermal heat pump, which is expected to reduce energy use by 50 percent. | Photo courtesy of the University at Albany.

16

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from oil and gas wells and develop possible uses and applications. In oil and gas exploration, produced water includes saline water found in underground formations that is...

17

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

18

Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Albany-Eugene-Rebuild-Project Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search Doing Business Expand Doing Business Customer Involvement Expand Customer Involvement...

19

Studies of New Albany shale in western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany (Upper Devonian) Shale in western Kentucky can be zoned by using correlative characteristics distinguishable on wire-line logs. Wells drilled through the shale which were logged by various methods provided a basis for zonation of the subsurface members and units of the Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and Blocher. Structure and isopach maps and cross sections were prepared. The Hannibal Shale and Rockford Limestone were found in limited areas; isopach maps were not made for these members. Samples of cuttings from selected wells were studied in order to identify the contact of the shale with underlying and overlying rock units. A well-site examination of cuttings through the shale section was conducted, and the presence of natural gas was observed in the field. The New Albany Shale has the potential for additional commercially marketable natural gas production. Exploratory drilling is needed to evaluate the reservoir characteristics of the New Albany Shale.

Schwalb, H.R.; Norris, R.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tankless Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tankless Gas Water Heaters Tankless Gas Water Heaters Standardized Templates for Reporting Test Results tanklessgaswaterheaterv12.xlsx More Documents & Publications Heat Pump...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Storage Gas Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Gas Water Heaters Storage Gas Water Heaters The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance...

22

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

23

EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon. Additional information is available at the project...

24

Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale The University relevant to the oil and gas industry. You will develop a versatile analytical, computational of Oxford http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/joec Key Words Shale gas, hydraulic fracture

Henderson, Gideon

25

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Challenges: Water Shale Gas Development Challenges: Water More Documents & Publications Natural Gas from Shale: Questions and Answers Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture...

27

Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance - Building America Top Innovation This photo shows a hot water heater...

28

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas Background Coal-fired power plants require large volumes of water for efficient operation, primarily for cooling purposes. Public concern over water use is increasing, particularly in water stressed areas of the country. Analyses conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory predict significant increases in power plant freshwater consumption over the coming years, encouraging the development of technologies to reduce this water loss. Power plant freshwater consumption refers to the quantity of water withdrawn from a water body that is not returned to the source but is lost to evaporation, while water withdrawal refers to the total quantity of water removed from a water source.

29

Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

2011-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

30

Isothermal decomposition of New Albany shale from Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The isothermal decomposition of a New Albany oil shale has been studied in the temperature range of 375/sup 0/C to 425/sup 0/C. The amount of conversion of kerogen to bitumen, oil, gas and residue products was obtained for different reaction times in this temperature range. Elemental analyses were obtained on the bitumen, oil, and solid reaction products. Molecular weights and /sup 13/C NMR measurements of the aliphatic and aromatic carbon fractions in the solid products were made to complete the analyses. The results show that the thermal decomposition of the New Albany oil shale exhibits complex behavior. None of the data fit a simple first-order kinetic expression with respect to kerogen concentration for all temperatures, indicating that multiple parallel reactions occur during the decomposition. However, by fitting the initial slopes of the oil conversion data, it was possible to obtain the weighted average rate constants at each temperature. These data gave a good fit to the Arrhenius equation with the frequency factor equal to 6.38 x 10/sup 15/ min/sup -1/, and the activation energy equal to 207.5 k.j mol/sup -1/ for the kerogen decomposition. The maximum bitumen concentration was 10% or less of the original kerogen at any temperature, indicating that direct conversion of kerogen to oil, gas and residue occurs during heating. Since the highly aliphatic Green River oil shale forms large amounts of bitumen whereas the more aromatic New Albany shale forms only small amounts, the formation of bitumen may be related to the aromatic nature of the kerogen. In general, the chemical properties of the oil were fairly constant at all reaction times and temperatures studied. Hydrogen sulfide was the dominant species in the gas phase. The solid and liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data show that the net increase of total aromatic carbon in the products was about 30% of the raw shale value. 37 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.

Miknis, F.P.; Conn, P.J.; Turner, T.F.; Berdan, G.L.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for gas storage...

32

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and or efficiency level. INPUT...

33

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Albany - OR 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Survey of the Albany Metallurgical Research Center United States Bureau of Mines Biomass Facility and the Back Forty Area, Albany, Oregon; June 1983 OR.01-8 - DOE Report...

34

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

needs of advanced power systems. Industries that utilize natural gas, gasifier syngas, biogas, landfill gas, or any type of fuel gas can benefit from knowing the composition of the...

35

Microsoft Word - AlbanyEugene_ROD-MAP_060112.docx  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Record of Decision June 2012 1 Bonneville Power Administration's Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Record of Decision June 2012 Decision The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to implement the Proposed Action Alternative from the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt (kV) No. 1 Transmission Line Rebuild Project Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0457, March 2012). The Proposed Action Alternative, which was identified as the agency's preferred alternative in the Final EIS, consists of rebuilding a 32-mile section of the existing Albany-Eugene 115-kV transmission line that extends from the Albany Substation in the City of Albany in Linn County, Oregon, to the Alderwood Tap

36

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pollutants and CO 2 . Oxy-fuel combustion of hydrocarbon fuel (coal, natural-gas, biomass) generates denitrified combustion gas comprising dominantly CO 2 and H 2 O. The...

37

Covered Product Category: Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including commercial gas water heaters, which are covered by the ENERGY STAR program. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

38

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regions Research Program Assessing Risk and Mitigating Deleterious Events Associated with Drilling and Production Background Increasingly, offshore domestic oil and natural gas...

39

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or...

40

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Impacts of Shale Gas Activities Background During hydraulic fracturing of unconventional resources, large quantities of fracturing fluids are injected at high...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Commission Association of American Railroads Augusta Systems, Inc. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy...

42

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Gas in Coal Seams Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that...

43

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

being developed for geologic carbon storage are focused on five storage types: oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, unmineable coal seams, basalts, and...

44

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal-Seq III Consortium: Advancing the Science of CO 2 Sequestration in Coal Seam and Gas Shale Reservoirs Background Through its core research and development (R&D) program...

45

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manager Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 281-494-2520 roy.long@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Offshore Technical Portfolio Lead Office of Research and Development 541-967-5883...

46

New Albany shale group of Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois basin's New Albany shale group consists of nine formations, with the brownish-black laminated shales being the predominant lithology in southeastern Illinois and nearby parts of Kentucky where the group reaches its maximum thickness of 460 ft. A second depositional center lies in west-central Illinois and southeastern Iowa, where the group is about 300 ft thick and the predominant lithology is bioturbated olive-gray to greenish-gray shale. A northeast-trending area of thin strata (mostly interfingering gray and black shales) separates these two depocenters. The distribution and types of lithofacies in the New Albany suggest that the shale was deposited across a shelf-slope-basin transition in a marine, stratified anoxic basin. The record of depositional events in the shale group could serve as a baseline for interpreting the history of tectonically more complex sequences such as the Appalachian basin's Devonian shales.

Cluff, R.M.; Reinbold, M.L.; Lineback, J.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Visiting NETL Albany, Morgantown or Pittsburgh | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Visiting NETL Albany, Morgantown or Pittsburgh Contact NETL Key Staff Mission and Overview History Organization Awards & Recognition Education Site Enviromental Quality Visiting...

48

Clean Cities: Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) Coalition The Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce petroleum use in transportation. Capital District Clean Communities (Albany) coalition Contact Information Jennifer Ceponis 518-458-2161 jceponis@cdtcmpo.org Coalition Website Clean Cities Coordinator Jennifer Ceponis Photo of Jennifer Ceponis Jennifer Ceponis has been the coordinator of Capital District Clean Communities Coalition since 2012. Ceponis is a Senior Transportation Planner at the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC), where she worked since 2008 on bicycle and pedestrian planning, transportation demand management programs and community planning. The Clean Communities Coalition

49

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

risks to water ecology and energy resources from potential leakage of CO 2 from deep brine reservoirs. The results of the efforts above will be used to develop a toolkit of...

50

Water retention and gas relative permeability of two industrial concretes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This experimental study aims at identifying the water retention properties of two industrial concretes to be used for long term underground nuclear waste storage structures. Together with water retention, gas transfer properties are identified at varying water saturation level, i.e. relative gas permeability is assessed directly as a function of water saturation level S{sub w}. The influence of the initial de-sorption path and of the subsequent re-saturation are analysed both in terms of water retention and gas transfer properties. Also, the influence of concrete microstructure upon water retention and relative gas permeability is assessed, using porosity measurements, analysis of the BET theory from water retention properties, and MIP. Finally, a single relative gas permeability curve is proposed for each concrete, based on Van Genuchten-Mualem's statistical model, to be used for continuous modelling approaches of concrete structures, both during drying and imbibition.

Chen Wei; Liu Jian; Brue, Flore; Skoczylas, Frederic [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Davy, C.A., E-mail: catherine.davy@ec-lille.fr [Univ Lille Nord de France, F-59000 Lille (France); ECLille, LML, BP 48, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); CNRS, UMR 8107, F-59650 Villeneuve d'Ascq (France); Bourbon, Xavier; Talandier, Jean [Andra, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy efficiency+ power plant energy efficiency+ Home Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas. How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature? Links: The technology of Condensing Flue Gas Heat Recovery natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building

53

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological Water Gas Shift DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and Infrastructure Technologies Program Review was produced from water in a linked cyanobacterial- hydrogenase hybrid system Isolated mutants and cloned 2

54

Chapter 7 - Test Cell Cooling Water and Exhaust Gas Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Part 1 considers the thermodynamics of water cooling systems, water quality, typical cooling water circuits, and engine coolant control units. Also covered are the commissioning cooling circuits, thermal shock, and chilled water systems. Part 2 covers the design of test cell exhaust systems, exhaust silencers, exhaust gas volume flow, exhaust silencers, and exhaust cowls. Part 3 briefly covers the testing of turbochargers.

A.J. Martyr; M.A. Plint

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

The Challenge of Producing Oil and Gas in Deep Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...institutions (Joides). The oil industry has drilled controlled...major unexplored frontier for oil and gas. The paper emphasizes...engineering geology natural gas offshore petroleum production 1977 06...1981 The challenge of producing oil and gas in deep water van Eek...

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water's Journey Through the Shale Gas Drilling and Production Processes in the Mid-Atlantic Region: Marcellus shale drilling in progress, Beaver Run Reservoir, Westmoreland County. Credit: Robert Donnan. Gas in the Marcellus shale natural gas industry in the Mid-Atlantic region. Using publicly available information, we

Lee, Dongwon

57

Development of Novel Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of Novel Water- Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor Addressing Barrier L: H2 Purification-22, 2003 #12;Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor · Relevance/Objectives - Produce Enhanced H2 Product with ppm CO at High Pressure Used for Reforming - Overcome Barrier L: H2 Purification/CO Clean-up - Achieve

58

Relative permeabilities of gas and water for different rank coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of gaswater two-phase flow through coal seams play crucial roles in water depletion and gas production associated with coalbed methane (CBM) recovery. One of the most important characteristic is the relative permeability of gas and water which is largely dependent on gas/water saturations in coal, varying with coal ranks. For better understanding of the seepage mechanism of the gaswater flow in coal, the relative permeabilities of gas and water in different rank coals selected from south Qinshui Basin have been investigated under various gas/water saturations through water replacement with methane using an unsteady-state method. The results have shown that the ratio of effective methane permeability and absolute permeability is obviously increasing with rank, implying that the gas slippage of high rank coal has more significant effect than the low rank coal. A series of relative permeability curves for selected coals have been obtained. All of these curves show that the selected coals are featured by smaller methane permeabilities and narrow spans of two-phase flow regions and lower relative permeability, and have low methane permeabilities under irreducible water condition as well. The experiments also revealed that the selected coals exhibit high residual water saturation with low relative permeabilities of gas and water. With increasing of the maximal vitrinite reflectance, the irreducible water saturation exhibits a U-shaped tendency whereas the methane permeability under the irreducible water condition generally increases. The irreducible water saturation slightly increases with increasing of vitrinite and weakly decreases as inertinite increases, while the methane permeability under irreducible water condition is negatively related with vitrinite and positively related to inertinite to some extent. The experimental data were further parameterized to correlate the relative permeabilities of methane and water to gas saturation, showing that a correlation of power function can fit the experiments well. As a result, a permeability model incorporated with coal rank and maceral compositions with gas saturation was developed to predict the relative permeabilities of gas (methane) and water in coals.

Jian Shen; Yong Qin; Geoff X. Wang; Xuehai Fu; Chongtao Wei; Bo Lei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Albany_FUSRAP  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Oregon Oregon Albany, Oregon, Site FUSRAP Site albany Background-The Albany, Oregon, Site was remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). FUSRAP was established in 1974 to remediate sites where radioactive contamination remained from Manhattan Project and early U.S. Atomic Energy Commission operations. History-The Albany Site is owned by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. Metallurgical research was conducted at this site for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration from 1948 to 1978. Activities involving radioactive thorium and uranium resulted in contamination of buildings, equipment, and soils. The U.S. Bureau of Mines remediated portions of the site from 1948 to 1978. DOE conducted additional remediation of buildings, equipment, and soils

60

Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of system cost Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $15.00/therm Provider Southwest Gas Corporation '''''Note: Effective July 15, 2013, Southwest Gas is no longer accepting applications for the current program year. Systems installed during the current program year will not be eligible for a rebate in the next program

62

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R R &D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

63

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) Regulation of Gas, Electric, and Water Companies (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maryland Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Public Service Commission The Public Service Commission is responsible for regulating gas, electric, and water companies in the state. This legislation contains provisions for such companies, addressing planning and siting considerations for electric

64

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program Memphis Light, Gas and Water (Electric) - Commercial Efficiency Advice and Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Manufacturing Other Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Commercial Weatherization Maximum Rebate 70% of project cost Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Commercial Dishwashers: $400 - $1500 Commercial Refrigerator: $60 - $100 Ice Machines: $100 - $400 Insulated Holding Cabinets: $250 - $600 Electric Steam Cookers: $400 Electric Convection Ovens: $200 Electric Griddles: $200 Electric Combination Ovens: $2,000

65

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) Gas, Heat, Water, Sewerage Collection and Disposal, and Street Railway Companies (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to public utilities and entities furnishing natural gas, heat, water, sewerage, and street railway services to the public. The legislation addresses rates and services, exemptions, investigations, and records. Article 4 (58-5-400 et seq.) of this

66

Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Gas Storage Water Heaters Gas Storage Water Heaters Covered Product Category: Gas Storage Water Heaters October 7, 2013 - 10:43am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases For the most up-to-date efficiency levels required by ENERGY STAR, look for

67

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

68

Questar Gas- Residential Solar Assisted Water Heating Rebate Program (Idaho)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Questar gas provides incentives for residential customers to purchase and install solar water heating systems on their homes. Rebates of $750 per system are provided to customers of Questar who...

69

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory...S. J. , Water pollution risk associated...jPlayer( { solution: "flash, html...relatively clean fossil fuel that could potentially...engineering pollutants pollution production risk...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...human health and environmental impacts associated with the release...inadequately treated wastewater to the environment (66). In addition, spills...assess potential water quality impacts in the northeast (78, 79...shale gas extraction (54). Impacts from casing leakage, well...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

71

A study of water driven oil encroachment into gas caps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF WATER DRIVEN OIL ENCROACHMENT INTO GAS CAPS LIBRARY A S I COLLEGE OF TEXAS A Thesis By HARLAN J. RITCH ~ ~ ~ Submitted to the Graduate School oi' the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1958 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A STUDY OF WATER DRIVEN OIL ENCROACHMENT INTO GAS CAPS A Thesis By HARLAN J. RITCH Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

Ritch, Harlan J

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

waters with geologic media such as confining layers and fossil fuels (e.g., coal, oil shale, natural gas bearing formations); and unconventional fossil fuel extraction...

73

Control of water coning in gas reservoirs by injecting gas into the aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 TOTAL PRODUCTION GAIN VERSUS GAS INJECTED FOR KW/K = 1 Cum. Water Prod. STB 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 10000 10000 10000 10000 10000 Cum. Gas Prod. MMMSCF . 545 715 . 825 . 830 . 979 . 788 . 979 1. 100 1. 100 1. 230 Cum... Production 13. 0 11. 3 12. 0 12. 5 3. 4 0. 22 TABLE 4 TOTAL PRODUCTION GAIN VERSUS GAS INJECTED FOR KW/K = 10 Cum. Water Prod. STB 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 10000 10000 10000 10000 10000 Cum. Gas Prod. MMMSCF 1. 549 1. 814 1. 942...

Haugen, Sigurd Arild

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

EA-1946: Salem-Albany Transmission Line Rebuild Project; Polk, Benton, Marion, and Linn Counties, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Bonneville Power Administration is preparing an EA to assess the potential environmental impacts of the proposed rebuild of the 24-mile Salem-Albany No. 1 and 28-mile Salem-Albany No. 2 transmission lines between Salem and Albany, Oregon.

75

Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

76

Albany, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Albany, New York: Energy Resources Albany, New York: Energy Resources (Redirected from Albany, NY) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.6525793°, -73.7562317° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6525793,"lon":-73.7562317,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

Greenhouse Gases (GHG) Emissions from Gas Field Water in Southern Gas Field, Sichuan Basin, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to assess correctly the gases emissions from oil/gas field water and its contributions to the source of greenhouse gases (GHG) at the atmospheric temperature and pressure, ... first developed to study th...

Guojun Chen; Wei Yang; Xuan Fang; Jiaai Zhong

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania . Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 109 ( 30...hydraulically fractured shale to aquifers . Ground Water 50...constitute the two primary aquifer li- thologies in northeastern...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program Southwest Gas Corporation - Smarter Greener Better Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Local Government Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: 30% of system cost or $3,000, whichever is less Small Commercial: 30% of system cost or $7,500, whichever is less Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County Facilities: 50% of system cost or $30,000, whichever is less Program Info State Nevada Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential and Small Business: $14.50 per therm Schools, Religious, Non-profit, Public Facilities and Civic and County

80

NMR studies of water-gas interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of published data concerning the solubility of different gases in water as dependent on temperature was carried out. ... described by mono-or bi-exponential functions. Solubilities of nitrogen and oxygen...

V. P. Kutyshenko; S. I. Vorobev

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364 ): 271...13 Boyer EW ( 2012 ) The Impact of Marcellus Gas Drilling on Rural Drinking Water Supplies...the Nicholas School of the Environment and Center on Global Change...derived from depositional environments that ranged from proposed...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methodology for Predicting Water Content in Supercritical Gas Vapor and Gas Solubility in Aqueous Phase for Natural Gas Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The streams in the natural gas process contain light hydrocarbons, mainly methane and ethane, associated with non-hydrocarbon supercritical gases (nitrogen, hydrogen, argon, etc.). ... For system that contains supercritical gases, the gas solubility in water can be related to the Henry's law constant. ...

Chorng H. Twu; Suphat Watanasiri; Vince Tassone

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

83

Landfill gas upgrading with pilot-scale water scrubber: Performance assessment with absorption water recycling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pilot-scale counter current absorption process for upgrading municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill gas to produce vehicle fuel was studied using absorption, desorption and drying units and water as an absorbent. Continuous water recycling was used without adding new water to the system. The process parameters were defined by a previous study made with this pilot system. The effect of pressure (2025bar), temperature (1025C) and water flow speed (5.511l/min) on the upgrading performance, trace compounds (siloxanes, halogenated compounds) and water quality were investigated. Raw landfill gas flow was kept constant at 7.41Nm3/h. Methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) contents in the product gas were 8690% and 4.58.0% with all studied pressures and temperatures. The remaining fraction in product gas was nitrogen (N2) (from 1% to 7%). Organic silicon compounds (siloxanes) were reduced by 16.6% and halogenated compounds similarly by 90.1% by water absorption. From studied process parameters, only water flow speed affected the removal of siloxanes and halogen compounds. The absorbent water pH was between 4.44.9, sulphide concentration between 0.11.0mg/l and carbonate concentration between 5001000mg/l. The product gas drying system reduced the siloxane concentration by 99.1% and halogenated compounds by 99.9% compared to the raw landfill gas. In conclusion, the pilot-scale gas upgrading process studied appears to be able to produce gas with high energy content (approx 8690% methane) using a closed water circulation system. When using a standard gas drying system, all trace compounds can be removed by over 99% compared to raw landfill gas.

J. Lntel; S. Rasi; J. Lehtinen; J. Rintala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

57: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR 57: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR EIS-0457: Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal by DOE's Bonneville Power Administration to rebuild a 32-mile section of the Albany-Eugene 115-kilovolt No. 1 Transmission Line in Lane and Linn Counties, Oregon. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Mitigation Action Plan Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Notice of Availability of a Record of Decision Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR June 13, 2012 EIS-0457: Record of Decision Albany-Eugene Rebuild Project, Lane and Linn Counties, OR

85

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Title FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5514E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5514E Pagination 8 Date Published April 1 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5514E Abstract None Notes This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State, and Community Programs, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Attachment Size PDF 240.22 KB Google Scholar BibTex RIS RTF XML Alternate URL: http://eetd.lbl.gov/node/50317

86

Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Gas & Water Sys Electric Gas & Water Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys Place New York Utility Id 1343 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial (20 KW to 75 KW demand) Commercial Industrial (Over 75 KW demand) Industrial Outdoor Lighting (175W MV-150W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (250W HPS) Lighting Outdoor Lighting (400W MV/HPS) Lighting Residential Residential Small Commercial ( Under 20 KW demand) Commercial

87

Analysis of a duo-selecting membrane reactor for the water-gas shift  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The water-gas shift reaction is an exothermic and reversible catalytic process that converts carbon monoxide and water (steam) to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. In regard to energy-related issues, the water-gas shift is part ...

Hardy, AliciA Jillian Jackson, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Covered Product Category: Residential Gas Storage Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including gas storage water heaters, which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

89

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development , (2011) Plan to Study the Potential...Dissolved Solids Standard: A Guide to the...gas and solution mining regulatory program...legacy of coal mining in many Pennsylvania...description, using standard codes for brine...remediation options: A review. Sci Total...water quality standard for chloride in...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R& R& D FAC T S Natural Gas & Oil R&D CONTACTS George Guthrie Focus Area Lead Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6571 george.guthrie@netl.doe.gov Kelly Rose Technical Coordinator Office of Research and Development National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Avenue SW Albany, OR 97321-2152 541-967-5883 kelly.rose@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Oregon State University Corvallis, OR Pennsylvania State University State College, PA University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA URS Corporation Pittsburgh, PA Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA West Virginia University Morgantown, WV

91

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Indiana New Albany shale in batch and continuous units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is being conducted at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for the production of oil from Eastern oil shales. The PFH process, using smaller particle sizes than the moving-bed hydroretorting process, offers higher oil yields and greater reactor mass fluxes through higher selectivity of organic carbon to oil and shorter residence times, respectively. Batch PFH tests have been conducted to study the effects of shale preheat time (15 to 30 min) and temperature (25{degree} to 320{degree}C), retorting temperature (450{degree} to 710{degree}C), hydrogen pressure (2.8 to 7.0 MPa), particle size (65 to 330 microns), and residence time (5 to 30 min) on the product yields from Indiana New Albany shale. Oil yield has been found to increase with increasing hydrogen pressure. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA)); Roosmagi, C. (USDOE Laramie Energy Technology Center, WY (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

City of Albany, Missouri (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri (Utility Company) Missouri (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Albany Place Missouri Utility Id 228 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SPP NERC SPP Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1210/kWh Commercial: $0.1190/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Albany,_Missouri_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409250

93

High temperature corrosion research at the Albany Research Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Severe Environment Corrosion and Erosion Research Facility (SECERF) at the Albany Research Center is operational. SECERF consists of 6 modules that share the availability of up to 10 different gases to produce environments for high temperature corrosion and erosion research. Projects to be conducted in the modules include: corrosion sensors for fossil energy systems, thermal gradient effects on high temperature corrosion, the development of sulfidation resistant alloys, determination of the effects of ash on the corrosion of metals and alloys in coal and waste combustion and coal gasification environments, high temperature erosion-corrosion of metals, and molten slag effects on refractories. Results from two areas, the effect of ash deposits on alloy corrosion and thermal gradient effects on the corrosion of metals, will be highlighted. Ash produced in coal gasifiers, coal combustors, and waste combustors, when deposited on metal surfaces, provides sites for corrosion attack and contributes chemical species that participate in the corrosion reaction. Results are presented for the corrosion of 304L stainless steel, that was either uncoated or coated with ash or with ash containing NaCl or Na2SO4, in air-water vapor mixtures at 600 C. The presence of high heat fluxes and temperature gradients in many fossil energy systems creates the need for an understanding of their effects on corrosion and oxidation. Such information would be useful for both improved alloy design and for better translation of isothermal laboratory results to field use. Temperature gradients in a solid oxide result in two changes that modify diffusion within the oxide. The first is when a gradient in point defect concentration is created within the oxide, for example, where more vacancies are expected at a higher temperature. The second change is when the presence of a temperature gradient biases the diffusion jump of an atom. Results of tests are presented for cobalt with metal surface temperatures of approximately 920-950 C in N2 plus 1-10 vol% O2 environments with a heat flux of about 40 kW/m2. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics were used to develop oxidation rate equations in temperature gradients that were combined with point defect information of CoO to predict oxidation rates.

Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Matthes, Steven A.; Chinn, R.E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Simulation of gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas production from hydrate reservoir by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurization is proposed, which can overcome ... gas production by the combination of warm water flooding and depressurizati...

YuHu Bai; QingPing Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Gas Separation by Adsorption in Order to Increase CO2 Conversion to CO via Reverse Water Gas Shift (RWGS) Reaction .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this research project, adsorption is considered in conjunction with the reverse water gas shift reaction in order to convert CO2 to CO for synthetic (more)

Abdollahi, Farhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas-Fired Absorption Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

97

Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Discharge Water Management for Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development Final Report Start Date: October 1, 2009 End Date: March 31, 2012 Authors: Paul Ziemkiewicz, PhD Jennifer Hause Raymond Lovett, PhD David Locke Harry Johnson Doug Patchen, PG Report Date Issued: June 2012 DOE Award #: DE-FE0001466 Submitting Organization: West Virginia Water Research Institute West Virginia University PO Box 6064 Morgantown, WV 26506-6064 FilterSure, Inc. PO Box 1277 McLean, VA 22101 ShipShaper, LLP PO Box 2 Morgantown, WV 26507 2 | P a g e Acknowledgment "This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-FE0001466." Disclaimer "This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

98

Water Use for Shale-Gas Production in Texas, U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shale-gas production using hydraulic fracturing of mostly horizontal wells has led to considerable controversy over water-resource and environmental impacts. ... Most studies of water-resource impacts from shale-gas exploration and production have focused on effects of fracking on water quality;(5) however, some studies also emphasize impacts on water quantity. ... (6-10) Few published studies quantify water use for shale-gas production and their environmental impact. ...

Jean-Philippe Nicot; Bridget R. Scanlon

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MathematicalGeology, Vol. 11,No. I,1979 Modeling and Optimizing a Gas-Water Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gas in psia pressure of gas in psia at time t constant production rate of gas in moles per year production rate at time t in moles per year ideal gas constant constant rate of water injection in cubic feet of the reservoir in cubic feet, below which gas production ceases initial reservoir volume in cubic feet reservoir

Waterman, Michael S.

102

Spin states of para-water and ortho-water molecule in gas and liquid phases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin degrees of freedom of water molecule in gas and liquid state were investigated in order to provide a reasonable answer about the unsolved problem of a long-term behavior of water spin isomers. The approach used involves an assumption that molecules change their spin state from a pure state to a mixed one when they interact with some sorts of adsorbent surface. Some models and conceptions of the quantum information processing were used.

V. K. Konyukhov

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

103

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, site on June 7 and 8, 2011. Natural gas sampling consists of collecting both gas samples and samples of produced water from gas production wells. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Minimizing Water Production from Unconventional Gas Wells Using a Novel Environmentally Benign Polymer Gel System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excess water production is a major economic and environmental problem for the oil and gas industry. The cost of processing excess water runs into billions of dollars. Polymer gel technology has been successfully used in controlling water influx...

Gakhar, Kush

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dear NSF/Bridge to the Doctorate Fellow Applicant, Thank you for your interest in the University at Albany's Louis Stokes Alliance for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Albany's Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) Bridge to Doctorate (BD) program

Kidd, William S. F.

107

Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling Results for 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual natural gas sampling for the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site on June 20 and 21, 2012. This long-term monitoring of natural gas includes samples of produced water from gas production wells that are located near the site. Water samples from gas production wells were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides, gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Natural gas samples were analyzed for tritium and carbon-14. ALS Laboratory Group in Fort Collins, Colorado, analyzed water samples. Isotech Laboratories in Champaign, Illinois, analyzed natural gas samples.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Review of technologies for oil and gas produced water treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Produced water is the largest waste stream generated in oil and gas industries. It is a mixture of different organic and inorganic compounds. Due to the increasing volume of waste all over the world in the current decade, the outcome and effect of discharging produced water on the environment has lately become a significant issue of environmental concern. Produced water is conventionally treated through different physical, chemical, and biological methods. In offshore platforms because of space constraints, compact physical and chemical systems are used. However, current technologies cannot remove small-suspended oil particles and dissolved elements. Besides, many chemical treatments, whose initial and/or running cost are high and produce hazardous sludge. In onshore facilities, biological pretreatment of oily wastewater can be a cost-effective and environmental friendly method. As high salt concentration and variations of influent characteristics have direct influence on the turbidity of the effluent, it is appropriate to incorporate a physical treatment, e.g., membrane to refine the final effluent. For these reasons, major research efforts in the future could focus on the optimization of current technologies and use of combined physico-chemical and/or biological treatment of produced water in order to comply with reuse and discharge limits.

Ahmadun Fakhrul-Razi; Alireza Pendashteh; Luqman Chuah Abdullah; Dayang Radiah Awang Biak; Sayed Siavash Madaeni; Zurina Zainal Abidin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Spatial and Temporal Impacts on Water Consumption in Texas from Shale Gas Development and Use  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spatial and Temporal Impacts on Water Consumption in Texas from Shale Gas Development and Use ... Despite the water intensity of hydraulic fracturing, recent life cycle analyses have concluded that increased shale gas development will lead to net decreases in water consumption if the increased natural gas production is used at natural gas combined cycle power plants, shifting electricity generation away from coal-fired steam cycle power plants. ... This work expands on these studies by estimating the spatial and temporal patterns of changes in consumptive water use in Texas river basins during a period of rapid shale gas development and use in electricity generation from August 2008 through December 2009. ...

Adam P. Pacsi; Kelly T. Sanders; Michael E. Webber; David T. Allen

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gas-Liquid Coexistence in the Primitive Model for Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We evaluate the location of the gas-liquid coexistence line and of the associated critical point for the primitive model for water (PMW), introduced by Kolafa and Nezbeda [J. Kolafa and I. Nezbeda, Mol. Phys. 61, 161 (1987)]. Besides being a simple model for a molecular network forming liquid, the PMW is representative of patchy proteins and novel colloidal particles interacting with localized directional short-range attractions. We show that the gas-liquid phase separation is metastable, i.e. it takes place in the region of the phase diagram where the crystal phase is thermodynamically favored, as in the case of articles interacting via short-range attractive spherical potentials. Differently from spherical potentials, we do not observe crystallization close to the critical point. The region of gas-liquid instability of this patchy model is significantly reduced as compared to equivalent models of spherically interacting particles, confirming the possibility of observing kinetic arrest in an homogeneous sample driven by bonding as opposed to packing.

F. Romano; P. Tartaglia; F. Sciortino

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project involved fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2} -separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams were examined in the project. Cu-cerium oxide was identified as the most promising high-temperature water-gas shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was optimized by proper selection of dopant type and amount in ceria. The formulation 10at%Cu-Ce(30at%La)O{sub x} showed the best performance, and was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The apparent activation energy, measured over aged catalysts, was equal to 70.2 kJ/mol. Reaction orders in CO, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} were found to be 0.8, 0.2, -0.3, and -0.3, respectively. This shows that H{sub 2}O has very little effect on the reaction rate, and that both CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} weakly inhibit the reaction. Good stability of catalyst performance was found in 40-hr long tests. A flat (38 cm{sup 2}) Pd-Cu alloy membrane reactor was used with the catalyst washcoated on oxidized aluminum screens close coupled with the membrane. To achieve higher loadings, catalyst granules were layered on the membrane itself to test the combined HTS activity/ H{sub 2} -separation efficiency of the composite. Simulated coal gas mixtures were used and the effect of membrane on the conversion of CO over the catalyst was evidenced at high space velocities. Equilibrium CO conversion at 400 C was measured at a space velocity of 30,000 h{sup -1} with the 10{micro}m- thick Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} membrane operating under a pressure differential of 100 psi. No carbon deposition took place during operation. The performance of the coupled Cu-ceria catalyst/membrane system at 400 C was stable in {approx} 30 h of continuous operation. The overall conclusion from this project is that Cu-doped ceria catalysts are suitable for use in high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactors. CO{sub 2}-rich operation does not affect the catalyst activity or stability; neither does it affect hydrogen permeation through the Pd-Cu membrane. Operation in the temperature range of 400-430 C is recommended.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos; Xiaomei Qi; Scott Kronewitter

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Isothermal kinetics of new Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the development of technologies for the utilization of eastern U.S. oil shales, fluidized bed pyrolysis technology is emerging as one of the most promising in terms of oil yield, operating cost, and capital investment. Bench-scale testing of eastern shales has reached a level where scale-up represents the next logical step in the evolution of this technology. A major consideration in this development and an essential part of any fluidized bed reactor scale-up effort--isothermal kinetics-- has largely been ignored for eastern US shale with the exception of a recent study conducted by Richardson et al. with a Cleveland shale. The method of Richardson et al. was used previously by Wallman et al. with western shale and has been used most recently by Forgac, also with western shale. This method, adopted for the present study, entails injecting a charge of shale into a fluidized bed and monitoring the hydrocarbon products with a flame ionization detector (FID). Advantages of this procedure are that fluidized bed heat-up effects are simulated exactly and real-time kinetics are obtained due to the on-line FID. Other isothermal methods have suffered from heat-up and cool-down effects making it impossible to observe the kinetics at realistic operating temperatures. A major drawback of the FID approach, however, is that no differentiation between oil and gas is possible.

Carter, S.D.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Emerging Technologies » Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Gas-Fired Absorption Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently conducting research into carbon gas-fired absorption heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to increase water heating energy efficiency over conventional gas storage water heaters by 40%. Project Description This project seeks to develop a natural gas-fired water heater using an absorption heat. The development effort is targeting lithium bromide aqueous solutions as a working fluid in order to avoid the negative implications of using more toxic ammonia. Project Partners Research is being undertaken through a Cooperative Research and Development

114

Development of a Market Optimized Condensing Gas Water Heater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program covered the development of a market optimized condensing gas water heater for residential applications. The intent of the program was to develop a condensing design that minimized the large initial cost premium associated with traditional condensing water heater designs. Equally important was that the considered approach utilizes design and construction methods that deliver the desired efficiency without compromising product reliability. Standard condensing water heater approaches in the marketplace utilize high cost materials such as stainless steel tanks and heat exchangers as well as expensive burner systems to achieve the higher efficiencies. The key in this program was to develop a water heater design that uses low-cost, available components and technologies to achieve higher efficiency at a modest cost premium. By doing this, the design can reduce the payback to a more reasonable length, increasing the appeal of the product to the marketplace. Condensing water heaters have been in existence for years, but have not been able to significantly penetrate the market. The issue has typically been cost. The high purchase price associated with existing condensing water heaters, sometimes as much as $2000, has been a very difficult hurdle to overcome in the marketplace. The design developed under this program has the potential to reduce the purchase price of this condensing design by as much as $1000 as compared to traditional condensing units. The condensing water heater design developed over the course of this program led to an approach that delivered the following performance attributes: 90%+ thermal efficiency; 76,000 Btu/hr input rate in a 50 gallon tank; First hour rating greater than 180 gph; Rapid recovery time; and Overall operating condition well matched to combination heat and hot water applications. Over the final three years of the program, TIAX worked very closely with A.O. Smith Water Products Company as our commercial partner to optimize the design for manufacturing. This work included the initiation of a large field testing program (over 125 units) and an in-depth reliability program intended to minimize the risks associated with a new product introduction. At the time of this report, A.O. Smith plans to introduce this product to the marketplace in the early 2006 time period.

Peter Pescatore

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

116

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

117

Water and Energy Issues in Gas-to-Liquid Processes: Assessment and Integration of Different Gas-Reforming Alternatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy and water management effects are analyzed for the development of syngas processes under the integration of three gas reforming alternatives ... Gandrick et al.(9) considered the recycling of the light gas from FT synthesis and refining areas to fire gas turbines to produce electricity and the reuse of the gas turbines to produce superheated steam. ... We address in this paper several aspects related to such issues: (a) A comparative analysis is developed for assesing the impact of the use of different reforming technologies on energy and water usage. ...

Diana Yered Martnez; Arturo Jimnez-Gutirrez; Patrick Linke; Kerron J. Gabriel; Mohamed M. B. Noureldin; Mahmoud M. El-Halwagi

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

118

New Advances in Shale Gas Reservoir Analysis Using Water Flowback Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shale gas reservoirs with multistage hydraulic fractures are commonly characterized by analyzing long-term gas production data, but water flowback data is usually not included in the analysis. However, this work shows there can be benefits...

Alkouh, Ahmad

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

119

Water-saving liquid-gas conditioning system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises contacting a process gas with a hygroscopic working fluid in order to remove a constituent from the process gas. A system for treating a process gas with a liquid comprises a hygroscopic working fluid comprising a component adapted to absorb or react with a constituent of a process gas, and a liquid-gas contactor for contacting the working fluid and the process gas, wherein the constituent is removed from the process gas within the liquid-gas contactor.

Martin, Christopher; Zhuang, Ye

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

WATER-GAS SHIFT WITH INTEGRATED HYDROGEN SEPARATION PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimization of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction system for hydrogen production for fuel cells is of particular interest to the energy industry. To this end, it is desirable to couple the WGS reaction to hydrogen separation using a semi-permeable membrane, with both processes carried out at high temperatures to improve reaction kinetics and permeation. Reduced equilibrium conversion of the WGS reaction at high temperatures is overcome by product H{sub 2} removal via the membrane. This project involves fundamental research and development of novel cerium oxide-based catalysts for the water-gas-shift reaction and the integration of these catalysts with Pd-alloy H{sub 2}-separation membranes supplying high purity hydrogen for fuel cell use. Conditions matching the requirements of coal gasifier-exit gas streams will be examined in the project. The first-year screening studies of WGS catalysts identified Cu-ceria as the most promising high-temperature shift catalyst for integration with H{sub 2}-selective membranes. Formulations containing iron oxide were found to deactivate in the presence of CO{sub 2}, and were thus eliminated from further consideration. Cu-containing ceria catalysts, on the other hand, showed high stability in CO{sub 2}-rich gases. This type gas will be present over much of the catalyst, as the membrane removes the hydrogen produced from the shift reaction. Several catalyst formulations were prepared, characterized and tested in the first year of study. Details from the catalyst development and testing work were given in our first annual technical report. Hydrogen permeation through Pd and Pd-alloy foils was investigated in a small membrane reactor constructed during the first year of the project. The effect of temperature on the hydrogen flux through pure Pd, Pd{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and Pd{sub 75}Ag{sub 25} alloy membranes, each 25 {micro}m thick, was evaluated in the temperature range from 250 C to 500 C at upstream pressure of 4.4 atm and permeate hydrogen pressure of 1 atm. Flux decay was observed for the Pd-Cu membrane above 500 C. From 350-450 C, an average hydrogen flux value of 0.2 mol H{sub 2}/m{sup 2}/s was measured over this Pd-alloy membrane. These results are in good agreement with literature data. In this year's report, we discuss reaction rate measurements, optimization of catalyst kinetics by proper choice of dopant oxide (lanthana) in ceria, long-term stability studies, and H{sub 2} permeation data collected with unsupported flat, 10 {micro}m-thick Pd-Cu membranes over a wide temperature window and in various gas mixtures. The high-temperature shift catalyst composition was further improved, by proper selection of dopant type and amount. The formulation 10 at%Cu-Ce(30 at%La)Ox was the best; this was selected for further kinetic studies. WGS reaction rates were measured in a simulated coal-gas mixture. The stability of catalyst performance was examined in 40-hr long tests. A series of hydrogen permeation tests were conducted in a small flat-membrane reactor using the 10 m{micro}-thick Pd-Cu membranes. Small inhibitory effects of CO and CO{sub 2} were found at temperatures above 350 C, while H{sub 2}O vapor had no effect on hydrogen permeation. No carbon deposition took place during many hours of membrane operation. The reaction extent on the blank (catalyst-free) membrane was also negligible. A larger flat-membrane reactor will be used next year with the catalyst wash coated on screens close coupled with the Pd-Cu membrane.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, PI; Jerry Meldon, Co-PI; Xiaomei Qi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A critical issue for optimal water management in proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells at lower temperatures is the removal of liquid water from the cell. This pathway is intimately linked with the phenomena of liquid-water droplet removal from surface of the gas-diffusion layer and into the flow channel. Thus, a good understanding of liquid-water transport and droplet growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layer is critical. In this study, liquid-water droplet growth and detachment on the gas-diffusion layer surfaces are investigated experimentally to improve the understating of water transport through and removal from gas-diffusion layers. An experiment using a sliding-angle measurement is designed and used to quantify and directly measure the adhesion force for liquid-water droplets, and to understand the droplets? growth and detachment from the gas-diffusion layers.

Das, Prodip K.; Grippin, Adam; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Studies of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) and equivalent strata in Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A formation of black carbonaceous shale, later named the New Albany Shale, was first recognized in 1837 and reported in 1839 by David D. Owen. Since then, the New Albany has been the subject of numerous investigations by individuals affiliated with the Indiana Geological Survey and others. The present comprehensive investigation, involves petrology, mineralogy, stratigraphy, geomorphology, organic and inorganic geochemistry, and physical properties. The lower part of the New Albany Shale is late Middle Devonian in age, and the upper part is Early Mississippian in age.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Woodard, G.S. (eds.)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Comparison of Palladium and Platinum Water Gas Shift Kinetics Using Density Functional Theory Models.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction can be either thermodynamically or kinetically limited, depending on process conditions. Improved catalysts are of particular interest at low (more)

Clay, John

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Comparison of palladium and platinum Water Gas Shift reaction kinetics using density functional theory models.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The Water Gas Shift (WGS) reaction can be either thermodynamically or kinetically limited, depending on process conditions. Improved catalysts are of particular interest at (more)

Clay, John P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electric, Gas, Water, Heating, Refrigeration, and Street Railways Facilities and Service (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation contains provisions for facilities and service related to electricity, natural gas, water, heating, refrigeration, and street railways. The chapter addresses the construction and...

126

The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the effect of gas production rate and rock and fluid properties on the recovery of gas from strong water drive gas reservoirs will permit gas production optimization and should result in conservation of natural and financial resources. Hence... saturations, gas production rate is not a dominant factor affecting the ultimate gas recovery. Almost all the gas is recovered whether producing the field at 0. 1 or 10 times GRR. In predicting the gas recovery in a strong water drive reser- voir...

Soemarso, Christophorus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

127

Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

128

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Intensity Assessment of Shale Gas Resources in the Wattenberg Field in Northeastern Colorado ... Efficient use of water, particularly in the western U.S., is an increasingly important aspect of many activities including agriculture, urban, and industry. ...

Stephen Goodwin; Ken Carlson; Ken Knox; Caleb Douglas; Luke Rein

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale (EARTH-15-CM1) Host institution: University of Oxford in extracting gas from these low-permeability rocks is hydraulic fracture. This involves injecting large of water and gas during hydraulic fracturing and subsequent gas recovery. This is essential in order

Henderson, Gideon

130

1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of H2S in septic sewers causing pipe corrosion. 2. CO2 Stripping of some ground waters, industrial1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important wastewaters to the stream. Gas/Liquid Interface Gas Liquid Gas transfer to the liquid is absorption Gas

Stenstrom, Michael K.

131

Determination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

route from the cathode catalyst layer to the cathode flow channels. Water can be removed from the cellDetermination of effective water vapor diffusion coefficient in pemfc gas diffusion layers Jacob M: Water vapor diffusion PEMFC Water management GDL Diffusivity MPL a b s t r a c t The primary removal

Kandlikar, Satish

132

Rapid pyrolysis of Green River and New Albany oil shales in solid-recycle systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are studying second generation oil shale retorting by a combined laboratory and modeling program coupled with operation of a 1 tonne-per-day solid-recycle pilot retorting facility. In the retort, we have measured oil yields equal to Fischer assay for Western, Green River shale and Eastern, New Albany shale. Laboratory experiments have measured yields of 125% of Fischer assay under ideal conditions in sand fluidized beds. However, when oxidized (or spent) shale is present in the bed, a decline in yield is observed along with increased coke formation. Recycling clay catalysts may improve oil yield by olefin absorption on active sites, preventing coke formation on these sites and allowing olefin incorporation into the oil. We studied the solid mixing limits in solid-recycle systems and conclude that nearly intimate mixing is required for adequate heat transfer and to minimize oil coke formation. Recycling oxidized shale has shown to self-scrub H/sub 2/S and SO/sub 2/ when processing Western shale. Cooling of spent shale with water from 500/degree/C releases H/sub 2/S. We describe an apparatus which uses solid-recycle to reduce the temperature before water spray to cool the shale without H/sub 2/S release. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Cena, R.J.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Impacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States, oil and gas wastewater is managed through recycling of the wastewater for shale gas operations of the wastewater.7 However, options for the proper disposal and management of the wastewater that is not recycledImpacts of Shale Gas Wastewater Disposal on Water Quality in Western Pennsylvania Nathaniel R

Jackson, Robert B.

134

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

Dexin Wang

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conditions. This difference was interface. The sorption appears to...sorption at the gas-water interface increases with in- Fhese...pore throats. (ii) The standard hypothesis with other strains...for the A static gas-water interface sorbs and retains microorganisms...

Jiamin Wan; John L. Wilson; Thomas L. Kieft

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

OpenEI Community - natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Increase Natural Gas Increase Natural Gas Energy Efficiency http://en.openei.org/community/group/increase-natural-gas-energy-efficiency Description: Increased natural gas energy efficiency = Reduced utility bills = Profit In 2011 the EIA reports that commercial buildings, industry and the power plants consumed approx. 17.5 Trillion cu.ft. of natural gas.How much of that energy was wasted, blown up chimneys across the country as HOT exhaust into the atmosphere? 40% ~ 60% ? At what temperature?gas-energy-efficiency" target="_blank">read more natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat

138

NETL: News Release - DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 20, 2007 July 20, 2007 DOE's Oil and Gas Produced-Water Program Logs Key Milestones Cost-Effectively Treating Coproduced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies MORGANTOWN, WV - A research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is making significant progress in developing new ways to treat and use water coproduced with oil and natural gas. The ultimate benefit is a two-for-one solution that expects to boost domestic energy supplies while enhancing the Nation's water supply. Coproduced water-some of which occurs naturally in subsurface formations, and some that is recovered following injection of water into an oil or gas reservoir to boost production-accounts for 98 percent of all waste generated by U.S. oil and natural gas operations. Produced-water volumes average nine barrels for each barrel of oil produced. Handling, treating, and safely disposing of this produced water has been a tough, costly challenge for oil and natural gas producers for decades. Much of the produced water has high concentrations of minerals or salts that make it unsuitable for beneficial use or surface discharge. An oilfield operator often must reinject such produced water into deep formations, sometimes resorting to costly trucking of the water to deep-injection well sites specially designated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

139

Heterogeneity effect on non-wetting phase trapping in strong water drive gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In strong water drive gas reservoirs (WDGR), the presence of entrance water in the gas zone has negative effects on the relative permeability; therefore, gas is trapped behind the water front as a non-wetting phase. Understanding WDGR could be complicated and depends on both the petrophysical and operational parameters, such as, reservoir heterogeneity, permeability, production rate and so on. In order to quantify the uncertainty associated with reservoirs, it is critical to create porous media models that incorporate stratigraphic details. In the present study, experimental models were used to simulate WDGR and describe the heterogeneity effect on residual gas saturation and the recovery factor. In models, distinct gas and water (aquifer portion) zones were designed, wherein the ratio of the permeability of the aquifer to the gas zone was varied over three ranges. All tests were conducted in the presence of connate water, and the main WDGR set-up was constructed for high pressure operational conditions. All porous media were characterized by DykstraParsons coefficient as heterogeneity index. The results demonstrate that the residual gas saturation depends on both heterogeneity index and permeability ratio. Results reveal that heterogeneity is not always detrimental to gas recovery. In addition, when the ratio of the aquifer to gas zone permeability is less than one, the amount of trapped gas reduces as the heterogeneity of the porous media increases and consequently, the recovery factor may be improved.

Mohammad Rezaee; Behzad Rostami; Peyman Pourafshary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The displacement of gas by oil in the presence of connate water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mixed stream of oil and gas. The mobile gas phase established within the core was then dis- placed by an oil flood. The assumption was made that the residual gas saturation within the oil bank would be the same as that which would occur within a... water bank resulting from a waterflood. The results indicate that the residual gas saturation within and behind the oil bank increases as the gas saturation prior to the flood increases. The relationship between the initial and residual gas...

Dardaganian, Stephen Garabed

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fractured shale aquifers . Ground Water 50 ( 6 ): 826 828...2011) Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion...poses a threat to surface waters. Front Ecol Environ...Acid mine drainage remediation options: A review...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States Economics of Residential Gas Furnaces and Water Heaters in United States New Construction Market Speaker(s): Alex Lekov Gabrielle Wong-Parodi James McMahon Victor Franco Date: May 8, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 In the new single-family home construction market, the choice of what gas furnace and gas water heater combination to install is primarily driven by first cost considerations. In this study, the authors use a life-cycle cost analysis approach that accounts for uncertainty and variability of inputs to assess the economic benefits of installing different gas furnace and water heater combinations. Among other factors, it assesses the economic feasibility of eliminating the traditional metal vents and replacing them with vents made of plastic materials used in condensing and power vent

143

Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dexin Wang Dexin Wang Principal Investigator Gas Technology Institute 1700 South Mount Prospect Rd Des Plaines, Il 60018 847-768-0533 dexin.wang@gastechnology.org TransporT MeMbrane Condenser for WaTer and energy reCovery froM poWer planT flue gas proMIs/projeCT no.: nT0005350 Background One area of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program's research is being performed to develop advanced technologies to reuse power plant cooling water and associated waste heat and to investigate methods to recover water from power plant flue gas. Considering the quantity of water withdrawn and consumed by power plants, any recovery or reuse of this water can significantly reduce the plant's water requirements. Coal occurs naturally with water present (3-60 weight %), and the combustion

144

Optimization Models for Shale Gas Water Management Linlin Yang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source water acquisition, wastewater production, reuse and recycle, and subsequent transportation, about 19,000-26,000 m3 of water is used to complete each well. A wastewater production forecast . Furthermore, the injected water that remains underground accounts for 0.3% of all water consumption in the US

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

145

Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric and Gas Water Heaters Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters October 8, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of Water Heaters to be Purchased unit(s) 1 unit * See assumptions for various daily water use totals. † The comparison assumes a storage tank water heater as the input type. To allow demand water heaters as the comparison type, users can specify an input EF of up to 0.85; however, 0.66 is currently the best available EF for storage water heaters.

146

Comparison of organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age in Indiana with New Albany Shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abundant black organic-rich shales occur in rocks of Pennsylvanian age in southwestern Indiana. They have not been well characterized except for a few thin intervals in small areas, the best example being at the abandoned Mecca Quarry in west-central Indiana. Although these shales are thinner and less widespread than the organic-rich shales of the New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian age) they warrant characterization because of their accessibility during strip mining of underlying coals. Organic-rich shales of Pennsylvanian age contain up to 44% organic carbon and might be considered potential oil shales. Carbon to hydrogen ratios in these shales are similar to those in the New Albany. Relatively high concentrations of certain metals occur in shales of both ages, especially where phosphate is abundant, and sulfur values for both shales range from < 1 to 6%. Sulfur values are much higher for thin pyrite-rich units. Siderite nodules are common in Pennsylvania shales, but little siderite if found in the New Albany. Dolomite, commonly ferroan, and calcite in a variety of forms are the dominant carbonates in the New Albany. Some Pennsylvanian shales may contain large fossils or mica flakes, but such coarse-grained features are uncommon in the New Albany Shale.

Shaffer, N.R.; Leininger, R.K.; Ennis, M.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Sea Water MHD : Electrolysis and Gas Production in Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The work presented is principally experimental, it concerns mainly the coupling between sea water electrolysis and hydrodynamics (in both ways). The ... of measurements is much more relevant to sea water MHD prop...

P. Boissonneau; J.-P. Thibault

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

National Grid (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Windows, Doors, & Skylights Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Multifamily: Free Energy Evaluation and hot water pipe insulation Boilers: $350-$560 Boiler Reset Controls: $70 Furnaces: $140-$420, depending on efficiency Indirect Water Heater: $210 7 Day Programmable Thermostats: $18 National Grid's High Efficiency Heating Rebates are offered to gas heating customers in the Upstate New York counties of Albany, Columbia, Fulton, Herkimer, Jefferson, Madison, Montgomery, Oneida, Onondaga, Oswego, Rensselaer, Saratoga, Schenectady, Warren and Washington. All equipment must meet certain energy standards provided on the website. Applications are to be completed and sent in after equipment installation. Eligible

149

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................76 4.2.3 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1976 .........................................................78 4.2.4 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1977 .........................................................81 4.2.5 Water-Gas Ratio Trend 1978 ? 2004... .........................................................76 4.2.3 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1976 .........................................................78 4.2.4 Water-Gas Ratio Trend in 1977 .........................................................81 4.2.5 Water-Gas Ratio Trend 1978 ? 2004...

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

150

The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not be affected by the increasing hydrostatic pressure of water as a function of water depth. Springs and heavy weights will be discussed as two options to replace nitrogen in accumulators. Efficient deep water accumulators would reduce the number of accumulators...

Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

The simulation of gas production from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by the combination of ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed to produce gas from oceanic gas hydrate reservoir by combining the ocean surface warm water flooding with depressurization which can efficiently utilize the synthetic effects of therma...

Hao Yang; Yu-Hu Bai; Qing-Ping Li

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

EIS-0071: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuels Gas Demonstration Plant, Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to assesses the potential environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of a 3,155-ton-per-day capacity facility, which will demonstrate the technical operability, economic viability, and environmental acceptability of the Memphis Division of Light, Gas and Water coal gasification plant at Memphis, Tennessee.

153

"Solution plot technique"-Analysis of water influx in gas reservoirs using simulation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the reservoir-aquifer boundary. The most widely used methods for estimating water- influx which can be applied to water-drive gas reservoirs include: 1. Van Everdingen-Hurst Radial, unsteady statet. 2. Carter and Tracy, unsteady state2. 3, Fetkovich, pseudo... of calculating water- influx, and involves the use of the convolution integral method. Fetkovich proposed a model that utilizes a pseudo-steady state productivity index and the aquifer material balance for estimating the water influx. The Van Everdingen...

Hardikar, Sachin Suresh

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of New Albany Shale A. Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, S.D. Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 125859 Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling of New Albany Shale A. Kalantari-Dahaghi, SPE, S contain conspicuous acknowledgment of SPE copyright. Abstract Although the New Albany Shale the potential of New Albany shale using a novel integrated workflow, which incorporates field production data

Mohaghegh, Shahab

155

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or a generator? NOTIFY the University Police. FOLLOW evacuation procedures. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel

Fernandez, Eduardo

156

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas. . What should I do if the if the building does not have emergency lighting or a generator? NOTIFY

Fernandez, Eduardo

157

Mathematical Model for Heavy OilWaterGas Stratified Flow in Horizontal Pipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, isothermal, transient model for the stratified flow of heavy oil, water and gas, in horizontal pipelines, is presented. The two-fluid mathematical model consists of mass, momentum and energy...

C. Centeno-Reyes; O. Cazarez-Candia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large (more)

Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Gasification of biomass in water/gas-stabilized plasma for syngas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The experimental reactor PLASGAS for plasma pyrolysis and vitrification equipped with the hybrid gas-water stabilized torch was used in the experiments. The plasma torch is characterized by low density, high t...

M. Hrabovsky; M. Konrad; V. Kopecky; M. Hlina; T. Kavka

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

New evidence for the origin of natural gas in Ordos Basin from hydrocarbons of oil water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chief aim of the present work is to investigate the controversy origin of natural gas in the Ordos Basin by using the hydrocarbons of oil water. New evidence has been found: There is relatively high content o...

Dujie Hou; Xianqing Li; Youjun Tang

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Jump to: navigation, search Project Lead Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Country United States Headquarters Location Memphis, Tennessee Recovery Act Funding $5,063,469.00 Total Project Value $13112363 Coverage Area Coverage Map: Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Smart Grid Project Coordinates 35.1495343°, -90.0489801° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

162

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...accept shale gas waste) upstream...Compliance System and Integrated Compliance Information System, with the...recall that we control for pre-cipitation...model results. Waste Treatment Regulatory...wastewater treatment plants to treat shale...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATING THE EFFECT OF WATER ON THE FRACTURE SYSTEM OF SHALE GAS WELLS A Thesis by HASSAN HASAN H. HAMAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

Arnold, Marion Denson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant-wide Control for Better De-oiling of Produced Water in Offshore Oil & Gas Production Zhenyu (PWT) in offshore oil & gas production processes. Different from most existing facility- or material offshore and the oil industry expects this share to grow continuously in the future. In last decade, oil

Yang, Zhenyu

166

Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen,*a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dual gas and oil dispersions in water: production and stability of foamulsion Anniina Salonen of oil droplets and gas bubbles and show that the oil can have two very different roles, either suppressing foaming or stabilising the foam. We have foamed emulsions made from two different oils (rapeseed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Exergoeconomic Evaluation of Desalinated Water Production in Pipeline Gas Station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pipelines transporting gas often are thousands of kilometers long, a number of compressor stations are needed, which consume a significant amount of energy. To improve the efficiency of the compressor stations, the high temperature exhaust gases from the gas turbines which drive the compressors are used for producing steam or other motive fluid in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). The steam or other vapor is then used to drive a turbine, which in turn drives other compressors or other applications. This paper is to discuss the techno-economic evaluation of different desalination process using the exhaust of 25 MW gas turbine in gas station. MED, MSF and RO desalination systems have been considered. Nadoshan pipeline gas stations with 25 MW gas turbine drivers in Iran were considered as a case study. In this regard, the simulation has been performed in Thermoflex Software. Moreover, the computer code has been developed for thermodynamic simulation and exergoeconomic analysis. Finally, different scenarios have been evaluated and comprised in view of economic, exergetic and exergoeconomic.

M.H. Khoshgoftar Manesh; S. Khamis Abadi; H. Ghalami; M. Amidpour

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

needs of advanced power systems. Industries that utilize natural gas, gasifier syngas, biogas, landfill gas, or any type of fuel gas can benefit from knowing the composition of the...

169

Association of trace elements with mineral species in the New Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-Ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were used to identify mineral species in the New Albany shale and kerogen isolates. Elemental abundances were determined by NAA and distributions of Ni, V, As, and other elements with-in mineral grains were determined by EMP-XRF. Vanadium in the New Albany shale was found to be associated primarily with clay minerals (illite, montmorrillonite). In the New Albany kerogen, Ni and V were shown to be predominantly associated with the organic matrix. Pyrite (and/or marcasite) was shown to occur in two forms, a euhedral variety and as framboidal clusters. The Ni content of the framboidal variety was found to be higher than that of the euhedral pyrite.

Fitzgerald, S.L.; Day, J.W.; Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

July 2010 Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual natural gas and produced water monitoring was conducted for gas wells adjacent to Section 36, where the Gasbuggy test was conducted, in accordance with the draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Gasbuggy Site, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico. Sampling and analysis was conducted as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites. (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Natural gas samples were collected for tritium and carbon-14 analysis. Produced water samples were collected and analyzed for tritium, gamma-emitting radionuclides (by high-resolution gamma spectrometry), gross alpha, and gross beta. An additional water sample was collected from well 29-6 Water Hole for analysis of tritium and gamma-emitting radionuclides. A duplicate produced water sample was collected from well 30-039-21743.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

these emissions can negatively impact air quality. The environmental risks of shale gas and shale oil development may be very different from that of conventional oil and gas...

172

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geomechanical Impacts of Shale Gas Activities Background Hydraulic fracturing of gas shale is the injection of large volumes of fluid at high pressures in low permeability shale to...

173

Optimization Models for Optimal Investment, Drilling, and Water Management in Shale Gas Supply Chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper provides an overview of recent optimization models for shale gas production. We first describe a new mixed-integer optimization model for the design of shale gas infrastructures. It is aimed at optimizing the number of wells to drill, size and location of new gas processing plants, section and length of pipelines for gathering raw gas, delivering dry gas and natural gas liquids, power of gas compressors, and planning of freshwater consumption for well drilling and fracturing. We also describe a detailed operational mixed-integer linear model to optimize life cycle water use for well pads. The objective of the model is to determine the fracturing schedule that minimizes costs for freshwater consumption, transportation, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Ignacio E. Grossmann; Diego C. Cafaro; Linlin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Criteria for displacement by gas versus water in oil reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199... on of a Two-Dimensional Technique for Computing Performance of Gas-Or ive Reservoirs", Soc. Pet. Enq. J. {Mar. 1963), 19-27; Trans. , AINE, 228. 15. Cardwell, W. T. , Jr. and Parsons, R. L. : 0Gravity Drainage Theory", Trans. , AIME (1949) 179, 199...

Piper, Larry Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

175

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Incorporating tankless water heaters was one Incorporating tankless water heaters was one of many energy-efficiency recommendations Building America's research team IBACOS had for San Antonio builder Imagine Homes. Although tankless gas water heaters should save approximately 33% on hot water heating compared to a conventional storage water heater, actual energy savings vary significantly based on individual draw volume. Above 10 gallons per draw, the efficiency approaches the rated energy factor. The greatest savings occur at a daily use quantity of about 50 gallons. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.2 Energy Efficient Components Tankless Gas Water Heater Performance As improved thermal enclosures dramatically reduce heating and cooling loads,

176

Carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (the CAMERE process)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CAMERE process (carbon dioxide hydrogenation to form methanol via a reverse-water-gas-shift reaction) was developed and evaluated. The reverse-water-gas-shift reactor and the methanol synthesis reactor were serially aligned to form methanol from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. Carbon dioxide was converted to CO and water by the reverse-water-gas-shift reaction (RWReaction) to remove water before methanol was synthesized. With the elimination of water by RWReaction, the purge gas volume was minimized as the recycle gas volume decreased. Because of the minimum purge gas loss by the pretreatment of RWReactor, the overall methanol yield increased up to 89% from 69%. An active and stable catalyst with the composition of Cu/ZnO/ZrO{sub 2}/Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} (5:3:1:1) was developed. The system was optimized and compared with the commercial methanol synthesis processes from natural gas and coal.

Joo, O.S.; Jung, K.D.; Han, S.H.; Uhm, S.J. [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.] [Korea Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Catalysis Lab.; Moon, I. [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Rozovskii, A.Y.; Lin, G.I. [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [A.V. Topchiev Inst. of Petrochemical Synthesis, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The impact of water depth on safety and environmental performance in offshore oil and gas production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on an empirical analysis of company-reported incidents on oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico between 1996 and 2010. During these years, there was a dramatic increase in the water depths at which offshore oil and gas is extracted. Controlling for platform characteristics such as age, quantity of oil and gas produced, and number of producing wells, we find that incidents (such as blowouts, injuries, and oil spills) are positively correlated with deeper water. Controlling for these and other characteristics, for an average platform, each 100 feet of added depth increases the probability of a company-reported incident by 8.5%. While further research into the causal connections between water depth and platform risks is warranted, this study highlights the potential value of increased monitoring of deeper water platforms.

Lucija Muehlenbachs; Mark A. Cohen; Todd Gerarden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Impact of Shale Gas Development on Regional Water Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydraulically fractured shale aquifers . Ground Water 50 , 826...Areas Underlain by the Glacial Aquifer System, Northern United States...Hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking," a technology being used...reviews what is known about fracking and makes suggestions for improving...

R. D. Vidic; S. L. Brantley; J. M. Vandenbossche; D. Yoxtheimer; J. D. Abad

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

179

Special Provisions Affecting Gas, Water, or Pipeline Companies (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation confers the rights and privileges of telegraph and telephone companies (S.C. Code 58-9) on pipeline and water companies, and contains several additional provisions pertaining to...

180

Poster: Building a test-bed for wireless sensor networking for under-water oil and gas installations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Initially we are building a laboratory in a large water tank. Later we will cooperate with an oil and gasPoster: Building a test-bed for wireless sensor networking for under-water oil and gas@ifi.uio.no 1 Introduction and background When the oil and gas industry moves its production facilities

Zhou, Shengli

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Regional Variation in Water-Related Impacts of Shale Gas Development and Implications for Emerging International Plays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Variation in Water-Related Impacts of Shale Gas Development and Implications for Emerging understanding of the unique regional issues that shale gas development poses. This manuscript highlights the variation in regional water issues associated with shale gas development in the U.S. and the approaches

Alvarez, Pedro J.

182

Method Validation for the Simultaneous Determination of Fecal Sterols in Surface Waters by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......waters is estimated by gas chromatographic (GC...steroids and endogenous CHL production and metabolism, the sterol...Sterols in Surface Waters by Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry...ally quantitated by gas chromatography (GC...characterized. Because cost and time effectiveness......

Sndor Szucs; Attila Srvry; Terry Cain; Rza dny

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Pennsylvania, Texas, and North Dakota. In addition to predrilling...Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 ( 7364...Middle Devonian of eastern North America . Palaeogeogr Palaeoclimatol...Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Increased stray gas abundance in a subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale gas extraction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Kerr RA ( 2010 ) Energy. Natural gas from...1626 . 3 US Energy Information Administration...March 2013 (US Energy Information Administration...Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk...isotopes in Icelandic geothermal systems. 1. He-3...

Robert B. Jackson; Avner Vengosh; Thomas H. Darrah; Nathaniel R. Warner; Adrian Down; Robert J. Poreda; Stephen G. Osborn; Kaiguang Zhao; Jonathan D. Karr

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Economics of residential gas furnaces and water heaters in United States new construction market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New single-family home construction represents a significant and important market for the introduction of energy-efficient gas-fired space heating and water-heating equipment. In the new construction market, the choice of furnace and water-heater type is primarily driven by first cost considerations and the availability of power vent and condensing water heaters. Few analysis have been performed to assess the economic impacts of the different combinations of space and water-heating equipment. Thus, equipment is often installed without taking into consideration the potential economic and energy savings of installing space and water-heating equipment combinations. In this study, we use a life-cycle cost analysis that accounts for uncertainty and variability of the analysis inputs to assess the economic benefits of gas furnace and water-heater design combinations. This study accounts not only for the equipment cost but also for the cost of installing, maintaining, repairing, and operating the equipment over its lifetime. Overall, this study, which is focused on US single-family new construction households that install gas furnaces and storage water heaters, finds that installing a condensing or power-vent water heater together with condensing furnace is the most cost-effective option for the majority of these houses. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the new construction residential market could be a target market for the large-scale introduction of a combination of condensing or power-vent water heaters with condensing furnaces.

Lekov, Alex B.; Franco, Victor H.; Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle; McMahon, James E.; Chan, Peter

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2014 start) Project Title: Environmental assessment of deep-water sponge fields in relation to oil and gas activity: a west of Shetland case study industry and government identified sponge grounds in areas of interest to the oil and gas sector

Henderson, Gideon

187

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: (1) An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing high-moisture, low rank coals. (2) Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. (3) Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. (4) Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. (5) Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. (6) Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. (7) Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. (8) Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; John DuPoint

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and DOE has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. DOE has also been placing emphasis on recovery of usable water from sources not generally considered, such as mine water, water produced from oil and gas extraction, and water contained in boiler flue gas. This report deals with development of condensing heat exchanger technology for recovering moisture from flue gas from coal-fired power plants. The report describes: An expanded data base on water and acid condensation characteristics of condensing heat exchangers in coal-fired units. This data base was generated by performing slip stream tests at a power plant with high sulfur bituminous coal and a wet FGD scrubber and at a power plant firing highmoisture, low rank coals. Data on typical concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in low temperature condensed flue gas moisture, and mercury capture efficiencies as functions of process conditions in power plant field tests. Theoretical predictions for sulfuric acid concentrations on tube surfaces at temperatures above the water vapor dewpoint temperature and below the sulfuric acid dew point temperature. Data on corrosion rates of candidate heat exchanger tube materials for the different regions of the heat exchanger system as functions of acid concentration and temperature. Data on effectiveness of acid traps in reducing sulfuric acid concentrations in a heat exchanger tube bundle. Condensed flue gas water treatment needs and costs. Condensing heat exchanger designs and installed capital costs for full-scale applications, both for installation immediately downstream of an ESP or baghouse and for installation downstream of a wet SO{sub 2} scrubber. Results of cost-benefit studies of condensing heat exchangers.

Levy, Edward; Bilirgen, Harun; DuPont, John

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Combination gas-producing and waste-water disposal well. [DOE patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a waste-water disposal system for use in a gas recovery well penetrating a subterranean water-containing and methane gas-bearing coal formation. A cased bore hole penetrates the coal formation and extends downwardly therefrom into a further earth formation which has sufficient permeability to absorb the waste water entering the borehole from the coal formation. Pump means are disposed in the casing below the coal formation for pumping the water through a main conduit towards the water-absorbing earth formation. A barrier or water plug is disposed about the main conduit to prevent water flow through the casing except for through the main conduit. Bypass conduits disposed above the barrier communicate with the main conduit to provide an unpumped flow of water to the water-absorbing earth formation. One-way valves are in the main conduit and in the bypass conduits to provide flow of water therethrough only in the direction towards the water-absorbing earth formation.

Malinchak, R.M.

1981-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

190

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pollutants and CO 2 . Oxy-fuel combustion of hydrocarbon fuel (coal, natural-gas, biomass) generates denitrified combustion gas comprising dominantly CO 2 and H 2 O. The...

191

DOE Closeout Report from SUNY Albany High Energy Physics to Department of Energy Office of Science.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report from the SUNY Albany Particle Physics Group summarizing our activities on the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. We summarize our work: on data analysis projects, on efforts to improve detector performance, and on service work to the experiment.

Ernst, Jesse [SUNY Albany; Jain, Vivek

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of adsorption for oil removal from produced water............... 13 2.3 Adsorption terminologies ...................................................................... 17 2.4 Evaluation of new organoclay adsorbent for oil removal...................... 19 2... to the experimental data of percentage of oil adsorbed with time.................................................................................................53 5.4 A straight line fit to the experimental data of oil adsorption vs. oil inflow...

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

193

Life Cycle Water Consumption for Shale Gas and Conventional Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The average shale gas well EUR is 100 million cubic meters (3.5 billion cubic feet (BCF)) for bulk gas, which is a mixture containing methane, in addition to other gases such as ethane, propane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen. ... Overbey, W. K.; Carden, R. S.; Locke, C. D.; Salamy, S. P.; Reeves, T. K.; Johnson, H. R.; Site Selection, Drilling, and Completion of Two Horizontal Wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia, DOE/MC/251153116; Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy, 1992. ...

Corrie E. Clark; Robert M. Horner; Christopher B. Harto

2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

194

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albany-Burnt Woods and Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 March 2009 B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Preliminary Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1636 Bonneville Power Administration March 2009 Bonneville Power Administration i Table of Contents Chapter 1 Need for and Purpose of Action ............................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction .....................................................................................................

195

Graphite-moderated, gas-cooled, and water-moderated, water-cooled reactors as power units in nuclearelectric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present article reviews a number of papers submitted at the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy bearing on water-cooled, water-moderated, graphite-moderated, and gas-coole...

Yu. I. Koryakin

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corp. , Columbus, Ohio. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solar Energy System located at the Columbia Gas Corporation, Columbus, Ohio, has 2978 ft/sup 2/ of Honeywell single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/h Bryan water-tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton Arkla hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts are included from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions.

None

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: ORGANIC SPECIES IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS IN LIGHT OF FLUID INCLUSION GAS ANALYSES Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Measurement of organic compounds in Karaha- Telaga Bodas and Coso fluid inclusions shows there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and butane > butylene. There are three end member fluid compositions: type 1 fluids in which alkane compounds predominate, type 2 fluids that have ethane and propylene and no

198

The Impact of Thermal Conductivity and Diffusion Rates on Water Vapor Transport through Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management in a hydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is critical for performance. The impact of thermal conductivity and water vapor diffusion coefficients in a gas diffusion layer (GDL) has been studied by a mathematical model. The fraction of product water that is removed in the vapour phase through the GDL as a function of GDL properties and operating conditions has been calculated and discussed. Furthermore, the current model enables identification of conditions when condensation occurs in each GDL component and calculation of temperature gradient across the interface between different layers, providing insight into the overall mechanism of water transport in a given cell design. Water transport mode and condensation conditions in the GDL components depend on the combination of water vapor diffusion coefficients and thermal conductivities of the GDL components. Different types of GDL and water removal scenarios have been identified and related to experimentally-determined GDL proper...

Burlatsky, S F; Gummallaa, M; Condita, D; Liua, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Organic substances in produced and formation water from unconventional natural gas extraction in coal and shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Organic substances in produced and formation water from coalbed methane (CBM) and gas shale plays from across the USA were examined in this study. Disposal of produced waters from gas extraction in coal and shale is an important environmental issue because of the large volumes of water involved and the variable quality of this water. Organic substances in produced water may be environmentally relevant as pollutants, but have been little studied. Results from five CBM plays and two gas shale plays (including the Marcellus Shale) show a myriad of organic chemicals present in the produced and formation water. Organic compound classes present in produced and formation water in CBM plays include: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), heterocyclic compounds, alkyl phenols, aromatic amines, alkyl aromatics (alkyl benzenes, alkyl biphenyls), long-chain fatty acids, and aliphatic hydrocarbons. Concentrations of individual compounds range from CBM samples) range from 50 to 100?g/L. Total dissolved organic carbon (TOC) in CBM produced water is generally in the 14mg/L range. Excursions from this general pattern in produced waters from individual wells arise from contaminants introduced by production activities (oils, grease, adhesives, etc.). Organic substances in produced and formation water from gas shale unimpacted by production chemicals have a similar range of compound classes as CBM produced water, and TOC levels of about 8mg/L. However, produced water from the Marcellus Shale using hydraulic fracturing has TOC levels as high as 5500mg/L and a range of added organic chemicals including, solvents, biocides, scale inhibitors, and other organic chemicals at levels of 1000s of ?g/L for individual compounds. Levels of these hydraulic fracturing chemicals and TOC decrease rapidly over the first 20days of water recovery and some level of residual organic contaminants remain up to 250days after hydraulic fracturing. Although the environmental impacts of the organics in produced water are not well defined, results suggest that care should be exercised in the disposal and release of produced waters containing these organic substances into the environment because of the potential toxicity of many of these substances.

William Orem; Calin Tatu; Matthew Varonka; Harry Lerch; Anne Bates; Mark Engle; Lynn Crosby; Jennifer McIntosh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimizing production from water drive gas reservoirs based on desirability concept  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract There are various factors which determine the optimization and economic production from water drive gas reservoirs. These factors play an important role in designing an effective reservoir development plan. The present study, in the first step, investigates the relation between recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and cumulative water production with six different engineering and geologic factors using design of experiments (DOE) and response surface methodology (RSM). Next, all derived response functions are optimized simultaneously based on the concept of desirability. In this manner, part of water drive gas reservoirs is simulated using BoxBehnken design. Important factors that have been studied include reservoir horizontal permeability (Kh), permeability anisotropy (Kv/Kh), aquifer size (Vaq), gas production rate (Qg), perforated thickness (Hp) and tubing head pressure (THP). The results indicate that by combining various levels of factors and considering relative importance of each response function, optimized conditions could be raised in order to maximizing recovery factor, volumetric sweep efficiency and minimizing cumulative water production. Also high rates of gas production result poor volumetric sweep efficiency and early water breakthrough, hence ultimate recovery factor decreases by 3.28.4%.

Meysam Naderi; Behzad Rostami; Maryam Khosravi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry air injection and extraction, is a potentially robust remediation process to slow migration of inorganic or radionuclide contaminants through the vadose zone. The application of gas-phase partitioning tracer tests has been proposed as a means to estimate initial water volumes and to monitor the progress of the desiccation process at pilot-test and field sites. In this paper, tracer tests have been conducted in porous medium columns with various water saturations using sulfur hexafluoride as the conservative tracer and tricholorofluoromethane and difluoromethane as the water-partitioning tracers. For porous media with minimal silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests provided reasonable saturation estimates for saturations close to zero. However, for sediments with significant silt and/or organic matter fractions, tracer tests only provided satisfactory results when the water saturation was at least 0.1 - 0.2. For dryer conditions, the apparent tracer retardation increases due to air soil sorption, which is not included in traditional retardation coefficients derived from advection-dispersion equations accounting only for air water partitioning and water soil sorption. Based on these results, gas-phase partitioning tracer tests may be used to determine initial water volumes in sediments, provided the initial water saturations are sufficiently large. However, tracer tests are not suitable for quantifying moisture content in desiccated sediments.

Oostrom, Martinus; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Truex, Michael J.; Dane, Jacob H.

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Carbon gas fluxes from a brown-water and a clear-water lake in the ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

48.7 mg m-2) and water color (100 vs. 20 mg Pt L-1) throughout an open-water period when summer precipitation doubled, using both floating chambers and...

204

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. industry in a complementary research program designed to develop and demonstrate oil and natural gas drilling and production methodologies in ultra-deep formations. This...

205

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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to offshore hydrocarbon production and the recovery of unconventional resources like shale gas, estimating CO 2 storage potential in various types of geologic formations, and...

206

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of carbon dioxide in tight formations. Benefits Production of natural gas from hydraulically-fractured shales surrounding horizontal wells is a relatively recent and...

207

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

potential risks associated with oil and gas resources in shale reservoirs that require hydraulic fracturing or other engineering measures to produce. The major areas of focus...

208

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deleterious Events Associated with Drilling and Production Background Increasingly, offshore domestic oil and natural gas activities are associated with remote and challenging...

209

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

number of individual break-through tasks in diverse number of areas. These range from identification of new materials for gas capture, storage or separation to optimization of...

210

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and material interactions that impact environmental and resource issues related to oil, gas, and CO2 storage development. However, studying the wide variety of subsurface...

211

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Services Vecta Oil & Gas, Ltd. Washington State University Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Kevin Dome Development Phase Project Background The U.S....

212

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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for the same amount of energy produced, thereby facilitating a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. When combined, oxy-combustion comes with an efficiency loss, so it will...

213

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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Turbine Thermal Management The gas turbine is the workhorse of power generation, and technology advances to current land-based turbines are directly linked to our country's...

214

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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are used to characterize the fundamental properties of unconventional natural gas and oil reservoirs, ultra-deepwater and frontier-region reservoirs, and reservoirs that offer...

215

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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being developed for geologic carbon storage are focused on five storage types: (1) oil and natural gas reservoirs; (2) saline formations; (3) unmineable coal seams; (4)...

216

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-141- SalemAlbany #2)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1- SalemAlbany #2) 1- SalemAlbany #2) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #2 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, within Marion, Polk, and Benton Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

217

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-140- SalemAlbany1)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0- SalemAlbany1) 0- SalemAlbany1) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Salem Albany #1 115 kV transmission line from Salem Substation to Albany Substation. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Marion, Linn, and Benton County, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of- way, access roads, switch platforms, microwave beam paths, and around tower structures of the subject transmission line corridor that may impede the operation and maintenance of the identified transmission lines. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission

218

Identification and selection of a stable gel polymer to control or reduce water production in gas condensate fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The existence of water in hydrocarbon reservoirs damages the wells. In many cases, it leads to shut off the wells and decreases the gas production efficiency. For example, one of the problems of fractured gas wells is unwanted water invasion to gas production areas through the existing fracture in the reservoirs. This would increase the water production and decrease the gas production efficiency. As well, increasing of water/gas production ratio will increase the total operational costs due to water separation from the gas flow, corrosion of inside and outside well facilities and hydrate formation. Hence, prevention of water production in gas wells can boost the gas production economy. Generally, some mechanical and chemical methods exist to control unwanted water. One of the most effective methods to control and prevent of water production in hydrocarbon reservoirs is gel polymer method. The gel polymer is a chemical method with high efficiency and low cost. This work is concerned with producing a stable and suitable gel polymer (HPAMCr (III) gel system) to control and remove water in the gas condensate fields. The important parameters in the gel construction such as the polymer and cross-linker concentrations, pH of solution and also the effect of different additives have been examined and optimized at four temperatures of 30, 60, 80 and 100C. The effect of gel polymer on the absolute and relative permeabilities of two different cores for water and gas condensate fluids has been investigated. The results show that prepared gel polymer results in decreasing the water relative permeability, while increases the gas condensate relative permeability.

Shahram Karimi; Feridun Esmaeilzadeh; Dariush Mowla

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, the upstream oil and gas industry has dealt with some of the most challenging metering applications. One of these is the measurement of water percentage at the point of allocation. It is an essential requirement when test separators...

Liu, Jin

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coagulation/Flocculation Treatments for Flue-Gas-Derived Water from Oxyfuel Power Production with CO2 Capture ... The buffered solution is then sent back to the top of the tower, where it is sprayed into the upflowing oxyfuel gas stream, condensing and cleaning the ash-laden gas. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen Gerdemann; John Clark; Cathy Summers

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Recovery of Fresh Water Resources from Desalination of Brine Produced During Oil and Gas Production Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management and disposal of produced water is one of the most important problems associated with oil and gas (O&G) production. O&G production operations generate large volumes of brine water along with the petroleum resource. Currently, produced water is treated as a waste and is not available for any beneficial purposes for the communities where oil and gas is produced. Produced water contains different contaminants that must be removed before it can be used for any beneficial surface applications. Arid areas like west Texas produce large amount of oil, but, at the same time, have a shortage of potable water. A multidisciplinary team headed by researchers from Texas A&M University has spent more than six years is developing advanced membrane filtration processes for treating oil field produced brines The government-industry cooperative joint venture has been managed by the Global Petroleum Research Institute (GPRI). The goal of the project has been to demonstrate that treatment of oil field waste water for re-use will reduce water handling costs by 50% or greater. Our work has included (1) integrating advanced materials into existing prototype units and (2) operating short and long-term field testing with full size process trains. Testing at A&M has allowed us to upgrade our existing units with improved pre-treatment oil removal techniques and new oil tolerant RO membranes. We have also been able to perform extended testing in 'field laboratories' to gather much needed extended run time data on filter salt rejection efficiency and plugging characteristics of the process train. The Program Report describes work to evaluate the technical and economical feasibility of treating produced water with a combination of different separation processes to obtain water of agricultural water quality standards. Experiments were done for the pretreatment of produced water using a new liquid-liquid centrifuge, organoclay and microfiltration and ultrafiltration membranes for the removal of hydrocarbons from produced water. The results of these experiments show that hydrocarbons from produced water can be reduced from 200 ppm to below 29 ppm level. Experiments were also done to remove the dissolved solids (salts) from the pretreated produced water using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. The Report also discusses the results of field testing of various process trains to measure performance of the desalination process. Economic analysis based on field testing, including capital and operational costs, was done to predict the water treatment costs. Cost of treating produced water containing 15,000 ppm total dissolved solids and 200 ppm hydrocarbons to obtain agricultural water quality with less than 200 ppm TDS and 2 ppm hydrocarbons range between $0.5-1.5 /bbl. The contribution of fresh water resource from produced water will contribute enormously to the sustainable development of the communities where oil and gas is produced and fresh water is a scarce resource. This water can be used for many beneficial purposes such as agriculture, horticulture, rangeland and ecological restorations, and other environmental and industrial application.

David B. Burnett; Mustafa Siddiqui

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Conservation Division regiulations for appliance-efficiency standards relating to refrigerators and freezers, room air conditioners, central air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The text of the appliance efficiency standards for certain types of new appliances sold in California is presented. Specifications and test methods to identify complying refrigerators, freezers, air conditioners, gas space heaters, water heaters, plumbing fittings, gas clothes dryers, and gas cooking appliances are covered.

Not Available

1981-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water-Gas Samples At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas Samples Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1). References David Norman, Nigel Blarney, Lynne Kurilovitch (2002) New

225

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

well and post- placement. Foamed cement stability depends on time evolution of the gas bubble-size distribution (BSD) and varies as it is pumped and placed in the well. Unstable...

226

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of meeting such a challenge is the combination of a high temperature fuel cell and a gas turbine with a gasifier or reformer. This hybrid technology has been studied...

227

Numerical simulation on the influence of water spray in thermal plasma treatment of CF4 gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nitrogen thermal plasma generated by a non-transferred DC arc plasma torch was used to decompose tetrafluoromethane (CF4). In the thermal decomposition process, water was used as a chemical reactant source. Two kinds of water spray methods were compared: water spray directly to the arc plasma flame and indirectly to the reactor tube wall. Although the same operating conditions of input power, waste gas, and sprayed water flow rate were employed for each water spray methods, a relatively higher decomposition rate was achieved in the case of water spray to the reactor wall. In order to investigate the effects of water spraying direction on the thermal decomposition process, a numerical simulation on the thermal plasma flow characteristics was carried out considering water injection in the reactor. The simulation was performed using commercial fluid dynamics software of the FLUENT, which is suitable for calculating a complex flow. From the results, it was revealed that water spray to the reactor wall and use of a relatively small quantity of water are more effective methods for decomposition of CF4, because a sufficiently high temperature area and long reaction time can be maintained over large area.

Tae-Hee Kim; Sooseok Choi; Dong-Wha Park

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONTACT CONTACT Cathy Summers Director, Process Development Division National Energy Technology Laboratory 1450 Queen Ave., SW Albany, OR 97321-2198 541-967-5844 cathy.summers@netl.doe.gov An Integrated Approach To Materials Development Traditional trial-and-error method in materials development is time consuming and costly. In order to speed up materials discovery for a variety of energy applications, an integrated approach for multi-scale materials simulations and materials design has

229

Jupiter Oxygen Corporation/Albany Research Center Crada Progress Report, September  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Albany Research Center (ARC) has developed a new Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) process for fossil-fueled boilers. Pursuant to a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) with Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, ARC currently is studying the IPR process as applied to the oxygen fuel technology developed by Jupiter. As discussed further below, these two new technologies are complementary. This interim report summarizes the study results to date and outlines the potential activities under the next phase of the CRADA with Jupiter.

Turner, Paul C.; Schoenfield, Mark (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.)

2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

230

State-Scale Perspective on Water Use and Production Associated with Oil and Gas Operations, Oklahoma, U.S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to quantify annual volumes of water used for completion of oil and gas wells, coproduced during oil and gas production, injected via underground injection program wells, and used in water flooding operations. ... (12) Many U.S. states (e.g., Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Wyoming) that have abundant reserves of oil and gas are also subject to water scarcity due to uneven spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall. ... 3.4 UIC and Water Flood Volumes ...

Kyle E. Murray

2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

231

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA...  

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changes in CO 2 -water inter- facial tension. * Experimental CO 2 injection tests in pore micro-models and parallel network model simulations demonstrate that the sweep efficiency...

232

Oil production from thin oil columns subject to water and gas coning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO MATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KMOK KIT CHAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering OIL PRODUCTION FROM THIN OIL COLUMNS SUBJECT TO WATER AND GAS CONING A Thesis by KWOK KIT CHAI Approved as to style and content by airman of o t ee Member Member Head o Department May 1981 ABSTRACT Oil...

Chai, Kwok Kit

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were studied for water-gas-shift (WGS), methanol steam reforming, and reverse-water-gas-shift (RWGS) reactions. WGS activity was found to be dependent on the Pd:Zn ratio with a maximum activity obtained at approximately 0.50, which was comparable to that of a commercial Pt-based catalyst. The catalyst stability was demonstrated for 100 hours time-on-stream at a temperature of 3600C without evidence of metal sintering. WGS reaction rates were approximately 1st order with respect to CO concentration, and kinetic parameters were determined to be Ea = 58.3 kJ mol-1 and k0 = 6.1x107 min-1. During methanol steam reforming, the CO selectivities were observed to be lower than the calculated equilibrium values over a range of temperatures and steam/carbon ratios studied while the reaction rate constants were approximately of the same magnitude for both WGS and methanol steam reforming. These results indicate that although Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 are active WGS catalysts, WGS is not involved in methanol steam reforming. RWGS rate constants are on the order of about 20 times lower than that of methanol steam reforming, suggesting that RWGS reaction could be one of the sources for small amount of CO formation in methanol steam reforming.

Dagle, Robert A.; Platon, Alexandru; Datye, Abhaya K.; Vohs, John M.; Wang, Yong; Palo, Daniel R.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modern Devonian shale gas search starting in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany shale of southwestern Indiana is a worthwhile exploration and exploitation objective. The technical ability to enhance natural fractures is available, the drilling depths are shallow, long term gas reserves are attractive, markets are available, drilling costs are reasonable, risks are very low, multiple drilling objectives are available, and the return on investment is good. Indiana Geological Survey records are well organized, accessible, and easy to use. The paper describes the New Albany shale play, play size, early exploration, geologic setting, completion techniques, and locating prime areas.

Minihan, E.D.; Buzzard, R.D. (Minihan/Buzzard Consulting Firm, Fort Worth, TX (United States))

1995-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Microbial Community Changes in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Produced Water from Shale Gas Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial communities associated with produced water from hydraulic fracturing are not well understood, and their deleterious activity can lead to significant increases in production costs and adverse environmental impacts. In this study, we compared the microbial ecology in prefracturing fluids (fracturing source water and fracturing fluid) and produced water at multiple time points from a natural gas well in southwestern Pennsylvania using 16S rRNA gene-based clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and quantitative PCR. The majority of the bacterial community in prefracturing fluids constituted aerobic species affiliated with the class Alphaproteobacteria. However, their relative abundance decreased in produced water with an increase in halotolerant, anaerobic/facultative anaerobic species affiliated with the classes Clostridia, Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Epsilonproteobacteria, Bacteroidia, and Fusobacteria. Produced water collected at the last time point (day 187) consisted almost entirely of sequences similar to Clostridia and showed a decrease in bacterial abundance by 3 orders of magnitude compared to the prefracturing fluids and produced water samplesfrom earlier time points. Geochemical analysis showed that produced water contained higher concentrations of salts and total radioactivity compared to prefracturing fluids. This study provides evidence of long-term subsurface selection of the microbial community introduced through hydraulic fracturing, which may include significant implications for disinfection as well as reuse of produced water in future fracturing operations.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Bibby, Kyle J.; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D.; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Investigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell in the Presence of Gas Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forms of hydrogen powered technologies exist and have been well-researched, fuel cells is considered efficiently in the fuel cells (4). Inefficient water removal results in flooding of the catalyst layerInvestigation of Water Droplet Interaction with the Sidewalls of the Gas Channel in a PEM Fuel Cell

Kandlikar, Satish

237

Summary of research and development effort on air and water cooling of gas turbine blades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The review on air- and water-cooled gas turbines from the 1904 Lemale-Armengaud water-cooled gas turbine, the 1948 to 1952 NACA work, and the program at GE indicates that the potential of air cooling has been largely exploited in reaching temperatures of 1100/sup 0/C (approx. 2000/sup 0/F) in utility service and that further increases in turbine inlet temperature may be obtained with water cooling. The local heat flux in the first-stage turbine rotor with water cooling is very high, yielding high-temperature gradients and severe thermal stresses. Analyses and tests indicate that by employing a blade with an outer cladding of an approx. 1-mm-thick oxidation-resistant high-nickel alloy, a sublayer of a high-thermal-conductivity, high-strength, copper alloy containing closely spaced cooling passages approx. 2 mm in ID to minimize thermal gradients, and a central high-strength alloy structural spar, it appears possible to operate a water-cooled gas turbine with an inlet gas temperature of 1370/sup 0/C. The cooling-water passages must be lined with an iron-chrome-nickel alloy must be bent 90/sup 0/ to extend in a neatly spaced array through the platform at the base of the blade. The complex geometry of the blade design presents truly formidable fabrication problems. The water flow rate to each of many thousands of coolant passages must be metered and held to within rather close limits because the heat flux is so high that a local flow interruption of only a few seconds would lead to a serious failure.Heat losses to the cooling water will run approx. 10% of the heat from the fuel. By recoverying this waste heat for feedwater heating in a command cycle, these heat losses will give a degradation in the power plant output of approx. 5% relative to what might be obtained if no cooling were required. However, the associated power loss is less than half that to be expected with an elegant air cooling system.

Fraas, A.P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NETL: Gasification- Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Syngas Processing Systems Water-Gas Shift (WGS) Tests to Reduce Steam Use National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Southern Company Services, Inc. Project Number: NT0000749 Project Description The National Carbon Capture Center is testing commercial water-gas shift (WGS) catalysts from multiple vendors in support of developing WGS reactor systems which will reduce the cost of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from the production of syngas using coal. These tests have revealed that steam-to-carbon monoxide (CO) ratios can be reduced, resulting in a substantial increase in the net power output and significantly reducing the cost of electricity from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant with CO2 capture. Several commercially available WGS catalysts have been tested, and the results are being provided to the manufacturers to aid them in specifying future WGS systems for IGCC plants incorporating CO2 capture.

239

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Life-Cycle Water and Greenhouse Gas Implications of Alternative Fuel Production Speaker(s): Corinne Scown Date: January 31, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Michael Sohn If the goal of science is to understand the structure and behavior of the physical and natural world, and the goal of engineering is to design, build, and manage systems that serve society's needs, then the study of civil infrastructure systems acts as a link between the two. Understanding the reliance of engineered systems on constrained natural resources, as well as their impact on human well-being and the environment, is key to building and maintaining infrastructure that is sustainable in the broader sense. This talk will explore the important role of life-cycle assessment and optimization in assessing such questions as: a.)

240

Preadsorbed Water-Promoted Mechanism of the Water?Gas Shift Reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heterogeneous Catalysis Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Cyprus, CY 1678, Nicosia, Cyprus ... (1) Such technologies have gained increasing respect in the light of developments of hydrocarbon steam-reforming technologies for which natural gas and other biomass-derived liquid fuels, such as ethanol, sugars and bio-oil can efficiently be used to produce syngas and hydrogen. ... The authors are able to convert glucose, which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals, to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. ...

Constantinos D. Zeinalipour-Yazdi; Angelos M. Efstathiou

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...two previously normal wells that displayed increased...tectonic (e.g., geothermal springs) or microbial...subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale...Domestic and Municipal Water Wells for Dissolved Gas Analysis...nitrate flux to the Gulf of Mexico. Ground Water 42...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the second year of a project investigating water-gas shift catalysts for use in membrane reactors. It has been established that a simple iron high temperature shift catalyst becomes ineffective in a membrane reactor because the reaction rate is severely inhibited by the build-up of the product CO{sub 2}. During the past year, an improved microkinetic model for water-gas shift over iron oxide was developed. Its principal advantage over prior models is that it displays the correct asymptotic behavior at all temperatures and pressures as the composition approaches equilibrium. This model has been used to explore whether it might be possible to improve the performance of iron high temperature shift catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The model predicts that weakening the surface oxygen bond strength by less than 5% should lead to higher catalytic activity as well as resistance to rate inhibition at higher CO{sub 2} partial pressures. Two promoted iron high temperature shift catalysts were studied. Ceria and copper were each studied as promoters since there were indications in the literature that they might weaken the surface oxygen bond strength. Ceria was found to be ineffective as a promoter, but preliminary results with copper promoted FeCr high temperature shift catalyst show it to be much more resistant to rate inhibition by high levels of CO{sub 2}. Finally, the performance of sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts under conditions of high CO{sub 2} partial pressure was simulated using an available microkinetic model for water-gas shift over this catalyst. The model suggests that this catalyst might be quite effective in a medium temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor, provided that the membrane was resistant to the H{sub 2}S that is required in the feed.

Carl R.F. Lund

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

244

Investigation of the thermal conductivity of unconsolidated sand packs containing oil, water, and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTIGATION OF THE THERNAL CONDUCTIVITY OF UNCONSOLIDATED SAND PACKS CONTAINING OIL, WATER, AND GAS A Thesis David E. Gore Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Nechanical College oi' Texas in Partial fulfillment.... EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURE All tests were performed on unconsolidated sand packs containing either one, two, or three saturating fluids, Phys- ical properties of the sand and saturating fluids are shown in Tables I and II in the Appendix...

Gore, David Eugene

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

245

Water-alternating-gas flooding of a hydrocarbon-bearing formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes an oil recovery process for recovering a low viscosity crude oil from an oil-bearing zone of a subterranean formation. The process consists of: (a) injecting a gas into the oil-bearing zone of the subterranean formation via an injection well in fluid communication with the oilbearing zone, the gas injected at an injection pressure substantially below the minimum miscibility pressure of the gas in the low-viscosity crude oil; (b) displacing the low-viscosity crude oil away from the injection well toward an oil production well in fluid communication with the oil-bearing formation; (c) continuously recovering the low-viscosity crude oil from the oil production well; (d) thereafter terminating the injection of the gas upon substantial diminution of the continuous crude oil recovery from the production well; (e) injecting water into the oil-bearing zone of the formation via the injection well; (f) displacing the low-viscosity crude oil away from the injection well toward the oil production well; (g) recovering the low-viscosity oil form the oil production well; and (h) terminating the water injection.

Haines, H.K.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

246

A dynamic prediction model for gaswater effective permeability based on coalbed methane production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An understanding of the relative permeability of gas and water in coal reservoirs is vital for coalbed methane (CBM) development. In this work, a prediction model for gaswater effective permeability is established to describe the permeability variation within coal reservoirs during production. The effective stress and matrix shrinkage effects are taken into account by introducing the Palmer and Mansoori (PM) absolute permeability model. The endpoint relative permeability is calibrated through experimentation instead of through the conventional Corey relative permeability model, which is traditionally employed for the simulation of petroleum reservoirs. In this framework, the absolute permeability model and the relative permeability model are comprehensively coupled under the same reservoir pressure and water saturation conditions through the material balance equation. Using the Qinshui Basin as an example, the differences between the actual curve that is measured with the steady-state method and the simulation curve are compared. The model indicates that the effective permeability is expressed as a function of reservoir pressure and that the curve shape is controlled by the production data. The results illustrate that the PMCorey dynamic prediction model can accurately reflect the positive and negative effects of coal reservoirs. In particular, the model predicts the matrix shrinkage effect, which is important because it can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically feasible.

H. Xu; D.Z. Tang; S.H. Tang; J.L. Zhao; Y.J. Meng; S. Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Sulfide, phosphate, and minor element enrichment in the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) of southern Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The upper part of the New Albany Shale is divided into three members, which in ascending order are: (1) the Morgan Trail Member, a laminated brownish-black shale; (2) the Camp Run Member, an interbedded brownish-black and greenish-gray shale; and (3) the Clegg Creek Member, also a laminated brownish-black shale. The Morgan Trail and Camp Run Members contain 5 to 6% total organic carbon (TOC) and 2% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic composition of sulfide in these members ranges from -5.0 to -20.0%. C/S plots indicate linear relationships between abundances of these elements characteristic of sediments deposited in a noneuxinic marine environment. The Clegg Creek Member contains 10 to 15% TOC and 2 to 6% sulfide sulfur. Isotopic composition of sulfide ranges from -5.0 to -40.0%. The most negative values are characteristic of syngenetic pyrite formed within an anoxic water column. Abundances of carbon and sulfur are higher and uncorrelated in this member, consistent with deposition in an euxinic environment. Further, DOP (degree of pyritization) values suggest that pyrite formation was generally iron limited throughout Clegg Creek deposition, but sulfur isotopes indicate that syngenetic (water column) pyrite becomes an important component in the sediment only in the upper part of the member. At the top of the Clegg Creek Member a zone of phosphate nodules and trace metal enrichment coincides with maximal TOC values. During euxinic deposition, phosphate and trace metals accumulated below the chemocline due to limited vertical circulation in the water column. Phosphate and trace metals released for organic matter during early diagenesis resulted in precipitation of metal-rich phosphate nodules.

Beier, J.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Flue gas carbon dioxide sequestration during water softening with ion-exchange fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the use of ion-exchange fibers (IX fibers) to permanently sequester carbon dioxide present in flue gas into an aqueous phase as calcium or magnesium alkalinity while concurrently softening hard water. The only process inputs besides carbon dioxide (or flue gas) are snowmelt (or rainwater); no other chemicals are required for the regeneration of the IX fibers. Importantly, the process is not energy intensive and carbon dioxide does not need to be compressed to excessive pressures (>150 psi) for efficient use. Sources of carbon dioxide do not require concentration and, therefore, the use of raw flue gas (similar to 17% CO{sub 2}) is feasible with the rate of sequestration governed only by the partial pressure of carbon dioxide. While valid for flue gas obtained from any combustion process (e.g., coal, oil, natural gas, etc.), emissions from oil or gas combustion may be more appropriate for use in the described process due to the absence of mercury and particulates. It should also be noted that the presence of sulfur dioxide in flue gas would not adversely affect the process and may even enhance regeneration efficiency. The only product of the proposed process is an environmentally benign regenerant stream containing calcium and/or magnesium alkalinity. The unique property of IX fibers that makes the proposed process both environmentally sustainable and economically feasible is amenability to efficient regeneration with carbon dioxide and harvested snowmelt. Low intraparticle diffusional resistance is the underlying reason why IX fibers are amenable to efficient regeneration using snowmelt sparged with carbon dioxide; 95% calcium recovery was attained at a CO{sub 2} partial pressure of 6.8 atm. The energy balance for a typical electric utility shows that up to 1% of carbon dioxide emitted during combustion would be sequestered in the softening process.

Greenleaf, J.E.; SenGupta, A.K. [Lafayette College, Easton, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

C-S-Fe relationships and the isotopic composition of pyrite in the New Albany Shale of the Illinois Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between pyritic sulfur content (S{sub pyr}) and organic carbon content (C{sub org}) of shales analyzed from the New Albany Group depends upon C/{sub org}. For samples of <6 wt.% C{sub org}, S{sub pyr} and C{sub org} are strongly correlated (r = 0.85). For C{sub org}-rich shales (>6 wt.%), no S{sub pyr}-C{sub org} correlation is apparent. The degree of Fe pyritization (DOP) shows similar relationships to C{sub org}. These C-S-Fe relationships suggest that pyrite formation was limited by the availability of metabolizable organic carbon in samples where C{sub org} < 6 wt.% and by the availability of reactive Fe for samples where C{sub org} > 6 wt.%. Apparent sulfur isotope fractionations relative to contemporaneous seawater sulfate ({Delta}{sup 34}S) for pyrite formation average {minus}40 {per thousand} for non-calcareous shales and {minus}25 {per thousand} for calcareous shales. {Delta}{sup 34}S values become smaller with increasing C{sub org}, S{sub pyr}, and DOP for all C{sub org}-poor (<6 wt.%) and some C{sub org}-rich (<6 wt.%) shales. These trends suggest that pyrite formation occurred in a closed system or that instantaneous bacterial fractionation for sulfate reduction decreased in magnitude with increasing organic carbon content. The isotopic trends observed in the New Albany Group are not necessarily representative of other shales having a comparable range of organic carbon content, e.g. Cretaceous shales and mudstones from the western interior of North America. {Delta}{sup 34}S values in the remainder of the C{sub org}-rich New Albany Group shales are relatively large ({minus}38 to {minus}47 {per thousand}) and independent of C{sub org}, S{sub pyr}, and DOP, which suggests that pyrite in these shales formed mostly at or above the sediment-water interface by precipitation from an isotopically uniform reservoir of dissolved H{sub 2}S.

Anderson, T.F.; Kruger, J. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA)); Raiswell, R. (Leeds Univ. (England))

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pressure, temperature, and dissolved gas dependence of dielectric breakdown in water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been shown experimentally that the optical breakdown strength of water is a pressure dependent quantity growing with increasing pressure. The dependence of the breakdown strength on temperature and dissolved gas concentration over a larger range of pressures will be observed. Using a custom fabricated pressure vessel and high?power Nd:YAG laser breakdown events will be generated and observed over a range of pressures from 0 to 25 kpsi. Observations of breakdown events will be made using a high?speed photodetector located behind the pressure vessels optical windows. Dissolved gas concentration will be controlled and varied using a custom water preparation system over a range from waters vapor pressure (?20 torr) to atmospheric pressure.Temperature will be monitored using a thermocouple attached to the pressure vessel and the temperature dependence will be measured over a range from 20 to 35 C. A comparison between current single detector methods and previous imaging methods of using breakdown to determine absolute pressure will then be made. [Work supported by Impulse Devices Inc.

Jonathan Sukovich; R. Glynn Holt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Impact of Pilot Light Modeling on the Predicted Annual Performance of Residential Gas Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling residential water heaters with dynamic simulation models can provide accurate estimates of their annual energy consumption, if the units? characteristics and use conditions are known. Most gas storage water heaters (GSWHs) include a standing pilot light. It is generally assumed that the pilot light energy will help make up standby losses and have no impact on the predicted annual energy consumption. However, that is not always the case. The gas input rate and conversion efficiency of a pilot light for a GSWH were determined from laboratory data. The data were used in simulations of a typical GSWH with and without a pilot light, for two cases: 1) the GSWH is used alone; and 2) the GSWH is the second tank in a solar water heating (SWH) system. The sensitivity of wasted pilot light energy to annual hot water use, climate, and installation location was examined. The GSWH used alone in unconditioned space in a hot climate had a slight increase in energy consumption. The GSWH with a pilot light used as a backup to an SWH used up to 80% more auxiliary energy than one without in hot, sunny locations, from increased tank losses.

Maguire, J.; Burch, J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

Bent, Jimmy

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

WATER-GAS SHIFT KINETICS OVER IRON OXIDE CATALYSTS AT MEMBRANE REACTOR CONDITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetics of water-gas shift were studied over ferrochrome catalysts under conditions with high carbon dioxide partial pressures, such as would be expected in a membrane reactor. The catalyst activity is inhibited by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure. A microkinetic model of the reaction kinetics was developed. The model indicated that catalyst performance could be improved by decreasing the strength of surface oxygen bonds. Literature data indicated that adding either ceria or copper to the catalyst as a promoter might impart this desired effect. Ceria-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did not perform any better than unpromoted catalyst at the conditions tested, but copper-promoted ferrochrome catalysts did offer an improvement over the base ferrochrome material. A different class of water-gas shift catalyst, sulfided CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is not affected by carbon dioxide and may be a good alternative to the ferrochrome system, provided other constraints, notably the requisite sulfur level and maximum temperature, are not too limiting. A model was developed for an adiabatic, high-temperature water-gas shift membrane reactor. Simulation results indicate that an excess of steam in the feed (three moles of water per mole of CO) is beneficial even in a membrane reactor as it reduces the rate of adiabatic temperature rise. The simulations also indicate that much greater improvement can be attained by improving the catalyst as opposed to improving the membrane. Further, eliminating the inhibition by carbon dioxide will have a greater impact than will increasing the catalyst activity (assuming inhibition is still operative). Follow-up research into the use of sulfide catalysts with continued kinetic and reactor modeling is suggested.

Carl R.F. Lund

2002-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

Techno-economic analysis of water management options for unconventional natural gas developments in the Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of large-scale hydrocarbon production from shale reservoirs has revolutionized the oil and gas sector, and hydraulic fracturing has been the key enabler of this advancement. As a result, the need for water ...

Karapataki, Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Identification and quantification of pesticides and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in water and food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chances are examined for the identification and determination of pesticides of different types and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 46 items, in water and food by means of gas chromatography ... make from 2 to 1...

V. G. Amelin; T. B. Nikeshina; A. V. Tretyakov

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Evaluating the phase equilibria of liquid water+natural gas mixtures using cubic equations of state with asymmetric mixing rules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on a previously developed liquidliquid mixing rule we present a modified and robust mixing rule for accurate prediction of water content of natural gas mixtures and the natural gas solubility in liquid water phase. The non-density dependent mixing rule (NDD) and the new mixing rule are incorporated into the PengRobinson (PR), SoaveRedlichKwong (SRK), and NasrifarBolland (NB) equations of state to investigate their accuracies in estimating the water content of the gas phase as well as the gas solubility in the aqueous phase. For each binary system water+hydrocarbon, water+carbon dioxide, water+hydrogen sulfide, and water+nitrogen, three binary interaction parameters are required to describe the gasliquid water equilibria. In this work, experimental data from literature were used to tune the parameters. The results are in good agreement with experimental data, demonstrating the reliability of the new mixing rule and the thermodynamic approach used in this work.

P. Reshadi; Kh. Nasrifar; M. Moshfeghian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Stable isotope geochemistry of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal bed and shale gas can be of thermogenic, microbial or of mixed origin with the distinction made primarily on the basis of the molecular and stable isotope compositions of the gases and production waters. Methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen are the main constituents of coal bed and shale gases, with a general lack of C2+ hydrocarbon species in gases produced from shallow levels and more mature coals and shales. Evidence for the presence of microbial gas include ?13CCH4 values less than ?50, covariation of the isotope compositions of gases and production water, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations consistent with microbial processes, and positive ?13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in production waters. The CO2-reduction pathway is distinguished from acetate/methyl-type fermentation by somewhat lower ?13CCH4 and higher ?DCH4, but can also have overlapping values depending on the openness of the microbial system and the extent of substrate depletion. Crossplots of ?13CCH4 versus ?13CCO2 and ?DCH4 versus ?13CH2O may provide a better indication of the origin of the gases and the dominant metabolic pathway than the absolute carbon and hydrogen isotope compositions of methane. In the majority of cases, microbial coal bed and shale gases have carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations close to those expected for CO2 reduction. Primary thermogenic gases have ?13CCH4 values greater than ?50, and ?13C values that systematically increase from C1 to C4 and define a relatively straight line when plotted against reciprocal carbon number. Although coals and disseminated organic matter in shales represent a continuum as hydrocarbon source rocks, current data suggest a divergence between these two rock types at the high maturity end. In deep basin shale gas, reversals or rollovers in molecular and isotopic compositions are increasingly reported in what is effectively a closed shale system as opposed to the relative openness in coal measure environments. Detailed geochemical studies of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters are essential to determine not only gas origins but also the dominant methanogenic pathway in the case of microbial gases.

Suzanne D. Golding; Chris J. Boreham; Joan S. Esterle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis by BRUCE...

Hook, Bruce David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Comparison of product yields obtained from the New Albany Shale by different rapid heating retorting procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seven samples of New Albany Shale, Clegg Creek Member were independently evaluated for possible oil yield enhancement above Fischer Assay. Bulk samples were crushed, blended, sieved and riffled into representative aliquots and then divided between two laboratories. Samples were evaluated by the ASTM Fischer Assay and the Rapid Heat Up Assay (RHU). Results provided the first case of the independent evaluation of oil yield enhancement over Fischer Assay (FA) for eastern US oil shales carried out by different laboratories working on the same samples. Oil yield enhancements were obtained by both laboratories. Fischer Assay results were remarkably comparable indicating that reproducibility is possible for eastern US shale. Results from the assays are given.

Rubel, A.M.; Audeh, C.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coating Issues in Coal-Derived Synthesis Coating Issues in Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas/Hydrogen-Fired Turbines-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background The Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading research on the reliable operation of gas turbines when fired with synthesis gas (syngas) and hydrogen-enriched fuel gases with respect to firing temperature and fuel impurity levels (water vapor, sulfur, and condensable species). Because syngas is derived from coal, it contains more carbon and more impurities than natural gas. In order to achieve the desired efficiency, syngas-fired systems need to operate at very high temperatures but under combustion conditions necessary to reduce nitrogen oxide (NO X ) emissions. ORNL's current project is focused on understanding the performance of high-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use By MFI Zeolite Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desalination of brines produced from oil and gas fields is an attractive option for providing potable water in arid regions. Recent field-testing of subsurface sequestration of carbon dioxide for climate management purposes provides new motivation for optimizing efficacy of oilfield brine desalination: as subsurface reservoirs become used for storing CO{sub 2}, the displaced brines must be managed somehow. However, oilfield brine desalination is not economical at this time because of high costs of synthesizing membranes and the need for sophisticated pretreatments to reduce initial high TDS and to prevent serious fouling of membranes. In addition to these barriers, oil/gas field brines typically contain high concentrations of multivalent counter cations (eg. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) that can reduce efficacy of reverse osmosis (RO). Development of inorganic membranes with typical characteristics of high strength and stability provide a valuable option to clean produced water for beneficial uses. Zeolite membranes have a well-defined subnanometer pore structure and extreme chemical and mechanical stability, thus showing promising applicability in produced water purification. For example, the MFI-type zeolite membranes with uniform pore size of {approx}0.56 nm can separate ions from aqueous solution through a mechanism of size exclusion and electrostatic repulsion (Donnan exclusion). Such a combination allows zeolite membranes to be unique in separation of both organics and electrolytes from aqueous solutions by a reverse osmosis process, which is of great interest for difficult separations, such as oil-containing produced water purification. The objectives of the project 'Treating Coalbed Natural Gas Produced Water for Beneficial Use by MFI Zeolite Membranes' are: (1) to conduct extensive fundamental investigations and understand the mechanism of the RO process on zeolite membranes and factors determining the membrane performance, (2) to improve the membranes and optimize operating conditions to enhance water flux and ion rejection, and (3) to perform long-term RO operation on tubular membranes to study membrane stability and to collect experimental data necessary for reliable evaluations of technical and economic feasibilities. Our completed research has resulted in deep understanding of the ion and organic separation mechanism by zeolite membranes. A two-step hydrothermal crystallization process resulted in a highly efficient membrane with good reproducibility. The zeolite membranes synthesized therein has an overall surface area of {approx}0.3 m{sup 2}. Multichannel vessels were designed and machined for holding the tubular zeolite membrane for water purification. A zeolite membrane RO demonstration with zeolite membranes fabricated on commercial alpha-alumina support was established in the laboratory. Good test results were obtained for both actual produced water samples and simulated samples. An overall 96.9% ion rejection and 2.23 kg/m{sup 2}.h water flux was achieved in the demonstration. In addition, a post-synthesis modification method using Al{sup 3+}-oligomers was developed for repairing the undesirable nano-scale intercrystalline pores. Considerable enhancement in ion rejection was achieved. This new method of zeolite membrane modification is particularly useful for enhancing the efficiency of ion separation from aqueous solutions because the modification does not need high temperature operation and may be carried out online during the RO operation. A long-term separation test for actual CBM produced water has indicated that the zeolite membranes show excellent ion separation and extraordinary stability at high pressure and produced water environment.

Robert Lee; Liangxiong Li

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production ... Water consumption for nuclear energy could be reduced, while also increasing the safety of nuclear plants, by deploying new high temperature gas reactors that potentially allow for internal operating temperatures in excess of 900 C and combined cycle turbine designs. ... Whittaker, S.; White, D.; Law, D.; Chalatumyk, R. In IEA GHG Weyburn CO2Monitoring and Storage Project Summary Report 2000 - 2004, 7th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, Vancouver, Canada, Wilson, M.; Monea, M., Eds.; Petroleum Technology Research Centre: Vancouver, Canada, 2004. ...

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effect of Channel Materials on the Behavior of Water Droplet Emerging From GDL into PEMFC Gas Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in PEMFCs to enable proper diffusion of gases into the catalyst layer as both the liquid droplets and air of the liquid water on the cathode side of the PEMFC leads to flooding of the channels and thereby hindersEffect of Channel Materials on the Behavior of Water Droplet Emerging From GDL into PEMFC Gas

Kandlikar, Satish

264

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...environmental costs and benefits of fracking . Annu Rev Environ Resour...SL ( 2014 ) Water resource impacts during unconventional shale gas development: The...the Nicholas School of the Environment. The authors declare no conflict...in marine and fresh-water environments- CO2 reduction vs acetate...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microsoft Word - Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift for Carbon Capture Final Final Report .doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Alternate Water Evaluation of Alternate Water Gas Shift Configurations for IGCC Systems August 5, 2009 DOE/NETL-401/080509 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States

266

Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

TRANSITION STATE FOR THE GAS-PHASE REACTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density Functional Theory and small-core, relativistic pseudopotentials were used to look for symmetric and asymmetric transitions states of the gas-phase hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride, UF{sub 6}, with water. At the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p)/SDD level, an asymmetric transition state leading to the formation of a uranium hydroxyl fluoride, U(OH)F{sub 5}, and hydrogen fluoride was found with an energy barrier of +77.3 kJ/mol and an enthalpy of reaction of +63.0 kJ/mol (both including zero-point energy corrections). Addition of diffuse functions to all atoms except uranium led to only minor changes in the structure and relative energies of the reacting complex and transition state. However, a significant change in the product complex structure was found, significantly reducing the enthalpy of reaction to +31.9 kJ/mol. Similar structures and values were found for PBE0 and MP2 calculations with this larger basis set, supporting the B3LYP results. No symmetric transition state leading to the direct formation of uranium oxide tetrafluoride, UOF{sub 4}, was found, indicating that the reaction under ambient conditions likely includes several more steps than the mechanisms commonly mentioned. The transition state presented here appears to be the first published transition state for the important gas-phase reaction of UF{sub 6} with water.

Garrison, S; James Becnel, J

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Albany, OR Anchorage, AK Morgantown, WV Pittsburgh, PA Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl.doe.gov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Albany, OR · Anchorage, AK · Morgantown, WV · Pittsburgh, PA · Sugar Land, TX Website: www.netl-285-5437 briggs.white@netl.doe.gov Neil Nofziger Principal Investigator seM-coM company, Inc. 1040 North Westwood 304-285-4717 daniel.driscoll@netl.doe.gov PARTNERS University of Toledo Ceramatec, Inc. PROJECT

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

269

A dynamic prediction model for gas-water effective permeability in unsaturated coalbed methane reservoirs based on production data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Effective permeability of gas and water in coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is vital during CBM development. However, few studies have investigated it for unsaturated CBM reservoirs rather than saturated CBM reservoirs. In this work, the dynamic prediction model (PM-Corey model) for average gas-water effective permeability in two-phase flow in saturated CBM reservoirs was improved to describe unsaturated CBM reservoirs. In the improved effective permeability model, Palmer etal. absolute permeability model segmented based on critical desorption pressure and Chen etal. relative permeability model segmented based on critical water saturation were introduced and coupled comprehensively under conditions with the identical reservoir pressures and the identical water saturations through production data and the material balance equations (MBEs) in unsaturated CBM reservoirs. Taking the Hancheng CBM field as an example, the differences between the saturated and unsaturated effective permeability curves were compared. The results illustrate that the new dynamic prediction model could characterize not only the stage of two-phase flow but also the stage of single-phase water drainage. Also, the new model can accurately reflect the comprehensive effects of the positive and negative effects (the matrix shrinking effect and the effective stress effect) and the gas Klinkenberg effect of coal reservoirs, especially for the matrix shrinkage effect and the gas Klinkenberg effect, which can improve the effective permeability of gas production and render the process more economically. The new improved model is more realistic and practical than previous models.

Junlong Zhao; Dazhen Tang; Hao Xu; Yanjun Meng; Yumin Lv; Shu Tao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Group (Devonian Black Shale) in Illinois to evaluate its characteristics as a source of hydrocarbons. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a detailed analysis of the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of the New Albany Group in Illinois to determine those characteristics of lithology, thickness, regional distribution, vertical and lateral variability, and deformation that are most relevant to the occurrence of hydrocarbons. The mineralogic and petrographic properties of the New Albany Shale in Illinois are characterized. This includes the quantitative and qualitative characterization, by optical and x-ray techniques, of the inorganic mineral constituents, the dispersed organic matter, and the fabric of the shale. Not less than 49 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in 300 to 500 shale samples, which are representative cross sections of the cores taken. Organic and mineral carbon are included; total hydrogen; total sulfur and when that exceeds 0.5%, pyritic and sulfate sulfur. Also, other elements observed during normal routine analysis are reported. The character of off-gases from approximately 10-foot intervals in cores collected in the Illinois Basin is determined. In addition, the relative distribution of hydrocarbons is determined in ten specially prepared core samples, which are the same as those in previous unit. The carbon isotopic composition of methane in off-gases is determined from core samples whenever sufficient methane can be collected. This data is compared to other pertinent data such as gas composition and vitrinite reflectance for the purpose of making interpretations as to the origin and maturity of the gas. Laboratory experiments are performed to study the relative effects and significance of chemical and isotopic fractionation that occurs as gas is released from core samples. Data accumulated can be evaluated to gain a better understanding of the origin, migration, and location of natural gas associated with the shales.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The minimum gas temperature at the inlet of regulators in natural gas pressure reduction stations (CGS) for energy saving in water bath heaters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study a computational procedure for the computation of JouleThomson coefficient of natural gas has been developed using fundamental thermodynamic equations and AGA-8 equation of state, and then the minimum possible temperature of the natural gas entering to the pressure regulator of city gate stations (CGS) is calculated. As a case study, a CGS located in Bistoon (of Iran's CGSs) with nominal capacity of 20,000 SCMH has been considered. A comparison has been made between the calculated results and corresponding collected data from the station within 10 months. Results of this study help to determine the minimum temperature values of entering gas with different pressures to the regulator in order to avoid hydrate formation of the outlet gas, and can be used to design appropriate temperature control systems for water bath heaters and in turn save consumed energy for gas heating. The results show that heating the gas up to calculated minimum temperatures can save energy consumption of heaters by 43%. Also, it is indicated that by applying a control system, based on the result of this study, in the CGS the payback period would be less than a year.

Esmail Ashouri; Farzad Veysi; Ehsan Shojaeizadeh; Maryam Asadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis: Cobalt plus a water-gas shift catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details experiments performed on three different copper-based catalysts: Cu/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], Cu/MnO/Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. Of these three catalysts, the Cu/ZnO/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] exhibits the greatest stability when slurried in octacosane. More than 1000 hours-on-stream indicate that the catalyst activity is not detrimentally affected by high pressure, high H[sub 2]/CO ratio, or the presence of alkenes. All of these are necessary stability characteristics for the water-gas shift catalyst, if it is to be used in combination with a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. A review of documented reduction procedures for cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts is presented.

Yates, I.C.; Satterfield, C.N.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pt loaded carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report development and characterization of platinum doped carbon aerogel catalyst for catalytic exchange reactions between water and hydrogen gas. The carbon aerogel with uniformly dispersed platinum nanoparticles was prepared by adding platinum precursor during the sol-gel process. Thereafter colloidal PTFE was mixed with the platinum doped carbon aerogel powder and coated on Dixon rings to obtain hydrophobic catalyst with required mechanical strength. Detailed studies have been carried out to observe the effect of physical characteristics of the catalyst powder (surface area and pore size of aerogels Pt cluster size and its valence state etc) and the different coating parameters (PTFE to Pt-CA ratio and Pt loading on Dixon ring) on volume transfer rate (Ky.a) for H/D reaction. Ky.a values of ?0.8 m3 (STP).s?1. m?3 were obtained for Pt loading of 7% and Pt cluster size of 3 nm at atmospheric pressure.

P. K. Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The influence of free gas saturation on water flood performance - variations caused by changes in flooding rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1971) Anil Kumar Dandona, B. S. , Indian School of Mines Directed by: Dr. R. A. Morse It has been recognised that the presence of a free gas satura- tion prior to water flooding can have an important influence on oil recovery. The published results... studies such as the disappearance of part or all of the free gas by solution in the oil bank. Also, it has been realised that gravity forces make it impossible to initiate and maintain a uniforxn gas saturation fram top to bottom of the production...

Dandona, Anil Kumar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

The effect on recovery of the injection of alternating slugs of gas and water at pressures above the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. 13 4, Refined Oil Recovery vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 14 5. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of Refined Oil. 15 6. Recovery of East... Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Gas Slug. ig 7. Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil vs Pore Volumes of Injected Fluid for an Initial Water Slug. 19 8. The Effect of Slug Length on Recovery of East Texas Crude Oil. 20...

Givens, James Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Kinetic studies of the water gas shift reaction on a sulfided cobalt/molybdena/alumina catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the applicability of low temperature oxygen chemisorption (LTOC) to measure the specific surface area of several rare-earth oxides (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Tb) and the kinetics of the water-gas shift reaction over a sulfided cobalt-molybdena-alumina (AMOCAT 1A) catalyst are investigated. The LTOC results indicate that oxygen is possibly adsorbed in the molecular form, O/sub 2//sup -/, as observed by others after heat treatment of these oxides in vacuum. Lanthana and ceria were found to have ratios of total surface area to LTOC similar to those of chromia and molybdena respectively, after a comparable pretreatment. Furthermore, ceria is deduced to exist as a monolayer on the alumina support at loadings below 12%. An additional hour of reduction after the 6 hours of reduction shows a significant increase in LTOC on lanthana, neodymia and terbia which may be due to phase changes exhibited by these polymorphic oxides. The kinetics of the water-gas shift reaction has been extensively studied on iron oxide (high temperature shift) and copper oxide (low temperature shift) based catalysts. This investigation establishes the kinetics over a sulfided cobalt-molybdena-alumina (AMOCAT 1A) catalyst in the medium temperature shift range, 250-300/sup 0/C. The catalyst was sulfided in-situ in a high pressure integrated Berty reactor system. Reaction rates were measured for different CO/H/sub 2/O feed ratios in the range 0.3-3.0, with and without CO/sub 2/ in the feed. The reaction was carried out at several pressures in the range 5-27 atm. and GHSV's in the range 4800-2400 hr/sup 1/.

Srivatsa, N.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Mechanism of the Water Gas Shift Reaction on Pt: First Principles, Experiments, and Microkinetic Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We present a microkinetic model as well as experimental data for the low-temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction catalyzed by Pt at temperatures from 523 to 573 K and for various gas compositions at a pressure of 1 atm. Thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for the model are derived from periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations on Pt(111). The destabilizing effect of high CO surface coverage on the binding energies of surface species is quantified through DFT calculations and accounted for in the microkinetic model. Deviations of specific fitted model parameters from DFT calculated parameters on Pt(111) point to the possible role of steps/defects in this reaction. Our model predicts reaction rates and reaction orders in good agreement with our experiments. The calculated and experimental apparent activation energies are 67.8 kJ/mol and 71.4 kJ/mol, respectively. The model shows that the most significant reaction channel proceeds via a carboxyl (COOH) intermediate. Formate (HCOO), which has been experimentally observed and thought to be the key WGS intermediate in the literature, is shown to act only as a spectator species.

Grabow, Lars C.; Gokhale, Amit A.; Evans, Steven T.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

278

Stability of Cohesive Sediments Subject to Pore Water and Gas Ebullition Fluxes and Effectiveness of Sand and Aquablok Caps in Reducing the Resuspension Rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study investigated resuspension of contaminated cohesive sediments subject to pore water flow and/or microbially generated gas release which may potentially enhance resuspension relative to (more)

Cakir Kavcar, Pinar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas.

280

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation 50 Wolf Road, Albany, New York 12233  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

State Department of Environmental Conservation State Department of Environmental Conservation 50 Wolf Road, Albany, New York 12233 Thomas Cl Jorling Commisbioner August 13, 1993 W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D. Designation 8 Certification Manager Off-Site Branch Division of Eastern Area Programs Office of Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 J Dear Alexander: f ., Thank you for sending me the enclosed February 19, 1991 letter from Mr. R. Sorum of Afrimet Indussa to Mr. Andrew Wall, III, a former employee of a U.S. Department of Energy contracts We are examining its contents relative to more recent statemen by representatives of this corporation and will discuss this issue in the future with you. I am particularly interested in the last sentence of the first page of this letter.

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281

DOE/EA-1636: Finding of No Significant Impact for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project EA (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) and Floodplain Statement of Findings DOE/EA-1636 Summary The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings on the Albany- Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. This project involves replacing wood pole structures on the existing Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line and along a portion of the existing Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1636) evaluating the proposed project and its alternative. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the Proposed Action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the

282

Evaluation of EOR Potential by Gas and Water Flooding in Shale Oil Reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The demand for oil and natural gas will continue to increase for the foreseeable future; unconventional resources such as tight oil, shale gas, shale oil (more)

Chen, Ke

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

WATER ABSORPTION FROM GAS VERY NEAR THE MASSIVE PROTOSTAR AFGL 2136 IRS 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present ground-based observations of the ?{sub 1} and ?{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 2}O toward the massive protostar AFGL 2136 IRS 1, identifying absorption features due to 47 different ro-vibrational transitions between 2.468 ?m and 2.561 ?m. Analysis of these features indicates the absorption arises in warm (T = 506 25 K), very dense (n(H{sub 2}) > 5 10{sup 9} cm{sup 3}) gas, suggesting an origin close to the central protostar. The total column density of warm water is estimated to be N(H{sub 2}O) = (1.02 0.02) 10{sup 19} cm{sup 2}, giving a relative abundance of N(H{sub 2}O)/N(H{sub 2}) ? 10{sup 4}. Our study represents the first extensive use of water vapor absorption lines in the near infrared, and demonstrates the utility of such observations in deriving physical parameters.

Indriolo, Nick; Neufeld, D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seifahrt, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Richter, M. J. [Department of Physics, University of California Davis, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing for recovery of shale gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing for natural gas extraction from shale produces waste brine known as flowback that is impounded at the surface prior to reuse and/or disposal. During impoundment, microbial activity can alter the fate of metals including radionuclides, give rise to odorous compounds, and result in biocorrosion that complicates water and waste management and increases production costs. Here, we describe the microbial ecology at multiple depths of three flowback impoundments from the Marcellus shale that were managed differently. 16S rRNA gene clone libraries revealed that bacterial communities in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments were depth dependent, diverse, and most similar to species within the taxa [gamma]-proteobacteria, [alpha]-proteobacteria, ?-proteobacteria, Clostridia, Synergistetes, Thermotogae, Spirochetes, and Bacteroidetes. The bacterial community in the pretreated and aerated impoundment was uniform with depth, less diverse, and most similar to known iodide-oxidizing bacteria in the [alpha]-proteobacteria. Archaea were identified only in the untreated and biocide-amended impoundments and were affiliated to the Methanomicrobia class. This is the first study of microbial communities in flowback water impoundments from hydraulic fracturing. The findings expand our knowledge of microbial diversity of an emergent and unexplored environment and may guide the management of flowback impoundments.

Mohan, Arvind Murali; Hartsock, Angela; Hammack, Richard W.; Vidic, Radisav D; Gregory, Kelvin B.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

A mini review on the chemistry and catalysis of the water gas shift reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water gas shift (WGS) reaction is a chemical reaction in which carbon monoxide reacts with water vapor to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen. It is an important reaction industrially used in conjunction with steam reforming of hydrocarbons for the production of high purity hydrogen. Grenoble et al examined the roles of both active metals and metal oxide support on the kinetics of the WGS reaction. They found out that the turn over numbers of various Al2O3 supported transition metals decreased in the trend of Cu, Re, Co, Ru, Ni, Pt, Os, Au, Fe, Pd, Rh, and Ir, which corresponds nicely to the observed volcano shaped correlation between catalytic activities and respective CO adsorption heat. This is a strong indication that CO gets activated on the metal surface during the reaction and different metals have different activation energies. The authors also observed that the turn over number of Pt/Al2O3 was one order of magnitude higher than that of Pt/SiO2, indicating a strong support effect, which the authors ascri...

Zhao, Zhun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Rate-transient analysis of 2-phase (gas+water) CBM wells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent work, the authors (Clarkson etal., 2008, 2007; Jordan etal., 2006) demonstrated how modern production data analysis (PDA) methods, such as flowing material balance (FMB) and production type-curves, may be adapted to account for the unique reservoir characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs through the appropriate use of material balance and time transforms. Reservoir characteristics related to storage and fluid flow that were addressed included: adsorbed and free-gas storage; single-phase flow of water above desorption pressure (undersaturated coals); 2-phase flow of gas and water below desorption pressure (saturated coals); non-static absolute permeability during depletion; and multi-layer behavior. Example (field) applications of the new PDA methods were limited to vertical wells that were either openhole completed, or slightly stimulated with hydraulic fracturing methods. In this work, new workflows and analytical approaches are provided for analyzing vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal CBM wells. The analysis and methodology for 2-phase flow reservoirs is complex, requiring modifications to account for desorption and changes in effective permeability. The proposed workflow for 2-phase CBM wells includes the transformation of the well production and flowing pressure data into dimensionless type-curve and straight line (ex. flowing material balance) coordinates using certain outputs (krg, pR) from the simulator used in turn to history-match the production data. Transient straight-line (pressure-transient analysis analog) techniques are applied for the first time to 2-phase CBM well production data. The type-curve and straight-line matches to actual production data are then used to retrieve reservoir properties (e.g. absolute permeability) and stimulation conditions (e.g. skin), which in turn are compared to reservoir simulation input as a consistency check. Both simulated and field cases are analyzed to illustrate the new procedures and analytical techniques. The primary contribution of the current work is the application of modern production analysis methods to 2-phase CBM reservoirs. These methods have been modified for CBM reservoir behavior and combined with analytical (or numerical) modeling to extract quantitative reservoir information from CBM reservoirs which exhibit a wide-range in production characteristics, and are completed in a variety of styles. The modifications proposed in this work to enable the use of single-phase flow techniques must be regarded as practical approximations. The methods rely heavily on late-time data because of the poor quality of water production and flowing pressure data that typically exists. The methods are expected to be used as a pre-cursor to or in parallel with field reservoir simulation, to assist with CBM development decisions.

C.R. Clarkson; C.L. Jordan; D. Ilk; T.A. Blasingame

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Gas Solubility Measurement and Modeling for the Nitrogen + Water System from 274.18 K to 363.02 K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas Solubility Measurement and Modeling for the Nitrogen + Water System from 274.18 K to 363.02 K ... (4)?Frolich, P. K.; Tauch, E. J.; Hogan, J. J.; Peer, A. A. Solubilities of Gases in Liquids at High Pressure. ...

Antonin Chapoy; Amir H. Mohammadi; Bahman Tohidi; Dominique Richon

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Design of Advanced Engineering Design of Advanced Hydrogen-Carbon Dioxide Palladium and Palladium/Alloy Composite Membrane Separations and Process Intensification Background Technologies for pre-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and economical hydrogen (H2) production will contribute to the development of a stable and sustainable U.S. energy sector. The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce electricity, hydrogen, fuels, and/or chemicals from coal and coal/biomass-mixtures in an environmentally responsible manner. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is a key part of this process for production of H2. The application of H2 separation technology can facilitate the production of high-purity H2 from gasification-based systems, as well as allow for process

290

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Foamed Wellbore Cement Foamed Wellbore Cement Stability under Deep Water Conditions Background Foamed cement is a gas-liquid dispersion that is produced when an inert gas, typically nitrogen, is injected into a conventional cement slurry to form microscopic bubbles. Foamed cements are ultralow-density systems typically employed in formations that are unable to support annular hydrostatic pressure exerted by conventional cement slurries. More recently, the use of foamed cement has expanded into regions with high-stress environments, for example, isolating problem formations typical in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to its light-weight application, foamed cement has a unique resistance to temperature and pressure-induced stresses. Foamed cement exhibits superior fluid

291

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Assessment Model for Predicting Integrated Assessment Model for Predicting Potential Risks to Groundwater and Surface Water Associated with Shale Gas Development Background The EPAct Subtitle J, Section 999A-999H established a research and development (R&D) program for ultra-deepwater and unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resources. This legislation identified three program elements to be administered by a consortium under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. Complementary research performed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Office of Research and Development (ORD) is a fourth program element of this cost-shared program. NETL was also tasked with managing the consortium: Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA). Historically, the Complementary R&D Program being carried out by NETL's ORD has focused

292

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

General Electric General Electric Background GE Power & Water, along with GE Global Research Center, has an ongoing U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) program to develop gas turbine technology for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). GE is broadening this development effort, along with expanding applicability to industrial applications such as refineries and steel mills under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines with industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

293

The Integration of a Structural Water-Gas-Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 The InTegraTIon of a STrucTural WaTer- gaS-ShIfT caTalyST WITh a VanadIum alloy hydrogen TranSporT deVIce Description The purpose of this project is to produce a scalable device that simultaneously performs both water-gas-shift (WGS) and hydrogen separation from a coal-derived synthesis gas stream. The justification of such a system is the improved efficiency for the overall production of hydrogen. Removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas (syngas) stream allows the WGS reaction to convert more carbon monoxide (CO) to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and maximizes the total hydrogen produced. An additional benefit is the reduction in capital cost of plant construction due to the removal of one step in the process by integrating WGS with the membrane separation device.

294

DOE/EA-1636: Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Mitigation Action Plan (March 2009)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project DOE/EA-1636 Summary This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) is part of the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the Albany-Burnt Woods and Santiam-Toledo Pole Replacement Project. The project involves replacing wood pole structures on about 26 miles of the Albany-Burnt Woods single-circuit, 115- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and about 21 miles of the Santiam-Toledo single circuit, 230-kV transmission line in Linn, Benton and Lincoln counties, Oregon. This MAP is for the Proposed Action and includes all of the integral elements and commitments made in the Environmental Assessment (EA) to mitigate any potential adverse environmental impacts. The purpose of this MAP is to explain how the mitigation measures will be

295

On the Clouds of Bubbles Formed by Breaking Wind-Waves in Deep Water, and their Role in Air -- Sea Gas Transfer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...than in the fresh-water loch, even at smaller...presence of oxygen (or gases other than nitrogen) in the gas composing the bubbles...of turbulence in the water also appears unlikely...and the effects of solubility of the gas within the...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Water Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak, Bruce A. McCarl, Allan J. Sommer, Brian C. Murray, Timothy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greenhouse gas (GHG) emission offset strategies in U.S. agriculture by linking a national level agriculturalWater Quality Co-effects of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in US Agriculture Subhrendu K. Pattanayak sector model (ASMGHG) to a national level water quality model (NWPCAM). The simulated policy scenario

McCarl, Bruce A.

297

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During April-September 2002, the JIP concentrated on: Reviewing the tasks and subtasks on the basis of the information generated during the three workshops held in March and May 2002; Writing Requests for Proposals (RFPs) and Cost, Time and Resource (CTRs) estimates to accomplish the tasks and subtasks; Reviewing proposals sent in by prospective contractors; Selecting four contractors; Selecting six sites for detailed review; and Talking to drill ship owners and operators about potential work with the JIP.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis NETL's Fluid Chemistry Analysis Capacity Background Establishing the geochemistry of surface and ground waters requires an arsenal of techniques devoted to determining the constituents these waters contain and the environment in which they exist. Many standard techniques have been developed over the years, and new ones continue to be explored as more complex matrices and harsher environments are encountered. Deep geologic storage of carbon dioxide and the development of unconventional oil and gas resourses are two areas of current concern where the study of geochemical processes is challenging due to the complex nature of the natural samples, and where routine analytical techniques are being pushed to their limits. The facilities at NETL include both conventional and cutting-edge instrumentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas Using Condensing Heat Exchangers ProMIS/Project No.: DE-NT0005648  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Edward Levy Edward Levy Principal Investigator Director, Lehigh University Energy Research Center RecoveRy of WateR fRom BoileR flue Gas usinG condensinG Heat excHanGeRs PRomis/PRoject no.: de-nt0005648 Background As the United States' population grows and demand for electricity and water increases, power plants located in some parts of the country will find it increasingly difficult to obtain the large quantities of water needed to maintain operations. Most of the water used in a thermoelectric power plant is used for cooling, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been focusing on possible techniques to reduce the amount of fresh water needed for cooling. Many coal-fired power plants operate with stack temperatures in the 300 °F range to minimize fouling and corrosion problems due to sulfuric acid condensation and to

303

Effect of low steam/carbon ratio on water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by reverse co-precipitation and an industrial catalyst were used for the low-temperature water gas shift reaction. The catalysts were characterized by chemical analysis (atomic absorption spectroscopy), BET surface area, nitrous oxide chemisorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and catalytic activity in the target reaction. The catalyst prepared by reverse co-precipitation showed higher BET and copper surface areas, as well as higher catalytic activity. XRD patterns showed that the aurichalcite and hydrozincite precursors were converted into crystalline CuO and ZnO oxides when calcined in air at 623K. TPR profiles revealed that Cu(I) oxide forms prior to Cu. Binding energies corresponding to several copper states on fresh catalysts were observed by XPS, but copper was in the metallic state during the reaction conditions (reduced catalyst). By varying the catalytic reaction conditions, such as vapor/carbon ratio and the time of contact, it is possible to obtain different conversion rates of carbon monoxide and thus operate under conditions of lower vapor consumption.

Renan Tavares Figueiredo; Andr Luis Dantas Ramos; Heloysa Martins Carvalho de Andrade; J.L.G. Fierro

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean's surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry's law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. (Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. (Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sustainability and Energy Development: Influences of Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reduction Options on Water Use in Energy Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation strategies cannot be evaluated solely in terms of energy cost and greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation potential. Maintaining GHGs at a 'safe' level will require fundamental change in the way we approach energy production, and a number of environmental, economic, and societal factors will come into play. Water is an essential component of energy production, and water resource constraints (e.g., insufficient supplies and competing ecological and anthropogenic needs) will limit our options for producing energy and for reducing GHG emissions. This study evaluates these potential constraints from a global perspective by revisiting the 'climate wedges' proposal of Pacala and Sokolow [1], and evaluating the potential water impacts of the 'wedges' associated with energy production. Results indicate that there is a range of water impacts, with some options reducing water demand while others increase water demand. Mitigation options that improve energy conversion and end-use efficiency have the greatest potential for reducing water resources impacts. These options provide 'win-win-win' scenarios for reducing GHG emissions, lowering energy costs and reducing water demand. Thet may merit higher priority than alternative options that emphasize deploying new low-carbon energy facilities or modifying existing facilities with energy intensive GHG mitigation technologies to reduce GHG emissions. While the latter can reduce GHG emissions, they will typically increase energy costs and water impacts.

D. Craig Cooper; Gerald Sehlke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sustainable development through beneficial use of produced water for the oil and gas industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using desalination membranes. Produced water with up to 45,000 ppm total dissolved solids (TDS) can be treated to agricultural water quality water standards having less than 500 ppm TDS. Finally an economic analysis, including capital and operational...

Siddiqui, Mustafa Ashique

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

307

Sorption-Enhanced Synthetic Natural Gas (SNG) Production from Syngas: A Novel Process Combining CO Methanation, Water-Gas Shift, and CO2 Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthetic natural gas (SNG) production from syngas is under investigation again due to the desire for less dependency from imports and the opportunity for increasing coal utilization and reducing green house gas emission. CO methanation is highly exothermic and substantial heat is liberated which can lead to process thermal imbalance and deactivation of the catalyst. As a result, conversion per pass is limited and substantial syngas recycle is employed in conventional processes. Furthermore, the conversion of syngas to SNG is typically performed at moderate temperatures (275 to 325C) to ensure high CH4 yields since this reaction is thermodynamically limited. In this study, the effectiveness of a novel integrated process for the SNG production from syngas at high temperature (i.e. 600?C) was investigated. This integrated process consists of combining a CO methanation nickel-based catalyst with a high temperature CO2 capture sorbent in a single reactor. Integration with CO2 separation eliminates the reverse-water-gas shift and the requirement for a separate water-gas shift (WGS) unit. Easing of thermodynamic constraint offers the opportunity of enhancing yield to CH4 at higher operating temperature (500-700C) which also favors methanation kinetics and improves the overall process efficiency due to exploitation of reaction heat at higher temperatures. Furthermore, simultaneous CO2 capture eliminates green house gas emission. In this work, sorption-enhanced CO methanation was demonstrated using a mixture of a 68% CaO/32% MgAl2O4 sorbent and a CO methanation catalyst (Ni/Al2O3, Ni/MgAl2O4, or Ni/SiC) utilizing a syngas ratio (H2/CO) of 1, gas-hour-space velocity (GHSV) of 22 000 hr-1, pressure of 1 bar and a temperature of 600oC. These conditions resulted in ~90% yield to methane, which was maintained until the sorbent became saturated with CO2. By contrast, without the use of sorbent, equilibrium yield to methane is only 22%. Cyclic stability of the methanation catalyst and durability of the sorbent were also studied in the multiple carbonation-decarbonation cycle studies proving the potential of this integrated process in a practical application.

Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Dagle, Robert A.; Kovarik, Libor; Albrecht, Karl O.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Liyu; Taylor, Charles E.; Bao, Xinhe; Wang, Yong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

309

Water quality in the vicinity of Mosquito Creek Lake, Trumbull County, Ohio, in relation of the chemistry of locally occurring oil, natural gas, and brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe current water quality and the chemistry of oil, natural gas, and brine in the Mosquito Creek Lake area. Additionally, these data are used to characterize water quality in the Mosquito Creek Lake area in relation to past oil and natural gas well drilling and production. To meet the overall objective, several goals for this investigation were established. These include (1) collect water-quality and subsurface-gas data from shallow sediments and rock that can be used for future evaluation of possible effects of oil and natural gas well drilling and production on water supplies, (2) characterize current surface-water and ground-water quality as it relates to the natural occurrence and (or) release of oil, gas, and brine (3) sample and chemically characterize the oil in the shallow Mecca Oil Pool, gas from the Berea and Cussewago Sandstone aquifers, and the oil, gas, and brine from the Clinton sandstone, and (4) identify areas where aquifers are vulnerable to contamination from surface spills at oil and natural gas drilling and production sites.

Barton, G.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Ryder, R.T.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Refractory Research Group - U.S. DOE, Albany Research Center [Institution Profile  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The refractory research group at the Albany Research Center (ARC) has a long history of conducting materials research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, and more recently, within the U.S. Dept. of Energy. When under the U.S. Bureau of Mines, research was driven by national needs to develop substitute materials and to conserve raw materials. This mission was accomplished by improving refractory material properties and/or by recycling refractories using critical and strategic materials. Currently, as a U.S. Dept of Energy Fossil Energy field site, research is driven primarily by the need to assist DOE in meeting its vision to develop economically and environmentally viable technologies for the production of electricity from fossil fuels. Research at ARC impacts this vision by: Providing information on the performance characteristics of materials being specified for the current generation of power systems; Developing cost-effective, high performance materials for inclusion in the next generation of fossil power systems; and Solving environmental emission and waste problems related to fossil energy systems. A brief history of past refractory research within the U.S. Bureau of Mines, the current refractory research at ARC, and the equipment and capabilities used to conduct refractory research at ARC will be discussed.

Bennett, James P.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Parametric Gasification of Oak Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 Parametric Gasification of Oak and Pine Feedstocks Using the TCPDU and Slipstream Water-Gas Shift Catalysis Jason Hrdlicka, Calvin Feik, Danny Carpenter, and Marc Pomeroy Prepared under Task No. H2713B13 Technical Report NREL/TP-510-44557 December 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

312

Cu/Zn-based catalysts improved by adding magnesium for watergas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ternary Cu/MeO/ZnO (Me: alkaline-earth metal, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) catalysts were prepared by homogeneous precipitation (hp) using urea hydrolysis. The structure and the activity for the watergas shift reaction of these catalysts were studied compared with those of the catalysts prepared by coprecipitation (cp). The highest activity was obtained over hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO among the catalysts tested. The catalyst precursors after the precipitation contained mainly aurichalcite, (Cu,Zn)5(CO3)2(OH)16, while the decomposed products after the calcination contained apparently CuO and ZnO as crystalline phases, since the amount of Mg actually included in the catalyst was less than 1.0at.%. The Cu metal surface area was larger and the particle size of Cu metal was smaller on the hp-catalysts than those on the cp-catalysts; nonetheless the BET surface area was sometimes larger on the latter than on the former. The addition of ?0.1at.% of Mg was the most effective, resulting in the highest activity as well as the lowest activation energy. A good correlation was observed between the amount of Cu+ species and the activation energy of the shift reaction, suggesting that MgO significantly enhanced the formation of Cu+ species as the active sites. Even after the pre-reduction at the high temperature, 250C, hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO catalyst showed no significant decrease in the activity as well as no detectable sintering in the Cu metal particles during 50h of the reaction. It was supposed that the shift reaction proceeds by a reductionoxidation mechanism between Cu0?Cu+.

Tetsuya Shishido; Manabu Yamamoto; Ikuo Atake; Dalin Li; Yan Tian; Hiroyuki Morioka; Masahide Honda; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pilot Scale Water Gas Shift - Membrane Device for Hydrogen from Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were to build pilot scale hydrogen separation systems for use in a gasification product stream. This device would demonstrate fabrication and manufacturing techniques for producing commercially ready facilities. The design was a 2 lb/day hydrogen device which included composite hydrogen separation membranes, a water gas shift monolith catalyst, and stainless steel structural components. Synkera Technologies was to prepare hydrogen separation membranes with metallic rims, and to adjust the alloy composition in their membranes to a palladium-gold composition which is sulfur resistant. Chart was to confirm their brazing technology for bonding the metallic rims of the composite membranes to their structural components and design and build the 2 lbs/day device incorporating membranes and catalysts. WRI prepared the catalysts and completed the testing of the membranes and devices on coal derived syngas. The reactor incorporated eighteen 2'' by 7'' composite palladium alloy membranes. These membranes were assembled with three stacks of three paired membranes. Initial vacuum testing and visual inspection indicated that some membranes were cracked, either in transportation or in testing. During replacement of the failed membranes, while pulling a vacuum on the back side of the membranes, folds were formed in the flexible composite membranes. In some instances these folds led to cracks, primarily at the interface between the alumina and the aluminum rim. The design of the 2 lb/day device was compromised by the lack of any membrane isolation. A leak in any membrane failed the entire device. A large number of tests were undertaken to bring the full 2 lb per day hydrogen capacity on line, but no single test lasted more than 48 hours. Subsequent tests to replace the mechanical seals with brazing have been promising, but the technology remains promising but not proven.

Barton, Tom

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Rock-eval data relating to oil-source potential of shales of New Albany group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Only limited data on petroleum source rock potential of New Albany Group (Devonian-Mississippian) shales have been reported, with the exception of vitrinite reflectance and some petrographic analyses. The New Albany Group contains the thickest and most widespread continuous black shale beds in the Illinois basin. The New Albany extends from northwestern Illinois to southwestern Indiana and western Kentucky and is thought to have played a major role in petroleum generation throughout the basin. In this study, Rock-Eval pyrolysis was used to measure the petroleum-generative potential and production index of the shale. Seven geochemical logs, based on 143 core samples from across the basin, and a production index map, based on a total of 252 samples (cuttings and cores) in Illinois, were generated. Systematic variations of petroleum-generative potential of the shale were observed. The variations are related to the differences in shale lithofacies, depth, and geographic location. The upper portion of the New Albany - the Hannibal and Saverton Shales - has the lowest oil-generative potential. The Grassy Creek, Sweetland Creek, and other stratigraphically lower shales of the New Albany Group generally have good oil-generative potential. However, samples from the Hicks dome area of extreme southern Illinois are overmature and have no oil-generative potential. Source rocks that have both good oil-generative potential (> 6 kg hydrocarbons per ton of rock) and a higher production index (> 0.09) are generally located at depths of 2,500-5,300 ft.

Chou, Mei-In M.; Dickerson, D.R.; Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Regional Variation in Water-Related Impacts of Shale Gas Development and Implications for Emerging International Plays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The manuscript also explores opportunities for emerging international shale plays to leverage the diverse experiences of U.S. states in formulating development strategies that minimize water-related impacts within their environmental, cultural, and political ecosystem. ... Despite this enhanced regulatory framework, there is public concern over lackluster enforcement in a country that is in need of new investment and energy resource development. ... Risks and Risk Governance in Unconventional Shale Gas Development ...

Meagan S. Mauter; Pedro J. J. Alvarez; Allen Burton; Diego C. Cafaro; Wei Chen; Kelvin B. Gregory; Guibin Jiang; Qilin Li; Jamie Pittock; Danny Reible; Jerald L. Schnoor

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Assessing water and environmental impacts of oil and gas projects in Nigeria.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Oil and gas development projects are major sources of social and environmental problems particularly in oil-rich developing countries like Nigeria. Yet, data paucity hinders our (more)

Anifowose, Babatunde A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the Piceance Basin of Colorado for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented gas/produced water separation process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Piceance Basin through literature surveys. Jack McIntyre`s tool separates produced water from gas and disposes of the water downhole into aquifers unused because of poor water quality, uneconomic lifting costs or poor aquifer deliverability. The beneficial aspects of this technology are two fold. The process increases the potential for recovering previously uneconomic gas resources by reducing produced water lifting, treatment and disposal costs. Of greater importance is the advantage of lessening the environmental impact of produced water by downhole disposal. Results from the survey indicate that research in the Piceance Basin includes studies of the geologic, hydrogeologic, conventional and unconventional recovery oil and gas technologies. Available information is mostly found centered upon the geology and hydrology for the Paleozoic and Mesozoic sediments. Lesser information is available on production technology because of the limited number of wells currently producing in the basin. Limited information is available on the baseline geochemistry of the coal/sand formation waters and that of the potential disposal zones. No determination was made of the compatibility of these waters. The study also indicates that water is often produced in variable quantities with gas from several gas productive formations which would indicate that there are potential applications for Jack McIntyre`s patented tool in the Piceance Basin.

Kieffer, F.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Electro- chemical Performance Using Multi-Phase Interfaces- University of Wisconsin Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by

319

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells-West Virginia University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/ NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. West Virginia University's (WVU) project will establish the tolerance limits of contaminant

320

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Investigations and Investigations and Rational Design of Durable High- Performance SOFC Cathodes- Georgia Institute of Technology Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/ NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of solid SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Cathode durability is critical to long-term SOFC performance for commercial deployment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unraveling the Role of Transport, Unraveling the Role of Transport, Electrocatalysis, and Surface Science in the SOFC Cathode Oxygen Reduction Reaction-Boston University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by

322

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes: Unraveling the Relationship among Structure, Surface Chemistry, and Oxygen Reduction-Boston University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture The Boston University (BU) project was competitively selected to acquire the fundamental

323

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cathode Surface Chemistry and Cathode Surface Chemistry and Optimization Studies-Carnegie Mellon University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) project was selected to acquire the fundamental knowledge and understanding that will facilitate research and development to enhance

324

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study of the Durability of Doped Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Based Cathode Materials under "Real World" Air Exposure Atmospheres- University of Connecticut Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO

325

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface-Modified Electrodes: Enhancing Surface-Modified Electrodes: Enhancing Performance Guided by In-Situ Spectroscopy and Microscopy- Stanford University Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. The electrochemical performance of SOFCs can be substantially influenced by mass and

326

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reliability and Durability of Materials Reliability and Durability of Materials and Components for SOFCs - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has a mission to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) program and systems coordination from the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), DOE/NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of SOFCs for both domestic coal and natural gas fueled central generation power systems that enable low cost, high efficiency, near-zero emissions and water usage, and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) project was selected to acquire the fundamental

327

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

K.A. Lokhandwala; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; C. Bailey; M. Jacobs; R. Baker; Membrane Group

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF A MEMBRANE PROCESS TO RECOVER HEAVY HYDROCARBONS AND TO REMOVE WATER FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to design, construct and field demonstrate a 3-MMscfd membrane system to recover natural gas liquids (NGL) and remove water from raw natural gas. An extended field test to demonstrate system performance under real-world conditions is required to convince industry users of the efficiency and reliability of the process. The system will be designed and fabricated by Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) and then installed and operated at British Petroleum (BP)-Amoco's Pascagoula, MS plant. The Gas Research Institute will partially support the field demonstration and BP-Amoco will help install the unit and provide onsite operators and utilities. The gas processed by the membrane system will meet pipeline specifications for dewpoint and Btu value and can be delivered without further treatment to the pipeline. Based on data from prior membrane module tests, the process is likely to be significantly less expensive than glycol dehydration followed by propane refrigeration, the principal competitive technology. At the end of this demonstration project the process will be ready for commercialization. The route to commercialization will be developed during this project and may involve collaboration with other companies already servicing the natural gas processing industry.

R. Baker; T. Hofmann; J. Kaschemekat; K.A. Lokhandwala; Membrane Group; Module Group; Systems Group

2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

329

CERIA-BASED WATER-GAS-SHIFT CATALYSTS S. Swartz, A-M. Azad, M. Seabaugh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on pure hydrogen or a hydrogen-rich gas with little or no carbon monoxide. In the near term, fuel cells used in fuel processors. This reaction increases the hydrogen content and reduces the carbon monoxide) to the reactor. The reactor section incorporates a bypass loop, which allows for baseline gas chromatograph

Azad, Abdul-Majeed

330

Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gray spots on the dark air-bubble surface (Fig. 2b shows a clean gas bubble and glass surface under the...lighting conditions). The ionic strength was 1.0 mM NaNO3 (pH 6...preferentially sorbed onto a trapped gas bubble relative to the nearby glass...

Jiamin Wan; John L. Wilson; Thomas L. Kieft

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

E-Print Network 3.0 - albany shale kentucky Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Engineering, West Virginia University Collection: Fossil Fuels 2 104 Int. J. Oil, Gas and Coal Technology, Vol. 4, No. 2, 2011 Copyright 2011 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd....

332

Life Cycle Water Consumption and Wastewater Generation Impacts of a Marcellus Shale Gas Well  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relative importance of water consumption was analyzed by integrating the method into the Eco-indicator-99 LCIA method. ...

Mohan Jiang; Chris T. Hendrickson; Jeanne M. VanBriesen

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Anisotropic Heat and Water Transport in a PEFC Cathode Gas Diffusion Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEFCs , owing to their high en- ergy efficiency, low emission, and low noise, are widely considered. In addition, the latent heat effects due to condensation/evaporation of water on the temperature and water ohmic losses. Along with water man- agement, thermal management is also a key to high performance

334

Metal/ceria water-gas shift catalysts for automotive polymer electrolyte fuel cell system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems are a leading candidate for replacing the internal combustion engine in light duty vehicles. One method of generating the hydrogen necessary for the PEFC is reforming a liquid fuel, such as methanol or gasoline, via partial oxidation, steam reforming, or autothermal reforming (a combination of partial oxidation and steam reforming). The H{sub 2}-rich reformate can contain as much as 10% carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide has been shown to poison the platinum-based anode catalyst at concentrations as low as 10 ppm,1 necessitating removal of CO to this level before passing the reformate to the fuel cell stack. The water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, CO + H{sub 2}O {rightleftharpoons} CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}, is used to convert the bulk of the reformate CO to CO{sub 2}. Industrially, the WGS reaction is conducted over two catalysts, which operate in different temperature regimes. One catalyst is a FeCr mixed oxide, which operates at 350-450 C and is termed the high-temperature shift (HTS) catalyst. The second catalyst is a CuZn mixed oxide, which operates at 200-250 C and is termed the low-temperature shift (LTS) catalyst. Although these two catalysts are used industrially in the production of H{sub 2} for ammonia synthesis, they have major drawbacks that make them unsuitable for transportation applications. Both the LTS and the HTS catalysts must first be ''activated'' before being used. For example, the copper in the copper oxide/zinc oxide LTS catalyst must first be reduced to elemental copper in situ before it becomes active for the WGS reaction. This reduction reaction is exothermic and must be carried out under well- controlled conditions using a dilute hydrogen stream (1 vol% H{sub 2}) to prevent high catalyst temperatures, which can result in sintering (agglomeration) of the copper particles and loss of active surface area for the WGS reaction. Also, once the catalyst has been activated by reduction, it must be protected from exposure to ambient air to prevent re-oxidation of the copper. The activated catalyst must also be protected from the condensation of liquids, for example, during start-up or transient operation. For these reasons, a more thermally rugged catalyst is needed which has sufficient activity to operate at the low temperatures that are thermodynamically necessary to achieve low CO concentrations.

Myers, D. J.; Krebs, J. F.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

335

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi...

You, Kehua

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

336

Heat Integration of the Water-Gas Shift Reaction System for Carbon Sequestration Ready IGCC Process with Chemical Looping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has been considered as an important alternative for efficient power systems that can reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. One of the technological schemes combines water-gas shift reaction and chemical-looping combustion as post gasification techniques in order to produce sequestration-ready CO2 and potentially reduce the size of the gas turbine. However, these schemes have not been energetically integrated and process synthesis techniques can be applied to obtain an optimal flowsheet. This work studies the heat exchange network synthesis (HENS) for the water-gas shift reaction train employing a set of alternative designs provided by Aspen energy analyzer (AEA) and combined in a process superstructure that was simulated in Aspen Plus (AP). This approach allows a rigorous evaluation of the alternative designs and their combinations avoiding all the AEA simplifications (linearized models of heat exchangers). A CAPE-OPEN compliant capability which makes use of a MINLP algorithm for sequential modular simulators was employed to obtain a heat exchange network that provided a cost of energy that was 27% lower than the base case. Highly influential parameters for the pos gasification technologies (i.e. CO/steam ratio, gasifier temperature and pressure) were calculated to obtain the minimum cost of energy while chemical looping parameters (oxidation and reduction temperature) were ensured to be satisfied.

Juan M. Salazara; Stephen E. Zitney; Urmila M. Diwekara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Interim report, 1994 Summer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP), seeks to evaluate new energy-saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This interim report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP and the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of a candidate energy-saving technology-a hot water heater conversion system to convert electrically heated hot water tanks to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Performance and economic evaluation of the seahorse natural gas hot water heater conversion at Fort Stewart. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal government is the largest single energy consumer in the United States with consumption of nearly 1.5 quads/year of energy (10{sup 15} quad = 1015 Btu) and cost valued at nearly $10 billion annually. The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) supports efforts to reduce energy use and associated expenses in the Federal sector. One such effort, the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP) seeks to evaluate new energy -- saving US technologies and secure their more timely adoption by the US government. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is one of four DOE laboratories that participate in the New Technologies Demonstration Program, providing technical expertise and equipment to evaluate new, energy-saving technologies being studied under that program. This report provides the results of a field evaluation that PNL conducted for DOE/FEMP with funding support from the US Department of Defense (DoD) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to examine the performance of 4 candidate energy-saving technology-a water heater conversion system to convert electrically powered water heaters to natural gas fuel. The unit was installed at a single residence at Fort Stewart, a US Army base in Georgia, and the performance was monitored under the NTDP. Participating in this effort under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) were Gas Fired Products, developers of the technology; the Public Service Company of North Carolina; Atlanta Gas Light Company; the Army Corps of Engineers; Fort Stewart; and Pacific Northwest Laboratory.

Winiarski, D.W.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12, 2014 (received for review November 27, 2013) Horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing have triggered by horizontal drilling or hydraulic fracturing. noble gas geochemistry | groundwater contamination and hydraulic fracturing have substantially increased hydrocarbon recovery from black shales and other

Jackson, Robert B.

340

Prevalence of dental erosion in adolescent competitive swimmers exposed to gas-chlorinated swimming pool water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the prevalence of dental erosion among competitive swimmers of the local swimming club in Szczecin, Poland, who train in closely monitored gas-chlorinated swimming pool wa...

J. Buczkowska-Radli?ska; R. ?agocka; W. Kaczmarek

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Developments of a powder-metallurgy, MZC copper-alloy, water-cooled gas turbine component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Department of Energy of the Federal Government has sponsored a technology development and verification testing program. This work is in support of an advanced, watercooled gas turbine firing at 2600 F (1427 ...

L. G. Peterson

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Water and gas coning: two and three phase system correlations for the critical oil production rate and optimum location of the completion interval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER AND GAS COMING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM LOCATION OF THE COMPLETION INTERVAL A Thesis by FRANCISCO MANUEL GONZALEZ, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering WATER AND GAS CONING: TWO AND THREE PHASE SYSTEM CORRELATIONS FOR THE CRITICAL OIL PRODUCTION RATE AND OPTIMUM...

Gonzalez, Francisco Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

343

Detachment of Liquid-Water Droplets from Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEMFC cathode where liquid-water is produced in the catalystcathode side of the PEMFC, causing less oxygen to reach the active catalyst

Das, Prodip K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Development of a gas backup heater for solar domestic hot-water systems. Final report, April 1978-April 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive program was undertaken to develop a unique gas fired backup for solar domestic hot water systems. Detailed computer design tools were written. A series of heat transfer experiments were performed to characterize the performance of individual components. A full scale engineering prototype, including the solar preheat tank and solar heat exchanger, was designed, fabricated and subjected to limited testing. Firing efficiency for the backup system was found to be 81.4% at a firing rate of 50,000 Btu/h. Long term standby losses should be negligible.

Morrison, D.J.; Grunes, H.E.; de Winter, F.; Armstrong, P.R.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Using of produced water associated with oil and gas production as a source of hydrogen: solar electrolysis cell application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract In frame of the growing global concerns regarding to the high extent of environmental pollution and its serious consequences on the future of the planet. The seek out for a proper source of clean energy is considered to be a top priority. Where a substantial reduction in a present reliance on fossil fuels is achieved. This objective can not be factual without intensive efforts to find out the appropriate alternative, which are the sustainable and environmentally friendly energy alternatives. The use of hydrogen as an alternative fuel is gaining more and more acceptance as the environmental impact of hydrocarbons becomes more evident. The using of enormous amount of a polluted produced water associated oil and gas production activities to generate the hydrogen by solar hydrolysis cell, is considered to be a multi advantages alternative, where the volume of polluted and environmentally risky water been reduced and a significant volume of hydrogen been gained. This work is an attempt to design of a hydrogen generating station by water electrolysis whose energy resources are solar. The electricity supply is done by photovoltaic cells. The novelty of this work is the using of produced water to generate a clean energy (hydrogen), and in the same time reducing the threats caused by the disposal pits of the vast volume of the produced water at oilfields, which is the biggest challenge to the oil industry and the environment. In this work, the produced water has been electrolyzed by using solar energy. Standard chemical analyses methods have followed to determine the pollutants constitutes in this water. A pilot plant of

Maher A. R; Sadiq Al-baghdadi; Hashim R. Abdolhamid B; Omar A. Mkhatresh B

346

Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Wilson, J. T., L. E. Leach, M. Henson, and J. N. Jones. 1986. In situ biorestoration as a ground water remediation technique. Ground Water Monit. Rev. 6:56-64. 45. Yates, M. V., C. P. Gerba, and L. M. Kelly. 1985. Virus...

Jiamin Wan; John L. Wilson; Thomas L. Kieft

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Average Reservoir Fluid Pro erties Before Break- Through Ultimate Economic Re cover Fraction OIP 1(a) (b) (c) 2(a) (b) (c) 3(a) (b) (c) (b) (c) (d) 5(*) (b) (c} 6(a) (b) (c) 3800 4200 4600 3800 4200 4600 3800 4ZOO 4600 3000...-through recovery of 75 per cent. Nitrogen resulted in an 81 per cent break- through recovery, after reaching miscibility at 4160 psi. Although nitrogen gave a higher break-through recovery than flue gas, flue gas 25 0. 80 4600 psi 4200 psi f4 0 0 0 'g 4...

Maxwell, H. D.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

348

A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organic matter was carried out at elevated temperature and pressure after collection of a large number of samples. The resulting carbon dioxide was flushed through a gas chromatograph with helium as the carrier gas and the signal was recorded on a strip... chart recorder. Chromatographic analysis time was approximately eleven minutes per sample with a precision of + Q. 1 mg C/l. The organic carbon content of the sample was determined by measurement of the peak area using an appropriate carbon dioxide...

Fredericks, Alan D

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Investigation of Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects of Coal Effects of Coal and Biomass Contaminants on the Performance of Water-Gas-Shift and Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Background Coal-Biomass-to-Liquids (CBTL) processes gasify coal, biomass, and mixtures of coal/ biomass to produce synthesis gas (syngas) that can be converted to liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Positive benefits of these processes include the use of feedstocks from domestic sources and lower greenhouse gas production than can be achieved from using conventional petroleum-based fuels. However, syngas generated by coal and biomass co-gasification contains a myriad of trace contaminants that may poison the water- gas-shift (WGS) and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts used in the gas-to-liquid processes. While the effect of coal contaminants on FT processes is well studied, more research

350

Gas-liquid-liquid equilibria in mixtures of water, light gases, and hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase equilibrium in mixtures of water + light gases and water + heavy hydrocarbons has been investigated with the development of new local composition theory, new equations of state, and new experimental data. The preferential segregation and orientation of molecules due to different energies of molecular interaction has been simulated with square well molecules. Extensive simulation has been made for pure square well fluids and mixtures to find the local composition at wide ranges of states. A theory of local composition has been developed and an equation of state has been obtained for square well fluids. The new local composition theory has been embedded in several equations of state. The pressure of water is decoupled into a polar pressure and non-polar pressure according to the molecular model of water of Jorgensen et al. The polar pressure of water is combined with the BACK equation for the general description of polar fluids and their mixtures. Being derived from the steam table, the Augmented BACK equation is particularly suited for mixtures of water + non-polar substances such as the hydrocarbons. The hydrophobic character of the hydrocarbons had made their mixtures with water a special challenge. A new group contribution equation of state is developed to describe phase equilibrium and volumetric behavior of fluids while requiring only to know the molecular structure of the components. 15 refs., 1 fig.

Chao, K.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

TRIF Water Sustainability Program Fellowship Report Destruction of Gas-Phase VOCs by a Coupled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are also widely employed for the remediation of sediment for recovered gas treatment was installed at the site as an interim remediation scheme while the Remedial-test this innovative technology perhaps leading to considerable cost savings without sacrificing the broad

Fay, Noah

352

Universal model for water costs of gas exchange by animals and plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial animals and plants exchange O2 and CO2 with the atmosphere and thereby incur costs in the currency Hemphill Brown, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, and approved March 30, 2010 (received for review), the steepness of the gradients for gas and vapor, and the transport mode (convective or diffusive). Model

353

Water-gas Shift Reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational Catalyst Screening from Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO{sub 2}/Cu(111), ZrO{sub 2}/Cu(111) < MoO{sub 3}/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

Liu, P.

2010-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Performance of Gas-fired Water Heaters in a 10-home Field Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation was given at the Summer 2012 DOE Building America meeting on July 25, 2012, and addressed the question "Are high-efficiency hot water heating systems worth the cost?"

355

Water in Alberta With Special Focus on the Oil and Gas Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tom Jack Gregor Wolbring Calgary-Canada May 2011 #12;2 Contents 1. Introduction......................................................................................................25 Wind and Solar Energy...........................................................................................................................25 Water Use for Wind and Solar Energy [73]..........................................

Gieg, Lisa

356

Structure Sensitivity of the Low-temperature Water-gas Shift Reaction on CuCeO2 catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the structure sensitivity of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts prepared at the nanoscale by different techniques. On the surface of ceria, different CuO{sub x} structures exist. We show here that only the strongly bound Cu-[O{sub x}]-Ce species, probably associated with the surface oxygen vacancies of ceria, are active for catalyzing the low-temperature WGS reaction. Weakly bound CuO{sub x} clusters and CuO nanoparticles are spectator species in the reaction. Isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions doping the ceria surface are not active themselves, but they are important in that they create oxygen vacancies and can be used as a reservoir of copper to replenish surface Cu removed by leaching or sintering. Accordingly, synthesis techniques such as coprecipitation that allow for extensive solubility of Cu in ceria should be preferred over impregnation, deposition-precipitation, ion exchange or another two-step method whereby the copper precursor is added to already made ceria nanocrystals. For the synthesis of different structures, we have used two methods: a homogeneous coprecipitation (CP), involving hexamethylenetetramine as the precipitating agent and the pH buffer; and a deposition-precipitation (DP) technique. In the latter case, the ceria supports were first synthesized at the nanoscale with different shapes (rods, cubes) to investigate any potential shape effect on the reaction. Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts with different copper contents up to ca. 20 at.% were prepared. An indirect shape effect of CeO{sub 2}, manifested by the propensity to form oxygen vacancies and strongly bind copper in the active form, was established; i.e. the water-gas shift reaction is not structure-sensitive. The apparent activation energy of the reaction on all samples was similar, 50 {+-} 10 kJ/mol, in a product-free (2% CO-10% H{sub 2}O) gas mixture.

Si, R.; Zhang, L.; Raitano, J.; Yi, N.; Chan, S.-W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

The distribution and association of trace elements in the bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution and association of trace elements in bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe x-ray fluorescence (EMP-XRF), liquid chromatography, ultra-violet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The kerogen was found to contain several HCl/HF resistant minerals (determined by XRD), including pyrite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, rutile, and anatase, and the neoformed mineral ralstonite. Kerogens (prepared at UNOCAL, CA) which were fractionated in an aqueous ZnBr[sub 2] solution were found to contain [approximately]20% less acid-resistant minerals than traditional' HCl/HF isolated kerogens and were contaminated with Zn and Br. Kerogens (prepared at the University of Munich) treated with SnCl[sub 2]/H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] at 150-270[degrees]C (Kiba) and/or SnCl[sub 2]/HCl at 110[degrees]C were found to contain <10% of their original pyrite/marcasite (FeS[sub 2]), but were contaminated with large amounts of Sn. The Kiba treatment also appeared to demetallate Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins. The inorganic and organic associations of trace elements in New Albany kerogen were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue ([approximately]85% FeS[sub 2]) obtained through density separations. The degree of association of several elements (As, Co, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, and Se) with FeS[sub 2] was determined through the analysis of individual mineral grains by EMP-XRF and by analysis of the mineral residue treated with dilute HNO[sub 3] to remove FeS[sub 2]. These studies indicated that essentially all of the V and [approximately]95% of the Ni present in New Albany kerogen is organically associated. Methods which are designed to account for the inorganic associations of trace elements in kerogens, including methods based on physical methods of separation, chemical removal of FeS[sub 2], EMP-XRF and low temperature ashing, are compared.

Mercer, G.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Liquid Water Transport in Gas Diffusion Layer of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In addition, at high current densities, excessive amount of water is generated and condenses, filling as a promising candidate for high-efficiency, low-emission power sources. High-current-density operation of PEFCs, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA High-current-density performance

360

STATE OF NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE THREE EMPIRE STATE PLAZA, ALBANY, NY 12223-1350  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE NEW YORK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE THREE EMPIRE STATE PLAZA, ALBANY, NY 12223-1350 www.dps.ny.gov PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSIO~ PETER McGOWAN GARRY A. BROWN General Counsel Chairman PATRICIA L. ACAMPORA MAUREEN F. HARRIS JACLYN A, BRILLING ROBERT E. CURRY JR. Secretary JAMES L. LAROCCA Commissioners January 31, 2012 FILED ELECTRONICALLY @ http://energy.gov/oelcongestion-study-2012 Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. i0585 Re: Preparation ofthe 2012 Congestion Study Dear Sir or Madam: I am writing in response to the Notice of Regional Workshops and Request For Written Comments, 76 Federal Register No. 218, 70122 (November 10,2011). Enclosed please find the comments of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Generating Singlet Oxygen Bubbles: A New Mechanism for GasLiquid Oxidations in Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Our interest in developing a singlet oxygen [1O2 (1?g)]-sparging reactor came from small-scale devices for disinfection of, for example, municipal and well water, but which used filtration, ozone, and/or UV light. ... In front of the A10449 mechanical shutter of the detector was placed either a 25-mm-diameter, 1150 nm long pass filter (FEL1150, Thorlabs Inc.) or one of three 25-mm-diameter NIR bandpass filters centered at 1220, 1270, and 1315 nm (OD4 blocking, fwhm = 15 nm, Omega, Brattleboro, VT). ... (19) Drying of the composite was done at 50 C for 10 h to avoid destruction of the confined phthalocyanine molecules, producing an aerogel that shrunk ?10% where some, but not all adsorbed water was removed. ...

Dorota Bartusik; David Aebisher; BiBi Ghafari; Alan M. Lyons; Alexander Greer

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Density Functional Theory and Reaction Kinetics Studies of the WaterGas Shift Reaction on PtRe Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations (DFT-GGA-PW91) on Pt(111) and Pt3Re(111) surfaces, reaction kinetics measurements, and microkinetic modeling are employed to study the mechanism of the watergas shift (WGS) reaction over Pt and PtRe catalysts. The values of the reaction rates and reaction orders predicted by the model are in agreement with the ones experimentally determined; the calculated apparent activation energies are matched to within 6% of the experimental values. The primary reaction pathway is predicted to take place through adsorbed carboxyl (COOH) species, whereas formate (HCOO) is predicted to be a spectator species. We conclude that the clean Pt(111) is a good representation of the active site for the WGS reaction on Pt catalysts, whereas the active sites on the PtRe alloy catalyst likely contain partially oxidized metal ensembles.

Carrasquillo-Flores, Ronald; Gallo, Jean Marcel R.; Hahn, Konstanze; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Considerations and Environmental Considerations and Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment- University of North Dakota Background Cooling airfoil leading edges of modern first stage gas turbine vanes presents a con- siderable challenge due to the aggressive heat transfer environment and efficiency penalties related to turbine hot gas path cooling. This environment is made more complex when natural gas is replaced by high hydrogen fuels (HHF) such as synthesis gas (syngas) derived from coal gasification with higher expected levels of impurities. In this project the University of North Dakota (UND) and The Ohio State University (OSU) will explore technology opportunities to improve the reliability of HHF gas turbines by analyzing the effects

365

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Low-Swirl Injectors for Hydrogen Gas Turbines in Near-Zero Emissions Coal Power Plants-Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Background The U.S. Department of Energy Hy(DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is leading a project in partnership with gas turbine manufacturers and universities to develop a robust ultra-low emission combustor for gas turbines that burn high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from gasification of coal. A high efficiency and ultra-low emissions HHC fueled gas turbine is a key component of a near-zero emis- sions integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) clean coal power plant. This project is managed by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). NETL is researching advanced turbine technology with the goal of producing reliable,

366

Stopping a water crossflow in a sour-gas producing well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lacq is a sour-gas field in southwest France. After maximum production of 774 MMcf/D in the 1970`s, production is now 290 MMcf/D, with a reservoir pressure of 712 psi. Despite the loss of pressure, production is maintained by adapting the surface equipment and well architecture to reservoir conditions. The original 5-in. production tubing is being replaced with 7-in. tubing to sustain production rates. During openhole cleaning, the casing collapsed in Well LA141. The primary objective was to plug all possible hydraulic communication paths into the lower zones. The following options were available: (1) re-entering the well from the top and pulling the fish before setting cement plugs; (2) sidetracking the well; and (3) drilling a relief well to intercept Well LA141 above the reservoirs. The decision was made to start with the first option and switch to a sidetrack if this option failed.

Hello, Y. Le [Elf Aquitaine Production (Norway); Woodruff, J. [John Wight Co. (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors: A preliminary assessment of experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6 and KORA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of water vapor on the release of fission gas from the fuel elements of high temperature, gas-cooled reactors has been measured in different laboratories under both irradiation and post irradiation conditions. The data from experiments HRB-17, HFR-B1, HFR-K6, and in the KORA facility are compared to assess their consistency and complimentarily. The experiments are consistent under comparable experimental conditions and reveal two general mechanisms involving exposed fuel kernels embedded in carbonaceous materials. One is manifest as a strong dependence of fission gas release on the partial pressure of water vapor below 1 kPa and the other, as a weak dependence above 1 kPa.

Myers, B.F.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Leads Collaborative Effort DOE Leads Collaborative Effort to Quantify Environmental Changes that Coincide with Shale Gas Development Background DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a joint industry/ government research project to document environmental changes that occur during the lifecycle of shale gas development. The research plan calls for one year of environmental monitoring before development takes place to establish baseline conditions and account for seasonal variations. Monitoring then will continue through the different stages of unconventional shale gas development including: road and pad construction, drilling, and hydraulic fracturing, and for at least one year of subsequent production operations. The study will take place at a Range Resources-Appalachia

370

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Local and Regional Air on Local and Regional Air Quality Impacts of Oil and Natural Gas Development Goal The NETL research effort in improving the assessment of impacts to air quality from oil and gas exploration and production activities has the following goals: (1) using NETL's mobile air monitoring laboratory, conduct targeted on-site measurements of emissions from oil and gas production activities that may impact the environment and (2) use collected data in atmospheric chemistry and transport models to further understanding of local and regional air quality impacts. Background The development of shale gas and shale oil resources requires horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing, two processes that have been known for many years but have only recently become common practice. In addition, fugitive atmospheric

372

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Filtration to Improve Single Filtration to Improve Single Crystal Casting Yield-Mikro Systems Background Single crystal (SX) nickel superalloys are a primary material choice for gas turbine hot gas path component castings because of their high resistance to deformation at elevated temperatures. However, the casting yields of these components need to be improved in order to reduce costs and encourage more widespread use within the gas turbine industry. Low yields have been associated with a number of process-related defects common to the conventional casting of SX components. One innovative improvement, advanced casting filter designs, has been identified as a potential path toward increasing the yield rates of SX castings for high-temperature gas turbine applications. Mikro Systems, Inc. (Mikro) proposes to increase SX casting yields by developing

373

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology- University of Texas at El Paso Background Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are protective layers of low thermal conductivity ceramic refractory material that protect gas turbine components from high temperature exposure. TBCs improve efficiency by allowing gas turbine components to operate at higher temperatures and are critical to future advanced coal-based power generation systems. Next generation gas turbine engines must tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of coal-derived synthesis gasses (syngas) with high hydrogen content. This will require TBCs to withstand surface temperatures much higher than those currently experienced by standard materials. In this project the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP)

374

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent Technology Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Capture Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic temperatures and practical CO 2 loading volumes. Current technologies that are effective at separating CO 2 from typical CO 2 -containing gas mixtures, such as coal-derived shifted synthesis gas (syngas), are both capital and energy intensive. Research and development is being conducted to identify technologies that will provide improved economics and

375

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Thermal Gas Turbine Thermal Performance-Ames Laboratory Background Developing turbine technologies to operate on coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), hydrogen fuels, and oxy-fuels is critical to the development of advanced power gener-ation technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle and the deployment of near-zero-emission type power plants with capture and separation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's

376

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Degradation of TBC Systems in Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems- University of Pittsburgh Background The conditions inside integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems, such as high steam levels from hydrogen firing, high carbon dioxide steam mixtures in oxy- fired systems, and different types of contaminants, introduce complexities associated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) durability that are currently unresolved. In this work the University of Pittsburgh will team with Praxair Surface Technologies (PST) to deter- mine the degradation mechanisms of current state-of-the-art TBCs in environments consisting of deposits and gas mixtures that are representative of gas turbines using coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas).

377

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High- Hydrogen Fuels-Pennsylvania State University Background Combustion dynamics is a major technical challenge to the development of efficient, low emission gas turbines. Current information is limited to single-nozzle combustors operating on natural gas and neglects combustors with configurations expected to meet operability requirements using a range of gaseous fuels such as coal derived synthesis gas (syngas). In this project, Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) in collaboration with Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech) will use multiple-nozzle research facilities to recreate flow conditions in an actual gas turbine to study complicated interactions between flames that can aggravate the combustion dynamics in syngas-

378

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant-and water-injected hydraulic fractures, Carthage Cotton Valley gas field, East Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of microseismicity induced by gel-proppant- and water-injected hydraulic fractures induced during a series of hydraulic fracture completions within the Cotton Valley formation of East Texas a series of hydraulic fracture imaging tests in the Carthage Cotton Valley gas field of East Texas (Walker

379

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Dynamic Model: H2S Absorption/Stripping, Water?Gas Shift Reactors, and CO2 Absorption/Stripping ... Future chemical plants may be required to have much higher flexibility and agility than existing process facilities in order to be able to handle new hybrid combinations of power and chemical units. ...

Patrick J. Robinson; William L. Luyben

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Book Review: Hegel's Absolute: An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit Verene, D.P. State University of New York Press, Albany, 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Book Reviews 63 Hegel's Absolute: An Introduction to Reading the Phenomenology of Spirit Verene, D.P. State University of New York Press, Albany, 2007 Review by Fabio Escobar Castelli, Erie Community College Donald Phillip Verene's latest work... on Hegel is a precise and brief contribution to the "Introduction to Hegel" scholarship. As an exercise in brevity, its summation of the Phenomenology is a laud able triumph. As a skeletal presentation of the Notion on its road of despair, however...

Castelli, Fabio Escobar

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program Alabama Gas Corporation - Residential Natural Gas Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (Replacement): $200 Dryer (Replacement): $100 Natural Gas Range/Cooktop (Replacement): $100 Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Tankless Water Heaters (Replacement): $200 Provider Alabama Gas Corporation Alabama Gas Corporation (Alagasco) offers various rebates to its residential customers who replace older furnaces, water heaters, cooktops, ranges and clothes dryers with new, efficient equipment. All equipment

382

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Unconventional Resources Unconventional Resources Background Natural gas and crude oil provide two-thirds of our Nation's primary energy supply and will continue to do so for at least the next several decades, as the Nation transitions to a more sustainable energy future. The natural gas resource estimated to exist within the United States has expanded significantly, but because this resource is increasingly harder to locate and produce, new technologies are required to extract it. Under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, the National Energy Technology Laboratory is charged with developing a complementary research program supportive of improving safety and minimizing the environmental impacts of activities related to unconventional natural gas and other petroleum resource exploration and production technology

383

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors and Control Sensors and Control CONTACTS Ben Chorpening Sensors & Controls Technical Team Coordinator 304-285-4673 benjamin.chorpening@netl.doe.gov Steven Woodruff Principal Investigator 304-285-4175 steven.woodruff@netl.doe.gov Michael Buric Co-Principal Investigator 304-285-2052 michael.buric@netl.doe.gov Raman Gas Composition Sensor System for Natural Gas and Syngas Applications Goal The goal of this project is to develop and test a Raman laser spectroscopy system for responsive gas composition monitoring, and to transfer the technology to industry for commercial implementation. The instrument provides state-of-the-art improvement of reduced size and increased sensitivity and sample rate to facilitate the process control

384

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Measurement of gas/water uptake coefficients for trace gases active in the marine environment. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ocean produced reduced sulfur compounds including dimethylsulfide (DMS), hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}), methyl mercaptan (CH{sub 3}CH) and carbonyl sulfide (OCS) deliver a sulfur burden to the atmosphere which is roughly equal to sulfur oxides produced by fossil fuel combustion. These species and their oxidation products dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl sulfone (DMSO{sub 2}) and methane sulfonic acid (MSA) dominate aerosol and CCN production in clean marine air. Furthermore, oxidation of reduced sulfur species will be strongly influenced by NO{sub x}/O{sub 3} chemistry in marine atmospheres. The multiphase chemical processes for these species must be understood in order to study the evolving role of combustion produced sulfur oxides over the oceans. We have measured the chemical and physical parameters affecting the uptake of reduced sulfur compounds, their oxidation products, ozone, and nitrogen oxides by the ocean`s surface, and marine clouds, fogs, and aerosols. These parameters include: gas/surface mass accommodation coefficients; physical and chemically modified (effective) Henry`s law constants; and surface and liquid phase reaction constants. These parameters are critical to understanding both the interaction of gaseous trace species with cloud and fog droplets and the deposition of trace gaseous species to dew covered, fresh water and marine surfaces.

Davidovits, P. [Boston Coll., Chestnut Hill, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Worsnop, D.W.; Zahniser, M.S.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The synergistic effect of the structural precursors of Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts for watergas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts (Cu/Zn=1, Al=424mol%) prepared by co-precipitation were investigated for low-temperature watergas shift reaction (WGSR) in H2-rich feed gas and characterized by means of XRD, DSC and TPR. The synergistic effect of the structural precursors was detected in catalyst containing Al level of 12mol%, in which CO conversion reaches to 97.5% at 513K. It suggests that aurichalcite has been partially intercalated into the hydrotalcite and assimilated the surrounding structure during precipitation, which eventually enhances the interaction between the active centers and supports of the catalyst.

Wei Fu; Zhenghong Bao; Weizhong Ding; Kuochih Chou; Qian Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Design of Computational Materials Design of Castable SX Ni-based Superalloys for IGT Blade Components-QuesTek Innovations Background Higher inlet gas temperatures in industrial gas turbines (IGTs) enable improved thermal efficiencies, but creep-the tendency of materials to deform gradually under stress-becomes more pronounced with increasing temperature. In order to raise inlet temperatures of IGTs, turbine blade materials are required to have superior creep rupture resistance. Nickel (Ni)-based single crystal (SX) blades have higher creep strength in comparison with directionally solidified blades and are widely used in aerospace engines. However, their use in IGTs, which require larger-size castings (two to three times the size needed in aerospace applications), is limited

388

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology to Mitigate Syngas Technology to Mitigate Syngas Cooler Fouling Background Coal gasification, in conjunction with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power production, is under development to increase efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas emissions associated with coal-based power production. However, coal gasification plants have not achieved their full potential for superior performance and economics due to challenges with reliability and availability. In particular, performance of the syngas cooler located downstream of the gasifier has been an issue. The syngas cooler is a fire tube heat exchanger located between the gasifier and the gas turbine. The purpose of the syngas cooler is to cool the raw syngas from the gasifier and recover heat. Although

389

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Studies to Enable Robust, Studies to Enable Robust, Reliable, Low Emission Gas Turbine Combustion of High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of Michigan Background The University of Michigan will perform experimental and computational studies which can provide an improved and robust understanding of the reaction kinetics and other fundamental characteristics of combustion of high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels that are vital to advancing HHC turbine design and to making coal gasification power plants environmentally sustainable and cost- competitive. The scope of work includes Rapid Compression Facility (RCF) studies of HHC ignition delay times and hydroxyl radical (OH) time-histories, flame speeds, and flammability limits. A range of temperatures, pressures, and test gas mixture compositions will

390

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment of Factors Influencing Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO2 Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

391

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological & Environmental Sciences Geological & Environmental Sciences Subsurface Experimental Laboratories Autoclave and Core Flow Test Facilities Description Researchers at NETL study subsurface systems in order to better characterize and understand gas-fluid-rock and material interactions that impact environmental and resource issues related to oil, gas, and CO2 storage development. However, studying the wide variety of subsurface environments related to hydrocarbon and CO2 systems requires costly and technically challenging tools and techniques. As a result, NETL's Experimental Laboratory encompasses multi-functional, state-of-the-art facilities that perform a wide spectrum of geological studies providing an experimental basis for modeling of various subsurface phenomena and processes. This includes, but is not

392

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Improving Durability of Turbine Components through Trenched Film Cooling and Contoured Endwalls-University of Texas at Austin Background Gas turbine operation utilizing coal-derived high hydrogen fuels (synthesis gas, or syngas) requires new cooling configurations for turbine components. The use of syngas is likely to lead to degraded cooling performance resulting from rougher surfaces and partial blockage of film cooling holes. In this project the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in cooperation with The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) will investigate the development of new film cooling and endwall cooling designs for maximum performance when subjected to high levels of contaminant depositions. This project was competitively selected under the University Turbine Systems Research

393

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Demonstration of Enabling Spar-Shell Cooling Technology in Gas Turbines - Florida Turbine Technologies Background The Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT) spar-shell gas turbine airfoil concept has an internal structural support (the spar) and an external covering (the shell). This concept allows the thermal-mechanical and aerodynamic requirements of the airfoil design to be considered separately, thereby enabling the overall design to be optimized for the harsh environment these parts are exposed to during operation. Such optimization is one of the major advantages of the spar-shell approach that is not possible with today's conventional monolithic turbine components. The proposed design integrates a novel cooling approach based on Advanced Recircu-

394

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

29,759 29,759 PROJECT NUMBER FWP-2012.03.03 Task 3 Conversion and Fouling Background Coal and biomass gasification is an approach to cleaner power generation and other uses of these resources. Currently, the service life of gasifiers does not meet the performance needs of users. Gasifiers fail to achieve on-line availability of 85-95 percent in utility applications and 95 percent in applications such as chemical production. The inability to meet these goals has created a potential roadblock to widespread acceptance and commercialization of advanced gasification technologies. Gasifier output is a hot gas mixture consisting primarily of hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), known as synthesis gas (syngas). The syngas cooler is one of the key components identified as negatively impacting gasifier availability. Ash originating from impurities

395

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Thermal Barrier Coatings for Operation in High Hydrogen Content Fueled Gas Turbines-Stony Brook University Background Traditional thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) based on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) will likely not be suitable in gas turbines used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. This is due to higher operating temperatures that will not only affect phase stability and sintering but will accelerate corrosive degradation phenomena. Coatings provide a framework to combat degradation issues and provide performance improvements needed for higher temperature environments. The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University, in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology, is investigating science and

396

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Enhancement Through a Vacuum-assisted Infiltration- Materials and Systems Research, Inc. Background Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology promises to provide an efficient method to generate electricity from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), biofuels, and natural gas. The typical SOFC composite cathode (current source) possesses excellent performance characteristics but is subject to chemical stability issues at elevated temperatures both during manufacturing and power generation. Costs attributed to the cathode and its long-term stability issues are a current limitation of SOFC technologies. These must be addressed before commercial SOFC power generation can be realized. Materials and Systems Research, Inc. (MSRI) will develop a vacuum-assisted infiltration

397

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comprehensive Comprehensive Monitoring Techniques to Verify the Integrity of Geological Storage Reservoirs Containing Carbon Dioxide Background Research aimed at monitoring the long-term storage stability and integrity of carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations is one of the most pressing areas of need if geological storage is to become a significant factor in meeting the United States' stated objectives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The most promising geologic formations under consideration for CO2 storage are active and depleted oil and gas formations, brine formations, and deep, unmineable coal seams. Unfortunately, the long-term CO2 storage capabilities of these formations are not yet well understood. Primary Project Goal The goal of this effort is to develop

398

Tectonic and flexural significance of Middle Devonian graben-fill sequence in new Albany shale, central Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third tectonic phase of the Acadian orogeny began in the late Middle Devonian, and the sedimentary record of that event is largely restricted to the deeper, more proximal portions of the Appalachian foreland and Illinois intercratonic basins. Much of the intervening area, on and near the Cincinnati arch, was uplifted and subjected to erosion by movement on the peripheral bulge accompanying the initiation of the third tectonic phase. However, bulge movement also reactivated basement fault systems in Kentucky and created a series of grabens that were filled with eroded sediments and debris flows from adjacent horsts. Although rarely preserved, a buried Devonian graben along Carpenter Fork in Boyle County, central Kentucky, reveals such a sequence. The graben is bounded by upthrown blocks of Middle Devonian Boyle Dolomite, which also floors the graben. Within the graben a black-shale unit, apparently absent elsewhere, conformably overlies the Boyle and grades upward into debris-flow deposits represented by the Duffin breccia facies of the New Albany Shale. The Duffin contains clasts of the shale, as well as of chert, silicified fossils, and fine to boulder-size dolostone clasts eroded from the Boyle high on the flanks of the graben. The underlying shale also exhibits evidence of penecontemporaneous soft-sediment deformation related to the debris-flow emplacement of Boyle residue in the graben and due to later loading by the Duffin.

Barnett, S.F.; Ettensohn, F.R.; Mellon, C. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Non-Thermal Plasma for Fossil Energy Related Applications Background The U.S. Department of Energy is investigating various non-thermal plasma tech- nologies for their catalytic properties related to fossil energy conversion and carbon dioxide decomposition. Non-thermal plasma is an ionized gas comprised of a mixture of charged particles (electrons, ions), active chemical radicals (O 3 , O, OH), and highly excited species that are known to accelerate reforming reactions in

400

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Methanol Economy Methanol Economy Background Fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas are composed of hydrocarbons with varying ratios of carbon and hydrogen. Consumption of hydrocarbons derived from fossil fuels is integral to modern day life in the U.S. Hydrocarbons are used as fuels and raw materials in the transportation sector and in many industrial production processes including chemicals, petrochemicals, plastics, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and rubber.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Water Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coal bed methane (CBM) gas recovery techniques are unique compared to other production methods. Formation water must be removed, or dewatered as it holds the methane gas in the coal seam by hydrostatic pressure...

Alireza Bahadori; Malcolm Clark; Bill Boyd

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Conductivity, High Thermal Conductivity, High Durability Thermal Barrier Coatings for IGCC Environments-University of Connecticut Background Improved turbine materials are needed to withstand higher component surface temperatures and water vapor content for successful development and deployment of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) in particular are required to have higher surface temperature capability, lower thermal conductivity, and resistance to attack at high temperature by contaminants such as calcium-magnesium-alumina-silicate (CMAS) and water vapor. There is also a concurrent need to address cost and availability issues associated with rare earth elements used in all low thermal conductivity TBCs.

404

Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas, which method comprises: (a) contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate of the formula: ##STR1## wherein the water-soluble organic compound is selected from compounds of the formula: ##STR2## wherein: R is selected from hydrogen or an organic moiety having at least one polar functional group; Z is selected from oxygen, sulfur, or --N--A wherein N is nitrogen and A is hydrogen or lower alkyl having from one to four carbon atoms; and M is selected from hydrogen, sodium or potassium; and n is 1 or 2, in a contacting zone for a time and at a temperature effective to reduce the nitrogen monoxide. These mixtures are useful to provide an unexpensive method of removing NO from gases, thus reducing atmospheric pollution from flue gases.

Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification Characteristics of Gasification Characteristics of Coal/Biomass Mixed Fuels Background Domestically abundant coal is a primary energy source and when mixed with optimum levels of biomass during the production of liquid fuels may have lower carbon footprints compared to petroleum fuel baselines. Coal and biomass mixtures are converted via gasification into synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of predominantly carbon monoxide and hydrogen, which can be subsequently converted to liquid fuels by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting research focused on using coal and biomass to produce clean and affordable power, fuels and chemicals. The DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is partnering with Leland Stanford Junior

406

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Geotechnical Site and Geotechnical Site Investigations for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility in an Underground Mine in the Keweenaw Basalts Background Fundamental and applied research on carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies is necessary in preparation for future commercial deployment. These technologies offer great potential for mitigating carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions into the atmosphere without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Deploying these technologies in commercial-scale applications requires a significantly expanded workforce trained in various CCUS technical and non-technical disciplines that are currently under-represented in the United States. Education and training

407

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Processes Electrochemical Processes for CO2 Capture and Conversion to Commodity Chemicals Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the

408

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

r r oj e c t Fac t s Advanced Research Micro-Structured Sapphire Fiber Sensors for Simultaneous Measurements of High Temperature and Dynamic Gas Pressure in Harsh Environments Background Securing a sustainable energy economy by developing affordable and clean energy from coal and other fossil fuels is central to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). To further this mission, NETL funds research and development of novel sensors that can function under the

409

Effective MgO surface doping of Cu/Zn/Al oxides as watergas shift catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace amounts of MgO were doped on Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts with the Cu/Zn/Al molar ratio of 45/45/10 and tested for the watergas shift (WGS) reaction. A mixture of Zn(Cu)Al hydrotalcite (HT) and Cu/Zn aurichalcite was prepared by co-precipitation (cp) of the metal nitrates and calcined at 300C to form the catalyst precursor. When the precursor was dispersed in an aqueous solution of Mg(II) nitrate, HT was reconstituted by the memory effect. During this procedure, the catalyst particle surface was modified by MgO-doping, leading to a high sustainability. Contrarily, cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al prepared by Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Al3+ co-precipitation as a control exhibited high activity but low sustainability. Mg2+ ions were enriched in the surface layer of m-MgCu/Zn/Al, whereas Mg2+ ions were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles of cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al. CuO particles were significantly sintered on the m-catalyst during the dispersion, whereas CuO particles were highly dispersed on the cp-catalyst. However, the m-catalyst was more sustainable against sintering than the cp-catalyst. Judging from TOF, the surface doping of MgO more efficiently enhanced an intrinsic activity of the m-catalyst than the cp-catalyst. Trace amounts of MgO on the catalyst surface were enough to enhance both activity and sustainability of the m-catalyst by accelerating the reductionoxidation between Cu0 and Cu+ and by suppressing Cu0 (or Cu+) oxidation to Cu2+.

Kazufumi Nishida; Dalin Li; Yingying Zhan; Tetsuya Shishido; Yasunori Oumi; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

In Situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts Michael Estrella,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of the Pt electrode in fuel cell systems. In order to get clean hydrogen for fuel cells and otherIn Situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts Michael Estrella, LauraVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 19, 2009 Mixtures of copper and iron oxides are used as industrial catalysts

Frenkel, Anatoly

411

Evaluation of stack criteria pollutant gas absorption in the new generation thermoelectric water condenser fitted with laminar impinger type heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to establish an Acid Rain Program to reduce the adverse effects of acidic deposition. The Act specifically stipulated that CEMS (continuous emissions monitoring systems) be used to measure the stack emissions under this program. Along with these rules, comes the task of the Stack Tester (Reference Method) to routinely perform RATA (Relative Accuracy Test Audit) tests on the installed CEMS. This paper presents a laboratory and field test sequence to evaluate the signal attenuation through the gas sample conditioning, water condensation removal process, using laminar flow impinger heat exchangers. This method is compared to the EPA CFR 40, Part 60, Appendix A, Method 6, glass impinger train, commonly used by RATA stack testers. CFR 40, Part 75 revisions as of the CAAA 1990, requires more stringent certification and CEMS performance standards. These standards are summarized and related to gas absorption in both the thermoelectric cooler heat exchanger and the Method 6 glass impinger train system. As an incentive to reduce the frequency of RATA tests required per year, emitters are encouraged to achieve relative accuracies of 7.5% or less compared to the reference method. This incentive requires better reference method test apparatus definition. This paper will explore these alternatives and provide test data for comparison to the currently available apparatus. Also discussed is the theory of Electronic Gas Sample Coolers and their practical application to the removal of water from stack gas.

Baldwin, T. [Baldwin Environmental, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Albany, OR * Fairbanks, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Air Products and Chemicals, Inc.: Demonstration of CO2 Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production Background Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial processes, among other sources, are linked to global climate change. Advancing development of technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for extended periods is of great importance. Advanced carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer significant potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating global climate change, while minimizing the economic impacts of the solution. Under the Industrial Carbon Capture and Storage (ICCS) program, the U.S. Department

413

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Siemens Energy Siemens Energy Background Siemens Energy, along with numerous partners, has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop hydrogen turbines for coal-based integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation that will improve efficiency, reduce emissions, lower costs, and allow for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Siemens Energy is expanding this program for industrial applications such as cement, chemical, steel, and aluminum plants, refineries, manufacturing facilities, etc., under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). ARRA funding will be utilized to facilitate a set of gas turbine technology advancements that will improve the efficiency, emissions, and cost performance of turbines for industrial CCS. ARRA industrial technology acceleration,

414

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reducing Uncertainties in Model Reducing Uncertainties in Model Predictions via History Matching of CO2 Migration and Reactive Transport Modeling of CO2 Fate at the Sleipner Project, Norwegian North Sea Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is todevelop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations

415

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molecular Separations Using Micro- Molecular Separations Using Micro- Defect Free Ultra-Thin Films Background Current methods for separating carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from methane (CH 4 ) in fuel gas streams are energy and cost-intensive. Molecular sieve membrane development for carbon capture has been pursued for several decades because of the potential these membranes have for high selectivity while using less energy than cryogenic separation methods and greater flux (permselectivity) than is possible from polymeric membranes. However, the adoption of molecular sieve membrane technology has been hindered by high production costs and the micro-defect fissures that always accompany this type of membrane when fabricated using conventional techniques. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), has

416

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Scale Liquids Production Laboratory Scale Liquids Production and Assessment: Coal and Biomass to Drop-In Fuels Background A major problem with the production of liquid fuels from coal is that the production process and subsequent combustion of the fuel generate excessive greenhouse gases over the entire production and usage lifecycle. Adding lignocellulosic biomass (as a raw feed material) along with coal has the potential to reduce lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions to below those of petroleum products. Altex Technologies Corporation (Altex) has developed an innovative thermo-chemical process capable of converting coal and biomass to transportation fuel ready for blending. The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has partnered with Altex to

417

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficiency Efficiency Molten Bed Oxy- Coal Combustion with Low Flue Gas Recirculation Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO 2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near

418

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alternative Low-Cost Process for Alternative Low-Cost Process for Deposition of MCrAlY Bond Coats for Advanced Syngas/Hydrogen Turbine Applications-Tennessee Technological University Background One of the material needs for the advancement of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants is the development of low-cost effective manufacturing processes for application of coating architectures with enhanced performance and durability in coal derived synthesis gas (syngas)/hydrogen environments. Thermal spray technologies such as air plasma spray (APS) and high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) are currently used to fabricate thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems for large land- based turbine components. In this research Tennessee Technological University (TTU) will develop metal chromium-aluminum-yttrium (MCrAlY; where M = nickel [Ni], cobalt

419

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Solid-Fueled Pressurized Chemical Looping with Flue-Gas Turbine Combined Cycle for Improved Plant Efficiency and CO2 Capture Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage technologies significantly reduce the efficiency of the power cycle. The ACS Program is focused on developing advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while

420

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Turbines Hydrogen Turbines CONTACTS Richard A. Dennis Technology Manager, Turbines National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4515 richard.dennis@netl.doe.gov Travis Shultz Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road PO Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-1370 travis.shultz@netl.doe.gov Jacob A. Mills Principal Investigator Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc 1701 Military Trail Suite 110 Jupiter, FL 33458-7887 561-427-6349 jmills@fttinc.com PARTNERS None PROJECT DURATION Start Date End Date 06/28/2012 08/13/2015 COST Total Project Value $1,149,847 DOE/Non-DOE Share $1,149,847 / $0 AWARD NUMBER SC0008218 Air-Riding Seal Technology for Advanced Gas Turbine Engines-Florida Turbine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Statistical Analysis of CO2 Exposed Wells Statistical Analysis of CO2 Exposed Wells to Predict Long Term Leakage through the Development of an Integrated Neural-Genetic Algorithm Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

422

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion of CO2 in Commercial Conversion of CO2 in Commercial Materials using Carbon Feedstocks Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

423

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Experimental and Chemical Kinetics Study of the Combustion of Syngas and High Hydrogen Content Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background Pennsylvania State University is teaming with Princeton University to enhance scientific understanding of the underlying factors affecting combustion for turbines in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants operating on synthesis gas (syngas). The team is using this knowledge to develop detailed, validated combustion kinetics models that are useful to support the design and future research and development needed to transition to fuel flexible operations, including high hydrogen content (HHC) fuels derived from coal syngas, the product of gasification of coal. This project also funda- mentally seeks to resolve previously reported discrepancies between published ex-

424

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Preparation and Testing of Corrosion- Preparation and Testing of Corrosion- and Spallation-Resistant Coatings- University of North Dakota Background The life of turbine components is a significant issue in gas fired turbine power systems. In this project the University of North Dakota (UND) will advance the maturity of a process capable of bonding oxide-dispersion strengthened alloy coatings onto nickel-based superalloy turbine parts. This will substantially improve the lifetimes and maximum use temperatures of parts with and without thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). This project is laboratory research and development and will be performed by UND at their Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) facility and the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Some thermal cycle testing will occur at Siemens Energy

425

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos National Laboratory - Los Alamos National Laboratory - Advancing the State of Geologic Sequestration Technologies towards Commercialization and Pre-Combustion Capture Goals Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to aid in reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) - the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent injection into deep geologic formations for permanent storage - is one option that is receiving considerable attention. NETL is devoted to improving geologic carbon sequestration technology by funding research projects aimed at removing barriers to commercial-scale

426

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials for Robust Repair Materials for Robust Repair of Leaky Wellbores in CO2 Storage Formations Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

427

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Livermore National Laboratory Livermore National Laboratory - Advancing the State of Geologic Sequestration Technologies towards Commercialization Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is helping to develop carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies to capture, separate, and store carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in order to reduce green-house gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO 2 by injecting and permanently storing it in underground geologic formations. NETL is working to advance geologic carbon sequestration technology by funding research projects that aim to accelerate deployment and remove barriers to commercial-scale carbon sequestration. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

428

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Oxy-Fuel Turbo Machinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications-Clean Energy Systems Background Clean Energy Systems (CES), with support from Siemens Energy and Florida Turbine Technologies (FTT), has an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to develop an oxy-fuel combustor for highly efficient near zero emission power plants. CES is expanding this development for an industrial-scale, oxy-fuel reheat combustor- equipped intermediate-pressure oxy-fuel turbine (IP-OFT) under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Through the design, analysis, and testing of a modified Siemens SGT-900 gas turbine, the team will demonstrate a simple-cycle oxy-fuel system. ARRA funding is accelerating advancement in OFT technology for

429

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Passive Wireless Acoustic Wave Sensors Passive Wireless Acoustic Wave Sensors for Monitoring CO 2 Emissions for Geological Sequestration Sites Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO 2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO

430

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Criteria for Flame- Criteria for Flame- holding Tendencies within Premixer Passages for High Hydrogen Content Fuels-University of California, Irvine Background The gas turbine community must develop low emissions systems while increasing overall efficiency for a widening source of fuels. In this work, the University of California, Irvine (UCI) will acquire the fundamental knowledge and understanding to facilitate the development of robust, reliable, and low emissions combustion systems with expanded high hydrogen content (HHC) fuel flexibility. Specifically, understanding flashback and the subsequent flameholding tendencies associated with geometric features found within combustor fuel/air premixers will enable the development of design guides to estimate flame holding tendencies for lean, premixed emission combustion systems

431

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Analytical Simulation Tool for Enhanced Analytical Simulation Tool for CO2 Storage Capacity Estimation and Uncertainty Quantification Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

432

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactive Transport Models with Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

433

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

a Prototype Commercial a Prototype Commercial Gasifier Sensor Background Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology has the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental performance of fossil fuel based electric power production. During the IGCC process, coal and/or biomass is gasified at high temperature and pressure to form synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of contaminants such as hydrogen sulfide. The syngas can be used to produce power, chemicals, and/or fuels. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Gasification Technologies Program is focused on enhancing the performance of gasification systems, thus enabling U.S. industry to improve the competitiveness of

434

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Training Toward Advanced 3-D Seismic Methods for CO 2 Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effective- ness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely af fecting energy use or hindering economic grow th. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO 2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO

435

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that

436

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Radiocarbon as a Reactive Tracer for Tracking Permanent CO2 Storage in Basaltic Rocks Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

437

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Beneficial Use of CO2 in Precast Concrete Products Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

438

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Efficiency Solar-Based Catalytic Structure for CO2 Reforming Background The Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program encompasses five Technology Areas: (1) Geologic Storage and Simulation and Risk Assessment (GSRA), (2) Monitoring, Verification, Accounting and Assessment (MVAA), (3) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Use and Re-Use, (4) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), and (5) Focus Areas for Sequestration Science. The first three Technology Areas comprise the Core Research and Development (R&D), which includes studies ranging from applied laboratory to pilot-scale research focused on developing new technologies and systems for greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation through carbon storage. This project is part of the Core R&D CO2 Use and Re-use Technology Area and focuses on developing pathways

439

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Staged, High-Pressure Oxy-Combustion Technology: Development and Scale-up Background The Advanced Combustion Systems (ACS) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy/ National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) is aiming to develop advanced oxy- combustion systems that have the potential to improve the efficiency and environmental impact of coal-based power generation systems. Currently available CO2 capture and storage significantly reduces efficiency of the power cycle. The aim of the ACS program is to develop advanced oxy-combustion systems capable of achieving power plant efficiencies approaching those of air-fired systems without CO2 capture. Additionally, the program looks to accomplish this while maintaining near zero emissions of other flue gas pollutants.

440

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating on Alternative and Renewable Fuels- Pennsylvania State University Background In this congressionally directed project, the Earth and Mineral Science (EMS) Energy Institute at Pennsylvania State University (PSU) focuses on the development of fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents to support the production of electricity from anaerobic digester gas (ADG) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) via solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). PSU will use the fuel processors, reforming catalysts, and chemical sorbents developed under this work to transform and clean ADG and ULSD into a syngas stream suitable as a feedstock for SOFCs. This project is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), whose mission is to advance energy options to fuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "albany water gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Large Eddy Simulation Modeling of Flashback and Flame Stabilization in Hydrogen-Rich Gas Turbines using a Hierarchical Validation Approach- University of Texas at Austin Background The focus of this project is the development of advanced large eddy simulation (LES)-based combustion modeling tools that can be used to design low emissions combustors burning high hydrogen content fuels. The University of Texas at Austin (UT) will develop models for two key topics: (1) flame stabilization, lift- off, and blowout when fuel-containing jets are introduced into a crossflow at high pressure, and (2) flashback dynamics of lean premixed flames with detailed description of flame propagation in turbulent core and near-wall flows. The jet- in-crossflow (JICF) configuration is widely used for rapid mixing of reactants

442

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Commercial Scale CO2 Injection and Optimization of Storage Capacity in the Southeastern United States Background The overall goal of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Storage Program is to develop and advance technologies that will significantly improve the effectiveness of geologic carbon storage, reduce the cost of implementation, and prepare for widespread commercial deployment between 2020 and 2030. Research conducted to develop these technologies will ensure safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions without adversely affecting energy use or hindering economic growth. Geologic carbon storage involves the injection of CO2 into underground formations that have the ability to securely contain the CO2 permanently. Technologies being

443

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Turbine Thermal Management-NETL-RUA Turbine Thermal Management-NETL-RUA Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is researching advanced turbine technology with the goal of producing reliable, affordable, and environmentally friendly electric power in response to the nation's increasing energy challenges. With the Hydrogen Turbine Program, NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of technologies to achieve power production from high-hydrogen-content fuels derived from coal that is clean, efficient, and cost-effective, and minimizes carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, and will help maintain the nation's leadership in the export of gas turbine equipment. The NETL Regional University Alliance (RUA) is an applied research collaboration that

444

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits Scoping Studies to Evaluate the Benefits of an Advanced Dry Feed System on the Use of Low Rank Coal in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Background Gasification of coal or other solid feedstocks (biomass, petroleum coke, etc.) produces synthesis gas (syngas), which can be cleaned and used to produce electricity and a variety of commercial products that support the U.S. economy, decrease U.S. dependence on oil imports, and meet current and future environmental emission standards. The major challenge is cost, which needs to be reduced to make integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology competitive. An IGCC plant combines a combustion turbine operating on a gasified fuel stream--syngas--with a steam turbine to capture what would otherwise be waste heat. Currently, the estimated cost of power from IGCC is higher than

445

High-purity hydrogen gas from the reaction between BOF steel slag and water in the 473e673 K  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Iron reduction is achieved witha reducing gas (generally,a gas mixture ofH2 and CO produced by coal reserved. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2013.03.163 #12;agent such as coke, in a blast furnace

Montes-Hernandez, German

446

A Critical Review of the Risks to Water Resources from Unconventional Shale Gas Development and Hydraulic Fracturing in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Hydraulic Fracturing in the United States Avner Vengosh,*, Robert B. Jackson,, Nathaniel Warner,§ Thomas H: The rapid rise of shale gas development through horizontal drilling and high volume hydraulic fracturing has hydraulic fracturing. This paper provides a critical review of the potential risks that shale gas operations

Jackson, Robert B.

447

Civil society research and Marcellus Shale natural gas development: results of a survey of volunteer water monitoring organizations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of a survey of civil society organizations that are monitoring surface water for impacts of Marcellus Shale development in Pennsylvania and New York. We ... of surface water quali...

Kirk Jalbert; Abby J. Kinchy

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Raman spectroscopy of solutions and interfaces containing nitrogen dioxide, water, and 1,4 dioxane: Evidence for repulsion of surface water by NO{sub 2} gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of water, 1,4 dioxane, and gaseous nitrogen dioxide, has been studied as a function of distance measured through the liquid-vapour interface by Raman spectroscopy with a narrow (<0.1 mm) laser beam directed parallel to the interface. The Raman spectra show that water is present at the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is absent, but is virtually absent from the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is present. This is consistent with recent theoretical calculations that show NO{sub 2} to be mildly hydrophobic.

Murdachaew, Garold [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Varner, Mychel E.; Veer, Wytze E. van der [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Gerber, R. Benny [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel) [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Phillips, Leon F., E-mail: leon.phillips@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Measurement of Fuel Oxygenates in Tap Water Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......States, 1993-2002: U.S. Geological Water-Resources Investigations Report 03-4200...5. J.H. Farrelly. Status of source water protection. Ground Water Monitoring and Remediation 22(3): 5051 (2002). 6. U.S. Environmental......

Frederick L. Cardinali; Benjamin C. Blount; Rachael Schmidt; John Morrow

450

Probing the Reaction Intermediates for the Water-Gas Shift over Inverse CeOx/Au(111) Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water-gas shift (WGS) is an important reaction for the production of molecular H{sub 2} from CO and H{sub 2}O. An inverse CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalyst exhibits a very good WGS activity, better than that of copper surfaces or Cu nanoparticles dispersed on a ZnO(0 0 0 {bar 1}) substrate which model current WGS industrial catalysts. In this work we report on intermediates likely to arise during the CO + H{sub 2}O reaction over CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) using soft X-ray photoemission (sXPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Several potential intermediates including formates (HCOO), carbonates (CO{sub 3}) and carboxylates (HOCO) are considered. Adsorption of HCOOH and CO{sub 2} is used to create both HCOO and CO{sub 3} on the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) surface, respectively. HCOO appears to have greater stability with desorption temperatures up to 600 K while CO{sub 3} only survives on the surface up to 300 K. On the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalysts, the presence of Ce{sup 3+} leads to the dissociation of H{sub 2}O to give OH groups. We demonstrate experimentally that the OH species are stable on the surface up to 600 K and interact with CO to yield weakly bound intermediates. When there is an abundance of Ce{sup 4+}, the OH concentration is diminished and the likely intermediates are carbonates. As the surface defects are increased and the Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio grows, the OH concentration also grows and both carbonate and formate species are observed on the surface after dosing CO to H{sub 2}O/CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1). The addition of ceria nanoparticles to Au(1 1 1) is essential to generate an active WGS catalyst and to increase the production and stability of key reaction intermediates (OH, HCOO and CO{sub 3}).

Rodriguez, J.A.; Senanayake, S.D.; Stacchiola, D.; Evans, J.; Estrella, M.; Barrio-Pliego, L.; Prez, M.; Hrbek, J.

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Probing the Reaction Intermediates for the Watergas Shift over Inverse CeOx / Au(1 1 1) Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The water-gas shift (WGS) is an important reaction for the production of molecular H{sub 2} from CO and H{sub 2}O. An inverse CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalyst exhibits a very good WGS activity, better than that of copper surfaces or Cu nanoparticles dispersed on a ZnO(0 0 0 {bar 1}) substrate which model current WGS industrial catalysts. In this work we report on intermediates likely to arise during the CO + H{sub 2}O reaction over CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) using soft X-ray photoemission (sXPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Several potential intermediates including formates (HCOO), carbonates (CO{sub 3}) and carboxylates (HOCO) are considered. Adsorption of HCOOH and CO{sub 2} is used to create both HCOO and CO{sub 3} on the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) surface, respectively. HCOO appears to have greater stability with desorption temperatures up to 600 K while CO{sub 3} only survives on the surface up to 300 K. On the CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1) catalysts, the presence of Ce{sup 3+} leads to the dissociation of H{sub 2}O to give OH groups. We demonstrate experimentally that the OH species are stable on the surface up to 600 K and interact with CO to yield weakly bound intermediates. When there is an abundance of Ce{sup 4+}, the OH concentration is diminished and the likely intermediates are carbonates. As the surface defects are increased and the Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+} ratio grows, the OH concentration also grows and both carbonate and formate species are observed on the surface after dosing CO to H{sub 2}O/CeO{sub x}/Au(1 1 1). The addition of ceria nanoparticles to Au(1 1 1) is essential to generate an active WGS catalyst and to increase the production and stability of key reaction intermediates (OH, HCOO and CO{sub 3}).

Senanayake, S.; Stacchiola, D; Evans, J; Estrella, M; Barrio, L; Perez, M; Hrbek, J; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Kinetics of Oxygen-enhanced Water Gas Shift on Bimetallic Catalysts and the Roles of Metals and Support.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The post-processing of reformate is an important step in producing hydrogen (H2) with low carbon monoxide (CO) for low temperature fuel cells from syn-gas. However, (more)

Kugai, Junichiro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hydrolyzed Polyacrylamide- Polyethylenimine- Dextran Sulfate Polymer Gel System as a Water Shut-Off Agent in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technologies such as horizontal wells and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have made ultra-low permeability shale and tight gas reservoirs productive but the industry is still on the learning curve when it comes to addressing various production...

Jayakumar, Swathika 1986-

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at theAidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling ofmineral-water-gas Reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reactive-transport model for 14C was developed to test its applicability to the Aidlin geothermal system. Using TOUGHREACT, we developed a 1-D grid to evaluate the effects of water injection and subsequent water-rock-gas interaction on the compositions of the produced fluids. A dual-permeability model of the fracture-matrix system was used to describe reaction-transport processes in which the permeability of the fractures is many orders of magnitude higher than that of the rock matrix. The geochemical system included the principal minerals (K-feldspar, plagioclase, calcite, silica polymorphs) of the metagraywackes that comprise the geothermal reservoir rocks. Initial simulation results predict that the gas-phase CO2 in the reservoir will become more enriched in 14C as air-equilibrated injectate water (with a modern carbon signature) is incorporated into the system, and that these changes will precede accompanying decreases in reservoir temperature. The effects of injection on 14C in the rock matrix will be lessened somewhat because of the dissolution of matrix calcite with ''dead'' carbon.

Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Research into the Characterization of Brackish Water and Disposal of Desalination Reject Water in Saline Aquifers and Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brackish groundwater is a valuable drought-proof resource that is plentiful in much of Texas. If treated by available desalination technologies, brackish groundwater resources could help many regions of Texas cope with pressing water shortages...

Jensen, R.

456

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program Questar Gas - Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Exterior Wall Insulation: $350 (single family), $150 (multifamily) Windows: $2.50/sq. ft. Gas Furnace: $200 - $400 Gas Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing Water Heater: $350 Gas Boiler: $400 -$600 Tankless Gas Water Heater: $350 Single Family Homes (New Construction): $50 - $500 Multifamily Homes (New Construction): $50 - $300/unit

457

Global Water Sustainability:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ground Water and Drinking Water EPA 816-R-04-003...oil and gas produced water treatment. Journal of Hazardous...92-99 Jurenka B (2007) Electrodialysis (ED) and Electrodialysis...usbr.gov/pmts/water/publications/reportpdfs...

Kelvin B. Gregory; Radisav D. Vidic; David A. Dzombak

458

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

on August 21. For Sale 184, MMS has introduced an incentive that applies to shallow-water deep gas production. A lease in less than 200 meters of water that begins production from...

459

Cluster Phase Chemistry: Gas-Phase Reactions of Anionic Sodium Salts of Dicarboxylic Acid Clusters with Water Molecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reported several studies of atmospheric reactions involving water complex formation,16-19 including with Water Molecules Hugh I. Kim, William A. Goddard III,§ and J. L. Beauchamp*, Noyes Laboratory of Chemical) generated via electrospray ionization (ESI) are investigated using collision- induced dissociation (CID

Goddard III, William A.

460

Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

A Two-Phase Pressure Drop Model Incorporating Local Water Balance and Reactant Consumption in PEM Fuel Cell Gas Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), and directly affects cost and sizing of fuel cell subsystems. Within several regions of PEMFC operating Fuel Cell Gas Channels E. J. See and S. G. Kandlikar Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rochester in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop

Kandlikar, Satish

462

Uncertainty quantification of volumetric and material balance analysis of gas reservoirs with water influx using a Bayesian framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

data, such as pressure and production data, are available. In this work, I propose a methodology for using a Bayesian approach to quantify the uncertainty of original gas in place (G), aquifer productivity index (J), and the volume of the aquifer (Wi...

Aprilia, Asti Wulandari

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z