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Sample records for alaskan beaufort continental

  1. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  2. Interannual variability of the Pacific water boundary current in the Beaufort Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brugler, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Between 2002 and 2011 a single mooring was maintained in the core of the Pacific Water boundary current in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea near 152° W. Using velocity and hydrographic data from six year-long deployments during ...

  3. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  4. Mud volcanoes and ice-keel ploughmarks, Beaufort Sea shelf, Arctic Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dowdeswell, J. A.; Todd, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    ., FORTIN, G., HILL, P. R., O’CONNOR, M. J. & BRIGHAM-GRETTE, J. 1990. The late Neogene and Quaternary stratigraphy of the Canadian Beaufort continental shelf. In: Grantz, A., Johnson, L. & Sweeney, J. F. (eds) The Geology of North America, vol. L...

  5. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  6. Exhaust Heat Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators Exhaust Heat Recovery for Rural Alaskan Diesel Generators Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research...

  7. Request for Information -- Remote Alaskan Communities Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communities Energy Efficiency Competition As part of President Obama's commitment to fight climate change and assist remote Alaskan Communities, the Energy Department (DOE) is...

  8. Dynamics of upwelling in the Alaskan Beaufort Sea and associated shelfbasin fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    currents and energetic waves can lead to significant coastal erosion along the North Slope of Alaska (e

  9. EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    371 EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS Marine Biological LaboratoryKernan, Director EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS by Fredrik V. Thorsteinson, Richard;#12;EXPERIMENTAL HARVEST OF THE STELLER SEA LION IN ALASKAN WATERS by Fredrik V. Thorsteinson, Bureau of Commercial

  10. UTILIZATION OF ALASKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UTILIZATION OF ALASKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE Marine Biological Laboratory iM0V3Ul953 WOODS HOLE and Wildlife Service, John L. Farley, Director UTILIZATION OP ALASKM SALMON CANlTEaT WASH PAHTS I AHD II, September 1953 #12;#12;UTILIZATION OF AUSKAN SALMON CANNERY WASTE y PART I 1. Possibility of Development

  11. El Nino signature in Alaskan river breakups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boffetta, G

    2011-01-01

    A signature of El Nino-Southern Oscillation is found in the historical dataset of the Alaskan Tanana river breakups where the average ice breaking day is found to anticipate of about 3.4 days when conditioned over El Nino years. This results represents a statistically significant example of ENSO teleconnection on regions remote from tropical Pacific.

  12. A Lipid Biomarker Investigation of Organic Matter Sources and Methane Cycling in Alaskan Thaw Lake Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mark

    2012-01-01

    in anoxic cold seep sediments”. PNAS. 11. 7663-7668.Cycling in Alaskan Thaw Lake Sediments A Thesis submitted inin Alaskan Thaw Lake Sediments by Mark Richard Williams

  13. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  14. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications for Geothermal Resource Capacity and Sustainable Energy Production Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  15. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  16. Beaufort County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation Beaufort County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate

  17. The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The footprint of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface of Alaskan tundra fires during the past half-century: implications for surface properties and radiative large and frequent fires above the Alaskan arctic circle have forced a reassessment of the ecological

  18. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition | Department of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *ReindustrializationEnergy Remote Alaskan Communities Energy

  19. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  20. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  1. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  2. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  3. Beaufort County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation Beaufort County, South Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone

  4. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  5. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY USE AMONG AMERICAN INDIAN/ALASKAN NATIVES WITH MILD DISABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Perry Robert

    2014-13-31

    ABSTRACT This descriptive study explores the reasons why American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) students with mild disabilities are likely to have a difficult transition into adulthood and why assistive technology (AT) is not playing as large of a...

  6. EXAMINATION OF THE FEASIBILITY FOR DEMONSTRATION AND USE OF RADIOLUMINESCENT LIGHTS FOR ALASKAN REMOTE RUNWAY LIGHTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, G.; Perrigo, L.; Leonard, L.; Hegdal, L

    1984-01-01

    This report examines the feasibility of radioluminescent light applications for rural Alaskan airports. The work presented in this report covers four tasks: State of the Art Evaluation of Radioluminescent Lights, Environmental, Radiological, and Regulatory Evaluations, Engineering Evaluations, and Demonstration Plan Development.

  7. Implications of lifting the ban on the export of Alaskan crude oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-26

    Present legislation effectively bans the export of crude oil produced in the United States. The ban has been in effect for years and is particularly stringent with respect to crude oil produced in Alaska, particularly on the North Slope. The Alaska crude export ban is specifically provided for in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline Authorization Act of 1973 and in other legislation. It was imposed for two reasons. The first was to reduce US dependence on imported crude oil. The Arab oil embargo had been imposed shortly before the Act was passed and a greater measure of energy independence was considered imperative at that time. The second reason was to assure that funds expended in building an Alaskan pipeline would benefit domestic users rather than simply employed to facilitate shipments to other countries. The main objective of this report is to estimate the potential impacts on crude oil prices that would result from lifting the export ban Alaskan crude oil. The report focuses on the Japanese market and the US West Coast market. Japan is the principal potential export market for Alaskan crude oil. Exports to that market would also affect the price of Alaskan crude oil as well as crude oil and product prices on the West Coast and the volume of petroleum imported in that area. 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats C . C . T R E poorly under- stood despite the potential for a significant positive feedback to climate change. Our dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions from peat samples collected at active layer and permafrost

  9. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  10. Patterns of shrub expansion in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naito, Adam T; Cairns, David M

    2015-01-01

    of tall shrubs. Given current understanding of the local-scale implications for hydrol- ogy, surface energy balances, and carbon and nutrient cycling as a result of enhanced shrub cover, the comple- tion of this phase transition will alter tundra ecosystem... in Alaskan arctic river corridors suggest phase transition Adam T. Naito & David M. Cairns Department of Geography, Texas A&M University, 810 Eller O&M Building, Mailstop 3147 TAMU, College Station, Texas 77843-3147 Keywords Alaska, Arctic, landscape analysis...

  11. Sandia Energy - Alaskan North Slope Climate: Hard Data from a Hard Place

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis ofSample SULI Program StudentSandiaCOMMUNITYandAir ForceAlaskan

  12. FOURTH A VENUE LANDSLIDE DURING 1964 ALASKAN EARTHQUAKE By Timothy D. Stark! and Ivan A. Contreras2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOURTH A VENUE LANDSLIDE DURING 1964 ALASKAN EARTHQUAKE By Timothy D. Stark! and Ivan A. Contreras2 ABSTRACT: This paper presents a reevaluation of the Fourth Avenue landslide in Anchorage that occurred the Saguenay earthquake of 1988. The most notable landslides are the Fourth Avenue, L-Street, Government Hill

  13. Modeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 19862005, by coupling a large-scale hydrological model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    gradients, and due to variations in methane production and oxidation due to complex freezing and thawing] Methane (CH4), a greenhouse gas, has a much larger radiative forcing potential than CO2, andModeling methane emissions from the Alaskan Yukon River basin, 1986­2005, by coupling a large

  14. Continental Lower Crust Bradley R. Hacker,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Continental Lower Crust Bradley R. Hacker,1 Peter B. Kelemen,2 and Mark D. Behn3 1 Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106; email: hacker@geol.ucsb.edu 2

  15. Geology and mineral resources of the Florence, Beaufort, Rocky Mount, and Norfolk 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles. National Uranium Resource Evaluation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, W.B.

    1982-08-01

    This document provides geologic and mineral resources data for previously-issued Savannah River Laboratory hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reports of the Beaufort, Florence, Norfolk, and Rocky Mount 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ National Topographic Map Series quadrangles in the southeastern United States. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program.

  16. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  17. Cost-Optimal Pathways to 75% Fuel Reduction in Remote Alaskan Villages: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpkins, Travis; Cutler, Dylan; Hirsch, Brian; Olis, Dan; Anderson, Kate

    2015-10-28

    There are thousands of isolated, diesel-powered microgrids that deliver energy to remote communities around the world at very high energy costs. The Remote Communities Renewable Energy program aims to help these communities reduce their fuel consumption and lower their energy costs through the use of high penetration renewable energy. As part of this program, the REopt modeling platform for energy system integration and optimization was used to analyze cost-optimal pathways toward achieving a combined 75% reduction in diesel fuel and fuel oil consumption in a select Alaskan village. In addition to the existing diesel generator and fuel oil heating technologies, the model was able to select from among wind, battery storage, and dispatchable electric heaters to meet the electrical and thermal loads. The model results indicate that while 75% fuel reduction appears to be technically feasible it may not be economically viable at this time. When the fuel reduction target was relaxed, the results indicate that by installing high-penetration renewable energy, the community could lower their energy costs by 21% while still reducing their fuel consumption by 54%.

  18. Exports of Alaskan north slope oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The bill addresses H.R. 70 a bill to permit exports of certain domestically produced oil. The background and need for the legislation is provided. The bill would amend the Mineral Leasing Act to allow exports of Alaskan North Slope oil under certain conditions.

  19. CSDP: Seismology of continental thermal regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1989-04-01

    This is a progress report for the past one year of research (year 2 of 5-year project) under the project titled CSDP: Seismology of Continental Thermal Regime'', in which we proposed to develop seismological interpretation theory and methods applicable to complex structures encountered in continental geothermal areas and apply them to several candidate sites for the Continental Scientific Drilling Project. During the past year, two Ph.D. thesis works were completed under the present project. One is a USC thesis on seismic wave propagation in anisotropic media with application to defining fractures in the earth. The other is a MIT thesis on seismic Q and velocity structure for the magma-hydrothermal system of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The P.I. co-organized the first International Workshop on Volcanic Seismology at Capri, Italy in October 1988, and presented the keynote paper on the state-of-art of volcanic seismology''. We presented another paper at the workshop on Assorted Seismic Signals from Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Another international meeting, namely, the Chapman Conference on seismic anisotropy in the earth's crust at Berkeley, California in May 1988, was co-organized by the co-P.I. (P.C.L), and we presented our work on seismic waves in heterogeneous and anisotropic media. Adding the publications and presentations made in the past year to the list for the preceding year, the following table lists 21 papers published, submitted or presented in the past two years of the present project. 65 refs., 334 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Continental breakup and the dawn of humankind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformation AdministrationContactContinental breakup and the dawn

  1. Continental Biofuels Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumer Connection Jump to:web (SmartContinental

  2. INTRODUCTION The continental promontory of the Eurasian plate in SE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    ­Java Trench, to the southeast Australian continental crust is colliding in eastern Indonesia University of London, Egham, Surrey, U.K. Christopher K. Morley Department of Petroleum Geoscience

  3. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources: Annual report, October 1986--September 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, G.D.; Kamath, V.A.; Godbole, S.P.; Patil, S.L.; Paranjpe, S.G.; Mutalik, P.N.; Nadem, N.

    1987-10-01

    Solid ice-like mixtures of natural gas and water in the form of natural gas hydrated have been found immobilized in the rocks beneath the permafrost in Arctic basins and in muds under the deep water along the American continental margins, in the North Sea and several other locations around the world. It is estimated that the arctic areas of the United States may contain as much as 500 trillion SCF of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates (Lewin and Associates, 1983). While the US Arctic gas hydrate resources may have enormous potential and represent long term future source of natural gas, the recovery of this resource from reservoir frozen with gas hydrates has not been commercialized yet. Continuing study and research is essential to develop technologies which will enable a detailed characterization and assessment of this alternative natural gas resource, so that development of cost effective extraction technology.

  4. Continental heat gain in the global climate system Hugo Beltrami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    from deep borehole profiles to quantify the continental component of Earth's changing energy budget. Although there has been considerable work on the determination of GSTHs from geothermal data [Beltrami

  5. Geotechnical characterization of sediments from Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Brian B. (Brian Bautista), 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Eight whole core sediment samples were obtained from ODP Site 1244, Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia Continental Margin with the goal of understanding the stress history, consolidation behavior and strength characteristics of the ...

  6. Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tourneret, Jean-Yves

    Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 1 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Proposition de 2015 Rémunération : 800 par mois (montant brut mensuel) Lieu: Continental Automotive France, 1 avenue.daurenjou@continental-corporation.com #12;Date: 30 Octobre 2014........ PAGE 2 OF 2 CONFIDENTIEL CONTINENTAL Automotive S.A. Internship

  7. Large-Eddy Observation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Schultz, David M.

    2010-10-01

    and continental stratocumulus to each other, the approach of large-eddy observation (LEO) was applied to a case of nocturnal continental stratocumulus observed over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the central...

  8. Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan, northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan the evolution of the stratigraphic architecture of two siliciclastic northern South China Sea continental slope structures, and slump deposits. The associated stratigraphic architecture in slope clinoforms is chaotic

  9. Continental ood basalts: episodic magmatism above long-lived hotspots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Stephen T.

    November 1999 Abstract The eruption of continental flood basalt (CFB) may reflect episodic magmatism above long-lived mantle plumes. The Iceland and Yellowstone hotspots have generated successive CFB provinces in subducting oceanic lithosphere led to subsequent breakthrough and eruption of CFB. Since both mantle plume

  10. From Lithospheric Thickening and Divergent Collapse to Active Continental Rifting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey, Patrice F.

    -thickening lithosphere), provided that gravitational collapse is accommodated by the passive displacement be important (Houseman andThermal thinning of the lithospheric mantle (above a mantle plume for instance) has of the lithosphere by the plume may be important (Houseman and England, 1986), active continental rifting is usually

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    representing a high-energy event and records exceptional marine flooding in a distal fluvial environmentORIGINAL ARTICLE Marine flooding event in continental Triassic facies identified by a nothosaur Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract Sudden marine flooding within otherwise con- tinental

  12. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  13. Update of the status of Alaskan oil exports. Hearing before the Subcommittee on International Economic Policy and Trade of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session, November 20, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Representatives of the Alaskan oil industry, citizen groups, and government agencies involved in trade and international affairs testified at a hearing on reauthorization of the Export Administration Act, which allowed the export of crude oil from Cook Inlet. Opponents to reauthorization cited the potential for compromising national security, the president's effort to circumvent congressional intent, and the possibility that trade balance benefits would be illusory. Proponents argued that oil exports would relieve the trade deficit with Japan, but would also remove trade barriers with other Pacific and Asian countries. West Coast consumers argued that the availability of Alaskan oil lowers their energy and product costs. Statements and letters submitted for the record and seven appendices with additional statements and a letter follow the testimony of the seven witnesses.

  14. RADIOBIOLOGICAL LABORATORY BEAUFORT, N. C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is concerned with energy flow in marine organisms and the relations of energy flow to the rates of move- ment relations 12 Pollution studies program. . 13 Accumulation of radionuclides by marine plants. 14 Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . · . . 16 Accumulation of radionuclides by marine invertebrates. 16 Methods

  15. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  16. Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from South Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnick, Roberta L.

    Extreme lithium isotopic fractionation during continental weathering revealed in saprolites from in revised form 6 July 2004 Abstract The lithium concentration and isotopic composition of two saprolites the behavior of lithium isotopes during continental weathering. Both saprolites show a general trend

  17. The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Continental Margin is a Key Source of Iron to the HNLC North Pacific Ocean Phoebe J. Lam1 concentrations in the upper 500m of the Western Subarctic Pacific, an iron-limited High Nutrient Low Chlorophyll a key source of bioavailable Fe to the HNLC North Pacific. Keywords: iron, continental margin, HNLC 1

  18. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part I: Comparison to GRACE Terrestrial Water Storage Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In earth system models, the partitioning of precipitation among the variations of continental water storage climate system sim- ulated by earth system models (ESMs). The continental freshwater reservoirs represent

  19. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-10

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available.

  20. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  1. Energy Department Moves Forward on Alaska Natural Gas Pipeline...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    guarantee program to encourage the construction of a pipeline that will bring Alaskan natural gas to the continental United States. The pipeline will provide access to Alaska's...

  2. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  3. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (jensen-sonde)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment.

  4. Rates of tectonic and magmatic processes in the North Cascades continental magmatic arc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzel, Jennifer E. Piontek, 1973-

    2004-01-01

    Continental magmatic arcs are among the most dynamic. geologic systems, and documentation of the magmatic, thermal, and tectonic evolution of arcs is essential for understanding the processes of magma generation, ascent ...

  5. Seismic investigation of the transition from continental to oceanic subduction along the western Hellenic Subduction Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Frederick Douglas

    The western Hellenic subduction zone (WHSZ) exhibits well-documented along-strike variations in lithosphere density (i.e., oceanic versus continental), subduction rates, and overriding plate extension. Differences in slab ...

  6. Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense G. C. Chang physical and optical measurements have captured sediment resuspension associated with two hurricanes. Sediment resuspension associated with Hurricane Edouard was forced by combined current and wave processes

  7. Remote sensing of submerged objects and geomorphology in continental shelf waters with acoustic waveguide scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratilal, Purnima, 1971-

    2002-01-01

    The long range imaging of submerged objects, seafloor and sub-seafloor geomorphology in continental shelf waters using an active sonar system is explored experimentally and theoretically. A unified model for 3-D object ...

  8. The evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to oceanic spreading centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behn, Mark Dietrich, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    This thesis investigates the evolution of lithospheric deformation and crustal structure from continental margins to mid-ocean ridges. The first part (Ch. 2) examines the style of segmentation along the U.S. East Coast ...

  9. Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical and petrological modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Electrical conductivity of continental lithospheric mantle from integrated geophysical; published 11 October 2011. [1] The electrical conductivity of mantle minerals is highly sensitive, and compositional variations. The bulk electrical conductivity model has been integrated into the software package

  10. The effect of LNG on the relationship between UK and Continental Europena natural gas markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Philipp

    2012-12-10

    the structural relationship between UK and Continental European markets. (ii) The effect of UK import capacity extensions since 2005, through both pipeline and LNG regasification capacity, on this long-term relationship will be analyzed. The results suggest...

  11. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  12. continental shelf bivalves and its paleoecologic significance. Paleobiology 6:331-340.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    continental shelf bivalves and its paleoecologic significance. Paleobiology 6:331-340. 1981 shell growth patterns in ecology and paleoecology. Lethaia 3:143-161. RoSENBERG, G. D.. AND S. K

  13. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  14. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ?) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at {approximately}1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  15. Structure of continental rifts: Role of older features and magmatism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, G.R. )

    1996-01-01

    Recent geological and geophysical studies in several continental rifts have begun to shed light on the details of the processes which govern the structural evolution of these important exploration targets. In Kenya and Tanzania, the classic East African rift has been the object of several investigations which reveal that its location follows the boundary (suture ) between the Tanzanian craton (Archean) and Mozambiquan belt (Proterozoic), The Baikal rift also follows a similar boundary, and the Mid-continent rift of North America appears to do the same. Rifts themselves often act as zones of weakness which are reactivated by younger tectonic regimes. The classic North American example of this effect is the Eocambrian Southern Oklahoma aulacogen which was deformed to create the Anadarko basin and Wichita uplift in the late Paleozoic. The Central basin platform has a similar history although the original rift formed at [approximately]1,100Ma. Integration of geophysical data with petrologic and geochemical data from several rift zones has also provided a new picture of the nature and extent of magmatic modification of the crust. An interesting contradiction is that Phanerozoic rifts, except the Afar region, show little evidence for major magmatic modification of the crust whereas, at least in North America, many Precambrian rifts are associated with very large mafic bodies in the crust. The Kenya rift displays evidence for modification of the lower crust in a two-phase magmatic history, but upper crustal magmatic features are limited to local intrusions associated with volcanoes. In this rift, complex basement structure plays a much more important role than previously realized, and the geophysical signatures of basement structure and magmatism are easy to confuse. If this is also the case in other rifts, additional rift basins remain to be discovered.

  16. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; et al

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have includedmore »a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.« less

  17. Workshop to develop deep-life continental scientific drilling projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T. L.; Onstott, T. C.; Ahonen, L.; Aloisi, V.; Colwell, F. S.; Engelen, B.; Fendrihan, S.; Gaidos, E.; Harms, U.; Head, I.; Kallmeyer, J.; Kiel Reese, B.; Lin, L.-H.; Long, P. E.; Moser, D. P.; Mills, H.; Sar, P.; Schulze-Makuch, D.; Stan-Lotter, H.; Wagner, D.; Wang, P.-L.; Westall, F.; Wilkins, M. J.

    2015-05-29

    The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) has long espoused studies of deep subsurface life, and has targeted fundamental questions regarding subsurface life, including the following: "(1) What is the extent and diversity of deep microbial life and what are the factors limiting it? (2) What are the types of metabolism/carbon/energy sources and the rates of subsurface activity? (3) How is deep microbial life adapted to subsurface conditions? (4) How do subsurface microbial communities affect energy resources? And (5) how does the deep biosphere interact with the geosphere and atmosphere?" (Horsfield et al., 2014) Many ICDP-sponsored drilling projects have included a deep-life component; however, to date, not one project has been driven by deep-life goals, in part because geomicrobiologists have been slow to initiate deep biosphere-driven ICDP projects. Therefore, the Deep Carbon Observatory (DCO) recently partnered with the ICDP to sponsor a workshop with the specific aim of gathering potential proponents for deep-life-driven ICDP projects and ideas for candidate drilling sites. Twenty-two participants from nine countries proposed projects and sites that included compressional and extensional tectonic environments, evaporites, hydrocarbon-rich shales, flood basalts, Precambrian shield rocks, subglacial and subpermafrost environments, active volcano–tectonic systems, megafan deltas, and serpentinizing ultramafic environments. The criteria and requirements for successful ICDP applications were presented. Deep-life-specific technical requirements were discussed and it was concluded that, while these procedures require adequate planning, they are entirely compatible with the sampling needs of other disciplines. As a result of this workshop, one drilling workshop proposal on the Basin and Range Physiographic Province (BRPP) has been submitted to the ICDP, and several other drilling project proponents plan to submit proposals for ICDP-sponsored drilling workshops in 2016.

  18. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, MP; Petersen, WA; Del Genio, AD; Giangrande, SE; Heymsfield, A; Heymsfield, G; Hou, AY; Kollias, P; Orr, B; Rutledge, SA; Schwaller, MR; Zipser, E

    2010-04-01

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth’s energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and subsequent impacts on the hydrologic cycle. Global observation and accurate representation of these processes in numerical models is vital to improving our current understanding and future simulations of Earth’s climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales that are associated with convective and stratiform precipitation processes; therefore, they must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, the physical basis for these parameterization schemes needs to be evaluated for general application under a variety of atmospheric conditions. Analogously, space-based remote sensing algorithms designed to retrieve related cloud and precipitation information for use in hydrological, climate, and numerical weather prediction applications often rely on physical “parameterizations” that reliably translate indirectly related instrument measurements to the physical quantity of interest (e.g., precipitation rate). Importantly, both spaceborne retrieval algorithms and model convective parameterization schemes traditionally rely on field campaign data sets as a basis for evaluating and improving the physics of their respective approaches. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) will take place in central Oklahoma during the April–May 2011 period. The experiment is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The field campaign leverages the unprecedented observing infrastructure currently available in the central United States, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, NASA GPM ground validation remote sensors, and new ARM instrumentation purchased with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding. The overarching goal is to provide the most complete characterization of convective cloud systems, precipitation, and the environment that has ever been obtained, providing constraints for model cumulus parameterizations and space-based rainfall retrieval algorithms over land that have never before been available. Several different components of convective cloud and precipitation processes tangible to both the convective parameterization and precipitation retrieval algorithm problem are targeted, such as preconvective environment and convective initiation, updraft/downdraft dynamics, condensate transport and detrainment, precipitation and cloud microphysics, spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, influence on the environment and radiation, and a detailed description of the large-scale forcing.

  19. Inference of human continental origin and admixture proportions using a highly discriminative ancestry informative 41-SNP panel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    continental origin and admixture proportions using a highlyorigin and admixture proportions in common populations inAfrican American admixture proportions by use of population-

  20. Enhancing the estimation of continental-scale snow water equivalent by assimilating MODIS snow cover with the ensemble Kalman filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Enhancing the estimation of continental-scale snow water equivalent by assimilating MODIS snow cover with the ensemble Kalman filter Hua Su,1 Zong-Liang Yang,1 Guo-Yue Niu,1 and Robert E. Dickinson2-quality continental-scale snow water equivalent (SWE) data sets are generally not available, although

  1. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  2. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  3. Feasibility study of extracting runoff data from satellite altimetry over continental surface waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuttgart, Universität

    the feasibility of extracting runoff data using satellite altimetry over all possible continental surface waters- ered algorithm for extracting runoff from the satellite altimetry is based on making water level. not feasible be- cause of bad quality of extracted water level time series class 4. impossible. Computed runoff

  4. The Unpredictable Nature of Internal Tides on Continental Shelves JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Unpredictable Nature of Internal Tides on Continental Shelves JONATHAN D. NASH College of Earth (Dushaw et al. 2011). Corresponding author address: Jonathan D. Nash, 104 CEOAS Admin. Bldg., Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331. E-mail: nash@coas.oregonstate.edu NOVEMBER 2012 N A S H E T A L . 1981 DOI

  5. Mid-Miocene cooling and the extinction of tundra in continental Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    Mid-Miocene cooling and the extinction of tundra in continental Antarctica Adam R. Lewisa of a tundra community that inhabited the mountains before stepped cooling that first brought a full polar inferences from glaciological modeling together sug- gest that mean summer temperatures in the region cooled

  6. The thermal structure of continental crust in active orogens: insight fromMioceneeclogiteandgranulitexenolithsofthePamirMountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Stephen R.

    The thermal structure of continental crust in active orogens: insight from in the Pamir Mountains, southeastern Tajikistan, preserve a compositional and thermal record at mantle depths. The extraction depths exceed the present-day Pamir Moho at 65 km depth and suggest an average thermal gradient

  7. Mobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    other to provide intelligent services to inhabitants [1, 3]. The mobile agents have sensors andMobile Agent Gain Scheduler Control in Inter-Continental Intelligent Space Rangsarit - Intelligent Space (iSpace) is a space (room, corridor, or street), which has distributed sensory and mobile

  8. Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA ABSTRACT The tectonic evolution of the North Amer- ican Gulf of Mexico margin, including the Interior Salt Basin, outboard unextended Wiggins arch, and an unusually

  9. Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Gas hydrate distribution on tectonically active continental margins: Impact on gas. Gregory F. Moore, University of Hawaii (USA) http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/moore/ Key Words Gas Hydrates, Faults, Fluid Flow, gas prospectivity Overview Fig. 1. Research on gas hydrates is often undertaken

  10. High particle export over the continental shelf of the west Antarctic Peninsula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    in surface waters. High fluxes also result in a large supply of sinking organic matter to support sub- surface and benthic food webs on the continental shelf. These new findings call into question of a food web for top predators [Knox, 2006], for its support of a rich benthos [Smith et al., 2006

  11. Continental Shelf Research 0 (2001) 123 Effects of seismic air guns on marine fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    U N C O R R EC TED PR O O F Continental Shelf Research 0 (2001) 1­23 Effects of seismic air guns G. airgun (three synchronised airguns, each gun 2.5 l and 2000 psi) was deployed and repeatedly fired. The guns were fired once/min for eight periods on four days at different positions. The structure

  12. Nonlinear internal waves over New Jersey's continental shelf E. L. Shroyer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2011. [1] Ship and mooring data collected off the coast of New Jersey are used to describeNonlinear internal waves over New Jersey's continental shelf E. L. Shroyer,1,2 J. N. Moum,1 and J to neap barotropic conditions, but when the shoreward baroclinic energy flux was elevated. During the time

  13. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    uranium-bearing fine-grained sediment component, is easily fulfilled for most lithologic compositions and deposituranium-series comminution age method, we applied the method to the glacigenic alluvial depositsuranium-series comminution age dating method differs from many existing methods for dating continental detrital sediment deposits

  14. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    Z .Lithos 48 1999 57­80 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic methods Alan G, such as olivine, are presented. q 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Electrical for such flow models, as shown in the paper by De Smet Z .et al. 1999, this issue . Deductions about the depth

  15. 18512004 annual heat budget of the continental landmasses Shaopeng Huang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    1851­2004 annual heat budget of the continental landmasses Shaopeng Huang1 Received 22 November landmasses. When the temperature at ground surface rises, more heat will be deposited to the rocks beneath the ground subsurface, whereas when ground surface temperature falls, certain amount of heat will escape from

  16. Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale GUO-YUE NIU) ABSTRACT The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite computes soil ice content and its modifications to soil hydrologic and thermal properties. However

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DISTRIBUTION OF SAND LANCE, AlVIMODYTES SP., LARVAE ON THE CONTINENTAL SHELF FROM CAPE COD TO CAPE of one species of sand lance, which rasembled AlIllllodytes lIlarillUS exactly, were collected along abundance of sand lance larval' occurred in winter off the mouths of the principal estuaries (southern New

  18. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  19. Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic composition and concentration of the deep continental crust Fang-Zhen Teng a April 2008 Accepted 5 June 2008 Editor: B. Bourdon Keywords: Lithium Isotope fractionation Deep. Lithium concentrations of granulite xenoliths also vary widely (0.5 to 21 ppm) and are, on average, lower

  20. Z .Lithos 48 1999 5780 Imaging the continental upper mantle using electromagnetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Alan G.

    . Jones Geological SurÕey of Canada, 615 Booth St., Room 218, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0E9 Received 27 are complementary in that the seismic parameters usually represent bulk properties of the rock, whereas electrical the state of knowledge of the continental upper mantle obtained primarily from the natural-source

  1. Differences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traveset, Anna

    communities of each of two different island systems: the Canary Islands (oceanic origin) and the BalearicDifferences in flower visitation networks between an oceanic and a continental island ROCÍO CASTRO, Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain Received 27 May 2013; revised 28 October 2013; accepted for publication

  2. Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Belt-parallel mantle flow beneath a halted continental collision: The Western Alps Guilhem Barruol belts, is a particularly important objective of "mantle tectonics" that may bring a depth extent a coherent picture of upper mantle anisotropy beneath the belt. The large-scale anisotropy pattern

  3. Iberia versus Europe - Effects of continental break-up and round-up on hydrocarbon habitat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourrouilh, R.; Zolnai, G.

    1988-08-01

    Based on the continuity of foldbelts and the positions of intermountain continental nuclei and transcontinental megashears, a close Pangea fit is proposed for the central and north Atlantic borderlands. The Variscan arch segment missing between Brittany and Galicia in the Gulf of Gascony (Biscaye) can tentatively be identified with the Flemish Cap block off Newfoundland. At the same time the northwest African-Gondwana border (central Morocco) was located some 800 km farther to the west-northwest, as compared to its present position in southwestern Europe (Iberia). During the opening of the central and northern segments of the Atlantic Ocean (Jurassic and Cretaceous) and during the closure of the western Mediterranean basin, i.e., the thrust of Africa toward southern Europe (Tertiary), the European continental mass underwent deformation in the transtensive and transpressive modes, which reactivated parts of its inherited structural network. The trailing south European continental margin was partially dismembered into loosely bound continental blocks, to be assembled again during the subsequent Alpine orogenic cycle. These events can be compared with processes known in the northernmost and western segments of the North American continent. Mechanisms are proposed for the formation and deformation of inter- and intraplate basins by way of moderate shifts (wrenching) and slight rotations, the direction of which changed during the Mesozoic-Tertiary according to the global stress field. The above evolution and mechanisms had multiple and decisive effects on hydrocarbon generation, habitat, and accumulation.

  4. Cyanobacterial macrophytes in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomescu, Alexandru MF

    , lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA ALEXANDRU M. F. TOMESCU, GAR W. ROTHWELL AND ROSMARIE in an Early Silurian (Llandovery) continental biota: Passage Creek, lower Massanutten Sandstone, Virginia, USA, in the lower Massanutten Sandstone (Virginia, USA). Filaments are predominantly multiseriate and consist

  5. Propagation of continental break-up in the southwestern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05, France 2present address: Gdosciences Azur, Pierre & Marie Curie University on the southwestern tip of the South China Sea oceanic basin, where propagation of continental break-up occurred of the South China Sea basin, one of the best examples of an ocea- nic basin with a propagating ridge geometry

  6. U^Pb geochronology of Seychelles granitoids: a Neoproterozoic continental arc fragment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    U^Pb geochronology of Seychelles granitoids: a Neoproterozoic continental arc fragment R.D. Tucker reserved. Keywords: U/Pb; geochronology; Neoproterozoic; magmatism; Rodinia; reconstruction; Seychelles 1 of these rocks was ¢rst established [2^4]. Since then, numerous geochronological studies of Sey- chelles

  7. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Association of Alaska Housing Authorities (AAHA), this three-day training event covers strategies and technical issues related to sustainable housing development.

  8. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    A number of blocks off Cape Hatteras have been leased by Mobil Oil, which has requested permission to drill an exploratory well, at 820-m depth, in a block identified as Manteo 467. The proposed well location is 39 miles from the coast of North Carolina. The possibility of extracting gas from the continental slope off the coast of North Carolina, particularly at slope depths, has raised a number of environmental concerns that cannot be addressed from existing data. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service to better define the nature of the continental slope benthic communities off Cape Hatteras and to delineate their areal extent. Emphasis was placed on the area around the proposed drill site in the Manteo 467 lease block.

  9. Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Daniel Walker

    1984-01-01

    in the record is offshore, to the southeast. On the 29th of March, in the wake of strong northeast winds, the current shifted to the west. In general, the westward direction was maintained throughout the deployment period. However, there was one occurrence... WIND INDUCED CIRCULATION ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OF TEXAS, SPRING 1982 A Thesis by DANIEL WALKER BEARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AE M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  10. The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakey, Joshua C.

    1999-01-01

    The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles ...

  11. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01

    Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. ...

  12. Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fewings, Melanie Rinn

    2007-01-01

    The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

  13. Subduction zone processes and continental crust formation in the southern Central Andes: insights from geochemistry and geochronology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Rosemary Ellen

    2014-06-30

    Subduction zones, such as the Andean convergent margin, are the sites at which new continental crust is generated, and where subducting material is either recycled to the crust via arc magmatism or transferred to the ...

  14. Beaufort Wind Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineering

  15. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  16. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2014-06-03

    A two-dimensional model of a passive continental margin was adapted to the simulation of the methane cycle on Siberian continental shelf and slope, attempting to account for the impacts of glacial/interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to freezing conditions with deep permafrost formation during glacial times, and immersion in the ocean in interglacial times. The model is used to gauge the impact of the glacial cycles, and potential anthropogenic warming in the deep future, on the atmospheric methane emission flux, and the sensitivities of that flux to processes such as permafrost formation and terrestrial organic carbonmore »(Yedoma) deposition. Hydrological forcing drives a freshening and ventilation of pore waters in areas exposed to the atmosphere, which is not quickly reversed by invasion of seawater upon submergence, since there is no analogous saltwater pump. This hydrological pump changes the salinity enough to affect the stability of permafrost and methane hydrates on the shelf. Permafrost formation inhibits bubble transport through the sediment column, by construction in the model. The impact of permafrost on the methane budget is to replace the bubble flux by offshore groundwater flow containing dissolved methane, rather than accumulating methane for catastrophic release when the permafrost seal fails during warming. By far the largest impact of the glacial/interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is attenuation by dissolution of bubbles in the ocean when sea level is high. Methane emissions are highest during the regression (soil freezing) part of the cycle, rather than during transgression (thawing). The model-predicted methane flux to the atmosphere in response to a warming climate is small, relative to the global methane production rate, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. A slight increase due to warming could be completely counteracted by sea level rise on geologic time scales, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The methane cycle on the shelf responds to climate change on a long time constant of thousands of years, because hydrate is excluded thermodynamically from the permafrost zone by water limitation, leaving the hydrate stability zone at least 300 m below the sediment surface.« less

  17. Outer continental shelf development and the North Carolina coast: a guide for local planners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, D.J.; McElyea, W.D.; Godschalk, D.R.; Lofaro, N.D.

    1981-08-01

    This guide supplies local governments in North Carolina's coastal region with information on (1) the facilities and activities associated with outer continental shelf (OCS) oil and gas development, (2) their impacts on coastal communities, and (3) how local governments can manage these impacts. Offshore activities and onshore facilities accompanying each stage of OCS development (leasing, exploration, field development, production, and shutdown) are described, including factors influencing facility siting, local economies, and local natural resources. The guide helps local governments apply this information by presenting ways in which they can influence the development process.

  18. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

  19. Geologic hazards on the Atlantic continental margin of the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folger, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    Although 46 exploratory holes have failed to reveal commercial hydrocarbon accumulations on the US Atlantic margin, about twice that number were drilled on the contiguous Canadian margin before large reserves were discovered. Thus, despite the initial results, exploration on the US margin will probably continue and additional information will be needed to augment the extensive environmental data base acquired over the past 10 years. The extent, timing, causes, and importance of sediment instability of the Continental Slopes of Georges Bank, Baltimore Canyon Trough and Carolina Trough--where future exploration will take place--remain controversial. Many question remain to be answered regarding such phenomena as creep on the upper slope, mass wasting in canyons and gullies, and slumping associated with faults and salt diapirs. Along the southeastern margin, the distribution of cavernous porosity below the shelf is only broadly known. Caverns pose a potential threat to drilling operations ranging from collapse of rigs to circulation loss and sheared drill strings. In deeper waters of the Continental Slope (700-2000 m), clathrates or frozen gas hydrates are common. The potential hazard of blow-outs from gas trapped beneath this layer are unknown. Additional information is needed to assess the bottom stresses imposed by tidal, storm, and geostrophically-driven currents on offshore rigs and structures, particularly in such areas as Georges Bank, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau.

  20. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the Continental Shelf: The interaction of internal waves and the bottom topography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Restrepo, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bona, J.L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Longshore sand ridges are frequently observed to occur on the continental shelf where the overlying ocean is stratified. This study formulates a model for the formation and evolution of three-dimensional longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf. The model is based on the interaction of interfacial, weakly nonlinear waves in a stratified ocean with the sedimentary bottom topography.

  1. A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility: Part I: Low-Level Cloud Macrophysical, Microphysical, and Radiative Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Xiquan

    A Climatology of Midlatitude Continental Clouds from the ARM SGP Central Facility: Part I: Low Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains Central Facility (SCF). The cloud properties include liquid- phase.563 for daytime (nighttime). A new conceptual model of midlatitude continental low clouds at the ARM SGP site has

  2. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1988-12-01

    As one of a group cooperative research projects on the southeastern continental shelf, this project is concerned with specific aspects of microbial processes and related phenomena that influence the fate of particulate organic materials naturally produced on the continental shelf. The projects of other grantees encompass the dynamics of the shelf from physical oceanography to biology. The integrated information as a whole will be useful in understanding the potential fate of a variety of energy related pollutants that may be released in continental shelf waters. With a focus on events on the southeastern continental shelf and their boundary conditions (Gulf Stream dynamics; river and estuarine processes), we form an interface between studies of oceanic processes such as GOFS and WOCE, and studies of processes at the land-sea boundary. During this grant year we completed two research cruises on the southeastern continental shelf on R/V Blue Fin, and processed data from previous cruises.

  3. A model of the methane cycle, permafrost, and hydrology of the Siberian continental margin

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, D.

    2015-05-21

    A two-dimensional model of a sediment column, with Darcy fluid flow, biological and thermal methane production, and permafrost and methane hydrate formation, is subjected to glacial–interglacial cycles in sea level, alternately exposing the continental shelf to the cold atmosphere during glacial times and immersing it in the ocean in interglacial times. The glacial cycles are followed by a "long-tail" 100 kyr warming due to fossil fuel combustion. The salinity of the sediment column in the interior of the shelf can be decreased by hydrological forcing to depths well below sea level when the sediment is exposed to the atmosphere.more »There is no analogous advective seawater-injecting mechanism upon resubmergence, only slower diffusive mechanisms. This hydrological ratchet is consistent with the existence of freshwater beneath the sea floor on continental shelves around the world, left over from the last glacial period. The salt content of the sediment column affects the relative proportions of the solid and fluid H2O-containing phases, but in the permafrost zone the salinity in the pore fluid brine is a function of temperature only, controlled by equilibrium with ice. Ice can tolerate a higher salinity in the pore fluid than methane hydrate can at low pressure and temperature, excluding methane hydrate from thermodynamic stability in the permafrost zone. The implication is that any methane hydrate existing today will be insulated from anthropogenic climate change by hundreds of meters of sediment, resulting in a response time of thousands of years. The strongest impact of the glacial–interglacial cycles on the atmospheric methane flux is due to bubbles dissolving in the ocean when sea level is high. When sea level is low and the sediment surface is exposed to the atmosphere, the atmospheric flux is sensitive to whether permafrost inhibits bubble migration in the model. If it does, the atmospheric flux is highest during the glaciating, sea level regression (soil-freezing) part of the cycle rather than during deglacial transgression (warming and thawing). The atmospheric flux response to a warming climate is small, relative to the rest of the methane sources to the atmosphere in the global budget, because of the ongoing flooding of the continental shelf. The increased methane flux due to ocean warming could be completely counteracted by a sea level rise of tens of meters on millennial timescales due to the loss of ice sheets, decreasing the efficiency of bubble transit through the water column. The model results give no indication of a mechanism by which methane emissions from the Siberian continental shelf could have a significant impact on the near-term evolution of Earth's climate, but on millennial timescales the release of carbon from hydrate and permafrost could contribute significantly to the fossil fuel carbon burden in the atmosphere–ocean–terrestrial carbon cycle.« less

  4. The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds (MC3E) Experiment Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Michael [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kollias, Pavlos [McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada); Giangrande, Scott [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place from April 22 through June 6, 2011, centered at the ARM Southern Great Plains site (http://www.arm.gov/sites/sgp) in northcentral Oklahoma. MC3E was a collaborative effort between the ARM Climate Research Facility and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Ground Validation (GV) program. The campaign leveraged the largest ground-based observing infrastructure available in the central United States, including recent upgrades through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, combined with an extensive sounding array, remote sensing and in situ aircraft observations, and additional radar and in situ precipitation instrumentation. The overarching goal of the campaign was to provide a three-dimensional characterization of convective clouds and precipitation for the purpose of improving the representation of convective lifecycle in atmospheric models and the reliability of satellite-based retrievals of precipitation.

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    2012-10-25

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  6. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Single Column Model Forcing (xie-scm_forcing)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Xie, Shaocheng; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yunyan

    The constrained variational objective analysis approach described in Zhang and Lin [1997] and Zhang et al. [2001]was used to derive the large-scale single-column/cloud resolving model forcing and evaluation data set from the observational data collected during Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), which was conducted during April to June 2011 near the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The analysis data cover the period from 00Z 22 April - 21Z 6 June 2011. The forcing data represent an average over the 3 different analysis domains centered at central facility with a diameter of 300 km (standard SGP forcing domain size), 150 km and 75 km, as shown in Figure 1. This is to support modeling studies on various-scale convective systems.

  8. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  9. NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    NUMBER1,2005 Published by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program with the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program No.14,September2012 ScientificDrilling ISSN: 1816-8957 Exp. 333: Nankai Trough Subduction Input and Records of Slope Instability 4 Lake Drilling In Eastern Turkey 18 Exp. 326 and 332: Nan

  10. Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timber Harvest Impacts on Water Yield in the Continental/Maritime Hydroclimatic Region and two different harvest practices (50% clearcut, 50% partial cut). The change in water yield harvesting. Monthly and seasonal analyses revealed the largest impacts of harvest practices on water yield

  11. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate model2"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1" shelf in a regional coupled climate, South Korea 120-749. Email:21" cyoo@cims.nyu.edu.22" #12;2" Abstract23" Understanding heat. This study analyzes the heat and freshwater budget using a regional25" coupled climate model, which has been

  12. Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, David

    Heat and freshwater exchange on the Antarctic continental1 shelf in a regional coupled climate exchange with the atmosphere and sea ice dominates the annual cycle in heat29 and freshwater content;2 Abstract23 Understanding heat and freshwater content change in the Antarctic shelf seas is important

  13. Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty continental shelf, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty Available online xxxx Keywords: Waipaoa River continental margin shelf sedimentation 210 Pb geochronology 239,240 Pu geochronology sediment budget The combination of high sediment yields and the prevalence

  14. Radiological effluents released from US continental tests, 1961 through 1992. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoengold, C.R.; DeMarre, M.E.; Kirkwood, E.M.

    1996-08-01

    This report documents all continental tests from September 15, 1961, through September 23, 1992, from which radioactive effluents were released. The report includes both updated information previously published in the publicly available May, 1990 report, DOE/NV-317, ``Radiological Effluents Released from Announced US Continental Tests 1961 through 1988``, and effluent release information on formerly unannounced tests. General information provided for each test includes the date, time, location, type of test, sponsoring laboratory and/or agency or other sponsor, depth of burial, purpose, yield or yield range, extent of release (onsite only or offsite), and category of release (detonation-time versus post-test operations). Where a test with simultaneous detonations is listed, location, depth of burial and yield information are given for each detonation if applicable, as well as the specific source of the release. A summary of each release incident by type of release is included. For a detonation-time release, the effluent curies are expressed at R+12 hours. For a controlled releases from tunnel-tests, the effluent curies are expressed at both time of release and at R+12 hours. All other types are listed at the time of the release. In addition, a qualitative statement of the isotopes in the effluent is included for detonation-time and controlled releases and a quantitative listing is included for all other types. Offsite release information includes the cloud direction, the maximum activity detected in the air offsite, the maximum gamma exposure rate detected offsite, the maximum iodine level detected offsite, and the maximum distance radiation was detected offsite. A release summary incudes whatever other pertinent information is available for each release incident. This document includes effluent release information for 433 tests, some of which have simultaneous detonations. However, only 52 of these are designated as having offsite releases.

  15. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Information Program. Update 2, August 1981, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: a summary report, July 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, C.A.

    1981-01-01

    In July 1980, the Office of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Information issued an initial report called Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their Onshore Impacts: A Summary Report, July 1980. The purpose of this report was to provide State and local governments with current information about offshore oil and gas resources and onshore activity in the area extending from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, to Cape Canaveral, Florida. This information was designed to assist in socioeconomic planning for the onshore impacts of oil and gas development in the affected areas. This report, Update 2, discusses Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities and their onshore impacts for the period of February 1981 to August 1981. Because of the minimal offshore oil- and gas-related activity in the South Atlantic Region, the onshore impacts are also minimal. Very little, if any, development has occurred as a result of exploration or development. Even though the South Atlantic OCS does contain large areas with hydrocarbon potential, little optimism has been generated by exploration associated with Lease Sale 43. Lease Sale 56 included tracts with geologic conditions more favorable to the generation, migration, and accumulation of hydrocarbons, especially the deepwatr tracts, but industry showed moderate interest in the first deepwater lease sale. The level of nearshore and onshore activity may increase with exploration associated with Lease Sale 56. More permanent onshore development will be contingent on the outcome of exploration efforts.

  16. A continental clastic depositional model for the Permian Unayzah formation, Hawtah field, central Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heine, C.J. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01

    The Permian Unayzah Formation lies unconformably on the Silurian Qusaiba Member of the Qalibah Formation. The pre-Unayzah unconformity (PUU) represents a Hercynian tectonic event responsible for uplift and erosion representing 100-150 m.y. worth of missing section along the Hawtah Trend. Overlying the PUU, the Unayzah clastic sequence is comprised of locally sourced sediments from the adjacent paleotopography. Above the thin veneer of locally sourced sediments is a more regionally sourced, confined braided stream sequence, which completely backfills the existing paleotopography. Once the paleotopographic surface had been leveled, the depositional environment changed from a confined braided stream to a broad braided plain. Within this sequence of vertically stacked and laterally migrating braided plain sediments, the bulk of the reservoirs within the Hawtah field are contained. As the transgressive Khuff seas continue to encroach on the Unayzah depositional system, the upper-most sediments of the broad braided plan environment are reworked by transgressive coastal processes. The resulting reworked shoreface and shallow-marine facies are genetically related to the Khuff transgression and lie unconformably on the Unayzah continental clastics.

  17. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, S.

    2015-01-27

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the US Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a six-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing data sets. Over the course of the 46-day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript provides details on the instrumentationmore »used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings. In addition, the impact of including the humidity corrections and quality controls on the thermodynamic profiles that are used in the derivation of a large-scale model forcing data set are investigated. The results show a significant impact on the derived large-scale vertical velocity field illustrating the importance of addressing these humidity biases.« less

  18. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) sounding network: operations, processing and analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.; Troyan, D.; Ciesielski, P. E.; Holdridge, D.; Kyrouac, J.; Schatz, J.

    2014-09-12

    The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) took place during the spring of 2011 centered in north-central Oklahoma, USA. The main goal of this field campaign was to capture the dynamical and microphysical characteristics of precipitating convective systems in the Central Plains. A major component of the campaign was a 6-site radiosonde array designed to capture the large-scale variability of the atmospheric state with the intent of deriving model forcing datasets. Over the course of the 46 day MC3E campaign, a total of 1362 radiosondes were launched from the enhanced sonde network. This manuscript describes the details of the instrumentationmore »used as part of the sounding array, the data processing activities including quality checks and humidity bias corrections and an analysis of the impacts of bias correction and algorithm assumptions on the determination of convective levels and indices. It is found that corrections for known radiosonde humidity biases and assumptions regarding the characteristics of the surface convective parcel result in significant differences in the derived values of convective levels and indices in many soundings.« less

  19. Phylogeography of Rhinichthys cataractae (Teleostei: Cyprinidae): pre-glacial colonization across the Great Continental Divide and Pleistocene diversification within the Rio Grande drainage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Min

    2013-09-16

    The longnose dace, Rhinichthys cataractae, is a primary freshwater fish inhibiting riffle habitats in small headwater rivers and streams across the North American continent, including drainages east and west of the Continental Divide. Phylogenetic...

  20. Characterization and Alteration of Wettability States of Alaskan Reserviors to Improve Oil Recovery Efficiency (including the within-scope expansion based on Cyclic Water Injection - a pulsed waterflood for Enhanced Oil Recovery)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhijit Dandekar; Shirish Patil; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    Numerous early reports on experimental works relating to the role of wettability in various aspects of oil recovery have been published. Early examples of laboratory waterfloods show oil recovery increasing with increasing water-wetness. This result is consistent with the intuitive notion that strong wetting preference of the rock for water and associated strong capillary-imbibition forces gives the most efficient oil displacement. This report examines the effect of wettability on waterflooding and gasflooding processes respectively. Waterflood oil recoveries were examined for the dual cases of uniform and non-uniform wetting conditions. Based on the results of the literature review on effect of wettability and oil recovery, coreflooding experiments were designed to examine the effect of changing water chemistry (salinity) on residual oil saturation. Numerous corefloods were conducted on reservoir rock material from representative formations on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The corefloods consisted of injecting water (reservoir water and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water) of different salinities in secondary as well as tertiary mode. Additionally, complete reservoir condition corefloods were also conducted using live oil. In all the tests, wettability indices, residual oil saturation, and oil recovery were measured. All results consistently lead to one conclusion; that is, a decrease in injection water salinity causes a reduction in residual oil saturation and a slight increase in water-wetness, both of which are comparable with literature observations. These observations have an intuitive appeal in that water easily imbibes into the core and displaces oil. Therefore, low-salinity waterfloods have the potential for improved oil recovery in the secondary recovery process, and ultra low-salinity ANS lake water is an attractive source of injection water or a source for diluting the high-salinity reservoir water. As part of the within-scope expansion of this project, cyclic water injection tests using high as well as low salinity were also conducted on several representative ANS core samples. These results indicate that less pore volume of water is required to recover the same amount of oil as compared with continuous water injection. Additionally, in cyclic water injection, oil is produced even during the idle time of water injection. It is understood that the injected brine front spreads/smears through the pores and displaces oil out uniformly rather than viscous fingering. The overall benefits of this project include increased oil production from existing Alaskan reservoirs. This conclusion is based on the performed experiments and results obtained on low-salinity water injection (including ANS lake water), vis-a-vis slightly altering the wetting conditions. Similarly, encouraging cyclic water-injection test results indicate that this method can help achieve residual oil saturation earlier than continuous water injection. If proved in field, this would be of great use, as more oil can be recovered through cyclic water injection for the same amount of water injected.

  1. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new Arctic Drilling Platform in search of gas hydrate and free gas accumulations at depths of approximately 1200 to 2500 ft MD. A secondary objective was the gas-charged sands of the uppermost Campanian interval at approximately 3000 ft. Summary results of geophysical analysis of the well are presented in this report.

  2. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the project reports.

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models and to research teams for developing future gas-hydrate projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and has been documented by the project team. This Topical Report documents drilling and coring operations and other daily activities.

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists planning hydrate exploration and development projects. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this and other project reports. This Topical Report contains details describing logging operations.

  6. ABS Alaskan Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDate RecCompetitionCentury Solar

  7. Alaskan Wind Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSA Jump to:AdaniandAirtricitySJVNL

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Microwave Radiometer Profiler (jensen-mwr)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-01

    A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tomlinson, Jason; Jensen, Mike

    2012-02-28

    Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

  12. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T.; Ravens, Thomas M.; Cunningham, Keith W.; Scott, George

    2012-12-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  13. Proposed 1986 outer continental shelf oil and gas lease sale offshore the Mid-Atlantic states, OCS Sale No. 111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Sale of oil and gas development leases is proposed for 3561 lease tracts containing 20.3 million acres of outer continental shelf lying off the coasts of Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina. The lease tracts are located beneath 132 to 10,560 feet of water within an area 24 to 140 miles offshore. Oil would become available in 1994, with production peaking in 1999. Gas production would begin in 1998, peak in 1999, and decline by approximately 50% by the year 2005. Development of the hydrocarbon field would involve approximately 22 exploratory wells, 9 delineation wells, 5 platforms, 27 subsea completions, and 54 production wells. If implemented, the lease offering would be held in October 1985.

  14. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 162, 2005, pp. 135146. Printed in Great Britain. Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, ZanskarLadakh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    . 135 Subsidence history of the north Indian continental margin, Zanskar­Ladakh Himalaya, NW India R. I of the tectonic subsidence and uplift through the pre- collisional history of the margin have been constructed.2. This model accounts for the general exponential decrease in the backstripped tectonic subsidence. The model

  15. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  16. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  17. Upper Plio-Pleistocene salt tectonics and seismic stratigraphy on the lower continental slope, Mississippi Canyon OCS Area, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jia-Yuh

    1993-01-01

    of the Mississippi Canyon and the northern part of the Atwater OCS (outer continental shelf) areas. The study area covers Shell's Mars prospect (M.C. Block 763) and Conoco's discovery (M.C. Block 243). From Lenticulina 1 (-2.2 Ma) to present, eight seismic...

  18. Tectonic features associated with the overriding of an accretionary wedge on top of a rifted continental margin: An example from Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    continental margin: An example from Taiwan Andrew T. Lin a, , Char-Shine Liu b , Che-Chuan Lin a , Philippe,d a Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Taiwan b Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taiwan c Institute of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taiwan d CPC Corporation, Taiwan

  19. Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints on the Li isotopic composition of the continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Lithium isotopic systematics of A-type granites and their mafic enclaves: Further constraints form 6 February 2009 Accepted 15 February 2009 Editor: D.B. Dingwell Keywords: Lithium isotopes A-type granite Mafic enclave Continental crust Lithium concentrations and isotopic compositions of 39 A

  20. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study development and ensemble large-scale forcings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; et al

    2015-06-19

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60-hour case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in-situ measurements from the RACORO field campaign and remote-sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functionsmore »for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, ?, are derived from observations to be ~0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing datasets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, ECMWF forecasts, and a multi-scale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in 'trial' large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary clouds.« less

  1. Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic and their onshore impacts. Atlantic summary report, July 1, 1983-December 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, R.W.; Havran, K.J.

    1984-12-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Atlantic continues. Hydrocarbon exploration efforts have been and probably will continue to be concentrated on four major sedimentary basins: the Georges Bank Basin, the Baltimore Canyon Trough, the Carolina Trough, and the Blake Plateau Basin. To date, 46 exploratory wells have been drilled in these areas, most of them in the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area where resource estimates indicate the hydrocarbon potential is the greatest of the three Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf planning areas. Currently, no operators are involved in exploration efforts in the Atlantic. No commercial discoveries have been announced. Since the first and most successful sale of Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf blocks in Lease Sale 40 in August 1976, there have been eight other sales bringing total revenues of almost $3 billion to the Federal Treasury. The current tentative milestone chart for the 5-year offshore leasing schedule calls for four additional lease sales to be held in the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Although no firm plans have been made for the transportation of potential offshore hydrocarbons to onshore processing facilities, it is believed that oil would be transported by tanker or tug-barge system to existing refineries on the Raritan and Delaware Bays. Gas probably would be transported by pipeline to one of several onshore landfalls identifed by Atlantic Coast States and in Federal environmental impact documents. Recent onshore support for Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf exploration came from Davisville, Rhode Island, the only shore support base for the Atlantic that was active during 1984. Three maps are provided in the back pocket of this report for the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning areas. 29 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. History of the Federal Fisheries Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dore Gill and William Stimpson in 1860. Elliott Coues and H. C. Yarrow, Army surgeons stationed at Fort, the State Universities of Virginia, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, and Alonzo Thomas

  3. Beaufort County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump

  4. File:Beaufort wind scale.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdisto ElectricMonaster And0383(2010).pdf Jump471503p.pdfAir

  5. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-01-06

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the gas phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the WRF-Chem regional chemistry transport model, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48 and 63% respectively over the continental US. Dry deposition ofmore »gas-phase SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40 vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, and ?52 vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas phase (61% for anthropogenics and 76% for biogenics). Results are sensitive to assumptions made in the dry deposition scheme, but gas-phase deposition of SVOCs remains crucial even under conservative estimates. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = H* (CH3COOH); H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 35%/25%/10% compared to our best estimate.« less

  6. The effect of dry and wet deposition of condensable vapors on secondary organic aerosols concentrations over the continental US

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knote, C.; Hodzic, A.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-05-26

    The effect of dry and wet deposition of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) in the gas-phase on the concentrations of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is reassessed using recently derived water solubility information. The water solubility of SVOCs was implemented as a function of their volatility distribution within the regional chemistry transport model WRF-Chem, and simulations were carried out over the continental United States for the year 2010. Results show that including dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs reduces annual average surface concentrations of anthropogenic and biogenic SOA by 48% and 63% respectively over the continental US Dry deposition of gas-phasemore »SVOCs is found to be more effective than wet deposition in reducing SOA concentrations (?40% vs. ?8% for anthropogenics, ?52% vs. ?11% for biogenics). Reductions for biogenic SOA are found to be higher due to the higher water solubility of biogenic SVOCs. The majority of the total mass of SVOC + SOA is actually deposited via the gas-phase (61% for anthropogenics, 76% for biogenics). A number of sensitivity studies shows that this is a robust feature of the modeling system. Other models that do not consider dry and wet removal of gas-phase SVOCs would hence overestimate SOA concentrations by roughly 50%. Assumptions about the water solubility of SVOCs made in some current modeling systems (H* = 105 M atm?1; H* = H* (HNO3)) still lead to an overestimation of 25% / 10% compared to our best estimate. A saturation effect is observed for Henry's law constants above 108 M atm?1, suggesting an upper bound of reductions in surface level SOA concentrations by 60% through removal of gas-phase SVOCs. Considering reactivity of gas-phase SVOCs in the dry deposition scheme was found to be negligible. Further sensitivity studies where we reduce the volatility of organic matter show that consideration of gas-phase SVOC removal still reduces average SOA concentrations by 31% on average. We consider this a lower bound for the effect of gas-phase SVOC removal on SOA concentrations.« less

  7. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  8. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  9. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Parcivel Disdrometer (williams-disdro)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  13. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Surface Meteorology (williams-surfmet)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, 449 MHz Profiler(williams-449_prof)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  15. Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

  16. EA-2011: Proposed Release of Three Parasitoids for the Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus Planipennis) in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service issued an EA (July 2007) that analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the release of three parasitoids into the continental U.S. for the biological control of the emerald ash borer, a nonnative invasive beetle. The DOE Oak Ridge Office reviewed the EA, adopted it, and issued a FONSI for the proposed release of the same parasitoids into the environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  17. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  18. South Atlantic summary report 2. Revision of Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, J.L.; Kurz, F.N.; Porter, E.O.

    1982-05-01

    The search for oil and gas on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) in the South Atlantic Region began in 1960, when geophysical surveys of the area were initiated. In 1977, a Continental Offshore Stratigraphic Test (COST) well was drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment. In March 1978, the first lease sale, Sale 43, was held, resulting in the leasing of 43 tracts. Approximately a year later, in May 1979, the first exploratory drilling began, and by February 1980, six exploratory wells had been drilled by four companies. Hydrocarbons were not found in any of these wells. Lease Sale 56, the second lease sale in the South Atlantic Region, was held in August 1981. The sale resulted in the leasing of 47 tracts. Most of the leased tracts are in deep water along the Continental Slope off North Carolina. To date, no drilling has occurred on these tracts, but it is likely that two wells will be drilled or will be in the process of being drilled by the end of 1982. Reoffering Sale RS-2 is scheduled for July 1982, and it will include tracts offered in Lease Sale 56 that were not awarded leases. Lease Sale 78 is scheduled to be held in July 1983. The most recent (March 1982) estimates of risked resources for leased lands in the South Atlantic OCS are 27 million barrels of oil and 120 billion cubic feet of gas. To date, onshore impacts resulting from OCS exploration have been minimal, and they were associated with Lease Sale 43 exploratory activities. In June 1981, the South Atlantic Regional Technical Working Group prepared a Regional Transportation Management Plan for the South Atlantic OCS. The plan is principally an integration of regulatory frameworks, policies, and plans that are applicable to pipeline siting from each of the South Atlantic coastal States and Federal agencies with jurisdiction in the area.

  19. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the South Atlantic (US) and their onshore impacts. South Atlantic summary report update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havran, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    An update of the South Atlantic Summary Report 2, this report provides current information about Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil- and gas-related activities and their onshore impacts for the period June 1982 to February, 1983. The geographical area covered by the report extends from north of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida. The information is designed to assist in planning for the onshore effects associated with offshore oil and gas development. It covers lease and transportation strategies and the nature and location of onshore facilities. An appendix summarizes related state and federal studies. 11 references, 2 tables.

  20. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  1. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anne Trehu; Peter Kannberg

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m{sup 2}). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that {approx}50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a 'toe-thrust' ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those {approx}70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the K-G basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m{sup 2}. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basi

  2. Oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Hearing before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, United States Senate, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, September 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The hearing addressed oil and gas development on the outer continental shelf. Testimony is given by Department of Energy officials on the United States oil and gas leasing program. Congressional questions and agency responses are provided. Statements and documents prepared for the record are included.

  3. On the connection between continental-scale land surface processes and the tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Hsi-Yen; Mechoso, C. R.; Xue, Yongkang; Xiao, Heng; Neelin, David; Ji, Xuan

    2013-11-15

    The impact of global tropical climate to perturbations in land surface processes (LSP) are evaluated using perturbations given by different LSP representations of continental-scale in a global climate model that includes atmosphere-ocean interactions. One representation is a simple land scheme, which specifies climatological albedos and soil moisture availability. The other representation is the more comprehensive Simplified Simple Biosphere Model, which allows for interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes. The results demonstrate that LSP processes such as interactive soil moisture and vegetation biophysical processes have strong impacts on the seasonal mean states and seasonal cycles of global precipitation, clouds, and surface air temperature. The impact is especially significant over the tropical Pacific. To explore the mechanisms for such impact, different LSP representations are confined to selected continental-scale regions where strong interactions of climate-vegetation biophysical processes are present. We find that the largest impact is mainly from LSP perturbations over the tropical African continent. The impact is through anomalous convective heating in tropical Africa due to changes in the surface heat fluxes, which in turn affect basinwide teleconnections in the Pacific through equatorial wave dynamics. The modifications in the equatorial Pacific climate are further enhanced by strong air-sea coupling between surface wind stress and upwelling, as well as effect of ocean memory. Our results further suggest that correct representations of land surface processes, land use change and the associated changes in the deep convection over tropical Africa are crucial to reducing the uncertainty when performing future climate projections under different climate change scenarios.

  4. Hoteliers Strike Gold with Geothermal Alaskan Resort | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lowest operating temperature geothermal power plants in the world, operating with 165 F water. The energy savings has been remarkable. Bernie estimates he saves anywhere from...

  5. Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC), and UC Berkeley's Departments of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Electrical Engineering. The project will collect...

  6. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    ethane, propane or butane. Concentrations of metabolitesacid COO - CH 3 O H 3 C Butane (C 4 H 10 ) H 3 C CH 3 O - O

  7. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    known to exacerbate corrosion of pipeline surfaces (3, 27).Canada. Abstract Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines bypipeline failure. In fact, it has long been known that microbes contribute to corrosion

  8. Alaskan refiner raced against winter to relocate vacuum unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gdula, L.M. [Tesoro Petroleum Corp., Kenai, AK (United States); Wentworth, J.A. [Litwin Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-03-20

    In late November 1994, San Antonio-based Tesoro Petroleum Corp. and Litwin Engineers and Constructors Inc. completed the relocation and refurbishment of a $25 million vacuum unit at Tesoro`s 72,000 b/d Kenai refinery. The addition of the vacuum distillation unit is a critical component in Tesoro`s market-driven strategy to enhance operating profits by maximizing production of higher-margin products such as gasoline and jet fuel. With its new vacuum distillation unit, Tesoro has reduced production of lower-value residual fuel oil while recovering more lighter, high-value material. The paper discusses the economic and strategic merits of purchasing and relocating an existing vacuum unit, the project schedule, new equipment, dismantling and transport, installation, tie-ins and start-up, products, operating changes, corrosion concerns, off gas, steam generation, design changes, environmental issues, reporting requirements, and accomplishments.

  9. Alaskan Natural Gas Pipeline Developments (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2007 reference case projects that an Alaska natural gas pipeline will go into operation in 2018, based on the Energy Information Administration's current understanding of the projects time line and economics. There is continuing debate, however, about the physical configuration and the ownership of the pipeline. In addition, the issue of Alaskas oil and natural gas production taxes has been raised, in the context of a current market environment characterized by rising construction costs and falling natural gas prices. If rates of return on investment by producers are reduced to unacceptable levels, or if the project faces significant delays, other sources of natural gas, such as unconventional natural gas production and liquefied natural gas imports, could fulfill the demand that otherwise would be served by an Alaska pipeline.

  10. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    thermoacetica Methanogenic sludge AMP (AY884087) PS4SGXI910Bacteroidetes Anaerobic sludge gene (AB195893) FJ469332LCFA enrichment Methanogenic sludge High temperature Dagang

  11. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition RFI | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-DMarch 9, 2015Watchdog| Department ofA Virtual

  12. Strategic Planning Opens Doors for Isolated Alaskan Village | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1 DOE|Energy Strategic Planning Opens

  13. Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy Costs by IncreasingWholeWind Energy Wind

  14. Rebate Program Serves Alaskans with Disabilities | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts onReal-Time Chemical Imaging ofReapingReasonableRebate

  15. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition Social Media Kit |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *Reindustrialization

  16. Hoteliers Strike Gold with Geothermal Alaskan Resort | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof Energy BeforeSavingss g n i r p S r e p

  17. MHK Projects/Galena ABS Alaskan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos Bay OPT WaveFishers IslandShelter IslandABS

  18. MHK Projects/Ruby ABS Alaskan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 JumpCoos BayOysterReliance Light ProjectRuby ABS

  19. The Advancing Date of Spring Snowmelt in the Alaskan Artic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConferencePriceshieldingFocus The

  20. Statement by Secretary Bodman Regarding Alaskan Natural Gas Contract |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVESDepartmentSpecialCode ofDepartmentCoordination

  1. Request for Information -- Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale Power RateEnergy Exclusionsfor a

  2. Alaskan Cooperative Wins Wind Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslie PezzulloAgendaChampion:Plans

  3. Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergyPartnership for EnergyPetroleumZero toofDepartment

  4. Remote Alaskan Communities Energy Efficiency Competition | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnowRedoxRelated Links Related

  5. River Turbine Provides Clean Energy to Remote Alaskan Village | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesA Token Requesting AQuestionsRevolving LoanRiskof

  6. Energy Department Announces Request for Information on the Remote Alaskan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicleDepartment ofGraphicsPower ElectricEnergyDepartment

  7. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  8. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of parameterization biases in single-column model CAM5 simulations of shallow cumulus

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Wuyin; Liu, Yangang; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann; Endo, Satoshi; Song, Hua; Feng, Sha; Toto, Tami; Li, Zhijin; Zhang, Minghua

    2015-06-19

    Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed case studies from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plain site during the RACORO aircraft campaign to facilitate research on model representation of boundary-layer clouds. This paper focuses on using the single-column Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (SCAM5) simulations of a multi-day continental shallow cumulus case to identify specific parameterization causes of low-cloud biases. Consistent model biases among the simulations driven by a set of alternative forcings suggest that uncertainty in the forcing plays only amore »relatively minor role. In-depth analysis reveals that the model's shallow cumulus convection scheme tends to significantly under-produce clouds during the times when shallow cumuli exist in the observations, while the deep convective and stratiform cloud schemes significantly over-produce low-level clouds throughout the day. The links between model biases and the underlying assumptions of the shallow cumulus scheme are further diagnosed with the aid of large-eddy simulations and aircraft measurements, and by suppressing the triggering of the deep convection scheme. It is found that the weak boundary layer turbulence simulated is directly responsible for the weak cumulus activity and the simulated boundary layer stratiform clouds. Increased vertical and temporal resolutions are shown to lead to stronger boundary layer turbulence and reduction of low-cloud biases.« less

  9. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy simulations of cumulus clouds and evaluation with in-situ and ground-based observations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Endo, Satoshi; Fridlind, Ann M.; Lin, Wuyin; Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Toto, Tami; Ackerman, Andrew S.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Jackson, Robert C.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Liu, Yangang

    2015-06-19

    A 60-hour case study of continental boundary layer cumulus clouds is examined using two large-eddy simulation (LES) models. The case is based on observations obtained during the RACORO Campaign (Routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Aerial Facility [AAF] Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths [CLOWD] Optical Radiative Observations) at the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains site. The LES models are driven by continuous large-scale and surface forcings, and are constrained by multi-modal and temporally varying aerosol number size distribution profiles derived from aircraft observations. We compare simulated cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties with ground-based remote sensing and aircraft observations.more »The LES simulations capture the observed transitions of the evolving cumulus-topped boundary layers during the three daytime periods, and generally reproduce variations of droplet number concentration with liquid water content (LWC), corresponding to the gradient between the cloud centers and cloud edges at given heights. The observed LWC values fall within the range of simulated values; the observed droplet number concentrations are commonly higher than simulated, but differences remain on par with potential estimation errors in the aircraft measurements. Sensitivity studies examine the influences of bin microphysics versus bulk microphysics, aerosol advection, supersaturation treatment, and aerosol hygroscopicity. Simulated macrophysical cloud properties are found to be insensitive in this non-precipitating case, but microphysical properties are especially sensitive to bulk microphysics supersaturation treatment and aerosol hygroscopicity.« less

  10. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  11. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, S-band Radar (williams-s_band)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Williams, Christopher

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  12. First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)/thermal regimes core hole project at Valles Caldera, New Mexico (VC-1): Drilling report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowley, J.; Hawkins, W.; Gardner, J. (comps.)

    1987-02-01

    This report is a review and summary of the core drilling operations of the first Valles Caldera research borehole (VC-1) under the Thermal Regimes element of the Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP). The project is a portion of a broader program that seeks to answer fundamental scientific questions about magma, rock/water interactions, and volcanology through shallow (<1-km) core holes at Long Valley, California; Salton Sea, California; and the Valles Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and performance. It is intended to guide future research on the core and in the borehole, as well as have applications to other areas and scientific problems in the Valles Caldera. The primary objectives of this Valles Caldera coring effort were (1) to study the hydrogeochemistry of a subsurface geothermal outflow zone of the caldera near the source of convective upflow, (2) to obtain structural and stratigraphic information from intracaldera rock formations in the southern ring-fracture zone, and (3) to obtain continuous core samples through the youngest volcanic unit in Valles Caldera, the Banco Bonito rhyolite (approximately 0.1 Ma). All objectives were met. The high percentage of core recovery and the excellent quality of the samples are especially notable. New field sample (core) handling and documentation procedures were successfully utilized. The procedures were designed to provide consistent field handling of the samples and logs obtained through the national CSDP.

  13. Dynamics of the continental margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    On 18--20 June 1990, over 70 oceanographers conducting research in the ocean margins of North America attended a workshop in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The purpose of the workshop was to provide the Department of Energy with recommendations for future research on the exchange of energy-related materials between the coastal and interior ocean and the relationship between the ocean margins and global change. The workshop was designed to optimize the interaction of scientists from specific research disciplines (biology, chemistry, physics and geology) as they developed hypotheses, research questions and topics and implementation plans. The participants were given few restraints on the research they proposed other than realistic time and monetary limits. The interdisciplinary structure of the meeting promoted lively discussion and creative research plans. The meeting was divided into four working groups based on lateral, vertical, air/sea and sediment/water processes. Working papers were prepared and distributed before the meeting. During the meeting the groups revised the papers and added recommendations that appear in this report, which was reviewed by an Executive Committee.

  14. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-19

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  15. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  16. MARINE ALGAE OF BEAUFORT, N. C., AND ADJACENT By W. D. Hoyt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , such as gelatins. They constitute the raw materials from which are derived valuable commercial products for the manufacture of food for fishes out of the inorganic materials which are otherwise useless or unavailable

  17. SOME HYDROIDS OF BEAUFORT. NORTH CAROLINA By C. McLean Fraser. Ph. D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks. Some specimens obtained from the sea buoy might be men- tioned here, but as this had been changed to 20 feet, with little success, and near the sea buoy in 6 or 7 fathoms. These forms, in general, were

  18. Photobiogeochemical cycling of carbon monoxide in the southeastern Beaufort Sea in spring and autumn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    and autumn Huixiang Xie1 Institut des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite´ du Que´bec a` Rimouski, Rimouski, Que´bec G5L 3A1, Canada Simon Be´langer De´partement de biologie, chimie et ge´ographie, Universite´ du Que´bec a` Rimouski, Rimouski, Que´bec G5L 3A1, Canada Serge Demers Institut des sciences de

  19. Assessing the Predictability of the Beaufort Sea Minimum Ice Extent in a Changing Arctic Climate Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirk, Laura Marie

    2014-04-25

    Understanding the climatic drivers of changes in sea ice extent in the Arctic has become increasingly important as record minima in the September sea ice extent continue to be reached. This research therefore addresses the question of which synoptic...

  20. port of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries ological Laboratory, Beaufort, N.C.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6 Operation of Hadley Falls Dam fish lift- -1 9 66. 6 Collection of shad eggs above Hadley Falls Dam menhaden fishery Catch sampling: Gulf menhaden fishery ··. Analysis of 1965 menhaden fishery statistics ......... ....... . ............... ..........Administration and Maintenance Meetings and training programs .......................... Publications

  1. Beaufort County, North Carolina ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformationArkansas:InformationHeadBear,Beasley,

  2. DOE-Sponsored Beaufort Sea Expedition Studies Methane's Role in Global

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis, MarchALARAPRINCIPLES33-94 December 1994 DOEMay

  3. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agriculturalwhereas latent energy fluxes in spruce forests, with theirenergy exchange in Arctic tundra and boreal forest:

  4. A Lipid Biomarker Investigation of Organic Matter Sources and Methane Cycling in Alaskan Thaw Lake Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Mark

    2012-01-01

    the most recalcitrant. The diagenesis of organic matter isorganisms and, during diagenesis, are reduced in chemicalskeleton to survive through diagenesis and catagenesis while

  5. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: Spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, U.

    2013-01-01

    soil wetness in Earth System Models may lead to largeand testing of Earth System Model (ESMs). Several recentsoil wetness in Earth System Models (Lawrence & Slater,

  6. Fishing Revenue, Productivity and Product Choice in the Alaskan Pollock Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Catherine J.; O. Torres, Marcelo; Felthoven, Ronald G.

    2009-01-01

    10.1007/s10640-009-9295-3 Fishing Revenue, Productivity andand Hannesson (2002). Fishing Revenue, Productivity andof price signals observed. Fishing Revenue, Productivity and

  7. The evolution prospects of the post-OPA90 Alaskan Oil Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Matthew Ryan

    2005-01-01

    In response to the grounding of the Exxon Valdez on March 24, 1989, the United States Congress enacted the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, a series of regulations requiring technical and operational changes in tank vessels ...

  8. Failure to Progress: A Renewed Call for American Indians and Alaskan Natives on the Federal Bench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronk, Elizabeth Ann

    2011-01-01

    In recent history, women and people of color are increasingly represented in the federal government, and the federal judiciary more specifically. Yet, despite this progress in the appointment, confirmation and election of ...

  9. Evaluation of Fatigue Resistance in Alaskan Sled Dogs Through Exercise Induced Myocyte Gene Expression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, Natacha Maria

    2012-02-14

    The physiological responses to exercise depend on intensity, duration, and type of exercise. The muscles in the body have complex regulation responses in order to create a certain resistance and adaptation to the exercise ...

  10. Fluxes, dynamics and chemistry of suspended particulate matter in a southeast Alaskan fjord

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, G.H.

    1986-01-01

    The weighted mean fluxes over the June 1982-October 1983 were 290, 519, 812, 1124 g m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/, respectively, determined using sediment traps deployed at 40, 120, 300 and 375 m depth in the 380 m water column. The long-term sedimentation rate was estimated at average 589 g m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ from sediment /sup 210/Pb profiles. Substantial SPM input to mid-depths (below 100 m) from the side arms was noted. Thus, the flux measured at 120 m depth was designated as the primary flux of the SPM to the basin. The sediment focusing resulting from the V shaped basin does not appear to be important. Using particulate Al as a tracer, resuspension rate was estimated at some 30-80% of the vertical flux below 280 m depth. Based on the SPM dynamics, the non-conservative behavior of particulate biogenic matter, Mn and Fe was investigated using a primary-resuspended-altered flux model.

  11. Microsoft Word - Comments to DOE on Alaskan LNG Project.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    organization that has published extensive research on developments in U.S. and world energy markets since 1944. Our focus is on the intersection of petroleum economics...

  12. The impacts and implications of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forest composition and albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    solar radiation (Lewis & Barnsley, 1994). Radiation values were taken from the surface radiation budget data

  13. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications for

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway1997) | Open Energy2005)EnergyGeothermal

  14. Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A sCOLONYDepartment

  15. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    record; influence of glacial melting rates on the Youngerrecord; influence of glacial melting rates on the Youngersediment inputs from glacial melting. Drainage across the

  16. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    N. W. , 1995. Sequence Stratigraphy. Annual Review of Earthinterpretation utilizing sequence stratigraphy, In: Bally,N. W. , 1995. Sequence Stratigraphy. Annual Review of Earth

  17. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    of seismic stratigraphy, Tulsa: American Association ofchanges: An integrated approach, Tulsa: Society of Economiccorrelation of time and facies, Tulsa: American Association

  18. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    Vail, P. R. , 1987. Seismic stratigraphy interpretationA. W. (Ed. ), Atlas of seismic stratigraphy, Tulsa: American274. Vail, P. R. , 1987. Seismic stratigraphy interpretation

  19. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States) UCLA Joint...

  20. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    N. W. , 1995. Sequence Stratigraphy. Annual Review of Earthinterpretation utilizing sequence stratigraphy, In: Bally,D. , 1990. Siliciclastic sequence stratigraphy in well logs,

  1. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    P. R. , 1987. Seismic stratigraphy interpretation utilizingP. R. , 1987. Seismic stratigraphy interpretation utilizing

  2. Continental margin architecture : sea level and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jenna Catherine

    2007-01-01

    stability: the Storegga Slide. EGS XXVII General Assembly.of magnetic susceptibility. EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly:

  3. QER- Comment of Continental Resources, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Per your request I am sending some backup data pursuant to our conversation today. You'll note I tweaked the numbers a bit since we spoke after digging a little deeper into the data.

  4. CSDP: The seismology of continental thermal regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aki, K.

    1991-05-01

    The past year continued to be extremely productive following up two major breakthroughs made in the preceding year. One of the breakthroughs was the derivation of an integral equation for time- dependent power spectra, which unified all the existing theories on seismic scattering including the radiative transfer theory for total energy and single-multiple scattering theories based on the ray approach. We successfully applied the method to the data from the USGS regional seismic arrays in central California, Long Valley and Island of Hawaii, and obtained convincing results on the scattering Q{sup {minus}1} and intrinsic Q{sup {minus}1} in these areas for the frequency range from 1 Hz to 20 Hz. The frequency dependence of scattering Q{sup {minus}1} is, then, interpreted in terms of random medium with continuous or discrete scatterers. The other breakthrough was the application of T-matrix formulation to the seismic scattering problem. We are currently working on 2-dimensional inclusions with high and low velocity contrast with the surrounding medium. In addition to the above two main lines of research, we were able to use so-called T-phase'' observed on the Island of Hawaii to map the Q value with a good spatial resolution. We found that we can eliminate remarkably well the frequency dependent recording site effect from the T-phase amplitude using the amplification factor for coda waves, further confirming the fundamental separability of source, path and site effects for coda waves, and proving the effectiveness of stochastic modeling of high-frequency seismic waves. 70 refs., 24 figs.

  5. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, New Mexico. The report emphasizes coring operations with reference to the stratigraphy of the core hole, core quality description, core rig specifications, and...

  6. US Continental Interior Precambrian-Paleozoic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Superior Upland (Pc) Midcontinent Rift (Pc) Michigan Basin (Pal) #12;© EarthStructure (2nd ed) 3012

  7. Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Science Objective

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection ofOctober10MidSchoolMath

  8. Continental Components Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumer Connection Jump to:web

  9. Paleoreconstruction of Particulate Organic Carbon Inputs to the High-Arctic Colville River Delta, Beaufort Sea, Alaska 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schreiner, Kathryn 1983-

    2013-01-09

    High Arctic permafrosted soils represent a massive sink in the global carbon cycle, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger...

  10. Deep-Sea Research II 52 (2005) 32813302 Sediment transport by sea ice in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rigor, Ignatius G.

    2005-01-01

    with entrainment of frazil ice into deformed, multiple layers of rafted nilas, indicative of a flaw-lead resuspension and subsequent ice entrainment (420 m for the Chukchi Sea). Sediment loads averaged at 128 t km­2 deep for resuspension and entrainment) is at minimum 4 Â 106 t in the sampling area and is estimated

  11. Seasonal variability of water mass distribution in the southeastern Beaufort Sea determined by total alkalinity and d18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ]. Satellite and field observations have revealed a steadily decreasing minimum ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, greater light penetration and an increase in nutrients brought to the euphotic zone by vertical mixing] and the biological CO2 pump. Hence, under these conditions, the Arctic Ocean will play a more active role

  12. GPS constraints on continental deformation in the Africa-Arabia-Eurasia continental collision zone and implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vernant, Philippe

    the Arabian plate, adjacent parts of the Zagros and central Iran, Turkey, and the Aegean/Peloponnesus relative shortening along the Caucasus and Zagros mountain belts around the periphery of the collision zone

  13. Tectonic and sedimentary response to oblique and incipient continental - continental collision the easternmost Mediterranean (Cyprus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinnaird, Timothy C.

    , the ‘Cyprus Arc’. Early Pleistocene to Recent D3a transpression generated strike-slip faulting along E-W trends, conjugate left-lateral NNE-SSW-trending and right-lateral NNW-SSE-trending strike-slip faults and reactivated Tortonian D1 NW-SE and NE-SW...

  14. President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investments to Combat Climate Change and Assist Remote Alaskan Communities President Obama Announces New Investments to Combat Climate Change and Assist Remote Alaskan Communities...

  15. Displacement of diesel fuel with wind energy in rural Alaskan villages. Final progress and project closeout report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meiners, Dennis; Drouhilet, Steve; Reeve, Brad; Bergen, Matt

    2002-03-11

    The basic concept behind this project was to construct a wind diesel hybrid power system which combines and maximizes the intermittent and variable energy output of wind turbine(s) with diesel generator(s) to provide continuous high quality electric power to weak isolated mini-grids.

  16. Cesium-137 inventories in Alaskan Tundra, lake and marine sediments: An indicator of recent organic material transport?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |; Larsen, I.L.; Solis, C.; Olsen, C.R.

    1993-06-01

    Tundra sampling was accomplished in 1989--1990 at Imnavait Creek, Alaska (68{degree}37` N, 149{degree}17` W). Inventories of {sup 137}Cs (102--162 mBq/cm{sup 2}) are close to expectations, based upon measured atmospheric deposition for this latitude. Accumulated inventories of {sup 137}Cs in tundra decrease by up to 50% along a transect to Prudhoe Bay (70{degree}13` N, 148{degree}30` W). Atmospheric deposition of {sup 137}Cs decreased with latitude in the Arctic, but declines in deposition would have been relatively small over this distance (200 km). This suggests a recent loss of {sup 137}Cs and possibly associated organic matter from tundra over the northern portions of the transect between Imnavait Creek and Prudhoe Bay. Sediments from Toolik Lake (68{degree}38` N, 149{degree}38` W) showed widely varying {sup 137}Cs inventories, from a low of 22 mBq/cm{sup 2} away from the lake inlet, to a high between 140 to >200 mBq/cm{sup 2} near the main stream inflow. This was indicative of recent accumulation of cesium and possibly organic material associated with it in arctic lakes, although additional sampling is needed.

  17. Reconstruction of a high-resolution late holocene arctic paleoclimate record from Colville River delta sediments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiner, Kathryn Melissa; Lowry, Thomas Stephen

    2013-10-01

    This work was partially supported by the Sandia National Laboratories,Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (LDRD) fellowship program in conjunction with Texas A&M University (TAMU). The research described herein is the work of Kathryn M. Schreiner (Katie') and her advisor, Thomas S. Bianchi and represents a concise description of Katie's dissertation that was submitted to the TAMU Office of Graduate Studies in May 2013 in partial fulfillment of her doctorate of philosophy degree. High Arctic permafrost soils contain a massive amount of organic carbon, accounting for twice as much carbon as what is currently stored as carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, with current warming trends this sink is in danger of thawing and potentially releasing large amounts of carbon as both carbon dioxide and methane into the atmosphere. It is difficult to make predictions about the future of this sink without knowing how it has reacted to past temperature and climate changes. This project investigated long term, fine scale particulate organic carbon (POC) delivery by the high-Arctic Colville River into Simpson's Lagoon in the near-shore Beaufort Sea. Modern POC was determined to be a mixture of three sources (riverine soils, coastal erosion, and marine). Downcore POC measurements were performed in a core close to the Colville River output and a core close to intense coastal erosion. Inputs of the three major sources were found to vary throughout the last two millennia, and in the Colville River core covary significantly with Alaskan temperature reconstructions.

  18. The Wicked Problem of Oil & Gas Development in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Current Permitting and Evaluation of Marine Spatial Planning as a Potential Management Tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes, Emilie Ann

    2014-06-02

    Changing climatic conditions and shifting global economics have thrust the Arctic into the spotlight for many scientists, academics, and policymakers as well as those in offshore industries, particularly in shipping and oil and gas. This research...

  19. BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS EXPLORATION ACTIVITIES IN THE CHUKCHI AND BEAUFORT SEAS IN 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS..............................................................................................................84 i #12;BIOLOGICAL OPINION ON ISSUANCE OF INCIDENTAL HARASSMENT AUTHORIZATIONS FOR OIL AND GAS" permits under section 101(a)(5) of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, as amended, for certain oil and gas

  20. Potential for hydroelectric development in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Testimony concerning Alaskan hydroelectricity development is presented. Various public and private organizations were represented.

  1. Coccoliths in the surface sediments of the Louisiana continental shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimers, David Dean

    1972-01-01

    144 167 LIST OF FIGURES Ffg. 1 E pl f Go ph* (~Gh 8, oceanica) Page Fig. 2 Location of' Study Area in the Gulf of Mexico 13 Fig. 3 Station Locations in Study Area 15 Fig. 4 Prevailing Surface Currents of the Gulf of' Mexico 18 Fig. 5 Surface... FIGURE 3 Station Locations in Study Area 94 229 I; 294 294 Ol 1st 394 3' 92, 91 I 224 P'. . :. . ':;:;+~ ] 20 , '/ ~. 222 2 2 229 L 399 O'"F OF SIKXt 0 4 XOOO Cont-Urs in Fattiness 27 OCEANOGRAPHIC FACTORS OF THE STUDY AREA...

  2. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    Salt Lake City abstract, (122- Atwater, T. , 1970: Implications of Plate Tectonics for the Cenozoic Tectonic

  3. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    both helped me with seismic stratigraphy and lots of geologyanalysis of seismic sequence stratigraphy within the Gulf

  4. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    Island- Kauai Island- Maui Island- Molokai Island- HawaiiIsland- Kauai Island- Maui Island- Molokai Island- HawaiiIsland- Kauai Island- Maui Island- Molokai Island- Hawaii

  5. PROGRAM OVERVIEW Australia is the size of continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rights. This program is designed to explore the legal and social issues shaping environmental policy in Asia. Students will experience the aboriginal culture-- 40,000 years old and contrast the political posture of Australia and the United States. This study will focus on environmental, land use, trade

  6. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) NASA Goddard Inst. for Space Studies (GISS), New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Illinois,...

  7. Continental Breakfast $10 Selection of Assorted Bottled Fruit Juices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    Fruit Assortment of Freshly Baked Pastries Fresh Brewed Starbucks Coffee, Decaffeinated & Assorted Tazo or Pork Sausage Links Home Fried Potatoes Assortment of Freshly Baked Pastries Fresh Brewed Starbucks Baked Pastries Fresh Brewed Starbucks Coffee, Decaffeinated, Assorted Tazo Teas Selection of Assorted

  8. Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-2 miles down into the crust. Access to some of these rocks, strewn along the rover's path, provided critical information that could not be observed by other means, such as by...

  9. Initial results from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    precaldera volcaniclastic breccia, and 523 m of Paleozoic carbonates, sandstones, and shales. A previously unknown obsidian flow was encountered at 160 m depth underlying the...

  10. Gas hydrates at two sites of an active continental margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1985-03-01

    Sediment containing gas hydrates from two distant Deep Sea Drilling Project sites (565 and 568), located about 670 km apart or the landward flank of the Middle America Trench, was studied to determine the geochemical conditions that characterize the occurrence of gas hydrates. Site 565 was located in the Pacific Ocean offshore the Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica in 3,111 m of water. The depth of the hole at this site was 328 m, and gas hydrates were recovered from 285 and 319 m. Site 568 was located about 670 km to the northwest offshore Guatemala in 2,031 m of water. At this site the hole penetrated to 418 m, and gas hydrates were encountered at 404 m. Both sites are characterized by rates of sedimentation exceeding about 30 m/m.y. and organic carbon contents exceeding about 0.5%. The magnitudes and trends of gas compositions, residual gas concentrations and chlorinity variations are generally similar at both sites. The carbon isotopic compositions are significantly heavier at Site 568 than at Site 565. The isotopic compositions and trends at Site 565 are typical of biogenic methane generation. At Site 568, the isotopic compositions are very heavy. In spite of its heavy carbon isotopic composition, this methane is believed to have a biogenic source.

  11. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    shape the interpretations of the multi-channel seismic data.seismic sequence stratigraphy within the Gulf will produce a ?rst-order interpretation

  12. Water Vapor Turbulence Profiles in Stationary Continental Convective Mixed Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, D. D.; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Berg, Larry K.; Schween, Jan

    2014-10-08

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Raman lidar at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in north-central Oklahoma has collected water vapor mixing ratio (q) profile data more than 90% of the time since October 2004. Three hundred (300) cases were identified where the convective boundary layer was quasi-stationary and well-mixed for a 2-hour period, and q mean, variance, third order moment, and skewness profiles were derived from the 10-s, 75-m resolution data. These cases span the entire calendar year, and demonstrate that the q variance profiles at the mixed layer (ML) top changes seasonally, but is more related to the gradient of q across the interfacial layer. The q variance at the top of the ML shows only weak correlations (r < 0.3) with sensible heat flux, Deardorff convective velocity scale, and turbulence kinetic energy measured at the surface. The median q skewness profile is most negative at 0.85 zi, zero at approximately zi, and positive above zi, where zi is the depth of the convective ML. The spread in the q skewness profiles is smallest between 0.95 zi and zi. The q skewness at altitudes between 0.6 zi and 1.2 zi is correlated with the magnitude of the q variance at zi, with increasingly negative values of skewness observed lower down in the ML as the variance at zi increases, suggesting that in cases with larger variance at zi there is deeper penetration of the warm, dry free tropospheric air into the ML.

  13. PALEOLIQUEFACTION STUDIES IN CONTINENTAL SETTINGS: GEOLOGIC AND GEOTECHNICAL FACTORS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ANALYSIS INTRODUCTION THE PROCESS OF LIQUEFACTION AND ITS MANIFESTATIONS The Basic Process Liquefaction Susceptibility U.S. to assess seismic hazards, and could be used elsewhere to good purpose because seismically induced liquefaction features are found in some locales and not in others. The guidelines that we

  14. Models of Deltaic and Inner Continental Shelf Landform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    delta, stratigraphy, geomorphology, sediment transport, simulations Abstract The morphology of passive sediments and water to the deep ocean. This morphological diver- sity is based on two main building elements to simulate the long-term evolution of passive siliciclastic shelves. Passive siliciclastic shelves

  15. ANATOMY AND EVOLUTION OF THE TRIASSIC-JURASSIC CONTINENTAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of North America and Africa. These basins locally overprint the Appalachian orogen and involve, 1984; Rosendahl, 1987] and are also the prevalent architecture of transtensional regimes, at least within the Tanganyika-Rukwa-Malawi system in East Africa [Rosendahl et al., 1992; Scott et al., 1992

  16. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2012-01-06

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  17. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds (comstock-hvps)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jensen, Mike; Comstock, Jennifer; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

  18. Changing spatial epidemiology of pertussis in continental USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choisy, Marc

    pathogen threat. To explore this issue, we examine case reports of whooping cough (or pertussis localities but in two eras separated by many decades. Whooping cough is a respiratory disease caused

  19. Active continental subduction and crustal exhumation: the Taiwan orogeny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Cheng-Horng

    . General background The island of Taiwan is located at a complex intersection between the Philippine Sea and Eurasian plates (Fig. 1). East of Taiwan, the Philippine Sea plate subducts northward beneath the Ryukyu subducts to the east beneath the Philippine Sea plate (Tsai et al., 1977). The major part of the island

  20. The world's offshore continental margins contain vast reserves of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    - ural gas that is embedded in cold, near-seafloorstrata.Published esti- mates suggest that the energy rep- resented by gas hydrate may exceed the energy available from conventional fossil fuel by a fac energy planning. Groups in several nations are attemptingtoevaluatetheresource and to define seafloor

  1. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    shallow cumulus Climatically important low-level clouds are commonly misrepresented in climate models. The FAst-physics System TEstbed and Research (FASTER) project has constructed...

  2. Decomposition and Organic Matter Quality in Continental Peatlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turetsky, Merritt

    deglaciation and represent a long-term sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Soil temperatures incubations to quantify carbon dioxide (CO2) pro- duction in peat formed under different permafrost regimes (Alberta, Sas- katchewan) or within depth intervals (surface, deep). Internal lawn peat produces more CO2

  3. the continental crust or the over-lying sediments. Microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    of the University of Washington, Seattle. Just how massive this ocean crustal bio- sphere might be remains unclear,000 kilometers through the global ocean. For example, something seems to be nib- bling on the glass that makes up about 5% of ocean crustal rock; samples of the glass brought up by deep drilling are scarred with pits

  4. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    alteration, ore deposits, hydrology, structural geology, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors John A. Musgrave, Fraser E. Goff, Lisa Shevenell, Patricio E. Trujillo Jr,...

  5. Continental Liquid-phase Stratus Clouds at SGP: Meteorological Influences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingConcentrating Department of Energy'sContango in

  6. Drilling Report- First CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont,Missouri:DowEnergyDraxDrexelSolarThermal

  7. Initial results from VC-1, First Continental Scientific Drilling Program

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt.Infinifuel Biodieself rIngos PresovCore Hole in

  8. InterContinental Hotels Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8, 13 (Vt.InfinifuelInovaEnergyCorporation Smart

  9. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design togovCampaignsMASRAD: Pt. Reyes Stratus(MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers

  11. Curiosity rover finds evidence of Mars' primitive continental crust

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsClusterInformationContractCorporateCrookerCrystalCuriosity rover finds

  12. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurementsWarmingMethane BackgroundMethane

  13. Continental Divide El Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,CoalConcordiaConsumer Connection Jump to:webEl Coop Inc Jump to:

  14. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 2. Large-eddy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) | SciTechQuirkssimulations of

  15. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. 3. Separation of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) | SciTechQuirkssimulations

  16. RACORO continental boundary layer cloud investigations. Part I: Case study

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech ConnectSpeedingConnect Pulse energy(Conference) |

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart Grid DataInformationOpenOsmosis CapitalBanks

  18. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN A County roadFeet) Deliveries DennisVertical

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    customers in Craven, Dare, Washington, Pamlico, Beaufort and Hyde counties. Home, farm and business owners... Eligibility: Commercial, Residential, Agricultural, Multifamily...

  20. Review of technology for Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W. M.

    1980-08-01

    The technical background briefing report is the first step in the preparation of a plan for engineering research oriented toward Arctic offshore oil and gas recovery. A five-year leasing schedule for the ice-prone waters of the Arctic offshore is presented, which also shows the projected dates of the lease sale for each area. The estimated peak production rates for these areas are given. There is considerable uncertainty for all these production estimates, since no exploratory drilling has yet taken place. A flow chart is presented which relates the special Arctic factors, such as ice and permafrost, to the normal petroleum production sequence. Some highlights from the chart and from the technical review are: (1) in many Arctic offshore locations the movement of sea ice causes major lateral forces on offshore structures, which are much greater than wave forces; (2) spray ice buildup on structures, ships and aircraft will be considerable, and must be prevented or accommodated with special designs; (3) the time available for summer exploratory drilling, and for deployment of permanent production structures, is limited by the return of the pack ice. This time may be extended by ice-breaking vessels in some cases; (4) during production, icebreaking workboats will service the offshore platforms in most areas throughout the year; (5) transportation of petroleum by icebreaking tankers from offshore tanker loading points is a highly probable situation, except in the Alaskan Beaufort; and (6) Arctic pipelines must contend with permafrost, making instrumentation necessary to detect subtle changes of the pipe before rupture occurs.

  1. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Contact: Connie Barclay/Monica Allen FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 301-427-8003 May 2, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Alaskan Natives, and are informed by the latest science as well as lessons learned from the Deepwater

  3. Real-time quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of gas in borehole fluid samples acquired using the U-Tube sampling methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.

    2006-01-01

    drilling mud tracer in Beaufort exploration wells: Petroleum Society of Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy Annual Meeting, 25th, Calgary, 1974, Paper

  4. U.S. Marine Corps Stand at Forefront of Energy and Water Savings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the U.S. Marine Corps Beaufort Air Station's energy and water savings accomplishments.

  5. Maggi Kelly -CV p. 1 Maggi Kelly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Resources Associate. NOAA-NMFS Lab, Beaufort, NC 1996 Ph.D. Department of Geography. University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 1991 M.A. Department of Geography

  6. The snowball Earth aftermath: Exploring the limits of continental weathering processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbonates capping Neoproterozoic glacial deposits contain peculiar sedimentological features and geochemical weathering alone does not supply enough cations during the snowball melting phase to account at 635 Ma (Hoffman et al., 2004; Condon et al., 2005). The melting of these snowball Earth events

  7. AbstractAll five species of sea tur tles in continental U.S. waters are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    loggerhead (Caretta caretta), green (Chelonia mydas), and Kemp's ridley (Lepidochelys kempii) sea turtles green tur tles (1­7%) are too large to fit through the required minimum-size TED open ings?* Sheryan P. Epperly Wendy G. Teas Southeast Fisheries Science Center National Marine Fisheries Service 75

  8. Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic techniques for identifying sediment processes on continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    N . W . Driscoll. Sequence stratigraphy. Annual of Earth andsequences to determine the tectonic and climatic history of the region. Stratigraphy

  9. Continental-scale net radiation and evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    exchanges of carbon, water, and energy in young and old-properties alter water and energy ?uxes of an oak-grassEcosystem and understory water and energy exchange for a

  10. Epibenthic invertebrates and fishes of the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Jabr, Abdulrahman Mohammad

    1995-01-01

    of 287 individuals per hectare. The average biomass for all the assemblages was 294 mg/m2 (0.294 g/m2), and the average diversity (H') was 2.0. Hypoxic conditions were not found during the investigation. There was no correlation found between the number...

  11. Research Review Schedule --Wednesday, October 12, 2011 8:00 AM --Continental Breakfast at CMRR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    of Active Flying Height Control Slider Pablo Salas Mendez, PhD A3 Simulation of HAMR/Thermal Flying Height Ruinan Chang G4 Micromagnetic Analysis of Write Head Dynamics using FASTMAG Marco Escobar G5

  12. Continental energy security: Energy security in the North American context1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    nuclear and hydroelectricity, while Canada is in the top ten for oil, natural gas, and electricity from nuclear and hydroelectricity production, and Mexico ranks in the top ten for oil production (IEA, 2010% each), hydroelectricity (5%), and a mix of renewables (2.5%) (U.S. EIA, 2011). Demand pressures

  13. Influence of tree species on continental differences in boreal fires and climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, BM; Rogers, BM; Soja, AJ; Goulden, ML; Randerson, JT

    2015-01-01

    stand age on the boreal forest energy balance. Agric. For.energy cycling as fire-mediated transitions between tropical forests

  14. Stratification Prediction and Bottom Boundary Layer Dynamics over the Texas-Louisiana Continental Shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wenxia

    2015-03-02

    and hypoxia formation. In this research, Both observations and numerical models are used to study models' ability of reproducing observed stratification and bottom boundary layer dynamics over the Texas-Louisiana shelf. Simulated vertical stratification...

  15. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    in Sanliurfa, Turkey, Renewable Energy. 29 (2004) 1265-1275.in Brunei Darussalam, Renewable Energy. 24 (2001) 223-234.by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) [9], the

  16. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    and validation.   Solar Energy.   73:5, 307? Perez, R. , irradiance forecasts for solar energy applications based on using satellite data.   Solar Energy 67:1?3, 139?150.  

  17. Tidal analysis of water level in continental boreholes Version 2.2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, Emily

    tidal analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 4.3.1 The "credo

  18. Petrology and origin of three rock outcrops off the Texas continental shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harber, Dale Lynn

    1974-01-01

    ;so carr iud sed ir?! ats i ro? t'hc Go(credo sud lit! zou r'ver. oi' Texas far to tf! east (Davf!u; e!!d Moor!, 19/0). lfesterly !irif o l!as occurred !!f. otl:c r tin!. . perio!ls !aoving Missf ssippi River:! dfm! nts far. to thc w!!f . Gonsf der fng...

  19. Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    Goldberg, E.D. , 1976. Methane production and consumption inanaerobic oxidation of methane. Nature, 407 , 623-626.profiles indicate in situ methane flux from underlying gas

  20. The continental shelf and upper slope of the Oregon Cascadia margin are underlain by an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    stratigraphy includes a regional late Miocene unconformity that may coincide with a worldwide hiatus ca. 7 and correlated seaward reflec- tor from seismic reflection data clearly out- lines deformation into major mar- gin. The basin stratigraphy contains several re- gional unconformities, suggesting a complex his

  1. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  2. Electromagnetic imaging of the crust and upper mantle across the continental margin in central California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheelock, Brent David

    2012-01-01

    to be made about this semi-diurnal tidal energy variation inthe spectrograms: the tidal energy is observed to be much2 s period when the tidal energy is high; the tidal energy

  3. Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

    2001-01-01

    content were measured using a new wet chemical technique. The []³?S relative to Vienna Canyon Diablo troilite was determined for TRS and hydrate H?S. Extensive (>95%) reduction of pore-fluid sulfate occurred, resulting in exceptionally high []H?S...

  4. Surficial sediments of the continental rise and slope, Niger Delta, West Africa: properties and geology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobilka, David William

    1999-01-01

    The submarine portions of the Niger Delta, West Africa are undergoing active gravity tectonic deformation due to thick deposits of ductile shale overlain by paralic sands. Because the region is rich in hydrocarbon reserves, the subdermal Niger Delta...

  5. Fractal topography and subsurface water flows from fluvial bedforms to the continental shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    important problems such as assessing the safety of high-level radioactive waste storage facilities [Gascoyne of contaminants in freshwater environments. Fractal scaling relationships have been found in distributions of both

  6. Outer continental shelf oil and gas activities. Pacific update: August 1987 - November 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slitor, Douglas L.; Wiese, Jeffrey D.; Karpas, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    This Pacific Update focuses on the geology and petroleum potential of the Central California and Washington-Oregon OCS Planning Areas. This report discusses the following topics: offshore oil and gas resources of the Pacific region; project-specific developments and status; and magnitude and timing of offshore developments. (CBS)

  7. Influence of tree species on continental differences in boreal fires and climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, BM; Rogers, BM; Soja, AJ; Goulden, ML; Randerson, JT

    2015-01-01

    Prediction using Earth System Models award to J.T.R. (AGS-fire strategies into Earth system models, and systematically

  8. Comparison of observed and general circulation model derived continental subsurface heat flux in the Northern Hemisphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    and compared to those obtained from subsurface geothermal data. Since GCMs have bottom boundary conditions. In addition, the agreement between the LSM surface fluxes and the borehole temperature reconstructed fluxes

  9. Permeability of the continental crust: dynamic variations inferred from seismicity and metamorphism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    can be probed indirectly by various means, including hydrologic models that use geothermal data, and retrograde metamorphism. Key words: permeability, geothermal, metamorphism, seismicity Received 14 September as the ratio between the horizontal and vertical permeabilities but may also reflect variously oriented

  10. ELSEVIER Tectonophysics 279 (1997) 327350 Continental-scale rheological heterogeneities and complex intraplate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommasi, Andrea

    1997-01-01

    displayed different geotherms and lithospheric thicknesses, and therefore contrasted rheological behaviours these heterogeneities may affect strain localization and the distribution of deformation regimes and vertical strain in vertical and/or rotational deformation. Such a heterogeneous strain distribution may induce contrasted

  11. Review Article Radiogenic heat production, thermal regime and evolution of continental crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the variations in seismic velocities below the Moho. Notably, heat flow studies have delin- eated the vertical use generic models based on a "type" crustal column to calculate crustal geotherms. In stable regions, lower crustal temperatures depend on the amount and vertical distribution of heat producing elements

  12. Fish population and behavior revealed by instantaneous continental-shelf scale imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Symonds, Deanelle T

    2008-01-01

    The application of a technique to instantaneously image and continuously monitor the abundance, spatial distribution, and behavior of fish populations over thousands of square kilometers using Ocean Acoustic Waveguide ...

  13. Continental-scale comparisons of terrestrial carbon sinks estimated from satellite data and ecosystem modeling 19821998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Carbon dioxide; Ecosystems; Remote sensing; Ocean climate 1. Introduction Less than 50% of the carbon emitted). This is the so-called ``missing sink'' for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2

  14. Shelf-edge deltas and drowned barrierisland complexes on the northwest Florida outer continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    barrier­island system developed on its south and southwestern rims. The deltas appear to have formed

  15. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP), Solar Forecasting  1.   to more accurate prediction of solar  irradiance, given a to create daily solar electricity predictions accurate to 

  16. Effects of continental-scale snow albedo anomalies on the wintertime Arctic oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, R. J; Zender, C. S

    2010-01-01

    to early?season Eurasian snow cover anomalies, Mon. Weather1973), The influence of average snow depth on monthly meanof Northern Hemisphere snow cover, Int. J. Climatol. , 16,

  17. Wintertime phytoplankton bloom in the subarctic Pacific supported by continental margin iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    J. Lam,1,2,3 James K. B. Bishop,1 Cara C. Henning,4 Matthew A. Marcus,5 Glenn A. Waychunas,1, partially relieving the HNLC condition. Citation: Lam, P. J., J. K. B. Bishop, C. C. Henning, M. A. Marcus]. There have been several models of the cycling of iron in the oceans [Lefevre and Watson, 1999; Archer

  18. Continental Shelf Research 21 (2001) 11571190 Cross-shelf phytoplankton pigment variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    2001-01-01

    alongshore wind stress over the California Current induces an offshore Ekman transport, coastal upwelling Hall 213, Orono, ME, USA b College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University­83) of satellite ocean color data from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data are used to calculate cross

  19. Modeling water column structure and suspended particulate matter on the Middle Atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    that contributed to the evolution of observed thermal structure and resuspension of particulate matter during resuspension processes. It is concluded that wave-current bottom shear stress was clearly the most important process for sediment resuspension during and following both hurricanes. Discrepancies between modeled

  20. Sensing animal group behavior and bio-clutter in the ocean over continental shelf scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinivasan, Jagannathan

    2011-01-01

    Fish populations often comprise the largest biomass in a productive marine ecosystem. They typically play an essential role in inter-trophic energy transport, and serve as a mainstay for human consumption comprising roughly ...

  1. Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

    2012-09-06

    Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

  2. The Dynamics of fluid flow and associated chemical fluxes at active continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan Alan

    2007-01-01

    tracer and Pump 2 did not sample tracer, then the volumetricIf Pump 1 contains no tracer, then Q>P 1 . The volumetric

  3. The Dynamics of Fluid Flow and Associated Chemical Fluxes at Active Continental Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan A

    2007-01-01

    tracer and Pump 2 did not sample tracer, then the volumetricIf Pump 1 contains no tracer, then Q>P 1 . The volumetric

  4. 7:00 a.m. 7:50 a.m. Continental Breakfast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Arrhythmias: Genetics, Genomics and Channelopathies 8:30 a.m. ­ 9:00 a.m. Jianmin Cui, Ph.D. (Washington

  5. Interannual Atmospheric Variability Affects Continental Ice Sheet Simulations on Millennial Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael S; Bush, Andrew B. G; Marshall, Shawn J

    2008-01-01

    Wu, P. , and W. R. Peltier, 1982: Viscous gravitationalG. K. C. Clarke, and W. R. Peltier, 2000: Gla- ciologicalTech. Rep. 2, 17 pp. Peltier, W. R. , 1985: The LAGEOS

  6. Efficient localization in a dispersive waveguide : applications in terrestrial continental shelves and on Europa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sunwoong

    2006-01-01

    Methods are developed for passive source localization and environmental parameter estimation in seismo-acoustic waveguides by exploiting the dispersive behavior of guided wave propagation. The methods developed are applied ...

  7. Mode 2 waves on the continental shelf: Ephemeral components of the nonlinear internal wavefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    waves appear sporadically in mooring records obtained off the coast of New Jersey in the summer of 2006. Turbulent dissipation in the mixed layer and radiation of the short mode 1 waves contributed to rapid energy a few hours. The energy in the leading mode 2 wave was 10­100 times smaller than the energy of mode 1

  8. Tectonic Growth of a Collisional Continental Margin: Crustal Evolution of Southern Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but not limited to, all types of electronic or digital scanning or other digital or manual transformation

  9. Using citation analysis techniques for computer-assisted legal research in continental jurisdictions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Anton

    2009-01-01

    The following research investigates the use of citation analysis techniques for relevance ranking in computer-assisted legal research systems. Overviews on information retrieval, legal research, computer-assisted legal ...

  10. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined withand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for a

  11. Aspects of the Physical Control of Phytoplankton Dynamics over the Southern California Bight Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    dissipation of internal tidal energy at a shelf break. Jour.and the strength of internal tidal energy ?ux, the max- imumthe maximum internal tidal energy ?ux by approximately one

  12. Aspects of the physical control of phytoplankton dynamics over the Southern California Bight continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    dissipation of internal tidal energy at a shelf break. Jour.strength of internal tidal energy flux, the max- imum energythe maximum internal tidal energy flux by approximately one

  13. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    nutrient-rich, low-oxygen offshore water is upwelled ontothe majority of the offshore casts were taken during theon the Washington coast, offshore of Grays Harbor (46 N–47

  14. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    nutrient-rich, low-oxygen offshore water is upwelled ontothe majority of the offshore casts were taken during theon the Washington coast, offshore of Grays Harbor (46 N–47

  15. Horizontal internal-tide fluxes support elevated phytoplankton productivity over the inner continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    ocean relative to adjacent offshore waters is due to thecontinental shelf and farther offshore (Eppley et al. 1979;is a linear function of offshore distance, D(x) ¼ a x. This

  16. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    respiration in the oceanic water column, in Respiration in2005), Transport of surface waters from the Juan de FucaG. C. Johnson (2013), Decadal water-property trends in the

  17. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Mexico, and along the Pacific Coastline. A due south azimuth would suggest that equal amounts of solar

  18. Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic techniques for identifying sediment processes on continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    of sedimnentary fabric. Sedimentology, 4:257-271, 1965. J .J. , 1991, Marine sedimentology of the early to middleof sedimentary fabric: Sedimentology, v. 4, p. 257 271.

  19. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    2003]. More information about the ecosystem model can beAppendix A More information about the ecosystem model can be

  20. Maps of Salinity, Nitrate and Chlorophyll over the Gulf of Alaska Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to enhanced salinity (inner shelf) and thermal (outer shelf) stratification. SeaWiFS and shipboard chlorophyll Point density section shows reduced, but not vanishing stratification, due to tidal mixing over Portlock

  1. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continentalin Juan de Fuca Canyon, Washington, Geophys. Res. Lett. ,oxygen ?uxes on the Washington shelf and slope: A comparison

  2. Wintertime pytoplankton bloom in the Subarctic Pacific supported by continental margin iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.; Henning, Cara C.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Fung, Inez

    2008-01-01

    of iron hydroxide (60% goethite) and amorphous irona linear combination of goethite (60%) and ferrihydrite (

  3. The North American Atlantic outer continental margin landslides data base: Summary and observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, J.S.; O'Leary, D.W. (Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    A compilation of published data from 179 Quaternary mass movement features was analyzed to determine the common attributes of the slides, to reveal general trends, and to classify and compare slide types. The data set was derived primarily from high-resolution, seismic-reflection data and sidescan-sonar images. In general, evidence of slope failure is found throughout the length of the margin and in all water depths. Slides have occurred on slope angles ranging from 1{degree} to 30{degree} (avg.{approximately}5{degree}); they vary in width from 0.2 to 50 km (avg. {approximately}4 km) and in length from 0.3 to 380 km (avg. {approximately}10 km) and have been reported to be as thick as 650 m. They are slightly more prevalent on open slopes than in other physiographic settings (e.g., canyons, ridges, spurs) and more commonly translational than rotational (i.e., slumps). The slides show no striking affinity for a particular depth range, either in the data set as a whole or when analyzed in terms of physiographic setting, size, slope angle, or other basis for classification. Comparison of slides found on the open slope with those found within canyons shows that the average open slope slide tends to occur at lower slope angles and is much larger (by an order of magnitude) than the average canyon slide. Regardless of the physiographic setting or other characteristic, large-scale slides (area >100 km{sup 2}) rather than small-scale slides (area <10 km{sup 2}) tend to be associated with gentle slopes ({approximately}3-4{degree}) Similarly, slides generated on steep slopes ({>=}10{degree}), regardless of other attributes, tend to be small (avg. area <5 km{sup 2}). With few exceptions, comparisons between slide categories show only minor differences.

  4. Paleomagnetic and stratigraphic techniques for identifying sediment processes on continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    1991. Booth, J . , D. O'Leary, P. Popenoe, and W . Danforth,Oceanogr, 34 , 23^43, 2004. O'Leary, D. , and E . Laine,8, 333-336, Booth, J . , D . O'leary, P . Popenoe, and W .

  5. Continental-scale net radiation and evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    by minimum temperature and vapor pressure de?cit (VPD), andradiation (R net ) and vapor-pressure de?cit, is slightlybetween saturation vapor pressure and air temperature, and

  6. Deconstructing the Mississippi River : restoring a continental system through the integration of flexible infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heard, Haley R. (Haley Ruth)

    2010-01-01

    The most prevalent social and economic issues plaguing cities are symptomatic of much bigger underlying environmental problems. Cities are governed by legislation set within artificial political boundaries, however ecology ...

  7. Littoral processes and sediments of the inner continental shelf of the southern bay of Campeche 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanez, Amado

    1968-01-01

    ?and criticisms, bo&h in writing the rcport and during the f'ield The assistance of. the per. . onnel of the Institvfo de Geologia is gratefully acknowledged. Ing. Rodo3 fo Cruz, Biologist Armando Ortega. , Oceano3 ogisi Armando Lecuanda and Mr. Antonio.... Lu ' s Burgos, Mr, d s ri er Osornio and Mr. Esteban Monroy of the Departm-. !&t of C. r- tography of the Inst. itvto de Geologia, for drafting ass. istance Thanks are fvrt'her extended to Mlles. Susana Benav'des an 1 L ta Flame, . dez for typing...

  8. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    of variability for solar power plants.   While  NWP model operation of solar thermal power  plants, the management of 

  9. Thermal structure of continental upper mantle inferred from S-wave velocity and surface heat ow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    ; geothermal gradient 1. Introduction Oceanic lithosphere is continuously recycled by mantle convection geotherms differ most at depths of 60^120 km with variations of up to 900³C. Below 230 km, differences do not exceed 300³C. These geotherms agree well with one-dimensional conductive geotherms for the observed range

  10. GEOLOGY, April 2008 331 We refine conventional continental-scale geodynamic models by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    stretch the geotherm and thus cause a decay in the geothermal gradient. However, high surface heat flow measurements. Keywords: shear heating, lithosphere, strength, geotherm, rheology, heat flow. DYNAMIC VERSUS

  11. Recent blackouts in US and continental Europe: is liberalisation to blame?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialek, Janusz

    2004-06-16

    to be self-sufficient, i.e. generation matched demand. This resulted in well developed internal transmission networks but relatively weak tie-lines linking neighbouring networks. Over time the networks started to be increasingly interconnected but those... and some early lessons to be learnt. There are several common features regarding all the recent blackouts. They were all transmission-based, i.e. there were no problems at the time with the level of generation. The systems were not stressed before...

  12. Interannual Atmospheric Variability Affects Continental Ice Sheet Simulations on Millennial Time Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael S; Bush, Andrew B. G; Marshall, Shawn J

    2008-01-01

    the westerly midlatitude jet stream into two branches thatthis midlatitude “split jet stream” recombine down- streamern branch of the split jet stream also acts to increase

  13. Observational and Numerical Modeling Studies of Turbulence on the Texas-Louisiana Continental Shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zheng

    2013-05-24

    ), dissipation rate of temperature variance (?), eddy diffusivity of temperature (?'t), and eddy diffusivity of density (?'p). Numerical models were also applied to test their capability of simulating these turbulence quantities. At site D, TKE, E, and ? were...

  14. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    a two-axis tracking solar panel. Figure 5b: Map of theand azimuth angles for solar panels were calculated for aannual azimuth for a solar panel, and can be combined with

  15. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    in the Design of Photovoltaic Systems, in: T. Markvart, L.1. Introduction Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems are quicklyphotovoltaic energy output for cloudy conditions with a solar tracking system’,

  16. The Dynamics of Fluid Flow and Associated Chemical Fluxes at Active Continental Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan A

    2007-01-01

    plate-boundary fault, Barbados accretionary complex. Geologytwo-well experiment in the Barbados accretionary complex. J.volcano field seaward of the Barbados accretionary wedge, J.

  17. The Dynamics of fluid flow and associated chemical fluxes at active continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan Alan

    2007-01-01

    plate-boundary fault, Barbados accretionary complex. Geologytwo-well experiment in the Barbados accretionary complex. J.volcano field seaward of the Barbados accretionary wedge, J.

  18. The Dynamics of Fluid Flow and Associated Chemical Fluxes at Active Continental Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan A

    2007-01-01

    mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situfluid and sediment Ba concentrations from Ocean Drillingof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

  19. The Dynamics of fluid flow and associated chemical fluxes at active continental margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Evan Alan

    2007-01-01

    mixture of fluids introduced during drilling and in situfluid and sediment Ba concentrations from Ocean Drillingof drilling indicators (IR imagery and pore fluid chemical

  20. Multisensor snow data assimilation at the continental scale: The value of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment terrestrial water storage information Hua Su,1 ZongLiang Yang,1 Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage (TWS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging autocovariance in assimilating TWS observations and the regional and/or seasonal dependence of GRACE's capability

  1. Evaluating inter-continental transport of fine aerosols:(2) Global health impact Junfeng Liu a,*,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    health on the Eurasian continent and would also benefit public health in the United States. Ó 2009.5 to be nearly 380 thousand (K) in 2000. Approximately half of these deaths occur in the Indian subcontinent (IN), mostly due to aerosols transported from Africa and the Middle East (ME). Approximately 90K deaths

  2. Near-Ultrahigh Pressure Processing of Continental Crust: Miocene Crustal Xenoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    BRADLEY HACKER1 *, PETER LUFFI2 , VALERY LUTKOV3 , VLADISLAV MINAEV3 , LOTHAR RATSCHBACHER4 , TERRY PLANK5. Fax: 805 893 2314. E-mail: hacker@geol.ucsb.edu # The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University

  3. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    and river transport. Uranium-Series Geochemistry 52, 533-using high- precision uranium isotopic measurements.B. , Turner, S.P. , 2008. Uranium-series isotopes in river

  4. Influence of tree species on continental differences in boreal fires and climate feedbacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, BM; Rogers, BM; Soja, AJ; Goulden, ML; Randerson, JT

    2015-01-01

    Prediction using Earth System Models award to J.T.R. (AGS-fire strategies into Earth system models, and systematicallythe Community Land Model (CLM)(NCAR Earth System Laboratory,

  5. Aspects of the Physical Control of Phytoplankton Dynamics over the Southern California Bight Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Estimating internal wave energy ? uxes in the ocean. J Atmosadapted from internal wave energy ?ux measurements tothe change of internal wave energy across an array of

  6. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Optimum tilt of a solar collector, Solar & Wind Technology.and orientation for solar collector in Brunei Darussalam,Optimum tilt angle for solar collectors, Energy Sources.

  7. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Rhoads, D.C.

    1993-03-01

    Because of the potential impact on the environment associated with development and production activities, the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 mandated that a panel of experts, the North Carolina Environmental Sciences Review Panel (NCESRP), be convened. Their purpose was to consider whether the availability of scientific information was adequate for making decisions about oil and gas leasing, exploration, and development off North Carolina. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service because of concern raised by the NCESRP (1992) that not more than 5 percent of the unusual benthic community be covered by drill muds and cuttings. The principal task of the study was to determine if the communities extended over an area of the sea floor that was 20 time larger then the area estimated to be covered by drill muds and cuttings. If more than 5 percent of the unusual benthic community were covered by drill muds and cuttings, the NCESRP recommended that a study be carried out to determine the recovery rate of this community.

  8. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer Continental Shelf in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1982-11-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region increased in 1981. Eight wells were drilled, 5 of which were completed for a total footage of 71,439 ft (21,780 m). Four of the wells were located in the Baltimore Canyon Trough area and 4 were located in the Georges Bank basin. No exploratory wells were drilled in the Southeast Georgia Embayment or in the onshore portion of this region in 1981. The 5 completed wells were reported as dry holes. Two lease sales were held in 1981: OCS Lease Sale 56 drew bids on 47 tracts for a total of $342,766,174 in the South Atlantic and OCS Lease Sale 59 drew bids on 50 tracts for a total of $321,981,000 in the Mid-Atlantic. Geophysical activity provided a total of 24,470 line-mi (39,380 line-km) of seismic data.

  9. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giordano, A.C.; Carpenter, G.B.; Amato, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    Exploratory drilling in the Atlantic coastal plain region declined slightly in 1983. Four wells were spudded during the year: 2 in the offshore Baltimore Canyon area and 2 onshore in Lee County, North Carolina. One North Carolina well was drilled, and the other was being tested at year end. In April, 4050 tracts were offered in the mid-Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 76), the first area-wide offering of offshore oil and gas leases under the Department of the Interior's new streamlined leasing system. Bids of $86,822,680 were exposed on 40 tracts, and 37 tracts were subsequently leased. In July 3, 082 tracts were offered in the south Atlantic lease offering (OCS Sale 78). Bids of $14,562,040 were exposed on 11 tracts, and all high bids were accepted. Seismic data acquisition decreased 64% below the 1982 level to 13,166 line-mi (21,189 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Effects of continental-scale snow albedo anomalies on the wintertime Arctic oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, R. J; Zender, C. S

    2010-01-01

    to as the idealized EA (IEA) experiment. [ 16 ] Figure 1Wavenumber?1 Wavenumber?2 Wavenumber?3 Wavenumber?4 IEAIEA 1–50 IEA 51–100 REA REA 1–50 REA 51–100 NA NH a Also

  11. Continental-scale net radiation and evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    1151. Priestley, C. H. , & Taylor, R. J. (1972). Assessment6 Mean ET, R net , Priestley–Taylor ?, and precipitation andbetween ET, R net , the Priestley–Taylor ? coef?cient, and

  12. New mapping of kilometric anisotropies over the granulitic continental crust of Madagascar: melt -fluid migration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the melt therefore Th spectrometric signal marks melt migration in the shear zone. The magnetic field is cause by magnetic mineral in the rocks. Low and high magnetic anomalies measured in nanotesla are associated with graphite mineralisations and disappearance of iron bearing minerals, high anomalies

  13. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Extended Continental Shelf (ECS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and oil and gas reserves. They recommended exploring creative ways, such as partnerships, to leverage model #12;simulations to make an economic and societal case that some small investment in ECS mapping will provide a large return on investment in the future. Governance of the Interagency Process The participants

  14. A large atomic chlorine source inferred from mid-continental reactive nitrogen chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that catalytically destroy or produce tropospheric ozone3 , a green- house gas potentially toxic to plant and animal

  15. Issues associated with the extreme weather hazard for fixed offshore installations on the UK continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D. [Health and Safety Executive, Bootle (United Kingdom). Offshore Safety Div.; Birkinshaw, M. [Health and Safety Executive, London (United Kingdom). Offshore Safety Div.

    1996-12-31

    The paper reviews the key issues associated with, ensuring that an installation has an adequate airgap, and the estimation of the loads to which the structure is exposed should it experience an extreme cast height which is in excess of the airgap. The practices for determining the airgap, as presented in UK, US and Norwegian Guidance, Standards and Regulations are reviewed. The airgap exceedance return period, associated with the application of the traditional UK Guidance based approach, is considered through the use of a joint probabilities surface elevation model. The problems associated with determining the greatly increased load the structure experiences once the airgap is eroded are reviewed, and ongoing HSE funded studies which aim to resolve some of these problems are summarized.

  16. Predicting continental-scale patterns of bird species richness with spatially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 15, 2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark 2 Department of Biology, University of Vermont. We demonstrate that the principal single-factor and composite (species-energy, water-energy richness and measures of temperature, precipitation and net primary productivity (Currie 1991; Rahbek

  17. Large-Eddy Simulation of Post-Cold-Frontal Continental Stratocumulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechem, David B.; Kogan, Yefim L.; Schultz, David M.

    2010-12-01

    Previous large-eddy simulations (LES) of stratocumulus-topped boundary layers have been exclusively set in marine environments. Boundary layer stratocumulus clouds are also prevalent over the continent but have not been ...

  18. Dense Water Cascading off the Continental Shelf 1 Shapiro_etal_JGR_04_manusc.doc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Georgy

    is a specific type of buoyancy driven current, in which dense water formed by cooling, evaporation or freezing. Estimates of observed down-slope transport rates in case studies accord with theory, which is thereby substantially validated. Typical values of cascading transport rates were in the range 0.5 ­ 1.6 m2 s-1 . We

  19. Uranium-series comminution ages of continental sediments: Case study of a Pleistocene alluvial fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Victoria E.

    2010-01-01

    B.R. , 1998. Exchanges of sediment between the flood plainthe terrestrial flux of sediment to the global ocean: aplanetary perspective. Sediment. Geol. 162 (1-2), 5-24.

  20. Diffusional methane fluxes within continental margin sediments and depositional constraints on formation factor estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    subsurface life in deep-sea sediments. Science , 295 , 2067-consumption in anoxic marine sediments. Geology , 4 , 297-oxidation in methane-rich sediments overlying the Blake

  1. Seismic stratigraphy and quaternary evolution of the New York Bight Inner Continental Shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotto, Linda L

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 5,300 km of digitally recorded high-resolution, nested, single-channel, seismic-refection data (2.46 m³ watergun, 200-500 Hz Geopulse acoustic source, and a CHIRP 2-7 kHz subbottom profiler) and coincident ...

  2. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    transport and  numerical weather modeling.   J.  Applied cross correlations.    Weather and Forecasting, 8:4, 401?of radiation for numerical weather prediction and climate 

  3. Seismic structure, gravity anomalies, and flexure of the Amazon continental margin, NE Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, A. B. "Tony"

    -way travel time (TWTT) which we interpret as marking the onset of the transcontinental Amazon River

  4. The epibenthic megafauna of the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Matthew Peek

    2002-01-01

    meter isobaths. Table 1 General site information for DGOMB Site ac I bl b2 b3 nb2 nb3 nb5 rw1 rw2 fw3 rw4 rw5 wl w2 w3 w5 w6 wc5 wc12 cl c4 c7 2000 c12 mtl 2000 mt2 mt3 mt4 mt5 mt6 s35 s36 s37 s38 s39 s41 2000 s42... megafaunal densities reached 780/ha. A total of 15 major taxonomic groups were identified from photographs Table 2 General results by site for DGoMB eel bl b2 b3 ab2 nb3 ab5 rwl rw2 fw3 rw4 rw5 wl w2 w3 w5 w6 wc5 wc12 cl c4 c7 2000 c...

  5. Evidence for the generation of juvenile granitic crust during continental extension, Mineral Mountains Batholith, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coleman, Drew S.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1992-07-10

    Field, chemical and isotopic data from the Miocene Mineral Mountains batholith in southwest Utah are consistent with the batholith being derived through differentiation of material recently separated from the lithospheric ...

  6. Seasonal and interannual oxygen variability on the Washington and Oregon continental shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    expected to expand with climate change, which will likelyJISAO and the Program on Climate Change at the University of

  7. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    and orientation for solar collector in Brunei Darussalam,Optimum tilt angle for solar collectors, Energy Sources.Optimum tilt of a solar collector, Solar & Wind Technology.

  8. Aspects of the physical control of phytoplankton dynamics over the Southern California Bight continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Kunze. Estimating internal wave energy fluxes in the ocean.adapted from internal wave energy flux measurements tothe change of internal wave energy across an array of

  9. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Dunlop, PV-GIS: a web-based solar radiation database for the2010. 10. NREL, National Solar Radiation Database, 1991-200514. S. Wilcox, National solar radiation database 1991-2005

  10. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    to  predict daily solar radiation.   Agriculture and Forest and Chuo, S.   2008.  Solar radiation forecasting using Short?term forecasting of solar radiation:   A statistical 

  11. Continental-scale net radiation and evapotranspiration estimated using MODIS satellite observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Yufang; Randerson, James T.; Goulden, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    of green LAI and solar radiation, provides the highestin temperature and solar radiation, but may be inappropriatecontrast, the incoming solar radiation (S ? ) and incoming

  12. Evaluation of numerical weather prediction for intra-day solar forecasting in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Downward surface solar radiation  data released at 12 UTC solar radiation:   A statistical approach using satellite data.   

  13. Optimum fixed orientations and benefits of tracking for capturing solar radiation in the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    0.1? by 0.1? National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB-SUNY)have used measured solar radiation data instead of clear-skySolar Radiation Database, 1991-2005 Update. solar/old_data/

  14. A regional perspective on trends in continental evaporation A. J. Teuling,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    on evapotranspiration (ET). Here we analyze how the main external drivers of ET (incident solar radiation-term records of ET. We focus on global radiation (hereafter Rg, the sum of diffuse and direct solar radiation and precipitation) vary regionally, using recent data from a eddy-covariance flux tower network (FLUXNET

  15. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment ofEnergyJoe25, 2015 EIS-0491:Action

  16. Selected Data from Continental Scientific Drilling Core Holes VC-1 and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedco Hills, California:Sekisui

  17. DOE/SC-ARM-14-012 The Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOE ProjectREMOTE-HANDLED TRU764 The Arctic632452 The

  18. Title 43 USC 1331 Definitions for Subchapter III - Outer Continental Shelf

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film Solar TechnologiesCFR 1201 General JumpWaterbodies |

  19. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u tCorporationIt's Bike-to-WorkEnergy|4

  20. ActOl OceOlnologicOl SinicOl 2008, VoL 27, No.3, p. 79 -87 http://www.oceOlnpress.com.cn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The depth- averaged annual mean ocean currents along the Beaufort Sea coast and shelf break compared well. It is the combined effects of the weak oceanic current near the coast, a prevailing wind with an onshore component, the opposite direction of the ocean current, and the blocking by the coastline that make the Beaufort Sea

  1. 20084 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 71 / Tuesday, April 14, 2015 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska node (OBN) seismic surveys program in the state and federal waters of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, during as part of that process. The draft EA will be posted at the foregoing internet site. FOR FURTHER

  2. 55539Federal Register / Vol. 74, No. 207 / Wednesday, October 28, 2009 / Notices the dredge gear study. All of these takes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement; Seismic Surveys in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas exploration using seismic surveys in the waters of the Chukchi and Beaufort seas. A Notice of Availability DPEIS and initiating a new NEPA process that will consider and incorporate this new information. DATES

  3. August 13, 2010 Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Open Water Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, Alaska; Notice VerDate Mar Seismic Survey in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, Alaska AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS an expedited process by which citizens of the U.S. can apply for an authorization to incidentally take small

  4. 35851Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 115 / Friday, June 14, 2013 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Marine Seismic Survey in the Beaufort Sea, Alaska (OBC) seismic surveys program in the state and federal waters of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska, during 101(a)(5)(D) of the MMPA established an expedited process by which citizens of the U.S. can apply

  5. London Gazette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ries, Paul

    2006-04-03

    ], & Staremberg[3 STAREMBERG] sur les Froni?res de son Pa?s. *KO De Paris[3 PARIS] *DR le 20 Aoust 1669. N.S. *IT 007 *a Le Roi[2 KF] a?ant appris la mort du Duc de Beaufort[2 DE BEAUFORT], a donn? au Comte de Vermandois[2 DE VERMANDOIS], son Fils Naturel, sa...

  6. London Gazette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ries, Paul

    2006-04-03

    ], & Staremberg[3 STAREMBERG] sur les Froniéres de son Païs. *KO De Paris[3 PARIS] *DR le 20 Aoust 1669. N.S. *IT 007 *a Le Roi[2 KF] aïant appris la mort du Duc de Beaufort[2 DE BEAUFORT], a donné au Comte de Vermandois[2 DE VERMANDOIS], son Fils Naturel, sa...

  7. Day in the Life of the Hudson River 10/21/14 Data (Salt Front RM 64.3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    , long pier with paved roadway and vegetated strip along both sides Surrounding Land Use: Urban Beaufort 2 North 1:03 PM 16 °C 61°F Beaufort 4 North Weather recent Rain last few days, wind picked up Blue Fish Diversity 2* 1* Blue Crab (M) *23 Total Catch 8* Comb Jelly small *Not in totals 1 Naked Goby

  8. Development and Application of Advanced Models for Steam Hydrogasification: Process Design and Economic Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    Bell D, Towler B. Coal Gasification and Its Applications.C, Chaney R. Alaskan coal gasification feasibility studies -Task 2 Topical Report: Coke/Coal Gasification with Liquids

  9. Givey Kochanowski | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and civilian capacities where he developed in-depth global, Alaskan, and remote logistics expertise. Most recently he served as the U.S. General Services Administration's...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy storage, and distributed energy resources such as combined heat and power, heat recovery, and other clean energy technologies. 2) Affordability: Remote Alaskan communities...

  11. An Information Dependant Computer Program for Engine Exhaust Heat Recovery for Heating

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A computer program was developed to help engineers at rural Alaskan village power plants to quickly evaluate how to use exhaust waste heat from individual diesel power plants.

  12. Timeline of Events: 2002 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge but encourages the construction of an Alaskan natural gas pipeline, requires that renewables make up 10 percent of electrical generation by...

  13. Effects of Large Scale Forcing on Thermal Regime and Mixing Dynamics of Lakes in the Alaskan Arctic. S. MacIntyre, J. P. Fram, Paul J. Kushner, and B. Emery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    are mostly diurnal. In cold years, such as 2003, energy in the wind field is increased at low frequencies. S. MacIntyre, J. P. Fram, Paul J. Kushner, and B. Emery In warm years, such as 2007, winds) and continuous sensors (red). show large variations in mean temperature and an insignificant ( R2 = 0.01, p

  14. Analyses of Selected Provisions of Proposed Energy Legislation: 2003

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This study responds to a July 31, 2003 request from Senator Byron L. Dorgan. The study is based primarily on analyses the Energy Information Administration has previously done for studies requested by Congress. It includes analysis of the Renewable Portfolio Standard, Renewable Fuels Standard, production in the Alaskan National Wildlife Refuge, the construction of an Alaskan Natural Gas pipeline, and various tax provisions.

  15. CHUVA reveals very diverse cloud processes in tropical continental regions and contributes to improving satellite precipitation estimation, nowcasting,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    MAn, ALAn J. P. cALheiroS, ThiAGo biScAro, chriSTiAn KuMMerow, JuLiA cohen, dAvid FiTzJArrALd, ernAni L. n

  16. Storm-induced upwelling of high pCO2 waters onto the continental shelf of the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S.

    shelf. A single 10-day event led to the outgassing of 0.18­0.54 Tg-C and caused aragonite outgassing events and the expansion of waters that are undersaturated in carbonate minerals over the shelf

  17. West Africa -A Safe Haven for Frogs? A Sub-Continental Assessment of the Chytrid Fungus (Batrachochytrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the River - A Transboundary Peace Park for Sierra Leone and Liberia, Kenema, Sierra Leone, 10 Forestry'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone - and were collected from a variety of habitats, ranging from

  18. 2001 Journal of Geophysical Research Vol 106 (C3), pp 4593-4612 Internal hydraulic flows on the continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramanian, Ravi

    hydraulic jump. The dissipation rate of turbulent energy is consistent with the mean energy removal rate elevation associated with hydraulic jumps. These arise when a flow dominated by kinetic energy (ac 2001 Journal of Geophysical Research Vol 106 (C3), pp 4593-4612 Internal hydraulic flows

  19. ContinentalShelfResearch, Vol. 16, No. 7, pp. 875906,1996 Coovriaht 0 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and engineers worldwide, without the requirement of original repro- *Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire al. gramming of the method by each user or for each new study. As these experiences were being convection/diffusion, fluid mechanics and electricity and magnetism. The decade of the 1970s produced a bloom

  20. Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part II: Uncertainties in River Routing Simulation Related to Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the entire globe. RRMs have been introduced into earth system models (ESMs) to convert the runoff simulated

  1. Provenance, areal distribution, and contemporary sedimentation of quartz sand and silt types on the mid-atlantic continental shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusak, Deanne

    1985-01-01

    , are present. These shelf valleys are the Hudson (Kelling et al. , 1975; Knebel et al. , 1979), Great Egg (McClennen, 1973), Delaware (Sheridan et al. , 1974; NcGregor, 1981), Susquehanna and Virginia Beach (Swift et al. , 1972, 1977), and Albemarle (Swift... Appalachian Plateaus Valley and Ridge New England Precambrian crystalline, glacial Devonian sedimentary, glacial Paleozoic sedimentary, glacial Precambrian-Paleozoic crystalline, glacial Delaware Appalachian Plateaus Valley and Ridge Piedmont Plateau...

  2. Reprinted from JOURNAL OF GEOLOGY, 1990, vol. 98, p. 135-155. QUANTITATIVE FILLING MODEL FOR CONTINENTAL EXTENSIONAL BASINS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Blackheath region of the hinge area of the Triassic Richmond basin of Virginia. Outcrop studies and coal mine the hanging wall block of the basins, indicating that both the basins and their depositional surface areas

  3. A lower crustal perspective on the stabilization and reactivation of continental lithosphere in the western Canadian shield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flowers, Rebecca Marie

    2005-01-01

    New geochronological, thermochronological, geological and isotopic data from an extensive (> 20,000 km²) exposure of high-pressure granulites (0.8 to > 1.5 GPa, >750 ?C) in the East Lake Athabasca region of the Snowbird ...

  4. Remote sensing analysis of natural oil and gas seeps on the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Beukelaer, Sophie Magdalena

    2004-11-15

    acoustic shadows on the side-scan sonar records. The oily bubbles generated clear signatures extending from the seafloor to the near surface on the acoustic profile records. RADARSAT SAR images verified the presence of surface oil slicks over the hydrate...

  5. A geostationary multispectral sensor provides the high spatiotemporal resolution continental-scale observations of lower-tropospheric pollutants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    include O3 , aerosols (e.g., PM), and the O3 precursors NOx (= NO + NO2 ) and VOCs (Brasseur et al. 2003 problems in rats (Lucas et al. 2010; Meyer et al. 2010). Reduction of life expectancy in the EU that a reduction of PM2.5 can increase life expectancy (Pope et al. 2009). Reduction of exposure to ozone and PM

  6. NO[x] production by lightning in the continental U.S. and its impacts on tropospheric chemistry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bond, Donald William

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. High tropospheric NOx concentrations increase ozone (O?) levels via photochemical cycling of NO to NO?, whereas low NOx concentrations result in the ...

  7. Geochemistry and magmatic history of eclogites and ultramafic rocks from the Chinese continental scientific drill hole: Subduction and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scientific drill hole: Subduction and ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism of lower crustal cumulates Yongsheng Drill Hole were studied. The low Mg#s (=100molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)) (81­84%) and low Ni (1150­1220 ppm sequence of fractional crystallization of tholeiitic or picritic magmas at intermediate to high pressure

  8. Coevolution of continental ice cover and permafrost extent over the last glacial-interglacial cycle in North

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    in North America Lev Tarasov1 and W. R. Peltier2 Received 14 August 2006; revised 20 March 2007; accepted both the most intense growth and recession phases. Citation: Tarasov, L., and W. R. Peltier (2007 of ice sheets across the North American continent [e.g., Tarasov and Peltier, 1999; Marshall et al., 2000

  9. Fluids and halogens at the diagenetic-metamorphic boundary: evidence from veins in continental basins, western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    basins, western Norway H. SVENSEN1 , B. JAMTVEIT1 , D. A. BANKS2 AND D. KARLSEN1 1 Department of Geology, University of Oslo, Blindern, Oslo, Norway; 2 School of Earth Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK, Kvamshesten and Solund basins) in western Norway. These include calcite-, quartz- and epidote-dominated veins

  10. Continental scale, high order, high spatial resolution, ice sheet modeling using the Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    to achieve high performance computing and scalability. Thecapabilities ensures high performance computing and a sig-

  11. The effect of stratification on wind-driven, cross-shelf circulation and transport on the inner continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horwitz, Rachel Mandy

    2012-01-01

    Observations from a three-year field program on the inner shelf south of Martha's Vineyard, MA and a numerical model are used to describe the effect of stratification on inner shelf circulation, transport, and sediment ...

  12. Deep-Sea Research I 55 (2008) 296323 Habitat use and preferences of cetaceans along the continental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    , S. Airoldib , B. Nanid a DIIAR Department of Hydraulic, Environmental and Survey Engineering IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/dsri 0967-0637/$ - see front matter r 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2007.11.006 ÃCorresponding authors at: DIIAR Department of Hydraulic

  13. Source and distribution patterns of the Late Pleistocene-Holocene sands on the Central Texas-Louisiana continental shelf 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reutter, David Christian

    1985-01-01

    I 0 0 1 C I 0 ICI 'I 0 lt *lbl- I lb I 0 OE ~ C DE I , 01 I CEO 0'I 'I 0 E 1 0 0 0" "OC CO PLEI' r. ' 1 , 0' 0 lb River during the last sea level regression (Curray, 1960). Lastly, the rapid deposition that is currently taking place... transgression are the dominant facies of the outer shelf region off the Texas and western Louisiana coast. Only in the eastern section off the Louisiana coast does the outer shelf have a silt-clay facies of modern age (Frazi er, 1974). These Recent sediments...

  14. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  15. 3-D multichannel seismic reflection study of variable-flux hydrocarbon seeps, continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Ryan Douglas

    2004-11-15

    and geophysical indicators of hydrocarbons and correlate them with seafloor amplitude anomalies and fault traces in order to characterize seep activity level. The southern mud volcano in the Garden Banks site is characterized as an established high flux seep vent...

  16. Sulfur isotope evidence for regional recharge of saline water during continental glaciation, north-central United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, D.I. )

    1990-11-01

    Sulfate concentrations in ground water from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of south-eastern Wisconsin and northern Illinois increase up to hundreds of times where the aquifer is confined beneath the Maquoketa Shale. There is no sulfate source in the aquifer or overlying rocks except for minor amounts of finely disseminated pyrite. Coinciding with increasing sulfate concentrations, {delta}{sup 34}S of the dissolved sulfate increases from less than {minus}5{per thousand} in the unconfined part of the aquifer to a nearly constant value of +20{per thousand} where the aquifer is confined and where sulfate reduction is minimal. The most likely source for this isotopically heavy sulfate is ground water associated with Silurian evaporites under Lake Michigan. It is uncertain if the sulfate-rich water was emplaced in pulses or mostly during the last glaciation.

  17. Fine-grained sedimentation on the Chenier Plain Coast and inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draut, Amy Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    This thesis examines the evolution of a mud-dominated coastal sedimentary system on multiple time scales. Fine-grained systems exhibit different properties and behavior from sandy coasts, and have received relatively little ...

  18. Nature and distribution of the deformation front in the Luzon Arc-Chinese continental margin collision zone at Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

    collision zone at Taiwan Ho-Shing Yu Institute of Oceanography, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan front, distribution, nature, seismics, Taiwan Abstract Marine seismic reflection profiles from offshore SW Taiwan combined with onland geological data are used to investigate the distri- bution and nature

  19. Composition of modern sand from the Sierra Nevada, California, USA: Implications for actualistic petrofacies of continental-margin magmatic arcs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingersoll, Raymond V.; Eastmond, Daniel J.

    2007-01-01

    variability of modern sands: Sedimentary Geology, v. 171, p.nonquartzose) lithic (L) sand(stone) composition. Designatedpredicted trend for sand(stone) composition during arc

  20. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  1. Scales Depencence of Fracture Density and Fabric in the Damage Zone of a Large Displacement Continental Transform Fault 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayyildiz, Muhammed

    2012-08-28

    Characterization of fractures in an arkosic sandstone from the western damage zone of the San Andreas Fault (SAF) at San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was used to better understand the origin of damage and to determine the scale...

  2. Mesozoic thermal history of the Prebetic continental margin (southern Spain): Constraints from apatite fission-track analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera, Carlos M.

    thermal history. Apatite fission-track age populations from Triassic samples indicate partial annealing to the termination of the Hercynian cycle; the progressive exhumation of the Hercynian basement and the thermal

  3. The onset of IndiaAsia continental collision: Early, steep subduction required by the timing of UHP metamorphism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a paleomagnetically determined slowdown of India's plate velocity, and as being at ca. 51 Ma based on the termination of the convergence rate and the termination of marine carbonate deposition. The Indian UHP rocks must have traveled MBT MCT STDS IYSZ Partial melt GHZ

  4. Impact of lake-level changes on the formation of thermogene travertine in continental rifts: Evidence from Lake Bogoria,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    pressure lowers the level of boiling in the plumbing system of the hot springs. Any carbonate precipitation then occurs below the land surface. During humid phases, the dilute meteoric recharge increases, enhancing geothermal circulation, but the rising lake waters, which become relatively dilute, flood most spring vents

  5. Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report, 1 June 1980-1 June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, L P

    1981-02-01

    Research progress is reported in studies of the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight during the spring transition period. Volume I contains preliminary results of GABEX-I. (ACR)

  6. Real-World Greenhouse Gas Emissions from a MY2010 Diesel Truck Traveling Across the Continental United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Data analysis from this study will provide insight into real-world performance of current emissions reduction devices, under various operating conditions, and with respect to greenhouse gas emissions.

  7. Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    observational program known as the Shallow Water 2006 program (also SW06) was undertaken in the late summer

  8. Sedimentology of Seismo-Turbidites off the Cascadia and Northern California Active Tectonic Continental Margins, Northwest Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    ÔØ Å ÒÙ× Ö ÔØ Sedimentology of Seismo-Turbidites off the Cascadia and Northern California Active, Goldfinger, Chris, Escutia, Carlota, Sedimentology of Seismo-Turbidites off the Cascadia and Northern Cal ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 Sedimentology of Seismo-Turbidites off the Cascadia and Northern California Active

  9. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) climate research facility in Oklahoma are used to develop detailed cloud climatology. Clouds

  10. RESEARCH FACILITIES of the UNITED STATES FISHERY LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    small buildings that were in poor condition), an oil and paint warehouse, and a concrete driveway, the first Government station began operations in a rented building in Beaufort. The following year

  11. Regional Management Units for Marine Turtles: A Novel Framework for Prioritizing Conservation and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Regional Management Units for Marine Turtles: A Novel Framework for Prioritizing Conservation, Virginia, United States of America, 2 Global Marine Division, Conservation International, Arlington, Virginia, United States of America, 3 Center for Marine Conservation, Duke University, Beaufort, North

  12. REPRODUCfIVE CYCLE, FECUNDITY, AND SEX RATIOS OF THE RED PORGY, PAGRUS PAGRUS(PISCES: SPARIDAE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    departure from the expected 1:1 sex ratio when data were stratified by month, year, and size. Females were Center, National Marine Fish- eries Service, NOAA, Beaufort, NC 28516. 2Headhoats are those that charge

  13. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    generating capacity, crude oil production~ total petroleumin the Alaskan crude oil production rate will significantlyProduction Oil/Gas Processing Tanker traffic lanes Barge traffic lanes Off-shore terminals/ lightering sites Pipelines Refinery Storage facilities Crude/

  14. Post-fire changes in net shortwave radiation along a latitudinal gradient in boreal North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y, Jin; Randerson, J T; Goulden, M L; Goetz, S J

    2012-01-01

    et al. (2003), Large forest fires in Canada, 1959–1997, J.of an intensifying fire regime on Alaskan boreal forestLamberty, B. , et al. (2007), Fire as the dominant driver of

  15. Panel Organization 1. Panel on Structural Geology & Geoengineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , government, and private organizations, including the White House, Department of Energy, National Academy professional organizations and societies. In particular, he has served as president of the Ecological Society include physiological ecology, micro-environments, Alaskan tundra vegetation, and academic administration

  16. Variation of mitochondrial control region sequences of Steller sea lions: the three-stock hypothesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Alyson Renee

    2004-09-30

    -statistics at the regional level. The Commander Islands clearly associate with Alaskan western stock rookeries, not with the Asian rookeries. Within each of the three stocks there is significant isolation by distance among rookeries. This relationship does not hold...

  17. Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

    2011-01-01

    from hydrocarbons such as oil sands, oil shale, methane orfrom hydrocarbons such as oil sands, oil shale, methane orblend that is 2% Canadian oil sands, 6.86% Alaskan crude,

  18. The Effects of Surfactant Pretreatment and Xylooligomers on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose and Pretreated Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qing, Qing

    2010-01-01

    from traditional feedstocks or oil sands. Finally, Chapter 9hydrocarbons such as oil sands or coal, the use of whichblend that is 2% Canadian oil sands, 6.86% Alaskan crude,

  19. Tracking Hemicellulose and Lignin Deconstruction During Hydrothermal Pretreatment of Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Heather Lorelei

    2012-01-01

    such as the Canadian oil sands, extra-heavy Venezuelan oilhydrocarbons such as oil sands, oil shale, methane or coal.blend that is 2% Canadian oil sands, 6.86% Alaskan crude,

  20. Design of a fluidic test bed for MEMS piezoelectric energy harvester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farm, Christopher P

    2006-01-01

    This document outlines the basic theory behind generating mathematical models, choosing materials and designing geometries for simulating a 900 mile Alaskan Pipeline. The use of dimensional analysis is useful for simulating ...

  1. Events Calendar | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing 8:30PM to 5:00PM AKST 2015 NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference 11:00AM to 1:00PM EST NASEO Energy Policy Outlook Conference 1:00PM to...

  2. ENERGY IN THE PACIFIC COASTAL ZONE DOES D.O.E. HAVE A ROLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritschard, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Hawa'ii Regional Total C.Z. Crude Oil; Movement ( 10 BBL/yr)generating capacity, crude oil production~ total petroleumincreases in the Alaskan crude oil production rate will

  3. Evidence for a Crustal Heat Source for Low-Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermalsystems in the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt (CAHSB) areheated by a crustal heat source. The overall rate of circulation inCAHSB systems appears to be low, with...

  4. Microbial Activity, Growth, and Mortality in Environmental Assemblages: Population and Community Response to Rewetting of a Dry Mediterranean Soil and Anaerobic Methane Cycling in Tropical and Boreal Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blazewicz, Steven Joseph

    2012-01-01

    total CH 4 produced in these soils was oxidized under anoxicAlaskan and Puerto Rican soils), this process is importantFollowing Wet-up of Dry Soil Revealed by H 218 O Stable

  5. A. GENERAL INFORMATION A1. Address Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    international students only in the category "Nonresident aliens." Complete the "Total Undergraduates" column-seeking) Nonresident aliens 42 180 224 Black, non-Hispanic 165 800 828 American Indian or Alaskan Native 4 28 28 Asian

  6. TABLE46.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Products by PAD District, a Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope...

  7. TABLE45.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Products by PAD District, a Crude oil exports are restricted to: (1) crude oil derived from fields under the State waters of Alaska's Cook Inlet; (2) Alaskan North Slope...

  8. Continental outflow from the US to the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic during the NASA INTEX-NA Airborne Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S. Y; Talbot, R.; Mao, H.; Blake, D.; Vay, S.; Fuelberg, H.

    2008-01-01

    of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (COS) and some similaritiesdioxide (CO 2 ) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) were reduced to

  9. The influence of sea level and tectonics on Late Pleistocene through Holocene sediment storage along the high-sediment supply Waipaoa continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Mary C.

    in sequence stratigraphy, which relates the balance of relative sea level (eustasy plus sea floor movement e i n f o Available online xxxx Keywords: Waipaoa shelf stratigraphy transgression highstand section deposited during the last eustatic rise that may correlate to estuarine sequences reported from

  10. From the Social Contract to a Social Contract Law: Forms and Functions of Administrative Contracts in a Fragmented Society – a Continental View

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abegg, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    split into numerous small contracts, which provide aaufheben") the many small contracts on the diffusion ofit lifted the many small contracts to the level of society

  11. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 28, NO. 4, PAGES 651-654, FEBRUARY 15, 2001 Crustal displacements due to continental water loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulds, James E.

    - glacial rebound when observed over a time span of a few years. Introduction The positioning time series and energy bal- ance, on a 1 -by-1 grid. The model is forced by estimated precipitation, downwelling- and energy-balance accounting. Snowmelt and rainfall recharge a single soil-water store until it is full (i

  12. GEOPHYSICALRESEARCHLETTERS,VOL. 28,NO. 4, PAGES651-654,FEBRUARY 15,2001 Crustal displacements due to continental water loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    for secular tectonic trends or post- glacial rebound when observed over a time span of a few years as a singlestore using mass- and energy-balanceaccounting. Snowmelt and rainfallrechargea singlesoil-waterstoragechangesare assumednegligible. Evap- oration depletes snowpack at a rate determined by energy availability. Elsewhere

  13. Reprinted and updated from: Petroleum Systems of Divergent Continental Margin Basins, edited by Paul Post, 25th Bob S. Perkins Re-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Review of Tectonic Events on the Passive Margin of Eastern North America Martha Oliver Withjack & Roy W the tectonic processes associated with rifting, breakup, and the early stages of seafloor spreading with salt movement also de- veloped after rifting, especially on the Scotian shelf and Grand Banks

  14. Field-based evidence of sedimentary and tectonic processes related to continental collision: the Early Cenozoic basins of Central Eastern Turkey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, Matthew Graham

    2013-07-01

    Turkey is widely accepted to have formed from a collage of microcontinents that rifted from the northern margin of Gondwana and assembled from the Mesozoic to Mid Cenozoic in response to the closure, collision and suturing ...

  15. Estimation of Hourly Solar Loads on the Surfaces of Moving Refrigerated Tractor Trailers Outfitted with Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for Several Routes across the Continental U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadarajan, Krupasagar

    2011-08-31

    The primary objective of this thesis was to calculate solar loads, wind chill temperatures on the surfaces of moving refrigerated tractor trailers outfitted with phase change materials (PCMs) for several routes across the ...

  16. Continental outflow from the US to the upper troposphere over the North Atlantic during the NASA INTEX-NA Airborne Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, S. Y; Talbot, R.; Mao, H.; Blake, D.; Vay, S.; Fuelberg, H.

    2008-01-01

    Flight 13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign of13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign phys. Res.13 case study during the NASA INTEX-NA Campaign Wang, C.

  17. Selected growth and interaction characteristics of seafloor faults in the central Mississippi Canyon Offshore Continental Shelf (OCS) area, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wegner, Scott Ashley

    2006-08-16

    growth processes generally involve tipline propagation and linkage of faults. Evidence of these processes has been observed in seismic data sets. This investigation uses a HR 3-D seismic data set to characterize growth, interaction, and linkage of a...

  18. Environ. Res. Lett. 10 (2015) 014009 doi:10.1088/1748-9326/10/1/014009 Ground surface temperature and continental heat gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-01-01

    -Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York, USA E-mail: hugo@stfx.ca Keywords: borehole associated with the heat flow from the Earths interior. Borehole climatology is concerned with the analysis the effects of data noise on the determination of the steady-state geothermal regime of the subsurface

  19. Miocene structure of Mustang Island, Mustang Island East Addition and part of Matagorda Island, Outer Continental Shelf areas, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasande, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Understanding the Miocene structure of Mustang Island and the neighboring areas in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico helps to increase knowledge of the geology and hence contribute to petroleum exploration and production in the area. Interpretation...

  20. UThPbREE systematics of organic-rich shales from the ca. 2.15 Ga Sengoma Argillite Formation, Botswana: Evidence for oxidative continental weathering during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bekker, Andrey

    U­Th­Pb­REE systematics of organic-rich shales from the ca. 2.15 Ga Sengoma Argillite Formation contains organic-rich shales deposited during the Great Oxidation Event. The slope of the 207 Pb/204 Pb­206 Pb/204 Pb array of shales from the Sengoma Argillite Formation corresponds to a Pb­Pb age