Sample records for alabama land recycling

  1. Land Division: Uniform Environmental Covenants Program (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to environmental covenants arising from environmental response projects conducted under any of the following Alabama Department of Environmental Management programs: Scrap...

  2. Alabama Land Recycling And Economic Redevelopment Act (Alabama) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed. GovernmentFed.

  3. Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying land朼tmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

  4. Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

  5. Forestry Policies (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alabama's Forests are managed by the Alabama Forestry Commission. The Commission has organized biomass market resources including a number of publications with regard to biomass energy...

  6. Alabama Profile

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerrSpring 2008U.S.Alabama

  7. Alabama Power- UESC Activities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation梘iven at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting梔iscusses Alabama Power and its utility energy service contract (UESC) projects and activities.

  8. Environmental Management Commission (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alabama Department of Environmental Management is charged with developing the state's environmental policy, hearing administrative appeals of permits, administrative orders and variances issued...

  9. Alabama - SEP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Huntsville program fact sheet Sample Energy Performance Score report Facebook: Nexus Energy Center Alabama Program Takes a Dual Approach to Energy Efficiency Upgrades Alabama...

  10. Water Rules (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure...

  11. The Source of Alabama抯 Abundance of Arbitration Cases: Alabama抯 Bizarre Law of Damages for Mental Anguish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, W. Scott; Ware, Stephen J.; Willard, Vickie M.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Article gives an overview of arbitration litigation in Alabama, including the evolution of mental anguish jurisprudence in contract cases, especially with regard to the automobile and home industries; a proposal to bring Alabama law in line...

  12. Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama DOT: Alabama Report Questions on NDT Testing 1. What NDT testing methods for concrete materials, concrete pavements, and overlays are you trying? 路 We perform pavement smoothness testing, pavement friction testing and FWD testing 路 We are currently using GPR on the I-59 project to locate voids

  13. South Alabama Electric Cooperative- Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Alabama Electric Cooperative (SAEC) is a part owner of Alabama Electric Cooperative which has a generation facility in Andalusia, Alabama. The Energy Resources Conservation Loan (ERC) helps...

  14. Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Summary of Reported Data Alabama -- SEP Summary of Reported Data Summary of data reported by Better Buildings Neighborhood Program partner Alabama -- SEP. Alabama Summary of...

  15. Hanford recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, I.M.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a study of the past and present recycling efforts on the Hanford site and options for future improvements in the recycling program. Until 1996, recycling goals were voluntarily set by the waste generators: this year, DOE has imposed goals for all its sites to accomplish by 1999. Hanford is presently meeting the voluntary site goals, but may not be able to meet all the new DOE goals without changes to the program. Most of these new DOE goals are recycling goals: * Reduce the generation of radioactive (low-level) waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of low-level mixed waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Reduce the generation of hazardous waste from routine operations 50 percent through source reduction and recycling. * Recycle 33 percent of the sanitary waste from all operations. * Increase affirmative procurement of EPA-designated recycled items to 100 percent. The Hanford recycling program has made great strides-there has been a 98 percent increase in the amount of paper recycled since its inception in 1990. Hanford recycles paper, chemicals cardboard, tires, oil, batteries, rags, lead weights, fluorescent tubes, aerosol products, concrete, office furniture, computer software, drums, toner cartridges, and scrap metal. Many other items are recycled or reused by individual groups on a one time basis without a formal contract. Several contracts are closed-loop contracts which involve all parts of the recycle loop. Considerable savings are generated from recycling, and much more is possible with increased attention and improvements to this program. General methods for improving the recycling program to ensure that the new goals can be met are: a Contract and financial changes 0 Tracking database and methods improvements 0 Expanded recycling efforts. Specifically, the Hanford recycling program would be improved by: 0 Establishing one overall DOE recycling contract at the Hanford site and a central group to control the contract. 0 Using a BOA or MTS contract as a way to get proceeds from recycling back to site facilities to provide incentives for recycling. . Upgrading tracking mechanisms to track and recycle construction waste which is presently buried in onsite pits. . Establishing contract performance measures which hold each project accountable for specific waste reduction goals. * Recycling and reusing any material or equipment possible as buildings are dismantled.

  16. Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable...

  17. ,"Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production",10,"Annual",2013,"630...

  18. Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers Add Jobs, Reduce Waste and Increase Profits April 8,...

  19. Alabama SEP Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimes, Elizabeth M.

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary In the fall of 2010, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) launched the Multi-State Model for Catalyzing the National Home Energy Retrofit Market Project (Multi-State Project). This residential energy efficiency pilot program was a collaborative effort among the states of Alabama, Massachusetts, Virginia, and Washington, and was funded by competitive State Energy Program (SEP) awards through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this project was to catalyze the home energy efficiency retrofit market in select areas within the state of Alabama. To achieve this goal, the project addressed a variety of marketplace elements that did not exist, or were underdeveloped, at the outset of the effort. These included establishing minimum standards and credentials for marketplace suppliers, educating and engaging homeowners on the benefits of energy efficiency and addressing real or perceived financial barriers to investments in whole-home energy efficiency, among others. The anticipated effect of the activities would be increased market demand for retrofits, improved audit to retrofit conversion rates and growth in overall community understanding of energy efficiency. The four-state collaborative was created with the intent of accelerating market transformation by allowing each state to learn from their peers, each of whom possessed different starting points, resources, and strategies for achieving the overall objective. The four partner states engaged the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) to oversee a project steering committee and to manage the project evaluation for all four states. The steering committee, comprised of key program partners, met on a regular basis to provide overall project coordination, guidance, and progress assessment. While there were variances in program design among the states, there were several common elements: use of the Energy Performance Score (EPS) platform; an audit and home energy rating tool; emphasis on community based coordination and partnerships; marketing and outreach to increase homeowner participation; training for market actors; access to financing options including rebates, incentives, and loan products; and an in depth process evaluation to support continual program improvement and analysis. In Alabama, Nexus Energy Center operated energy efficiency retrofit programs in Huntsville and Birmingham. In the Huntsville community the AlabamaWISE program was available in five Alabama counties: Cullman, Lawrence, Limestone, Madison, and Morgan. In Birmingham, the program was available to residents in Jefferson and Shelby Counties. In both communities, the program was similar in terms of program design but tailored marketing and partnerships to address the unique local conditions and population of each community. ADECA and the Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (SEEA) provided overall project management services and common resources to the local program administrator Nexus Energy Center, including contracted services for contractor training, quality assurance testing, data collection and reporting, and compliance. The fundamental components of the AlabamaWISE program included a vertical contractor-based business model; comprehensive energy assessments; third-party quality assurance; rebates for installation of energy saving measures; accessible, low-interest financing; targeted and inbound marketing; Energy Performance Score (EPS) tool to engage and educate homeowners; training for auditors, contractors, and real estate professionals; and online resources for education and program enrollment. Program participants were eligible to receive rebates or financing toward the assessments and upgrades to their home provided they reached at least 20 percent deemed or modeled energy savings. The design of each program focused on addressing several known barriers including: limited homeowner knowledge on the benefits of energy efficiency, lack of financing options, lack of community support for energy efficiency programs, and

  20. Extreme Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Singing the recycling blues because you have to separate your chipboard from your newspaper, your steel from your aluminum, your #1 from your #2 plastic? Pantywaists! The residents of Kamikatsu, Japan ...

  1. Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"Click worksheet9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,,781Title: Telephone:short version)ecTotalnerrSpring 2008

  2. Recycling universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaume Garriga; Alexander Vilenkin

    1997-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If the effective cosmological constant is non-zero, our observable universe may enter a stage of exponential expansion. In such case, regions of it may tunnel back to the false vacuum of an inflaton scalar field, and inflation with a high expansion rate may resume in those regions. An ``ideal'' eternal observer would then witness an infinite succession of cycles from false vacuum to true, and back. Within each cycle, the entire history of a hot universe would be replayed. If there were several minima of the inflaton potential, our ideal observer would visit each one of these minima with a frequency which depends on the shape of the potential. We generalize the formalism of stochastic inflation to analyze the global structure of the universe when this `recycling' process is taken into account.

  3. A critical analysis of bulk precipitation recycling models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzmaurice, Jean Anne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation recycling is the contribution of local land evaporation to the precipitation of a region. The significant local evaporative contribution to rainfall in many continental regions highlights the potential ...

  4. ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ParadigmParadigm Concrete RecyclingConcrete Recycling #12;Recycled ConcreteRecycled Concrete 路路 Whatever steel goes into PCC must comeWhatever steel goes into PCC must come out for recycleout for recycle 路路 Aggregates have a big impact on the costAggregates have a big impact on the cost of recyclingof recycling

  5. Plastic Recycling Toter -ORANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    microfuge tubes - beakers - flasks - bottles - jars - Plastic disposable pipettes with cotton plugsPlastic Recycling Toter - ORANGE Glass Recycling Toter - TEAL Garbage Yellow sharps container Categories - All Plastic except Styrofoam - rinsed 3 times - may have contained Biohazard level 1 bacteria

  6. Federal Recycling Program Printed on recycled paper.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    #12;Federal Recycling Program Printed on recycled paper. The Forest Health Technology Enterprise of discrimination, write USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, Room 326-W, Whitten Building, 1400 independence MALEZAS POR ENEMIGOS NATURALES R. G. VAN DRIESCHE University of Massachusetts Amherst, Massachusetts, USA

  7. Haleburg, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:Greer County is a countyon State Highways |Haiti:Haleburg, Alabama:

  8. Gordon, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy ResourcesGordon, Alabama: Energy Resources Jump to:

  9. Rehobeth, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, searchVirginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces |Rehobeth, Alabama: Energy

  10. ,"Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2013,"6302009" ,"Release...

  11. Energy Secretary Bodman Tours Alabama Red Cross Facility and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Remembrance Service with Governor Riley September 16, 2005 - 10:24am Addthis MONTGOMERY, AL - Today, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman traveled to Montgomery, Alabama, to...

  12. Two Alabama Elementary Schools Get Cool with New HVAC Units ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    campaign. Winston's HVAC replacement project received a boost from the Alabama State Energy Program, which granted the school district a little more than 82,000 in Recovery...

  13. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    financing products, and stakeholder education and training. Managed by Nexus Energy Center, AlabamaWISE achieved success through high involvement from contractors to...

  14. Alabama Family Staying Nice and Cozy This Fall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recovery Act money to weatherize homes has resulted in much lower energy bills for Alabama families, including Mary, whose bill is about $300 cheaper now.

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama volume ii Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    License Sales in Alabama Summary: in Alabama by Sayeed Mehmood, Daowei Zhang and James Armstrong* June 18, 2003 *The authors are, respectively... of this paper. This research is...

  16. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    W - - - - - - - Alabama New Jersey - W - W W W - W Arizona Arizona - W - W W W - W Colorado Alabama W 34.52 W 62.70 55.1% 2,898 W 96.7% Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W...

  17. Origin State Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    - W - W W W - W Alabama Pennsylvania - W - W W W - W Arizona Arizona - W - W W W - W Colorado Alabama W 30.35 W 70.84 42.8% 905 W 95.3% Colorado Arizona W W W W W W W W Colorado...

  18. Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Shannon Golden, Alabama DOT PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENT PROJECT 路 First in Alabama in more than 25 years! 路 IM-I059 (342) Etowah County 颅 I-59 Concrete Pavement Rehabilitation with Unbonded Concrete Overlay 颅 Length: 10.9 miles 颅 Thickness: 11.0 to 13.5 inches 颅 Volume: 300

  19. Coker, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy, -105.3774934掳Coda BatteryCohoe, Alaska:Coker, Alabama:

  20. Cowarts, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) |Cordova39. It is classified as ASHRAECowarts, Alabama:

  1. Ariton, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy InformationArcata,Koblitz JumpAriton, Alabama: Energy

  2. Ashford, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergyElectric Coop CorpInformationAscopiaveAlabama: Energy

  3. Brookwood, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a village in CookEnergyBrookwood, Alabama: Energy Resources

  4. Energy Incentive Programs, Alabama | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergyIDIQBusinessin Jamaica, N.Y.EnergyDepartment ofScheduleFrom theAlabama

  5. Tennessee Valley Authority (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:TaosISGANAttribution(Alabama) Jump to: navigation, search

  6. Enterprise, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump37. It isInformation ContractsCGNPC JV JumpEnphaseEnterprise, Alabama:

  7. The Corporate Headquarters for Alabama Power Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reardon, J. G.; Penuel, K. M.

    of the "product", and also helps to delay require ments for future generating capacity. Therefore, cooling for the complex will be provided by a state of-the-art refrigeration plant and ice storage system which is capable of producing and storing one and a... 16-18, 1987 I Typical Peak Demand Breakdown Commercial Building LIGHTING (39.4%) AIR HANDLING (10.8%) / COOLING AUX (5.2%) Figure 1 DESIGN APPROACH Specific objectives established by Alabama Power for the project include: - Reduce peak...

  8. St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    St Andrews Recycling Points Recycling Points are situated locally to allow you to recycle the following materials: To find your nearest Recycling Point please visit www.fifedirect.org.uk/wasteaware or call the Recycling Helpline on 08451 55 00 22. R&A GOLF CLUB OLD COURSE HOTEL UNIVERSITY NORTH HAUGH

  9. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  10. Announcing: All Recycling Reduce your

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Announcing: All Recycling Go Green! Reduce your contribution to the landfill, by choosing to voluntarily recycle acceptable items in the green All Recycling toters and containers around campus. ONLY THE ITEMS BELOW ARE ACCEPTED FOR ALL RECYCLING Please do not contaminate the recycling containers with trash

  11. TRANSPARENCY RECYCLING PROGRAM PROCEDURES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transparencies to be recycled. 2.) SEPARATE the transparencies from ringed binders, plastic or paper folders, envelopes, andor files. 3.) PLACE the transparencies (only) into...

  12. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind Biodiesel Project Green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmiston, Jessica L

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Through extensive collaboration, Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) is Alabama's first educational entity to initiate a biodiesel public education, student training and production program, Project Green. With state and national replication potential, Project Green benefits local businesses and city infrastructures within a 120-mile radius; provides alternative education to Alabama school systems and to schools for the deaf and blind in Appalachian States; trains students with sensory and/or multiple disabilities in the acquisition and production of biodiesel; and educates the external public on alternative fuels benefits.

  13. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  14. RESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    ://www.thesoftlanding.com/ AVOIDING BISPHENOL-A Eden Organics Beans http://www.edenfoods.com/ CD and DVD recycling httpRESOURCE GUIDE RECYCLING ELECTRONICS Batteries and Accessories Office Depot Cell Phones Any Verizon Plastics Call your local Solid Waste Management Facility eCycling resource (EPA) http

  15. RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    RecycleMania! Improving Waste Reduction and Recycling on Campus from Universities to Big Business #12;Contact Information Tracy Artley Recycling Coordinator University of Michigan Tel: 734-763-5539 Email: recycle@umich.edu #12;Agenda Waste Impacts of Large Institutions Unique Challenges Overcoming

  16. Solvent recycle/recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffhausen, M.W.; Smith, D.L.; Ugaki, S.N.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of the Solvent Recycle/Recovery Task of the DOE Chlorinated Solvent Substitution Program for the US Air Force by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho, Inc., through the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The purpose of the task is to identify and test recovery and recycling technologies for proposed substitution solvents identified by the Biodegradable Solvent Substitution Program and the Alternative Solvents/Technologies for Paint Stripping Program with the overall objective of minimizing hazardous wastes. A literature search to identify recycle/recovery technologies and initial distillation studies has been conducted. 4 refs.

  17. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  18. Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authorization Recycling in RBAC Systems 1Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems 路motivation 路recycling approach recycling algorithms experimental evaluations summary & future work #12 issued before (precise recycling) #12;6 Laboratory for Education and Research in Secure Systems

  19. RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    RETHINKING WASTE, RECYCLING, AND HOUSEKEEPING EFFICIENCY.EFFICIENCY. A l GA leaner Green #12 t R li Management Recycling Staff The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in The Office of Waste Reduction & Recycling started in 1990, we have 14 full time staff positions. 路We collect over 40

  20. Fermilab recycler diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet storage ring for the storage and cooling of antiprotons. The following note describes the diagnostic tools currently available for commissioning, as well as the improvements and upgrades planned for the near future.

  1. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008 |Energy Information Alabama Power

  2. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - October 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008 |Energy Information Alabama

  3. Alabama Power Co (Alabama) EIA Revenue and Sales - September 2008 | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowattOpen2008 |Energy Information AlabamaEnergy

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama eastern gulf Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: alabama eastern gulf Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Curriculum vitae Steven J.A. Kimble Summary: of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Birmingham, AL May...

  5. Impacts of House Bill 56 on the Construction Economy in Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilbo, David; Escamilla, Edelmiro; Bigelow, Ben F.; Garcia, Jose

    bill, and its impact on the construction economy in Alabama. The study utilized construction employment rates, construction GDP, and construction spending as the major indices detailing the 揾ealth of the construction economy in Alabama. This research...

  6. SEP Success Story: Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project SEP Success Story: Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project August 20, 2010 - 9:44am Addthis...

  7. Curbside recycling in the presence of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beatty, Timothy K.M.; Berck, Peter; Shimshack, Jay P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH MINOR REVISIONS). Curbside Recycling in the Presence ofConservation, Division of Recycling. The views expressed inThese historically high recycling rates have often been

  8. Scrap tire recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lula, J.W.; Bohnert, G.W.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the automobile tire technology has grown and met the need for safer and more durable tires, stronger reinforcement and more chemically resistant rubber compounds have made recycling tires more difficult. In an effort to resolve this problem, techniques and equipment were developed to grind tires into small pieces, and new markets were sought to utilize the crumb rubber product streams from ground tires. Industrial combustion processes were modified to accept scrap tires as fuel. These efforts have been beneficial, steadily increasing the percentage of scrap tires recycled to about 10% in 1985, and reaching 72% in 1995. By the end of 1997, fully 100% of tires generated in the U.S. are expected to be recycled.

  9. Rutgers Cooperative Extension graduated 27 New Jersey landscapers and land care providers from their first Organic Land Care Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    the waste recycling process that naturally occurs in a forest or grassland. "In the case of organic land-day program where they learned new skills related to sustainable, environ- mentally-friendly land care practices that im- prove soil health, pro- mote biodiversity, and reduce negative im- pacts on home land

  10. http://nevadarecycles.gov/main/recyclables.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Residential Recycling Guide for Clark County TV Recycling in Nevada National Recycling Web Resources Earth911.com provides a listing of recycling resources to help you find a way...

  11. Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ejiri, Shinji

    THESIS Power recycling for an interferometric gravitational wave detector Masaki Ando Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 3.3 Power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.1 Principle of power recycling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 3.3.2 Recycling cavity

  12. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from 揚roof of Concept to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  13. CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    1 2 3 CHERRY: CHECKPOINTED EARLY RESOURCE RECYCLING Jos麓e F. Mart麓inez1 , Jose Renau2 Michael C. Huang3 , Milos Prvulovic2 , and Josep Torrellas2 #12;Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling efficient use by aggressive recycling Opportunity: Resources reserved until retirement 搂 娄 陇 楼 Solution

  14. Refrigerator recycling and CFCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, M.; Hawthorne, W.; Wilson, A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-sponsored refrigerator and freezer pick-up programs have removed almost 900,000 inefficient appliances from the North American electric grid to date. While the CFC-12 refrigerant from the discarded appliances is typically removed and recycled, in all but a few programs the CFC-11 in the foam insulation is not. About a quarter-billion pounds of CFC-11 are banked in refrigerator foam in the United States. Release of this ``bank`` of CFC, combined with that from foam insulation used in buildings, will be the largest source of future emissions if preventive measures are not taken. Methods exist to recover the CFC for reuse or to destroy it by incineration. The task of recycling or destroying the CFCs and other materials from millions of refrigerators is a daunting challenge, but one in which utilities can play a leadership role. E Source believes that utilities can profitably serve as the catalyst for public-private partnerships that deliver comprehensive refrigerator recycling. Rather than treating such efforts solely as a DSM resource acquisition, utilities could position these programs as a multifaceted service delivery that offers convenient appliance removal for homeowners, a solid waste minimization service for landfills, a source of recycled materials for industry, and a CFC recovery and/or disposal service in support of the HVAC industry and society`s atmospheric protection goals and laws. Financial mechanisms could be developed through these public-private enterprises to ensure that utilities are compensated for the extra cost of fully recycling refrigerators, including the foam CFC.

  15. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA IN HUNTSVILLE FINANCIAL DATA SHEET 1. Price Summary The cost estimate raises. These increases are MERIT, not cost-of-living, raises. Percentage of time is estimated. Salaries on Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC). Equipment, capital expenditures, charges for patient care and tuition

  16. The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    The University of Alabama 1 Department of Computer Science Computer science is a multifaceted discipline that encompasses a broad range of topics. At one end of the spectrum, computer science focuses. At the other applications-oriented end of the spectrum, computer science deals with techniques for the design

  17. Phase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    counties. The project includes reef designs to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore and limestone layers with spacers between the layers, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feetPhase III Early Restoration Projects Alabama 路 Florida 路 Louisiana 路 Mississippi 路 Texas NOAA

  18. A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    CAVT A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty Research Center OBJECTIVE 颅 Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric Axial motor 颅 Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric motor topologies with high torque and power densities MOTIVATION 颅 Axial-gap ("pancake") motors have

  19. A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to H2 tank Loads 颅 Study the ability of hydrogen fuel cells to respondCAVT A University of Alabama Fuel Cell Electronic Integration y Research Center OBJECTIVE 颅 Study to rapid load changes MOTIVATION Fuel cell 颅 Automotive cycles include rapid load changes (passing

  20. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to pay for curbside recycling; A comparison of payment carefees needed to sustain recycling of covered electronicsbehavior: waste recycling in Hong Kong. Journal of

  1. Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Battery recycling How can I recycle batteries? The University Safety Office is responsible for arranging battery recycling for departments (see Contact at bottom of page). Colleges must in normal waste bins or recycling boxes. To recycle batteries, select either option 1 or 2 below: Option 1

  2. Recycling Best Practices Report August 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Recycling Best Practices Report August 2011 Elizabeth Fox, Recycling Best Practices Intern Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling University of Michigan Plant Building and Grounds Services #12;Recycling Best Practices Report Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling 1 Executive Summary Due to the high

  3. Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    Environmental Management Waste and Recycling Policy October 2006 The University is committed and promoting recycling and the use of recycled materials. We will actively encourage the recycling of office reduction techniques 路 Provide facilities for recycling on campus 路 Give guidance and information to staff

  4. Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    Recycling Bin Guide Locations and prices Metal Bins Deskside Bins with Side Saddle Rubbermaid Bins.58 for auxiliaries. And Non-Public Areas Public Offices Non-Public Recyclables Recyclables RecyclablesTrash Trash Trash #12;New Recycling Bin Guidelines Frequently Asked Questions (as of December 2008) 路 Why

  5. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Germantown Paperclips Supply Stores. Batteries accepted for recycling are: Alkaline, Lithium Ion, Nickel Cadmium (Ni-Cd), Nickel-Iron, and Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH). Toner...

  6. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  7. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  8. Recycling Magnets | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 Revision 3 +DepartmentPolicyRecycling

  9. Pioneer Electric Coop, Inc (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOskiPhilips Color Kinetics Jump to:PiedmontMaunaAlabama)

  10. Lamar County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey, Washington:Lakeville, MN) Jump to:Lamar County, Alabama Beaverton,

  11. Macon County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point,ECO Auger <IndustriesMacomb,County, Alabama:

  12. Jackson County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen Energy2005) |JMalucelli EnergiaJackson County, Alabama

  13. City of Evergreen, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) JumpDoerun, GeorgiaElectraElsmore, KansasErieAlabama

  14. City of Fairhope, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (Utility Company) JumpDoerun, GeorgiaElectraElsmore,Fairhope, Alabama

  15. City of Luverne, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhio (UtilityHolyrood, KansasLampasas,Luverne Place: Alabama References: EIA

  16. City of Piedmont, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby, Illinois (Utility Company) JumpPaullina,Piedmont Place: Alabama

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama argillacea huebner Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology and Organismal Summary: . of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology Advisor: Dr. Allison Snow 2001 - 2004 University of Alabama... HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology and Organismal Summary: . of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology Advisor: Dr. Allison Snow 2001 - 2004 University of Alabama... HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - alabama doe-experimental program Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University Graduate Program Dept... . of Evolution, Ecology and Organismal Biology Advisor: Dr. Allison Snow 2001 - 2004 University of Alabama... HOWARD HUGHES MEDICAL...

  20. Constitutional Reform in Alabama: Why Efforts for Change Continue to Fail .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Rebecca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Alabama has been governed by the same constitutional document for one hundred thirteen years. The document is outdated and it is also the longest constitution (more)

  1. Single Stream Recycling Say Goodbye to Sorting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Single Stream Recycling Say Goodbye to Sorting Paper Please email recycle@umich.edu for more Containers Cardboard Please flatten all cardboard before placing into bin! Visit us at www.recycle

  2. RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    RECYCLING: SUPPLY, ECONOMICS, ENVIRONMENT, AND TECHNOLOGY Panel Discussion Roundtable Moderator: S, although higher market values for recyclable will certainly stimulate increased interest in collection in recycling and deinking technologies and process design among North American, European, and Pacific Rim

  3. The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    The Economic Benefits of Recycling in Virginia Alexander P. Miller Hang T. Nguyen Samantha D, and the recycling contacts from the participating Solid Waste Planning Units discussed in this study. #12;3 Table Determinants of Recycling_______________________________ 12 State Reports

  4. Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

  5. RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    RECYCLING AND GENERAL WASTE MANAGEMENT OPERATIONAL PROCEDURE Swansea University Estates Services.6.1/1 Recycling & General Waste Management Department: Estates & Facilities Management Site: Swansea University recycling and waste management facilities in Swansea university To ensure that Waste Management Objectives

  6. PITT RECYCLES! *Please empty cans!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    PITT RECYCLES! Steel Aluminum Tin cans *Please empty cans! *Please empty containers! *Plastic bags can be recycled at Giant Eagle and Trader Joe's. Look on the bottom or the side of the container for one of these numbers! Clear glass Green glass Brown glass Blue glass *Please empty containers! Other

  7. Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials In addition to the DOE making a final...

  8. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 'clean coal' combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 'allowable' under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and private-sector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  9. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziemkiewicz, Paul; Vandivort, Tamara; Pflughoeft-Hassett, Debra; Chugh, Y Paul; Hower, James

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Each year, over 100 million tons of solid byproducts are produced by coal-burning electric utilities in the United States. Annual production of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) byproducts continues to increase as the result of more stringent sulfur emission restrictions. In addition, stricter limits on NOx emissions mandated by the 1990 Clean Air Act have resulted in utility burner/boiler modifications that frequently yield higher carbon concentrations in fly ash, which restricts the use of the ash as a cement replacement. Controlling ammonia in ash is also of concern. If newer, 揷lean coal combustion and gasification technologies are adopted, their byproducts may also present a management challenge. The objective of the Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) is to develop and demonstrate technologies to address issues related to the recycling of byproducts associated with coal combustion processes. A goal of CBRC is that these technologies, by the year 2010, will lead to an overall ash utilization rate from the current 34% to 50% by such measures as increasing the current rate of FGD byproduct use and increasing in the number of uses considered 揳llowable under state regulations. Another issue of interest to the CBRC would be to examine the environmental impact of both byproduct utilization and disposal. No byproduct utilization technology is likely to be adopted by industry unless it is more cost-effective than landfilling. Therefore, it is extremely important that the utility industry provide guidance to the R&D program. Government agencies and privatesector organizations that may be able to utilize these materials in the conduct of their missions should also provide input. The CBRC will serve as an effective vehicle for acquiring and maintaining guidance from these diverse organizations so that the proper balance in the R&D program is achieved.

  10. Coal liquefaction with preasphaltene recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weimer, Robert F. (Allentown, PA); Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A coal liquefaction system is disclosed with a novel preasphaltene recycle from a supercritical extraction unit to the slurry mix tank wherein the recycle stream contains at least 90% preasphaltenes (benzene insoluble, pyridine soluble organics) with other residual materials such as unconverted coal and ash. This subject process results in the production of asphaltene materials which can be subjected to hydrotreating to acquire a substitute for No. 6 fuel oil. The preasphaltene-predominant recycle reduces the hydrogen consumption for a process where asphaltene material is being sought.

  11. Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts Willow on recycled paper #12;1 Impacts of Land-Use and Biofuels Policy on Climate: Temperature and Localized Impacts to agricultural production, including growing biofuels, and (ii) Observed Land Supply Response (OLSR

  12. Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    natural resources, and emits less CO2 because less energy is required in the manufacture of products made saved energy and reduced Greenhouse Gases through recycling. Recycling uses less energy, preserves) of GHG (Greenhouse Gas) Emissions: We Recycled: 477 tons of mixed or office paper The recycling

  13. Recycled Materials Resource Jeffrey S. Melton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recycled Materials Resource Center Jeffrey S. Melton Outreach Director Recycled Materials Resource Center NCC Meeting, April 9th, 2008 #12;Recycled Materials Resource Center Partner laboratory of FHWA Founded in 1998, renewed in 2007 Dedicated to the appropriate use of recycled materials in the highway

  14. The College Student's Guide to Recycling,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidd, William S. F.

    The College Student's Guide to Recycling, Reduction, and Reuse UNIVERSITY AT ALBANY Phone Albany, NY 12222 Top 7 Recycling and Reuse TipsTop 7 Recycling and Reuse Tips University at Albany Office of Environmental Sustainability 1. Set up separate bins for recyclable materials such as plastics and papers. 2

  15. Ink and Toner Recycling Rewards Program Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Ink and Toner Recycling Rewards Program Overview www.MyBusinessRecycles.com April 2013 #12;Program Overview 路 All BSD contract customers can participate in the MyBusinessRecycles program 路 Customers located in AK, HI or PR are not currently eligible. 颅 Education sector customers should join the Recycling Rules

  16. RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    RECYCLING PROGRAM TYPE LOCATION ALLOWED NOT ALLOWED Batteries, toner, ink cartridges & cell phones and recycling is an important part of that effort. Below is a guide to on-campus recycling at RSMAS: Visit http://www.rsmas.miami.edu/msgso/ for map of recycling bin locations. NOTE: This is not an exhaustive list. If unauthorized items are found

  17. WasteTraining Booklet Waste & Recycling Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    WasteTraining Booklet #12;Waste & Recycling Impacts Environment: The majority of our municipal jobs while recycling 10,000 tons of waste creates 36 jobs. Environment: Recycling conserves resources. It takes 95% less energy to make aluminum from recycled aluminum than from virgin materials, 60% less

  18. The Environment Team to Waste & Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    The Environment Team A-Z Guide to Waste & Recycling www.le.ac.uk/environment #12;Welcome ...to the University of Leicester's `A-Z Guide to Waste and Recycling'. Over the last 3 years, the Environment Team has introduced an award- winning recycling scheme across the campus that allows us to recycle paper, plastics

  19. Solar hot water system installed at Mobile, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the solar energy hot water system installed at LaQuinta Motor Inn Inc., at Mobile, Alabama. The building is a 122 unit motel. The system consists of six rows of ten collectors and three rows of eleven collectors (1990 square feet) mounted on the roof. Griswald flow control valves were installed to regulate the flow to each row. Two Heliotrope electronic thermometers with a combined capability of measuring the temperatures of 22 different locations were installed for monitoring purposes. Engineering drawings, component specifications, and operator instructions are included.

  20. ALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembershipof EnergyALABAMA GETS WISE ABOUT SELLING

  1. Washington County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS dataIndiana: EnergyWasco County, Oregon:WashburnAlabama:

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Alabama Ordnance Works - AL 02

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home 禄 Sites 禄 SitesNewAlabama Ordnance

  3. Wilcox County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to:Westview,GeothermalHawaii: EnergyLinkButtonEnergyAlabama: Energy

  4. Winston County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay, OR)Winneshiek County, Iowa:Winooski,Alabama:

  5. Fort Rucker, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdfNotify98.pdf JumpFlixMapFile Jump to:ForseoMcKinley, Ohio:Rucker, Alabama:

  6. Alabama - Seds - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquids consumption by region,Purchases211Alabama - Seds - U.S.

  7. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquids consumption by region,Purchases211Alabama - Seds -

  8. Alabama Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperativeA2. World liquids consumption by region,Purchases211Alabama - Seds -Year

  9. Alabama Recovery Act State Memo | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts1-034 Advance| DepartmentBurden RFI |Air-SourceAlabama

  10. City of Hartford, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Nebraska (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, searchAlabama (Utility

  11. City of Robertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Nebraska (UtilityGeorgiaArkansas References:Robertsdale, Alabama (Utility

  12. Cleburne County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpSouthSolarClearPathEdwardsville, Alabama

  13. Alabama Regions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,BiosScience (SC)Supply andofJuneDOE OfficeAlabama

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama City Leads With Biodiesel and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermalPlug-inTexas Laws andEthanol Alabama

  15. How to recycle asbestos containing materials (ACM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The current disposal of asbestos containing materials (ACM) in the private sector consists of sealing asbestos wetted with water in plastic for safe transportation and burial in regulated land fills. This disposal methodology requires large disposal volumes especially for asbestos covered pipe and asbestos/fiberglass adhering to metal framework, e.g. filters. This wrap and bury technology precludes recycle of the asbestos, the pipe and/or the metal frameworks. Safe disposal of ACM at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, likewise, requires large disposal volumes in landfills for non-radioactive ACM and large disposal volumes in radioactive burial grounds for radioactive and suspect contaminated ACM. The availability of regulated disposal sites is rapidly diminishing causing recycle to be a more attractive option. Asbestos adhering to metal (e.g., pipes) can be recycled by safely removing the asbestos from the metal in a patented hot caustic bath which prevents airborne contamination /inhalation of asbestos fibers. The dissolution residue (caustic and asbestos) can be wet slurry fed to a melter and vitrified into a glass or glass-ceramic. Palex glasses, which are commercially manufactured, are shown to be preferred over conventional borosilicate glasses. The Palex glasses are alkali magnesium silicate glasses derived by substituting MgO for B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in borosilicate type glasses. Palex glasses are very tolerant of the high MgO and high CaO content of the fillers used in forming asbestos coverings for pipes and found in boiler lashing, e.g., hydromagnesite (3MgCO{sub 3} Mg(OH){sub 2} 3H{sub 2}O) and plaster of paris, gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}). The high temperate of the vitrification process destroys the asbestos fibers and renders the asbestos non-hazardous, e.g., a glass or glass-ceramic. In this manner the glass or glass-ceramic produced can be recycled, e.g., glassphalt or glasscrete, as can the clean metal pipe or metal framework.

  16. Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Welcome new and returning residents! Help us make USC greener by recycling! Your Room Recycling Bin Every room is provided with a recycling bin to make it easy for you to recycle while living in University Housing. Use this bin to collect mixed recyclables in your room and take them to your nearest

  17. Renewable and Recycled Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In March 2007, the North Dakota enacted legislation (H.B. 1506) establishing an ''objective'' that 10% of all retail electricity sold in the state be obtained from renewable energy and recycled...

  18. Framework for Building Design Recyclability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Fan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and reusing it as compacted base or drain material; 2. hauling it to a recycling facility Regardless of which recovery strategy is used, the physical processing of the material is the same: the concrete shards are fed into an impact crusher, followed... to Recycling Facilities 17 side discharge conveyor, screening plant, and a return conveyor from the screen to the crusher inlet for reprocessing oversize materials. Compact, self-contained mini- crushers are also available that can handle up to 150 tons per...

  19. Key recycling in authentication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Portmann

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In their seminal work on authentication, Wegman and Carter propose that to authenticate multiple messages, it is sufficient to reuse the same hash function as long as each tag is encrypted with a one-time pad. They argue that because the one-time pad is perfectly hiding, the hash function used remains completely unknown to the adversary. Since their proof is not composable, we revisit it using a composable security framework. It turns out that the above argument is insufficient: if the adversary learns whether a corrupted message was accepted or rejected, information about the hash function is leaked, and after a bounded finite amount of rounds it is completely known. We show however that this leak is very small: Wegman and Carter's protocol is still $\\epsilon$-secure, if $\\epsilon$-almost strongly universal$_2$ hash functions are used. This implies that the secret key corresponding to the choice of hash function can be reused in the next round of authentication without any additional error than this $\\epsilon$. We also show that if the players have a mild form of synchronization, namely that the receiver knows when a message should be received, the key can be recycled for any arbitrary task, not only new rounds of authentication.

  20. Brownfields in China : how Cities recycle industrial land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since around 2000, China has been experiencing a major shift in its industrial bases. Many cities have been relocating polluting and energy-intensive plants from urban areas to the less-developed periphery. In the summer ...

  1. RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    RDS and Recycling Waste Diversion in Food Prep Setting #12;Why Recycle? Recycling saves resources Recycling one ton of paper saves 17 trees! Recycling saves energy Recycling one aluminum can saves enough energy to power a television for 3 hours! Recycling is easy There are 4 waste categories here at UM

  2. Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Tamara Vandivort; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Y. Paul Chugh; James Hower

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combustion Byproducts Recycling Consortium (CBRC) program was developed as a focused program to remove and/or minimize the barriers for effective management of over 123 million tons of coal combustion byproducts (CCBs) annually generated in the USA. At the time of launching the CBRC in 1998, about 25% of CCBs were beneficially utilized while the remaining was disposed in on-site or off-site landfills. During the ten (10) year tenure of CBRC (1998-2008), after a critical review, 52 projects were funded nationwide. By region, the East, Midwest, and West had 21, 18, and 13 projects funded, respectively. Almost all projects were cooperative projects involving industry, government, and academia. The CBRC projects, to a large extent, successfully addressed the problems of large-scale utilization of CCBs. A few projects, such as the two Eastern Region projects that addressed the use of fly ash in foundry applications, might be thought of as a somewhat smaller application in comparison to construction and agricultural uses, but as a novel niche use, they set the stage to draw interest that fly ash substitution for Portland cement might not attract. With consideration of the large increase in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum in response to EPA regulations, agricultural uses of FGD gypsum hold promise for large-scale uses of a product currently directed to the (currently stagnant) home construction market. Outstanding achievements of the program are: (1) The CBRC successfully enhanced professional expertise in the area of CCBs throughout the nation. The enhanced capacity continues to provide technology and information transfer expertise to industry and regulatory agencies. (2) Several technologies were developed that can be used immediately. These include: (a) Use of CCBs for road base and sub-base applications; (b) full-depth, in situ stabilization of gravel roads or highway/pavement construction recycled materials; and (c) fired bricks containing up to 30%-40% F-fly ash. Some developed technologies have similar potential in the longer term. (3) Laboratory studies have been completed that indicate that much higher amounts of fly ash could be added in cement-concrete applications under some circumstances. This could significantly increase use of fly ash in cement-concrete applications. (4) A study of the long-term environmental effects of structural fills in a surface mine in Indiana was completed. This study has provided much sought after data for permitting large-volume management options in both beneficial as well as non-beneficial use settings. (5) The impact of CBRC on CCBs utilization trends is difficult to quantify. However it is fair to say that the CBRC program had a significant positive impact on increased utilization of CCBs in every region of the USA. Today, the overall utilization of CCBs is over 43%. (6) CBRC-developed knowledge base led to a large number of other projects completed with support from other sources of funding. (7) CBRC research has also had a large impact on CCBs management across the globe. Information transfer activities and visitors from leading coal producing countries such as South Africa, Australia, England, India, China, Poland, Czech Republic and Japan are truly noteworthy. (8) Overall, the CBRC has been a truly successful, cooperative research program. It has brought together researchers, industry, government, and regulators to deal with a major problem facing the USA and other coal producing countries in the world.

  3. Waste in a land of plenty -Solid waste generation and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    of recycling and waste-to- energy, according to the latest in an annual series of national surveys on municipal waste numbers using tonnages only, with any percentages - for recycling, landfilling, waste-to-energyWaste in a land of plenty - Solid waste generation and management in the US The US generates

  4. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    documents. Else Refining & Recycling Ltd. , Shefford 54.and the potential for recycling other small electrical andon material recovery and recycling of end-of-life mobile

  5. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of an evaporation process to reduce the volume of the recycle stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The concentrated recycle would be returned to DWPF while the overhead condensate would be transferred to the Effluent Treatment Plant. Various blends of evaporator feed were tested using simulants developed from characterization of actual recycle streams from DWPF and input from DWPF-Engineering. The simulated feed was evaporated in laboratory scale apparatus to target a 30X volume reduction. Condensate and concentrate samples from each run were analyzed and the process characteristics (foaming, scaling, etc) were visually monitored during each run. The following conclusions were made from the testing: Concentration of the ''typical'' recycle stream in DWPF by 30X was feasible. The addition of DWTT recycle streams to the typical recycle stream raises the solids content of the evaporator feed considerably and lowers the amount of concentration that can be achieved. Foaming was noted during all evaporation tests and must be addressed prior to operation of the full-scale evaporator. Tests were conducted that identified Dow Corning 2210 as an antifoam candidate that warrants further evaluation. The condensate has the potential to exceed the ETP WAC for mercury, silicon, and TOC. Controlling the amount of equipment decontamination recycle in the evaporator blend would help meet the TOC limits. The evaporator condensate will be saturated with mercury and elemental mercury will collect in the evaporator condensate collection vessel. No scaling on heating surfaces was noted during the tests, but splatter onto the walls of the evaporation vessels led to a buildup of solids. These solids were difficult to remove with 2M nitric acid. Precipitation of solids was not noted during the testing. Some of the aluminum present in the recycle streams was converted from gibbsite to aluminum oxide during the evaporation process. The following recommendations were made: Recycle from the DWTT should be metered in slowly to the ''typical'' recycle streams to avoid spikes in solids content to allow consistent processing and avoid process upsets. Additional studies should be conducted to determine acceptable volume ratios for the HEME dissolution and decontamination solutions in the evaporator feed. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam should be evaluated for use to control foaming. Additional tests are required to determine the concentration of antifoam required to prevent foaming during startup, the frequency of antifoam additions required to control foaming during steady state processing, and the ability of the antifoam to control foam over a range of potential feed compositions. This evaluation should also include evaluation of the degradation of the antifoam and impact on the silicon and TOC content of the condensate. The caustic HEME dissolution recycle stream should be neutralized to at least pH of 7 prior to blending with the acidic recycle streams. Dow Corning 2210 should be used during the evaporation testing using the radioactive recycle samples received from DWPF. Evaluation of additional antifoam candidates should be conducted as a backup for Dow Corning 2210. A camera and/or foam detection instrument should be included in the evaporator design to allow monitoring of the foaming behavior during operation. The potential for foam formation and high solids content should be considered during the design of the evaporator vessel.

  6. Process to recycle shredder residue

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jody, Bassam J. (Chicago, IL); Daniels, Edward J. (Oak Lawn, IL); Bonsignore, Patrick V. (Channahon, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and process for recycling shredder residue, in which separating any polyurethane foam materials are first separated. Then separate a fines fraction of less than about 1/4 inch leaving a plastics-rich fraction. Thereafter, the plastics rich fraction is sequentially contacted with a series of solvents beginning with one or more of hexane or an alcohol to remove automotive fluids; acetone to remove ABS; one or more of EDC, THF or a ketone having a boiling point of not greater than about 125.degree. C. to remove PVC; and one or more of xylene or toluene to remove polypropylene and polyethylene. The solvents are recovered and recycled.

  7. Cost-Effectiveness of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for the State of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Philip R.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Xie, YuLong; Zhang, Jian; Richman, Eric E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Loper, Susan A.; Myer, Michael

    2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Moving to the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2010 version from the Base Code (90.1-2007) is cost-effective for all building types and climate zones in the State of Alabama.

  8. Launching an Energy-Efficient Future in Alabama: Weatherization Assistance Close-Up Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D& R International

    2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Alabama demonstrates its commitment to technology and efficiency through the Weatherization Program. Weatherization uses advanced technologies and techniques to reduce energy costs for low-income families by increasing the energy efficiency of their homes.

  9. Recycling of used perfluorosulfonic acid membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen (Middletown, DE); Grot, Walther (Chadds Ford, PA)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for recovering and recycling catalyst coated fuel cell membranes includes dissolving the used membranes in water and solvent, heating the dissolved membranes under pressure and separating the components. Active membranes are produced from the recycled materials.

  10. Automobile Recycling Policy: Findings and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Frank

    This report focuses on recycling. As an objective neutral party, MIT has compiled a knowledge base that examines the many complex issues relating to re-cycling. Although this report was prepared at the request of the ...

  11. Compositional evaluation of asphalt binder recycling agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madrid, Richard Charles

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several experiments were performed to determine how recycling agent composition affects the high, intermediate, and low temperature properties as well as long term oxidative aging characteristics of recycled asphalt blends. Specifically, several...

  12. Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Refrigerator Recycling Ninth Year Retention Study Study ID Nos. 546B, 563 Prepared RECYCLING PROGRAMS Study ID Nos. 546B and 563 Prepared for Southern California Edison Rosemead, California

  13. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 颅 Fall 2012 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any trash or other

  14. TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC & ALUMINUM RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling ALL plastics (#1 through #7) by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each and in LH100. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics and aluminum. However, any

  15. TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    TTUAB PLASTIC RECYCLING PROTOCOL 颅 Fall 2011 What Plastic Do We Recycle? TTUAB has taken on the responsibility of recycling #1 PET and #2 HDPE plastics by placing a yellow TTUAB Plastic Recycling bin on each floor. Technically, we are only responsible for aforementioned plastics. However, any trash or other

  16. Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Where can I recycle it year-round? Item Local Recycling Locations Styrofoam First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007 SE 3rd St., 541-753-3115 (small fee) Packing Peanuts OSU Surplus, 644 SW 13 th St., 541-737-7347 Commercial shipping stores Film Plastics First Alternative Co-op Recycling Center, 1007

  17. Waste Management and Recycling in Lab Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Waste Management and Recycling in Lab 路 Batteries can be recycled in the VWR stockroom 路 Electronic material can be recycled for free by MIT facilities (via SAP web) 路 Bulk equipment can be disposed be placed in recycling bin 颅 Cardboard 颅 Please break down and flatten boxes 颅 Containers (aluminum, metal

  18. Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, Catherine

    Research Report Recycling gone bad: When the option to recycle increases resource consumption Jesse Abstract In this study, we propose that the ability to recycle may lead to increased resource usage compared to when a recycling option is not available. Supporting this hypothesis, our first experiment

  19. Proceedings of the waste recycling workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, R.E.; Thomas, A.F.; Ries, M.A. [eds.] [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)] [eds.; Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recorded are seventeen talks from five sessions at the workshop. FERMCO`s recycling program, state of the art recycling technology, and an integrated demonstration of deactivation, decommissioning and decommissioning are presented in the plenary session. In the concrete session, decontamination and recycling are discussed. In the transite session, regulations are considered along with recycling and decontamination. In the metals session, radioactive scrap metals are emphasized. And in the regulatory considerations and liabilities session, DOE and EPA viewpoints are discussed. (GHH)

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory completes demolition, recycling...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    completes demolition, recycling of former Administration Building | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  1. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

  2. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  3. Ames Lab 101: Rare-Earth Recycling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ryan Ott

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling keeps paper, plastics, and even jeans out of landfills. Could recycling rare-earth magnets do the same? Perhaps, if the recycling process can be improved. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are working to more effectively remove the neodymium, a rare earth, from the mix of other materials in a magnet.

  4. Recycling at Mooov-In 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Cardboard Recycling at Mooov-In 2011 For the second year in a row, Division of Housing and Food Service (DHFS) and Recycling & Sustainability teamed up to divert as much cardboard as possible from area landfills. In addition to the paper, cardboard, aluminum and plastic recycling available in all residence

  5. Energy and Environmental Considerations in Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Energy and Environmental Considerations in Recycling Griffin Hosseinzadeh 11 April 2012 Physics H materials from recyclables 路 Carbon emissions & water pollution from production of virgin materials vs. recycling 路 Methane from decomposing materials in landfill 路 Depletion of natural resources (trees, minerals

  6. Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    5015/03/08 Nottingham Trent University Plastic Recycling Water and fizzy drinks bottles Contaminated plastic (food, fluids, etc.) Oil containers Toxic chemical containers Metal strips or fasteners Carrier bags and bin liners Margarine tubs, wall coverings Yoghurt pots, egg cartons, plastic packaging

  7. Rural recycling in southeast Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lariviere, R. (Prowers County Development, Inc., Lamar, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a recycling effort developed for rural southeast Colorado. The program was inspired and manned by local volunteers and based on a drop-off method used in Europe. The topics of the article include getting started, funding, problems encountered, level of participation, and estimated savings in waste collection and landfilling fees.

  8. Cost effectiveness of recycling: A systems model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonjes, David J., E-mail: david.tonjes@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States); Waste Reduction and Management Institute, School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5000 (United States); Center for Bioenergy Research and Development, Advanced Energy Research and Technology Center, Stony Brook University, 1000 Innovation Rd., Stony Brook, NY 11794-6044 (United States); Mallikarjun, Sreekanth, E-mail: sreekanth.mallikarjun@stonybrook.edu [Department of Technology and Society, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3560 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Curbside collection of recyclables reduces overall system costs over a range of conditions. When avoided costs for recyclables are large, even high collection costs are supported. When avoided costs for recyclables are not great, there are reduced opportunities for savings. For common waste compositions, maximizing curbside recyclables collection always saves money. - Abstract: Financial analytical models of waste management systems have often found that recycling costs exceed direct benefits, and in order to economically justify recycling activities, externalities such as household expenses or environmental impacts must be invoked. Certain more empirically based studies have also found that recycling is more expensive than disposal. Other work, both through models and surveys, have found differently. Here we present an empirical systems model, largely drawn from a suburban Long Island municipality. The model accounts for changes in distribution of effort as recycling tonnages displace disposal tonnages, and the seven different cases examined all show that curbside collection programs that manage up to between 31% and 37% of the waste stream should result in overall system savings. These savings accrue partially because of assumed cost differences in tip fees for recyclables and disposed wastes, and also because recycling can result in a more efficient, cost-effective collection program. These results imply that increases in recycling are justifiable due to cost-savings alone, not on more difficult to measure factors that may not impact program budgets.

  9. Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS Website at http://www.nems.nih.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Recycling Guide: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle Recycling Information 颅 Call 301-496-7990 or visit the NEMS in COMMINGLED bin Rinse food/beverage containers before recycling No Pyrex or Styrofoam Printer and Copier Toner Cartridges in TONER CARTRIDGE bin Recycle packaging material in appropriate bin NIH charities

  10. Recycling Programs | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles 禄ExchangeDepartment ofManagementManagement RecordsRecycling

  11. SEP Success Story: Local Program Helps Alabama Manufacturers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands. The pair brought more than 75 jobs to the area with help from DOE's State Energy Program and the U.S. Forest Service. | Photo...

  12. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No. 34. USAID Plastic Recycling Project. Accessed March Recycling Regulation in Macedoniathe Macedonian waste and recycling regulatory framework with

  13. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Dbase III plus) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year.Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  14. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooda, K. E.; Galloway, K.; McCray, C. W.; Aitken, D. W.

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  15. INEEL Lead Recycling in a Moratorium Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooda, Kevin Evan; Mc Cray, Casey William; Aitken, Darren William; Galloway, Kelly

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1999, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Lead Project successfully recycled over 700,000 pounds of excess INEEL lead to the private sector. On February 14, 2000, the Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, formalized the January 12, 2000, moratorium on recycling radioactive scrap metal that prevented the unrestricted release of recycled scrap metals to the private sector. This moratorium created significant problems for the INEEL lead recycling program and associated plans; however, through the cooperative efforts of the INEEL and Idaho State University as well as innovative planning and creative thinking the recycling issues were resolved. This collaboration has recycled over 160,000 pounds of excess lead to Idaho State University with a cost savings of over $.5M.

  16. Recycling production designs : the value of coordination and flexibility in aluminum recycling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brommer, Tracey H. (Tracey Helenius)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growing motivation for aluminum recycling has prompted interest in recycling alternative and more challenging secondary materials. The nature of these alternative secondary materials necessitates the development of an ...

  17. USF Physical Plant Recycling Program Updated November 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    USF Physical Plant Recycling Program Updated November 2013 #12;Beginnings 路 Program initiated 路 Continuously expanding recycling efforts #12;Paper Recycling 路 Currently recycling mixed paper Office paper, newspaper, magazines, cardboard, paperbacks 路 PPD has distributed about 2,400 office-size recycling

  18. Recycling Campaign Award Prizes for best project proposal to improve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Recycling Campaign Award Prizes for best project proposal to improve waste recycling. Recycling bins contain inappropriate waste that cannot be recycled and thus are not picked up. THE REASON for picking up the waste. 60% of the waste budget. Your task: - To develop a new project to improve recycling

  19. Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    Recycling Realities: ASU's Quest for Zero Solid Waste Dawn RatcliffePast Recycling Coordinator in the sustainability and animal-advocacy fields. She has organized several Earth Day events, recycling events and recycling. She has run recycling and solid waste programs for The University of Arizona, MIT in Cambridge

  20. Request for Information on Photovoltaic Module Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requests feedback from industry, academia, research laboratories, government agencies, and other stakeholders on issues related to photovoltaic (PV) module recycling technology. SunShot intends to understand the current state of recycling technology and the areas of research that could lead to impactful recycling technologies to support the developing PV industry. The intent of this request for information is to generate discussion related to planning for the end of life of photovoltaic modules and to create a list of high impact research topics in photovoltaics recycling.

  1. Super recycled water: quenching computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout 禄Lab (NewportSuccess Stories T E CSuper recycled

  2. THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE RECYCLING SCHEME Under the new recycling scheme commencing at the beginning of Hilary Term the following

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capdeboscq, Yves

    THE QUEEN'S COLLEGE RECYCLING SCHEME Under the new recycling scheme commencing at the beginning in all student rooms and offices o one for normal waste o one for co-mingled recycling1 Bins these bins. If any recycling is contaminated it will be `waste' not recycling and it would need to go

  3. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecent SREL

  4. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sullivan DE (2006) Recycled cell phones梐 treasure trove ofsheet: recycle your cell phone梚t抯 an easy call, EPA530-F-ARTICLE The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

  5. Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Bituminous pavement recycling Aravind K. and Animesh Das Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kanpur Introduction The bituminous pavement rehabilitation alternatives are mainly overlaying, recycling and reconstruction. In the recycling process the material from deteriorated pavement, known as reclaimed asphalt

  6. Integrated Recycling Test Fuel Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; K.H. Kim; B. Grover; J. Smith; J. King; K. Wendt; D. Chapman; L. Zirker

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Recycling Test is a collaborative irradiation test that will electrochemically recycle used light water reactor fuel into metallic fuel feedstock. The feedstock will be fabricated into a metallic fast reactor type fuel that will be irradiation tested in a drop in capsule test in the Advanced Test Reactor on the Idaho National Laboratory site. This paper will summarize the fuel fabrication activities and design efforts. Casting development will include developing a casting process and system. The closure welding system will be based on the gas tungsten arc burst welding process. The settler/bonder system has been designed to be a simple system which provides heating and controllable impact energy to ensure wetting between the fuel and cladding. The final major pieces of equipment to be designed are the weld and sodium bond inspection system. Both x-radiography and ultrasonic inspection techniques have been examine experimentally and found to be feasible, however the final remote system has not been designed. Conceptual designs for radiography and an ultrasonic system have been made.

  7. Argonne National Laboratory's Recycling Pilot Plant

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Spangenberger, Jeff; Jody, Sam;

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne has a Recycling Pilot Plant designed to save the non-metal portions of junked cars. Here, program managers demonstrate how plastic shredder residue can be recycled. (Currently these automotive leftovers are sent to landfills.) For more information, visit Argonne's Transportation Technology R&D Center Web site at http://www.transportation.anl.gov.

  8. PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    PCC Mix Designs Using Recycled Concrete Pavements Mary E. Vancura, Derek Tompkins, & Lev Khazanovich 21st Annual Transportation Research Conference #12;路! Reassessment of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) use in rigid pavements 路! History of RCA use 路! Characteristics of RCA concrete 路! RCA production

  9. Preconceptual Design Description for Caustic Recycle Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.

    2008-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy plans to vitrify both high-level and low-activity waste at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. One aspect of the planning includes a need for a caustic recycle process to separate sodium hydroxide for recycle. Sodium is already a major limitation to the waste-oxide loading in the low-activity waste glass to be vitrified at the Waste Treatment Plant, and additional sodium hydroxide will be added to remove aluminum and to control precipitation in the process equipment. Aluminum is being removed from the high level sludge to reduce the number of high level waste canisters produced. A sodium recycle process would reduce the volume of low-activity waste glass produced and minimize the need to purchase new sodium hydroxide, so there is a renewed interest in investigating sodium recycle. This document describes an electrochemical facility for recycling sodium for the WTP.

  10. North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates Electricity North Dakota: EERE-Funded Project Recycles Energy, Generates Electricity June 17, 2014 - 2:58pm Addthis...

  11. SAFETY ANALYSIS ON RAIL HIGHWAY AT-GRADE CROSSING IN ALABAMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Administration (FRA) database 路 Highway-rail crossing inventory 路 Highway-rail crossing history file 路 Highway-rail crossing accident database Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) database 路 Rail-highway at,720 RHGCs FRA highway-rail crossing history file Crossing ID Crossing characteristics Crash count over 1998

  12. Phase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama Florida Louisiana Mississippi Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be constructed at various depths. The deep water "nearshore reefs" would have a single, prefabricated modular, in less than 20 feet deep water and within 950 feet of shore. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Natural ResourcePhase III Proposed Early Restoration Project Alabama 路 Florida 路 Louisiana 路 Mississippi 路 Texas

  13. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  14. THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF ALABAMA Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering) that are administratively supported by the Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. In the last ten degrees in environmental engineering and architectural engineering. At the graduate level, the department

  15. Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Ice Plants in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, 1980-81 JOHN M. WARD and JOHN R. POFFENBERGER Introduction Reports of ice shortages during the shrimp fishing season prompted a Na- tional closure regulation on ice plant production and sales. Like Texas, Louisiana controls the opening

  16. Issues in recycling galvanized scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koros, P.J. [LTV Steel Co., Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Hellickson, D.A. [General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI (United States); Dudek, F.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality of the steel used for most galvanizing (and tinplate) applications makes scrap derived from their production and use a premier solid charge material for steelmaking. In 1989 the AISI created a Task Force to define the issues and to recommend technologically and economically sound approaches to assure continued, unhindered recyclability of the growing volume of galvanized scrap. The AISI program addressed the treatment of full-sized industrial bales of scrap. The current, on-going MRI (US)--Argonne National Laboratory program is focused on ``loose`` scrap from industrial and post-consumer sources. Results from these programs, issues of scrap management from source to steel melting, the choices for handling zinc in iron and steelmaking and the benefits/costs for removal of zinc (and lead) from scrap prior to melting in BOF and foundry operations are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Heterogeneous Recycling in Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Benoit Forget; Michael Pope; Piet, Steven J.; Michael Driscoll

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Current sodium fast reactor (SFR) designs have avoided the use of depleted uranium blankets over concerns of creating weapons grade plutonium. While reducing proliferation risks, this restrains the reactor design space considerably. This project will analyze various blanket and transmutation target configurations that could broaden the design space while still addressing the non-proliferation issues. The blanket designs will be assessed based on the transmutation efficiency of key minor actinide (MA) isotopes and also on mitigation of associated proliferation risks. This study will also evaluate SFR core performance under different scenarios in which depleted uranium blankets are modified to include minor actinides with or without moderators (e.g. BeO, MgO, B4C, and hydrides). This will be done in an effort to increase the sustainability of the reactor and increase its power density while still offering a proliferation resistant design with the capability of burning MA waste produced from light water reactors (LWRs). Researchers will also analyze the use of recycled (as opposed to depleted) uranium in the blankets. The various designs will compare MA transmutation efficiency, plutonium breeding characteristics, proliferation risk, shutdown margins and reactivity coefficients with a current reference sodium fast reactor design employing homogeneous recycling. The team will also evaluate the out-of-core accumulation and/or burn-down rates of MAs and plutonium isotopes on a cycle-by-cycle basis. This cycle-by-cycle information will be produced in a format readily usable by the fuel cycle systems analysis code, VISION, for assessment of the sustainability of the deployment scenarios.

  18. RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    RECYCLING COORDINATOR GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP University of Nebraska--Lincoln Landscape Services, implementing and maintaining recycling on campus. Assist in annual recycler's survey; tracking of recycling drop- off program; assist in market research for selected recycled materials; assist in developing

  19. Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    1 Recycling asphalt overview of more than 25 years of use in France Y. Brosseaud 颅 LCPC hal with ring for recycling 颅 Average rate with high proportion : 30 to 50% 颅 Used of rejuvenators (soft oil,version1-20May2011 #12;4 Hot recycling asphalt on mixing plant Recycling in place in hot or cold

  20. Evaluating Water Recycling in California Sachi De Souza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Evaluating Water Recycling in California By Sachi De Souza B.Sc.Hon (Queen's University) 2005 Recycling in California ii ABSTRACT This document describes how to complete an economic analysis, financial analysis, and cost allocation for a water recycling project. Water recycling is gaining importance

  1. Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machen, Terry E.

    Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes* (Received, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3200 The pH and trafficking of recycling endosomes have-enriched recycling endosomes (pHCb) and FITC-transferrin to measure the pH of transferrin- enriched recycling

  2. Integrated petrographic and petrophysical study of the Smackover formation, Womack Hill field, Clarke and Choctaw counties, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Tiffany Lynn

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to describe depositional and diagenetic characteristics of the Oxfordian (Jurassic) Smackover formation in Womack Hill field, Alabama, as part of an integrated reservoir description program. In order to understand...

  3. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DC: Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response.J. , 1999. Reducing solid waste: Linking recycling to135. EPA, 2005. Municipal Solid Waste in the United States:

  4. FINANCING ELECTRONIC WASTE RECYCLING - Californian Households Willingness to Pay Advanced Recycling Fees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nixon, Hilary; Saphores, Jean-Daniel M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    led to a patchwork of programs and higher costs, particularly for collection, which is a major expense for e-waste recycling (

  5. Length sensing and control of a Michelson interferometer with Power Recycling and Twin Signal Recycling cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Gr鋐; Andr Th黵ing; Henning Vahlbruch; Karsten Danzmann; Roman Schnabel

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The techniques of power recycling and signal recycling have proven as key concepts to increase the sensitivity of large-scale gravitational wave detectors by independent resonant enhancement of light power and signal sidebands within the interferometer. Developing the latter concept further, twin signal recycling was proposed as an alternative to conventional detuned signal recycling. Twin signal recycling features the narrow-band sensitivity gain of conventional detuned signal recycling but furthermore facilitates the injection of squeezed states of light, increases the detector sensitivity over a wide frequency band and requires a less complex detection scheme for optimal signal readout. These benefits come at the expense of an additional recycling mirror, thus increasing the number of degrees of freedom in the interferometer which need to be controlled. In this article we describe the development of a length sensing and control scheme and its successful application to a tabletop-scale power recycled Michelson interferometer with twin signal recycling. We were able to lock the interferometer in all relevant longitudinal degrees of freedom, enabling the long-term stable operation of the experiment. We thus laid the foundation for further investigations of this interferometer topology to evaluate its viability for the application in gravitational wave detectors.

  6. BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

  7. Loveland Water and Power- Refrigerator Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Loveland Water and Power is providing an incentive for its customers to recycle their old refrigerators. Interested customers can call the utility to arrange a time to pick up the old refrigerator...

  8. Absorptive Recycle of Distillation Waste Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, D. C.; Lutz, E. J., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    condenser operates above ambient temperature, the rejected heat also contains unused availability. By incorporating an absorption heat pump (AHP) into the distillation process, these sources of unused availability can be tapped so as to recycle (and hence...

  9. printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    printed on recycled paper INDUSTRIAL ASSESSMENT CENTER ENERGY EFFICIENCY, POLLUTION PREVENTION ASSESSMENT REPORT FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY, POLLUTION PREVENTION, AND PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT No. CO0999 ASSESSMENT DATE: February 29, 2000 LOCATION: ______, Colorado PRINCIPAL PRODUCTS: Injection molded plastic

  10. Evaluation of radioactive scrap metal recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the human health risks and environmental and socio-political impacts of options for recycling radioactive scrap metal (RSM) or disposing of and replacing it. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is assisting the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, Oak Ridge Programs Division, in assessing the implications of RSM management alternatives. This study is intended to support the DOE contribution to a study of metal recycling being conducted by the Task Group on Recycling and Reuse of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The focus is on evaluating the justification for the practice of recycling RSM, and the case of iron and steel scrap is used as an example in assessing the impacts. To conduct the evaluation, a considerable set of data was compiled and developed. Much of this information is included in this document to provide a source book of information.

  11. Solid Waste Reduction, Recovery, and Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute expresses the strong support of the State of Wisconsin for the reduction of the amount of solid waste generated, the reuse, recycling and composting of solid waste, and resource...

  12. Renewable, Recycled and Conserved Energy Objective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2008, South Dakota enacted legislation (HB 1123) establishing an objective that 10% of all retail electricity sales in the state be obtained from renewable and recycled energy by 2015....

  13. Printed on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    management by focusing University resources and capabilities on this pressing economic, environmental of waste generation and composition, waste reduction, risk management, environmental equity and publicPrinted on recycled paper. 2013 Cornell Waste Management Institute CWMI is a program

  14. EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass, plastic and metal bottles and containers that previously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    EMPTY CHEMICAL BOTTLES RECYCLING PROGRAM Empty Chemical Bottles Recycling includes all glass Disposal Guide. Do not place empty chemical bottles in commingled recycling bins on hallways, trash cans and with a 20 gallons capacity. It is made of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with 100% post-consumer recycled

  15. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the City of New Orleans' waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans' waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city's limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city's waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city's ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  16. Generalized teleportation and entanglement recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergii Strelchuk; Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new teleportation protocols which are generalizations of the original teleportation protocols that use the Pauli group [Bennett, et al. Physical Review Letters, 70(13) 1895-1899] and the port-based teleportation protocols, introduced by Hiroshima and Ishizaka [Physical Review Letters, 101(24) 240501], that use the symmetric permutation group. We derive sufficient condition for a set of operations, which in general need not form a group, to give rise to a teleportation protocol and provide examples of such schemes. This generalization leads to protocols with novel properties and is needed to push forward new schemes of computation based on them. Port-based teleportation protocols and our generalizations use a large resource state consisting of N singlets to teleport only a single qubit state reliably. We provide two distinct protocols which recycle the resource state to teleport multiple states with error linearly increasing with their number. The first protocol consists of sequentially teleporting qubit states, and the second teleports them in a bulk.

  17. LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, July-Sep 1980. [Hoe Creek and Gorgas, Alabama tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olness, D.U. (ed.)

    1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal have continued. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition to obtaining a qualitative comparison of the forward burn characteristics of two coals, we obtained information on the influence of bedding plane/cleat structure orientation on the early-time shape of the burn cavity in the Roland coal. We have improved our model of the coal drying rate during underground coal gasification (UCG) by adding refinements to the model. To aid in analyzing and predicting the performance of UCG tests, we have developed a simple gas-compositional model. When the model was tested against experimental data from the three Hoe Creek experiments, it was able to match very closely the observed gas compositions, energy fractions, and water influxes. This model can be used to make performance predictions consistent with the material and energy balance constraints of the underground system. A postburn coring and wireline-logging study is under way at the Hoe Creek No. 3 site to investigate the overall effect of the directionally-drilled, horizontal linking hole to better estimate the amount of coal gasified and the shape of the combustion front, and to provide additional information on subsurface deformation and thermal effects. The site reclamation work was completed, including the dismantling of all surface equipment and piping and the plugging and sealing of process and diagnostics wells. Final grading of the reclaimed land has been completed, and the area is ready for disk-seeding. Our survey of the UCG literature has continued with a review of the extensive tests at Gorgas, Alabama, carried on by the US Bureau of Mines from 1947 to 1959.

  18. DWPF RECYCLE EVAPORATOR FLOWSHEET EVALUATION (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M

    2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) converts the high level waste slurries stored at the Savannah River Site into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. The vitrification process results in the generation of approximately five gallons of dilute recycle streams for each gallon of waste slurry vitrified. This dilute recycle stream is currently transferred to the H-area Tank Farm and amounts to approximately 1,400,000 gallons of effluent per year. Process changes to incorporate salt waste could increase the amount of effluent to approximately 2,900,000 gallons per year. The recycle consists of two major streams and four smaller streams. The first major recycle stream is condensate from the Chemical Process Cell (CPC), and is collected in the Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT). The second major recycle stream is the melter offgas which is collected in the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT). The four smaller streams are the sample flushes, sump flushes, decon solution, and High Efficiency Mist Eliminator (HEME) dissolution solution. These streams are collected in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) or the Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). All recycle streams are currently combined in the RCT and treated with sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide prior to transfer to the tank farm. Tank Farm space limitations and previous outages in the 2H Evaporator system due to deposition of sodium alumino-silicates have led to evaluation of alternative methods of dealing with the DWPF recycle. One option identified for processing the recycle was a dedicated evaporator to concentrate the recycle stream to allow the solids to be recycled to the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the condensate from this evaporation process to be sent and treated in the Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). In order to meet process objectives, the recycle stream must be concentrated to 1/30th of the feed volume during the evaporation process. The concentrated stream must be pumpable to the DWPF SRAT vessel and should not precipitate solids to avoid fouling the evaporator vessel and heat transfer coils. The evaporation process must not generate excessive foam and must have a high Decontamination Factor (DF) for many species in the evaporator feed to allow the condensate to be transferred to the ETP. An initial scoping study was completed in 2001 to evaluate the feasibility of the evaporator which concluded that the concentration objectives could be met. This initial study was based on initial estimates of recycle concentration and was based solely on OLI modeling of the evaporation process. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has completed additional studies using simulated recycle streams and OLI{reg_sign} simulations. Based on this work, the proposed flowsheet for the recycle evaporator was evaluated for feasibility, evaporator design considerations, and impact on the DWPF process. This work was in accordance with guidance from DWPF-E and was performed in accordance with the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan.

  19. Electroless nickel recycling via electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffani, C.; Meltzer, M.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroless nickel is widely used in the metal finishing industry as a coating. It plates evenly on a variety of surfaces and replicates or enhances the surface finish. It has high hardness and good corrosion resistance and machinability. However, its bath life is limited and it has a tendency to spontaneously plate out on the tank and associated equipment. These problems add to the cost per unit component plated. Also, expensive waste treatment is required before users can dispose of the spent solution. Electroless nickel`s limited bath life is inherent in its chemical make-up. Using hypophosphite as the reducing agent for the nickel ion generates by-products of nickel metal and orthophosphite. When the level of orthophosphite in the solution reaches a high concentration, the reaction slows and finally stops. The bath must be disposed of, and its treatment and replacement costs are high. Metal salts have a tendency to plate out because of the dissolved solids present, and this also makes it necessary to discard the bath. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has conducted a study of an electrodialysis process that can reduce both chemical purchases and disposal costs. Electrodialysis employs a membrane, deionized water, and an electromotive potential to separate the orthophosphite and other dissolved solids from the nickel ions. With the aid of the electromotive potential, the dissolved solids migrate across the membrane from the process solution into the water in the recycling unit`s holding cell. This migration lowers the total dissolved solids (TDS) in the process solution and improves plating performance. The dialysis process makes it possible to reuse the bath many times without disposal.

  20. Waste tire recycling by pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project examines the City of New Orleans` waste tire problem. Louisiana State law, as of January 1, 1991, prohibits the knowing disposal of whole waste tires in landfills. Presently, the numerous waste tire stockpiles in New Orleans range in size from tens to hundreds of tires. New Orleans` waste tire problem will continue to increase until legal disposal facilities are made accessible and a waste tire tracking and regulatory system with enforcement provisions is in place. Tires purchased outside of the city of New Orleans may be discarded within the city`s limits; therefore, as a practical matter this study analyzes the impact stemming from the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. Pyrolysis mass recovery (PMR), a tire reclamation process which produces gas, oil, carbon black and steel, is the primary focus of this report. The technical, legal and environmental aspects of various alternative technologies are examined. The feasibility of locating a hypothetical PMR operation within the city of New Orleans is analyzed based on the current economic, regulatory, and environmental climate in Louisiana. A thorough analysis of active, abandoned, and proposed Pyrolysis operations (both national and international) was conducted as part of this project. Siting a PMR plant in New Orleans at the present time is technically feasible and could solve the city`s waste tire problem. Pending state legislation could improve the city`s ability to guarantee a long term supply of waste tires to any large scale tire reclamation or recycling operation, but the local market for PMR end products is undefined.

  1. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood.2 million cubic meters) of lumber treated with CCA are produced annually in the United States (Micklewright 1998). 路In 1997, for example, some 581.4 million cu. ft. was treated with waterborne preservatives

  2. Recycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid, nickel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. The use of these batteries is increasing as a green, nickel metal hydride and lithium ion batteries. Please contact EHS if you need an accumulation containerRecycle Batteries CSM recycles a variety of battery types including automotive, sealed lead acid

  3. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

  4. Environmental control technology survey of selected US strip mining sites. Volume 2B. Alabama. Water quality impacts and overburden chemistry of Alabama study site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henricks, J D; Bogner, J E; Olsen, R D; Schubert, J P; Sobek, A A; Johnson, D O

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a program to examine the ability of existing control technologies to meet federal guidelines for the quality of aqueous effluents from coal mines, an intensive study of water, coal, and overburden chemistry was conducted at a surface coal mine in Alabama from May 1976 through July 1977. Sampling sites included the pit sump, a stream downgrade from the mine, the discharge from the water treatment facility, and a small stream outside the mine drainage. Water samples were collected every two weeks by Argonne subcontractors at the Alabama Geological Survey and analysed for the following parameters: specific conductance, pH, temperature, acidity, bicarbonate, carbonate, chloride, total dissolved solids, suspended solids, sulfate, and 20 metals. Analysis of the coal and overburden shows that no potential acid problem exists at this mine. Water quality is good in both streams sampled, and high levels of dissolved elements are found only in water collected from the pit sump. The mine effluent is in compliance with Office of Surface Mining water quality standards.

  5. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a specific focus on the recycling of PET plastic bottles andprocess I chose recycling of PET plastic bottles andinformal recycling in Skopje. They collect mainly PET and

  6. The use of NTA and EDTA for lead phytoextraction from soil from a battery recycling site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Silva, Airon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are lead mining, lead smelting and battery recycling.Areas near Pb recycling facilities may be enriched bysoil with lead. A battery recycling site is a location where

  7. The importance of cytosolic glutamine synthetase in nitrogen assimilation and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard, S.M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nitrogen mobilization and recycling in trees. Photosynthesisloci mapping for nitrogen recycling in rice. Journal ofNitrogen Assimilation and Recycling St閜hanie M. Bernard 1

  8. Recycling of electric-arc-furnace dust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sresty, G.C.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric arc furnace (EAF) dust is one of the largest solid waste streams produced by steel mills, and is classified as a waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Successful recycle of the valuable metals (iron, zinc, and lead) present in the dust will result in resource conservation while simultaneously reducing the disposal problems. Technical feasibility of a novel recycling method based on using hydrogen as the reductant was established under this project through laboratory experiments. Sponge iron produced was low in zinc, cadmium, and lead to permit its recycle, and nontoxic to permit its safe disposal as an alternative to recycling. Zinc oxide was analyzed to contain 50% to 58% zinc by weight, and can be marketed for recovering zinc and lead. A prototype system was designed to process 2.5 tons per day (600 tons/year) of EAF dust, and a preliminary economic analysis was conducted. The cost of processing dust by this recycling method was estimated to be comparable to or lower than existing methods, even at such low capacities.

  9. Energy implications of glass-container recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaines, L.L.; Mintz, M.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the question of whether glass-container recycling actually saves energy. Glass-container production in 1991 was 10{sup 7} tons, with cullet making up about 30% of the input to manufacture. Two-thirds of the cullet is postconsumer waste; the remainder is in-house scrap (rejects). Most of the glass recycled is made into new containers. Total primary energy consumption includes direct process-energy use by the industry (adjusted to account for the efficiency of fuel production) plus fuel and raw-material transportation and production energies; the grand total for 1991 is estimated to be about 168 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. The total primary energy use decreases as the percent of glass recycled rises, but the maximum energy saved is only about 13%. If distance to the landfill is kept fixed and that to the recovery facility multiplied by about eight, to 100 mi, a break-even point is reached, and recycling saves no energy. Previous work has shown that to save energy when using glass bottles, reuse is the clear choice. Recycling of glass does not save much energy or valuable raw material and does not reduce air or water pollution significantly. The most important impacts are the small reduction of waste sent to the landfill and increased production rates at glass plants.

  10. Scrap uranium recycling via electron beam melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is underway at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to recycle scrap uranium metal. Currently, much of the material from forging and machining processes is considered radioactive waste and is disposed of by oxidation and encapsulation at significant cost. In the recycling process, uranium and uranium alloys in various forms will be processed by electron beam melting and continuously cast into ingots meeting applicable specifications for virgin material. Existing vacuum processing facilities at LLNL are in compliance with all current federal and state environmental, safety and health regulations for the electron beam melting and vaporization of uranium metal. One of these facilities has been retrofitted with an auxiliary electron beam gun system, water-cooled hearth, crucible and ingot puller to create an electron beam melt furnace. In this furnace, basic process R&D on uranium recycling will be performed with the goal of eventual transfer of this technology to a production facility.

  11. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, G.M. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, 575 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ?15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ?15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing facility. If any of these issues were not adequately resolved prior to the start of the outage, costly delays would result and the re-start of the power plant could be impacted. The main focus of this project was to find successful methods for keeping this material out of the landfills and preserving the natural resources. In addition, this operation provided a significant cost savings to the public utility by minimizing landfill disposal. The onsite portion of the project has been completed without impact to the overall outage schedule. By the date of presentation, the majority of the waste from the condenser replacement project will have been processed and recycled. The goals for this project included helping Energy Northwest maintain the outage schedule, package and characterize waste compliantly, perform transportation activities in compliance with 49CFR (Ref-1), and minimize the waste disposal volume. During this condenser replacement project, over three millions pounds of waste was generated, packaged, characterized and transported without injury or incident. It is anticipated that 95% of the waste generated during this project will not require landfill disposal. All of the waste is scheduled to be processed, decontaminated and recycled by June of 2012. (authors)

  12. Advanced recycling and research complexes: A second strategic use for installations on the base closure list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, D.W.; Kuusinen, T.L.; Beck, J.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obstacles currently facing the solid waste recycling industry are often related to a lack of public and investor confidence, issues of profitability and liability, and insufficient consumer identification with products made from recycled materials. Resolution of these issues may not be possible without major changes in the way the solid waste recycling business is structured. At the same time, we are faced with opportunities which will not likely recur in our lifetimes: access to educated, well trained work forces; and large tracts of land that are contiguous with metropolitan areas and are developed for heavy industry and transportation. Military installations are being converted to civilian use just in time to serve as important a role in our national resource conservation policy. The future of recycling in North America converges with the future of selected bases on the closure list and takes the form of converting these bases into Advanced Recycling and Research Complexes. The premise is simple: use these strategically-located facilities as industrial parks where a broad range of secondary wastes are separated, refined, or converted and made into new products on site. The wastes would include municipal solid waste (MSW), demolition waste, landscape trimmings, used tires, scrap metal, agricultural waste, food processing waste, and other non-hazardous materials. The park would consist of separation and conversion facilities, research and product standards laboratories, and industries that convert the materials into products and fuels. Energy conversion systems using some waste streams as fuel could be located at the park to supplement energy demands of the industrial operations. The strategic co-location of the resource providers and user industries would minimize transportation costs.

  13. Self-protection in dry recycle technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.; Stanford, G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the INFCE conclusions, the U.S. undertook development of a new dry fuel cycle. Dry recycle processes have been demonstrated to be feasible. Safeguarding such fuel cycles will be dramatically simpler than the PUREX fuel cycle. At every step of the processes, the materials meet the {open_quotes}spent-fuel standard.{close_quotes} The scale is compatible with collocation of power reactors and their recycle facility, eliminating off-site transportation and storage of plutonium-bearing materials. Material diverted either covertly or overtly would be difficult (relative to material available by other means) to process into weapons feedstock.

  14. The value of recycling on water conservation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludi-Herrera, Katlyn D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is working to conserve water through recycling. This report will focus on the water conservation that has been accumulated through the recycling of paper, ceiling tiles, compost, and plastic. It will be discussed the use of water in the process of manufacturing these materials and the amount of water that is used. The way that water is conserved will be reviewed. From the stand point of SNL it will be discussed the amount of material that has been accumulated from 2010 to the first two quarters of 2013 and how much water this material has saved.

  15. Business plan for the Solar Recycle-o-Sort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalk, David O. (David Oliver)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists much room for growth in recycling participation with almost 1 in every 4 Americans still not recycling at all. In many communities this fraction is significantly higher, with low awareness of the benefits of ...

  16. A comparison of public policies for lead recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Hilary

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies that encourage recycling may be used to reduce environmental costs from waste disposal when direct restrictions on disposal are difficult to enforce. Four recycling policies have been advanced: (i) taxes on the ...

  17. actinide multi recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert B. 38 DOI: 10.1002adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable Hierarchical Bucky Aerogels** Physics Websites Summary: DOI: 10.1002adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable...

  18. Waste Toolkit A-Z Can I recycle paper cups?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    in the Grundon recycling boxes. Do not leave dregs of drink in them, as this will contaminate the recycling box) www.pefc.co.uk FSC Forest Stewardship Council www.fsc.org Contact University Environmental

  19. Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability Breakout Session: Getting in the Loop: PV Hardware Recycling and Sustainability May 21, 2014 6:30PM to 7:30PM PDT...

  20. advanced recycle filter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 185 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  1. areva nc recycling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 329 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  2. avoids recycling endosomal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 214 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  3. as recycling process: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the IEA R&D Wind's Topical expert meeting on Material recycling and life cycle analysis (LCA) of wind turbines 347 The Randomness Recycler Approach to Perfect James Allen Fill...

  4. Re:Cycle - a Generative Ambient Video Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bizzocchi, Jim; Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Quan, Brian; Suzuki, Wakiko; Bagheri, Majid; Riecke, Bernhard E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current ambient video engine is in the early stages ofa Generative Ambient Video Engine Jim Bizzocchi Assistantis complete. 2.1 The Re:Cycle Engine Re:Cycle incorporates a

  5. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI), Alabama, 1991 and 1992 (in Lotus 1-2-3) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) data gives annual estimated releases of toxic chemicals to the environment for the area indicated. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (also known as Title III) of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) requires EPA to establish an inventory of toxic chemical emissions from certain facilities. Section 313 informs the public of the presence of chemicals in their communities and releases of these chemicals into the community. With this information, States and communities, working with industrial facilities required to comply with this law, will be better able to protect public health and the environment. The TRI data on diskette includes (1) the names, addresses, counties, and public contacts of facilities manufacturing, processing or using the reported chemicals; (2) the SIC code for the plants; (3) the chemical involved; and (4) the estimated quantity emitted into the air (point and non-point emissions), discharged into bodies of water, injected underground, released to land, or released to publicly owned treatment works. Beginning with the 1991 reports, facilities also are required to provide information about pollution prevention and source reduction activities. New data elements include quantities of the listed chemical recycled and used for energy recovery on-site; quanties transferred off- site for recycling and energy recovery. Source reduction activities, and methods used to indentify those activities. All releases are in pounds per year. Also provided is the FIPS code corresponding to the facility state and county; the unique ID number assigned by Dun and Bradstreet to the parent company of the reporting facility as well as the name of the corporation or other business entity that owns or controls the reporting facility.

  6. Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment Using Catalyst/Zeolite-II-collaborative UAB/UA project funded by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    of an electrostatic diesel injector. Micro-Pilot Ignition Studies for Alternative Fueled Engines- five-year project with/without electrical heating and with/without secondary air injection. Alabama Alternative Fuel base, develop and disseminate alternative fuels information to Alabama citizens, and coordinate

  7. The economics of cell phone reuse and recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Doctori Blass, Vered

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from obsolete handsets without batteries and accessories.recycling agents remove the batteries, which have their own

  8. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  9. School Land Board (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

  10. Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaic Modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress in Recycling of Retired Cadmium- Telluride Photovoltaic Modules Postdoctoral: Wenming Wang-Talk Program July 21, 2005 #12;Recycling Retired Photovoltaic Modules to Valuable Products, Where Are We.M., Feasibility of Recycling of Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaics, Presented at 134th TMS Annual Meeting &Exhibition

  11. "Maximum recycling of Material and Energy, Minimum of Landfilling"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    in "Recycling". "Waste-to-Energy" is now defined as Recycling, when energy efficiency is > 0,65 Prevention Reuse Recycling and Waste-to Energy? #12;6 European Policies on Landfill Ban The EU Landfill Directive The amount Ban decided upon in 2000, in force in 2005. A very strong effect, with a strong increase of Waste-to-Energy

  12. Recycling Computed Answers in Rewrite Systems for Abduction Fangzhen Lin #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dekai

    Recycling Computed Answers in Rewrite Systems for Abduction Fangzhen Lin # http computed answers can be recycled arises. A yes answer could result in sub颅 stantial savings of repeated tends to be颅 lieve that the answer should be no, since recycling is a form of adding information

  13. 2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 International and Western States In-Place Recycling Conference August 5颅7, 2014 Denver and the road to revitalizing in-place recycling technologies. 路 Join this prestigious forum especially designed/research agencies to discuss the status of in-place recycling. 路 Experience what we know today for each form of in

  14. Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Thienen, Peter

    Chapter 6 Production and recycling of oceanic crust in the early Earth Abstract Because in the production and recycling of oceanic crust: (1) Small scale (x 路 100km) convection involving the lower crust have been different from those in the present-day Earth. Crustal recycling must however have taken

  15. Pesticide Container Recycling "It's Just The Right Thing To Do!"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Pesticide Container Recycling "It's Just The Right Thing To Do!" Some of you may recall that when I Container Recycling Programs in counties around the state. Highlands County was one of the first counties to establish a Pesticide Container Recycling Collection Center (which is still in operation). I set up twenty

  16. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 In the CNS, receptor recycling is critical for synaptic plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel

  17. Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Libin

    Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Jannett Highfill Department of Economics) 677-3374. #12;2 Locating a Recycling Center: The General Density Case Abstract: The present paper considers a municipality that has a landfill (fixed in location) and plans to optimally locate a "recycling

  18. Using OWL Ontologies Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Using OWL Ontologies for Selective Waste Sorting and Recycling Arnab Sinha and Paul Couderc INRIA for better recycling of materials. Our motive for using ontologies is for representing and rea- soning, recyclable materials, N-ary relations 1 Introduction Today Pervasive computing is gradually entering people

  19. Archetypes: Durer's Rhino and the Recycling of Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, John P.

    Chapter 17 Archetypes: D篓urer's Rhino and the Recycling of Images 17.1 Introduction: Aref's Rule Rule-of-Thumb 5 (Aref's Rule) Never publish the same graph more than once. As we shall below, recycling illustrate when recycling of previously published images is good, and also when and how it can go

  20. PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLACEMENT OF OUTDOOR RECYCLING CONTAINERS AROUND UBC CAMPUS UBC SEEDS Project by Iong, Sin I (Jace RECYCLING CONTAINERS ON UBC CAMPUS by Jace Iong 24 April, 2009 INTRODUCTION This SEEDS (Social, Ecological recycling containers on UBC-Vancouver campus. Initiated by David Smith, the associate director of municipal

  1. Preparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on recycled high density poly- ethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt com- pounding; recycling INTRODUCTION Plastics account for an increasing fraction of municipal solid waste around the worldPreparation and Properties of Recycled HDPE/Clay Hybrids Yong Lei,1 Qinglin Wu,1 Craig M. Clemons2

  2. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holsinger, Kent

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm Connecticut Recycling Coalition

  3. Why Become a Master By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Why Become a Master Composter? By encouraging Connecticut residents to recycle organic waste % of a typical household's waste can be recycled right in our own backyards. This significantly reduces Service Ken Longo, Manchester Recycling Center Matt Freund, Freund's Farm Bob Jacquier, Laurelbrook Farm

  4. WINCO Metal Recycle annual report, FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtold, T.E. [ed.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the first year progress of the WINCO Metal Recycle Program. Efforts were directed towards assessment of radioactive scrap metal inventories, economics and concepts for recycling, technology development, and transfer of technology to the private sector. Seven DOE laboratories worked together to develop a means for characterizing scrap metal. Radioactive scrap metal generation rates were established for several of these laboratories. Initial cost estimates indicate that recycle may be preferable over burial if sufficient decontamination factors can be achieved during melt refining. Radiation levels of resulting ingots must be minimized in order to keep fabrication costs low. Industry has much of the expertise and capability to execute the recycling of radioactive scrap metal. While no single company can sort, melt, refine, roll and fabricate, a combination of two to three can complete this operation. The one process which requires development is in melt refining for removal of radionuclides other than uranium. WINCO is developing this capability in conjunction with academia and industry. This work will continue into FY-94.

  5. Plastic bottles > Remove lids (not recyclable)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Plastic bottles Please: > Remove lids (not recyclable) > Empty bottles > Rinse milk bottles, & other bottles if possible > Squash bottles www.st-andrews.ac.uk/estates/environment All types of plastic bottle accepted Clear, opaque and coloured bottles Labels can remain on X No plastic bags X No plastics

  6. Transverse instability at the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sporadic transverse instabilities have been observed at the Fermilab Recycler Ring leading to increase in transverse emittances and beam loss. The driving source of these instabilities has been attributed to the resistive-wall impedance with space-charge playing an important role in suppressing Landau damping. Growth rates of the instabilities are computed. Remaining problems are discussed.

  7. PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Rolf

    PET-Recycling Schweiz Naglerwiesenstrasse 4 8049 Zurigo Telefono: 044 344 10 80 Fax: 044 344 10 99 E-mail: info@prs.ch www.petrecycling.ch #12;Il PET 猫 un materiale riciclabile. Riciclare PET utilizzato il PET. Riconsegna le bottiglie PET, se no mancano altrove! #12;PET 颅 pi霉 di un semplice materiale

  8. Correction magnets for the Fermilab Recycler Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James T Volk et al.

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the commissioning of the Fermilab Recycler ring the need for higher order corrector magnets in the regions near beam transfers was discovered. Three types of permanent magnet skew quadrupoles, and two types of permanent magnet sextupoles were designed and built. This paper describes the need for these magnets, the design, assembly, and magnetic measurements.

  9. Selective purge for hydrogenation reactor recycle loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved contaminant removal and hydrogen recovery in hydrogenation reactors, particularly in refineries and petrochemical plants. The improved contaminant removal is achieved by selective purging, by passing gases in the hydrogenation reactor recycle loop or purge stream across membranes selective in favor of the contaminant over hydrogen.

  10. 8. Has recycled ber been used appropriately?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,788,008North and Central America 33,246,500 45,945,000 47,806,928 38%** 2,417,000South America 2,665,000 4. Recovery rate is 62.6% if including European recovered paper recycled in third countries. ** North America

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION FOR THE AUTOMOBILE RECYCLING INDUSTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - Best Management Practices Volume 2- Technical Pollution Prevention Guide Volume 3- Code of Practice DOE 224 West Esplanade North Vancouver, B.C. Vm3H7 #12;BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE AUTO RECYCLING volumes, including the Best Management Practices, Technical Pollution Prevention Guide, and Code

  12. Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Waste Toolkit A-Z Food waste (recycling on-site) How can I recycle food waste on-site? Recycling to be recycled. While this is better than sending waste to landfill, there is a more sustainable way to recycle and parks. See examples of Tidy Planet's customers recycling on-site: www.tidyplanet.co.uk/our-news Short

  13. Model institutional infrastructures for recycling of photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaven, S.J.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How will photovoltaic modules (PVMS) be recycled at the end of their service lives? This question has technological and institutional components (Reaven, 1994a). The technological aspect concerns the physical means of recycling: what advantages and disadvantages of the several existing and emerging mechanical, thermal, and chemical recycling processes and facilities merit consideration? The institutional dimension refers to the arrangements for recycling: what are the operational and financial roles of the parties with an interest in PVM recycling? These parties include PVM manufacturers, trade organizations; distributors, and retailers; residential, commercial, and utility PVM users; waste collectors, transporters, reclaimers, and reclaimers; and governments.

  14. Evaluation of engine coolant recycling processes: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, W.H. [General Motors, Warren, MI (United States). Service Technology Group

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engine coolant recycling continues to provide solutions to both economic and environmental challenges often faced with the disposal of used engine coolant. General Motors` Service Technology Group (STG), in a continuing effort to validate the general practice of recycling engine coolants, has conducted an in-depth study on the capabilities of recycled coolants. Various recycling processes ranging from complex forms of fractional distillation to simple filtration were evaluated in this study to best represent the current state of coolant recycling technology. This study incorporates both lab and (limited) fleet testing to determine the performance capabilities of the recycled coolants tested. While the results suggest the need for additional studies in this area, they reveal the true capabilities of all types of engine coolant recycling technologies.

  15. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  16. Argonne explains nuclear recycling in 4 minutes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, when using nuclear energy only about five percent of the uranium used in a fuel rod gets fissioned for energy; after that, the rods are taken out of the reactor and put into permanent storage. There is a way, however, to use almost all of the uranium in a fuel rod. Recycling used nuclear fuel could produce hundreds of years of energy from just the uranium we've already mined, all of it carbon-free. Problems with older technology put a halt to recycling used nuclear fuel in the United States, but new techniques developed by scientists at Argonne National Laboratory address many of those issues. For more information, visit http://www.anl.gov/energy/nuclear-energy.

  17. Recycled Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus PowerLouisiana:CampbellOpenHomeRecycled Energy

  18. Recycling Technology Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office of EnvironmentalRecycling

  19. Bayshore Recycling Solar Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/CuriumSunways JV Jump to: navigation, search Name:Recycling

  20. at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Ehud

    Cardboard Recycling at the Weizmann Institute We are launching a new cardboard recycling e ort and brought to the Weizmann warehouse for reuse. Damaged boxes will be compressed and recycled by the by the recycling company (Kamam). Why do it? Re-using and recycling saves garbage burial space and frees space

  1. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Task Force, 揥ater Recycling 2030: Recommendation抯 of2007. Water Funding Recycling Program Strategic Plan. Web.grants_loans/water_recycling/docs/strategicplan2007.pdf

  2. Developing Criteria and Metrics for Assessing Recycled Water Program Effectiveness.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias, Michelle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Many U.S. states are currently experiencing or expect to experience water shortages in the next ten years. Recycling water is one strategy states are (more)

  3. Decentralized Decision-making and Protocol Design for Recycled ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ihong

    2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Decentralized Decision-making and Protocol. Design for Recycled Material Flows. Reverse logistics networks often consist of several tiers with independent

  4. New CMI process recycles valuable rare earth metals from old...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New CMI process recycles valuable rare earth metals from old electronics Contacts: For release: Feb. 26, 2015 Ryan Ott, Critical Materials Institute, 515-294-3616 Laura Millsaps,...

  5. Chapter 7, Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol: The Uniform...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    environmentally harmful refrigerants and foam and enables the recycling of the plastic, metal, and wiring components. 1 Secondary refrigerators are units not located in the...

  6. Refrigerator Recycling Evaluation Protocol Doug Bruchs, The Cadmus Group, Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recycling programs have become a staple of residential demand-side management portfolios. 1 Measure coincidence factor (demand savings), incremental cost, or measure life. #12;3 PART

  7. Orange and Rockland Utilities (Electric)- Residential Appliance Recycling Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Orange and Rockland Utilities provides rebates for residential customers for recycling older, inefficient refrigerators and freezers. All appliances must meet the program requirements listed on the...

  8. Aachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta University Amsterdam University Arizona University Auckland University Australian National University Bath University Beijing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tisdell, Chris

    Massachusetts University Massey University McGill University McMaster University Melbourne University Michigan State University Michigan University Minnesota University Monash University Montpellier UniversityAachen RWTH Aarhus University Aberdeen University Adelaide University Alabama University Alberta

  9. Reservoir Simulation and Evaluation of the Upper Jurassic Smackover Microbial Carbonate and Grainstone-Packstone Reservoirs in Little Cedar Creek Field, Conecuh County, Alabama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mostafa, Moetaz Y

    2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an integrated study of mature carbonate oil reservoirs (Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation) undergoing gas injection in the Little Cedar Creek Field located in Conecuh County, Alabama. This field produces from two reservoirs...

  10. 1. Recycle all bottles and cans 2. Recycle all personal electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    as possible ENERGY CONSERVATION 6. Turn off the lights when not in use 7. Turn off your computer when. They provide air filters 24. Use energy efficient light bulbs 25. Buy supplies locally 26. Select efficient reusable grocery bags when shopping 4. Buy things with recycled material in them 5. Reduce waste as much

  11. Progress toward uranium scrap recycling via EBCHR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKoon, R.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW electron beam cold hearth refining (EBCHR) melt furnace at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been in operation for over a year producing 5.5 in.-diameter ingots of various uranium alloys. Production of in-specification uranium-6%-niobium (U-6Nb) alloy ingots has been demonstrated using virgin feedstock. A vibratory scrap feeder has been installed on the system and the ability to recycle chopped U-6Nb scrap has been established. A preliminary comparison of vacuum arc remelted (VAR) and electron beam (EB) melted product is presented.

  12. Chemical Recycling | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck In &Chemical LabelChemical Recycling

  13. Texas facility treats, recycles refinery, petrochemical wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A US Gulf Coast environmental services company is treating refinery and petrochemical plant wastes to universal treatment standards (UTS). DuraTherm Inc.`s recycling center uses thermal desorption to treat a variety of refinery wastes and other hazardous materials. The plant is located in San Leon, Tex., near the major Houston/Texas City refining and petrochemical center. DuraTherm`s customers include major US refining companies, plus petrochemical, terminal, pipeline, transportation, and remediation companies. Examples of typical contaminant concentrations and treatment levels for refinery wastes are shown. The paper discusses thermal desorption, the process description and testing.

  14. NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NREL Materials Recycling Procedure Purpose To promote environmental sustainability and stewardship, NREL provides the infrastructure for workers to incorporate materials recycling in daily operations. This procedure identifies appropriate materials, collection locations, and rules and processes for recycling

  15. Analysis of the cost of recycling compliance for the automobile industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dantec, Delphine

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cars are one of the most recycled commercial products. Currently, approximately 75% of the total vehicle weight is recycled. The EU directives on End-of-life vehicles try to push the recycling process further: it fixed the ...

  16. Expanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Forest Service research on recycling is being led by scientists at the Forest Products Laboratory (FPLExpanding Research Horizons: USDA Forest Service Initiative for Developing Recycled Paper Technology Theodore L. Laufenberg, Program Manager Forest Products Conservation and Recycling Said Abubakr

  17. Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132 adjustments. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from

  18. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. (Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  19. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. [Metal Recovery Industries, Inc., Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  20. Metal melting for volume reduction and recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.L.

    1987-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the experiences with melting contaminated steel materials for volume reduction and melting uranium-contaminated copper and aluminum for possible recycle. In the past there has not been an economic incentive to reduce the volume of low-level beta-gamma contaminated metallic scrap materials in the United States. With the rising cost of transportation and burial facility fees new interest in volume reduction is being generated. This new interest has been primarily focused at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) where the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility (WERF) was established to demonstrate both metal melting and incineration of combustible material for volume reduction. Other demonstration programs involving melting for volume reduction and recycle of aluminum and copper, as well as ferrous scrap, were related to the Cascade Improvement and Cascade Upgrade Programs (CIP/CUP) at the Paducah, Kentucky facility. While the melting demonstrations for the CIP/CUP material were not primarily based on economic incentives, several observations recorded during the programs are of interest with regard to melting of copper and aluminum. (4 refs., 8 tabs.)

  1. Recycling Krylov subspaces for CFD applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amritkar, Amit; ?wirydowicz, Katarzyna; Tafti, Danesh; Ahuja, Kapil

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular iterative linear solvers in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations are restarted GMRES and BiCGStab. At the beginning of most incompressible flow calculations, the computation time and the number of iterations to converge for the pressure Poisson equation are quite high. In this case, the BiCGStab algorithm, with relatively cheap but non-optimal iterations, may fail to converge for stiff problems. Thus, a more robust algorithm like GMRES, which guarantees monotonic convergence, is preferred. To reduce the large storage requirements of GMRES, a restarted version - GMRES(m) or its variants - is used in CFD applications. However, GMRES(m) can suffer from stagnation or very slow convergence. For this reason, we use the rGCROT method. rGCROT is an algorithm that improves restarted GMRES by recycling a selected subspace of the search space from one restart of GMRES(m) to the next as well as building and recycling this outer vector space from one problem to the next (subsequent time steps i...

  2. Taiwan`s experience with municipal waste recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H. [Da-Yeh Univ., Chang-Hwa (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, each person on the average produces 1.15 kg of the municipal waste per day and a total of 9 million metric tons were generated annually in Taiwan. The disposal of such a huge amount of waste presents tremendous challenge for the island due to the scarcity of landfills and incineration facilities available locally. EPA of Taiwan, R.O.C. thus takes an active role in promoting waste recycling to reduce the garbage produced in municipalities. In order to efficiently utilize the government`s human and financial resources used in recycling, started from January 31, 1989, EPA has mandated the producer responsibility recycling program for several designated post-consumer products such as PET, PVC bottles, scrap tires, scrap motor vehicles, etc. Producer responsibility recycling program specifies that the manufacturers, importers and sellers of these designated products have the responsibility to retrieve their products and recycle them properly. Several negative effects have been encountered while the implementation of this producer responsibility recycling program in Taiwan which resulted in a modification of this recycling program recently. This paper presents the encountered experiences on the implementation of municipal waste recycling program in Taiwan.

  3. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal.

  4. Recent trends in automobile recycling: An energy and economic assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T.R.; Das, S.; Rizy, C.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexanyder, S.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent and anticipated trends in the material composition of domestic and imported automobiles and the increasing cost of landfilling the non-recyclable portion of automobiles (automobile shredder residue or ASR) pose questions about the future of automobile recycling. This report documents the findings of a study sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Analysis to examine the impacts of these and other relevant trends on the life-cycle energy consumption of automobiles and on the economic viability of the domestic automobile recycling industry. More specifically, the study (1) reviewed the status of the automobile recycling industry in the United States, including the current technologies used to process scrapped automobiles and the challenges facing the automobile recycling industry; (2) examined the current status and future trends of automobile recycling in Europe and Japan, with the objectives of identifying ``lessons learned`` and pinpointing differences between those areas and the United States; (3) developed estimates of the energy system impacts of the recycling status quo and projections of the probable energy impacts of alternative technical and institutional approaches to recycling; and (4) identified the key policy questions that will determine the future economic viability of automobile shredder facilities in the United States.

  5. Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control structure selection for Reactor, Separator and Recycle Process T. Larsson M.S. Govatsmark S to control", for a simple plant with a liquid phase reactor, a distillation column and recycle of unreacted study that reactor level should be kept at its maximum, which rules out many of control structures

  6. Catalytic coal liquefaction with treated solvent and SRC recycle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, D.; Givens, E.N.; Schweighardt, F.K.

    1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for the solvent refining of coal to distillable, pentane soluble products using a dephenolated and denitrogenated recycle solvent and a recycled, pentane-insoluble, solvent-refined coal material, which process provides enhanced oil-make in the conversion of coal. 2 figs.

  7. AN EXAMINATION OF WOOD RECYCLING PROVISIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN GREEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -use and recycling. About 90 green building standards were examined. Current green building programs were determined (ASHRAE) come closest to universally describing the differences between these terms: Recovered Material Building Standards To understand how wood recycling is addressed in green building standards, about 90

  8. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South place from unique wetlands to high quality grasslands to the bristlecone pine forests to its alpine

  9. Program in Functional Genomics of Autoimmunity and Immunology of yhe University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan M Kaplan

    2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant will be used to augment the equipment infrastructure and core support at the University of Kentucky and the University of Alabama particularly in the areas of genomics/informatics, molecular analysis and cell separation. In addition, we will promote collaborative research interactions through scientific workshops and exchange of scientists, as well as joint exploration of the role of immune receptors as targets in autoimmunity and host defense, innate and adaptive immune responses, and mucosal immunity in host defense.

  10. Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 -2005 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2005 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 1997 1998 Tested #12;Alaska Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 1997 1998 1999 2000;Arizona Blood Lead Surveillance Report 1997 - 2006 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 1997 1998

  11. T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, Taiwan AIChE annual meeting / 11.3.1999 1 NTNU #12; T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor / 11.3.1999 2 NTNU #12; T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle

  12. T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, separator with recycle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Control of reactor, Taiwan AIChE annual meeting / 11.3.1999 1 NTNU #12;T. Larsson, S. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor. Skogestad, C.C. Yu Control of reactor, separator with recycle. Related work A lot has been on the control

  13. Recycling technologies and market opportunities: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goland, A.N.; Petrakis, L. [eds.

    1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    These proceedings are the result of our collective effort to meet that challenge. They reflect the dedication and commitment of many people in government, academia, the private sector and national laboratories to finding practical solutions to one of the most pressing problems of our time -- how to deal effectively with the growing waste s that is the product of our affluent industrial society. The Conference was successful in providing a clear picture of the scope of the problem and of the great potential that recycling holds for enhancing economic development while at the same time, having a significant positive impact on the waste management problem. That success was due in large measure to the enthusiastic response of our panelists to our invitation to participate and share their expertise with us.

  14. Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

  15. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  16. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International 搊ffsets are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  17. Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities. Volume Three. Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feurer, D A; Weaver, C L

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed description is given of the laws and programs of the State of Alabama governing the regulation of public energy utilities, the siting of energy generating and transmission facilities, the municipal franchising of public energy utilities, and the prescription of rates to be charged by utilities including attendant problems of cost allocations, rate base and operating expense determinations, and rate of return allowances. These laws and programs are analyzed to identify impediments which they may present to the implementation of Integrated Community Energy Systems (ICES). This report is one of fifty-one separate volumes which describe such regulatory programs at the Federal level and in each state as background to the report entitled Community Energy Systems and the Law of Public Utilities - Volume One: An Overview. This report also contains a summary of a strategy described in Volume One - An Overview for overcoming these impediments by working within the existing regulatory framework and by making changes in the regulatory programs to enhance the likelihood of ICES implementation.

  18. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  19. GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shigui

    GLOBAL STABILITY IN CHEMOSTAT-TYPE COMPETITION MODELS WITH NUTRIENT RECYCLING SHIGUI RUAN AND XUE- type competition models with nutrient recycling. In the first model the recycling is instantaneous, whereas in the second, the recycling is delayed. They carried out the equilibrium analysis and obtained

  20. Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Green Labs and EH&S, Nov. 2013 ___________________ Lab Recycling Guide Non-contaminated, clean lab plastic containers and conical tubes may be recycled. To be accepted, containers must be clean, triple. Recycling bin located: PSB Loading Dock Alcohol cans and metal shipping containers may be recycled

  1. Recycling Evaluation of Newly Developed Environmentally Benign Pressure Sensitive Adhesive for Postage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    Recycling Evaluation of Newly Developed Environmentally Benign Pressure Sensitive Adhesive stamp products that can be successfully recycled into fine paper products in a typical recycling additional burden on plants that are using recycled fiber. As a result of an initiative by the USPS, a team

  2. Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonparametric Bootstrap Recycling Val'erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from a recycling distribution G

  3. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  4. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  5. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  6. Neutronic analysis of a proposed plutonium recycle assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solan, George Michael

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the neutronic analysis of plutonium recycle assemblies has been developed with emphasis on relative power distribution prediction in the boundary area of vastly different spectral regions. Such regions are ...

  7. Superharmonic Injection Locked Quadrature LC VCO Using Current Recycling Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalusalingam, Shriram

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . This thesis investigates a coupling mechanism to implement a quadrature voltage controlled oscillator using indirect injection method. The coupling network in this QVCO couples the two LC cores with their super-harmonic and it recycles its bias current back...

  8. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  9. Demolitions Produce Recyclable Materials for Organization Promoting Economic Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demolitions have helped generate more than 8 million pounds of metal at the Piketon site for recycling, further promoting economic activity in the region thanks to the American Recovery and...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Battery Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by OnTo Technology LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced battery recycling.

  11. Considerations in the recycling of urban parking garages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, Michael Johannes

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the decreasing use of private automobiles in city centers and because of usual development pressures, some urban parking garages will become available for replacement or recycling. The choice between replacement ...

  12. Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Database for Rare Earth Elements Recycling Process: Energetics of the REE-X Systems (XA;, Mg, Zn, Si, Sn, Mn, Pb, Fe, Co, Ni) Apr 17 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM In-Ho...

  13. Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, A.

    The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

  14. Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquien, Alexandre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

  15. Charlotte Green Supply Chain: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Three years ago at Sacred Heart grade school in Norfolk, Neb., efforts to recycle were grim. "When I got here, we had...

  16. HOUSEHOLD WILLINGNESS TO RECYCLE ELECTRONIC WASTE - An Application to California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saphores, Jean-Daniel M; Nixon, Hilary; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Shapiro, Andrew A

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    00-007). Washington, DC: Solid Waste and Emergency Response.DC: Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. Weiss,R. , & Schwer, R. (1998). Solid-waste recycling behavior and

  17. Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

  18. Quantitative assessment of disassembly difficulty in product recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanft, Thomas Albert

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the difficulty encountered in disassembling products for recycling is presented. The original version of the method relies on the evaluator's subjective judgments of disassembly task difficulty. The primary objective of the research is to reduce the subjectivity...

  19. Strategies for aluminum recycling : insights from material system optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Preston Pui-Chuen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dramatic increase in aluminum consumption over the past decades necessitates a societal effort to recycle and reuse these materials to promote true sustainability and energy savings in aluminum production. However, the ...

  20. International investigation of electronic waste recycling plant design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theurer, Jean E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the industry of electronic waste recycling industry in three countries: Germany, the United States, and Chile. Despite differences in the legal structure surrounding the industry, there are many ...

  1. Heavy-duty fleet test evaluation of recycled engine coolant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woyciesjes, P.M.; Frost, R.A. [Prestone Products Corp., Danbury, CT (United States). Coolant Group

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 240,000 mile (386,232 km) fleet test was conducted to evaluate recycled engine coolant against factory fill coolant. The fleet consisted of 12 new Navistar International Model 9600 trucks equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 60 engines. Six of the trucks were drained and filled with the recycled engine coolant that had been recycled by a chemical treatment/filtration/reinhibited process. The other six test trucks contained the factory filled coolant. All the trucks followed the same maintenance practices which included the use of supplemental coolant additives. The trucks were equipped with metal specimen bundles. Metal specimen bundles and coolant samples were periodically removed to monitor the cooling system chemistry. A comparison of the solution chemistry and metal coupon corrosion patterns for the recycled and factory filled coolants is presented and discussed.

  2. National Forest Land Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

  3. Clearing Debris from Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    level. Burial ? Tree debris can be buried, but the cost is high. ? Use a chipping machine to eliminate smaller branches and reduce the amount of burial space needed. Landfill ? You can place tree debris in erosion gullies (where the land is not prac...

  4. Recycling asphaltic concrete with sulphur as a supplemental binder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnett, Robert William

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECYCLING ASPHALTIC CONCRETE WITH SULPHUR AS A SUPPLEMENTAL BINDER A Thesis by ROBERT WILLIAM BARNETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1976 Major Subject: Civil Engineering RECYCLING ASPHALTIC CONCRETE WITH SULPHUR AS A SUPPLEMENTAL BINDER A Thesis by ROBERT WILLIAM BARNETT Approved as to style and content by: :) (Chairm o I ommit tee) (M ber) Mem er) August 1976...

  5. Design and analysis of recycled content sign blanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Ben Frank

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . In response, industries have developed composite materials made of recycled plastic, fiber-reinforced plastics, and alloys made of recycled aluminum. Two predoininantly reclaimed inaterials have been investigated for use as sign substrates. The first... in avoiding costs from tort actions. Aluminuin and wood are the substrates most frequently used for traffic signs. Grades 6061 (heat beatable) and 5052 (non-heat treatable) aluminum alloys are widely used. Currently, grade 3000 aluminum alloys, which...

  6. Technical specifications for mechanical recycling of agricultural plastic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briassoulis, D., E-mail: briassou@aua.gr; Hiskakis, M.; Babou, E.

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Technical specifications for agricultural plastic wastes (APWs) recycling proposed. Specifications are the base for best economical and environmental APW valorisation. Analysis of APW reveals inherent characteristics and constraints of APW streams. Thorough survey on mechanical recycling processes and industry as it applies to APW. Specifications for APW recycling tested, adjusted and verified through pilot trials. - Abstract: Technical specifications appropriate for the recycling of agricultural plastic wastes (APWs), widely accepted by the recycling industry were developed. The specifications establish quality standards to be met by the agricultural plastics producers, users and the agricultural plastic waste management chain. They constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW. The analysis of the APW streams conducted across Europe in the framework of the European project 揕abelAgriWaste revealed the inherent characteristics of the APW streams and the inherent constraints (technical or economical) of the APW. The APW stream properties related to its recycling potential and measured during pilot trials are presented and a subsequent universally accepted simplified and expanded list of APW recycling technical specifications is proposed and justified. The list includes two sets of specifications, applied to two different quality categories of recyclable APW: one for pellet production process (換uality I) and another one for plastic profile production process (換uality II). Parameters that are taken into consideration in the specifications include the APW physical characteristics, contamination, composition and degradation. The proposed specifications are focused on polyethylene based APW that represents the vast majority of the APW stream. However, the specifications can be adjusted to cover also APW of different materials (e.g. PP or PVC) that are found in very small quantities in protected cultivations in Europe. The adoption of the proposed specifications could transform this waste stream into a labelled commodity traded freely in the market and will constitute the base for the best economical and environmental valorisation of the APW.

  7. Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

  8. Optics of electron beam in the Recycler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burov, Alexey V.; Kazakevich, G.; Kroc, T.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Pruss, S.; Shemyakin, A.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; Warner, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron cooling of 8.9 GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring (Fermilab) requires high current and good quality of the DC electron beam. Electron trajectories of {approx}0.2 A or higher DC electron beam have to be parallel in the cooling section, within {approx}0.2 mrad, making the beam envelope cylindrical. These requirements yielded a specific scheme of the electron transport from a gun to the cooling section, with electrostatic acceleration and deceleration in the Pelletron. Recuperation of the DC beam limits beam losses at as tiny level as {approx}0.001%, setting strict requirements on the return electron line to the Pelletron and a collector. To smooth the beam envelope in the cooling section, it has to be linear and known at the transport start. Also, strength of the relevant optic elements has to be measured with good accuracy. Beam-based optic measurements are being carried out and analyzed to get this information. They include beam simulations in the Pelletron, differential optic (beam response) measurements and simulation, beam profile measurements with optical transition radiation, envelope measurements and analysis with orifice scrapers. Current results for the first half-year of commissioning are presented. Although electron cooling is already routinely used for pbar stacking, its efficiency is expected to be improved.

  9. Duality and Recycling Computing in Quantum Computers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui Lu Long; Yang Liu

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computer possesses quantum parallelism and offers great computing power over classical computer \\cite{er1,er2}. As is well-know, a moving quantum object passing through a double-slit exhibits particle wave duality. A quantum computer is static and lacks this duality property. The recently proposed duality computer has exploited this particle wave duality property, and it may offer additional computing power \\cite{r1}. Simply put it, a duality computer is a moving quantum computer passing through a double-slit. A duality computer offers the capability to perform separate operations on the sub-waves coming out of the different slits, in the so-called duality parallelism. Here we show that an $n$-dubit duality computer can be modeled by an $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer. In a duality mode, computing operations are not necessarily unitary. A $n$-qubit quantum computer can be used as an $n$-bit reversible classical computer and is energy efficient. Our result further enables a $(n+1)$-qubit quantum computer to run classical algorithms in a $O(2^n)$-bit classical computer. The duality mode provides a natural link between classical computing and quantum computing. Here we also propose a recycling computing mode in which a quantum computer will continue to compute until the result is obtained. These two modes provide new tool for algorithm design. A search algorithm for the unsorted database search problem is designed.

  10. FSC-Watch: FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global warming FSC undermines paper recycling, contributes to global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the May/June 2008 Eco-Journal of the Manitoba Eco-Network, Canada, which we are happy to reproduce pile of collected paper, which can either be burned or landfilled, or shipped to more distant recycling

  11. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE抯 high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  12. The Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of various Two-Stage Liquefaction (TSL) process configurations was conducted at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction R D Facility between July 1982 and September 1986. The facility combines three process units. There are the liquefaction unit, either thermal (TLU) or catalytic, for the dissolution of coal, the Critical Solvent Deashing unit (CSD) for the separation of ash and undissolved coal, and a catalytic hydrogenation unit (HTR) for product upgrading and recycle process solvent replenishment. The various TSL process configurations were created by changing the process sequence of these three units and by recycling hydrotreated solvents between the units. This report presents a description of the TSL configurations investigated and an analysis of the operating and performance data from the period of study. Illinois No. 6 Burning Star Mine coal Wyodak Clovis Point Mine coal were processed. Cobalt-molybdenum and disposable iron-oxide catalysts were used to improve coal liquefaction reactions and nickel-molybdenum catalysts were used in the hydrotreater. 28 refs., 31 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  14. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  15. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O. [AREVA, 33 rue Lafayette, F-75009 Paris (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  16. Evaluating land application effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkis, K. (Philadelphia Water Department, PA (USA))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Philadelphia, PA Water Department embarked on a land application program of its treated wastewater sludge in 1977. Initially, liquid sludge averaging from 1-5% solids was applied to approximately 400 acres of corn, soybeans, and sod at rates sufficient to supply crop nitrogen needs. During the 1978 through 1984 growing seasons, crops and soils were monitored for heavy metals (bioavailability of cadmium, copper, nickel, chromium, lead and zinc) and in 1984 for PCB accumulation. This report summarizes results of the monitoring program until 1984.

  17. Proposed Conveyance of Land

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16HamadaBaO/Al2O3 leanProposalConveyance of Land at the

  18. Absentee Landowners Near a Military Installation in Texas: Use, Motivation, and Emotional Tie to their Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dankert, Amber 1980-

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 97 Family land. ........................................................................................................................... 98 Leasing land.... ......................................................................................................................... 117 Leasing land. ....................................................................................................................... 118 Hunting on land...

  19. Articles published in the University of Alabama Research Magazine with vehicle or transportation relevance (press "ctrl+click" on link to access articles)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    to make hydrogen-powered cars and trucks a reality. Truck with Prototype Fuel Cell Visits UA - May 26 on hydrogen fuel cells. Research at The University of Alabama is helping move this scenario toward reality, 2003 - A heavy-duty highway tractor truck equipped with a first-of-its-kind fuel-cell auxiliary power

  20. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PARALLEL AND DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS, VOL. 19, NO. 7, JULY 2008 1 Cooperative Secondary Authorization Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secondary Authorization Recycling Qiang Wei, Matei Ripeanu, Member, IEEE, and Konstantin Beznosov, Member recycles previously received authorizations and shares them with other application servers to mask authorization recycling system and its evaluation using simulation and prototype implementation. The results

  1. SNX17 regulates Notch pathway and pancreas development through the retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1. Cell RegenerationWnt secretion by recycling Yin et al. Cell Regenerationthe retromer-dependent recycling of Jag1 Wenguang Yin 1 ,

  2. Auto shredder residue recycling: Mechanical separation and pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, Alessandro [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Passarini, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.passarini@unibo.it [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Vassura, Ivano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy); Serrano, David; Dufour, Javier [Department of Chemical and Energy Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Instituto IMDEA Energy, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Morselli, Luciano [Department of Industrial Chemistry and Materials, University of Bologna, Viale Risorgimento 4, I-40136 Bologna (Italy)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this work, we exploited mechanical separation and pyrolysis to recycle ASR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pyrolysis of the floating organic fraction is promising in reaching ELV Directive targets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite catalyst improve pyrolysis oil and gas yield. - Abstract: sets a goal of 85% material recycling from end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) by the end of 2015. The current ELV recycling rate is around 80%, while the remaining waste is called automotive shredder residue (ASR), or car fluff. In Europe, this is mainly landfilled because it is extremely heterogeneous and often polluted with car fluids. Despite technical difficulties, in the coming years it will be necessary to recover materials from car fluff in order to meet the ELV Directive requirement. This study deals with ASR pretreatment and pyrolysis, and aims to determine whether the ELV material recycling target may be achieved by car fluff mechanical separation followed by pyrolysis with a bench scale reactor. Results show that flotation followed by pyrolysis of the light, organic fraction may be a suitable ASR recycling technique if the oil can be further refined and used as a chemical. Moreover, metals are liberated during thermal cracking and can be easily separated from the pyrolysis char, amounting to roughly 5% in mass. Lastly, pyrolysis can be a good starting point from a 'waste-to-chemicals' perspective, but further research should be done with a focus on oil and gas refining, in order both to make products suitable for the chemical industry and to render the whole recycling process economically feasible.

  3. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  4. Recycling tires. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology and economic advantages of scrap tire recycling. The application of crumb rubber in the production of asphalt paving, floor-coverings, high performance composites, and other products is described. The production of fuels from scrap tires is also discussed. Legislation which promotes recycling, and the roles of government and the private sector in developing new markets and expanding existing markets are included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  5. Energy Return on Investment from Recycling Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an evaluation of the Energy Return on Investment (EROI) from recycling an initial batch of 800 t/y of used nuclear fuel (UNF) through a Recycle Center under a number of different fuel cycle scenarios. The study assumed that apart from the original 800 t of UNF only depleted uranium was available as a feed. Therefore for each subsequent scenario only fuel that was derived from the previous fuel cycle scenario was considered. The scenarios represent a good cross section of the options available and the results contained in this paper and associated appendices will allow for other fuel cycle options to be considered.

  6. Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

  7. Land Stewardship | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Improvements are implemented with consideration of adjacent land uses, owners, and political entities. Success is defined when measurable parameters are achieved. Scope The team...

  8. Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Windsor E.

    Contemporary evolution, allelic recycling, and adaptive radiation of the threespine stickleback within ten generations. Rare freshwater-adapted alleles have been recycled from freshwater to oceanic evolve very slowly led him to study artificial selection, natural selection's component mechanisms (e

  9. The potential environmental gains from recycling waste plastics: Simulation of transferring recycling and recovery technologies to Shenyang, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xudong, E-mail: chen.xudong@nies.go.jp [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan); Xi Fengming [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Geng Yong, E-mail: gengyong@iae.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Fujita, Tsuyoshi [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8506 (Japan); Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya City 464-8601 (Japan)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} Urban symbiosis creates compatibility of industrial development and waste management. {yields} Mechanical technology leads to more CO{sub 2} emission reduction. {yields} Energy recovery technology leads to more fossil fuel saving. {yields} Clean energy makes recycling technologies cleaner. {yields} Demand management is crucial for realizing potential environmental gains of recycling. - Abstract: With the increasing attention on developing a low-carbon economy, it is necessary to seek appropriate ways on reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through innovative municipal solid waste management (MSWM), such as urban symbiosis. However, quantitative assessments on the environmental benefits of urban symbiosis, especially in developing countries, are limited because only a limited number of planned synergistic activities have been successful and it is difficult to acquire detailed inventory data from private companies. This paper modifies and applies a two-step simulation system and used it to assess the potential environmental benefits, including the reduction of GHG emissions and saving of fossil fuels, by employing various Japanese plastics recycling/energy-recovery technologies in Shenyang, China. The results showed that among various recycling/energy-recovery technologies, the mechanical waste plastics recycling technology, which produces concrete formwork boards (NF boards), has the greatest potential in terms of reducing GHG emissions (1.66 kg CO{sub 2}e/kg plastics), whereas the technology for the production of refuse plastic fuel (RPF) has the greatest potential on saving fossil fuel consumption (0.77 kgce/kg-plastics). Additional benefits can be gained by applying combined technologies that cascade the utilization of waste plastics. Moreover, the development of clean energy in conjunction with the promotion of new waste plastics recycling programs could contribute to additional reductions in GHG emissions and fossil fuel consumption.

  10. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

  11. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  12. Development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber. Phase 1: technical feasibility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullin, J.A.; Davison, R.R.; Glover, C.J. [and others

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical progress made on the development of asphalts and pavements using recycled tire rubber.

  13. A Research Needs Assessment for waste plastics recycling: Volume 2, Project report. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second volume contains detailed information on a number of specific topics relevant to the recovery/recycling of plastics.

  14. Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Solid waste reclamation and recycling: Tires. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the development, management, economic analysis, and environmental impacts of reclamation and recycling of scrap tires. The design and evaluation of recycling processes are examined. Recycled products for use in construction materials, embankment fills, fuel supplements, and material substitutions are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Weathering Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled HDPE Based Plastic Lumber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weathering Effects on Mechanical Properties of Recycled HDPE Based Plastic Lumber Jennifer K. Lynch recycled plastic lumber (RPL) decking was exposed to the environment for eleven years. The weathering in the construction of the deck were a commingled recycled plastic material referred to as curbside tailings, NJCT

  17. Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Out-of-order Microprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renau, Jose

    Cherry: Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Out-of-order Microprocessors拢 Jos麓e F. Mart of Rochester michael.huang@ece.rochester.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents CHeckpointed Early Resource RecYcling (Cherry), a hybrid mode of execution based on ROB and checkpoint- ing that decouples resource recycling

  18. Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mart铆nez, Jos茅 F.

    Cherry-MP: Correctly Integrating Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling in Chip Multiprocessors 14853 USA http://m3.csl.cornell.edu/ ABSTRACT Checkpointed Early Resource Recycling (Cherry by performing aggres- sive resource recycling decoupled from instruction retire- ment, using a checkpoint

  19. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 242颅249 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Resources, Conservation and Recycling journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resconrec Factors influencing the rate of recycling: An analysis of Minnesota counties Shaufique F. Sidiquea, , Satish V. Joshib

  20. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878892 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 878颅892 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Resources, Conservation and Recycling journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/resconrec Stabilization of recycled base materials with high carbon fly ash Bora Cetina , Ahmet H. Aydilekb, , Yucel Guneyc a Deptment

  1. ENG 4793: Composite Materials and Processes 1 Glass Mat Reinforced Recycled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    of nylon, PP and PET 路 Need to recycle! ENG 4793: Composite Materials and Processes 4 Mixed Thermoplastics1 ENG 4793: Composite Materials and Processes 1 Glass Mat Reinforced Recycled Thermoplastics ver 1 ENG 4793: Composite Materials and Processes 2 Outline 路 Motivation 路 Recycling issues 路 Why reinforce

  2. JABSOM EHSO E-WASTE Recycling Program Created: May 13, 2010 Revised: January 6, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Stephen L.

    JABSOM EHSO 颅 E-WASTE Recycling Program Created: May 13, 2010 颅 Revised: January 6, 2013 Page 1 of 2 UH eWaste Recycling Program at JABSOM Kaka'ako The University of Hawaii has established a long-term, free-of-charge quarterly recycling program of UH electronic waste (eWaste), compliments of APPLE

  3. Non-parametric Bootstrap Recycling Val erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-parametric Bootstrap Recycling Val#19;erie Ventura, Department of Statistics, Baker Hall 132 adjustments. The amount of computation involved is usually considerable, and recycling provides a less computer intensive alternative. Recycling consists of using repeatedly the same samples drawn from

  4. Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with Unstable First Order Forward Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with Unstable First Order Forward Loop J. F. M Abstract Unstable time-delay systems and recycling systems are challenging problems for control analysis and design. When an unstable time-delay system has a recycle, its control problem becomes even more difficult

  5. Nutrient-plankton models with nutrient recycling S. R.-J. Jang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baglama, James

    Nutrient-plankton models with nutrient recycling S. R.-J. Jang1 and J. Baglama2 1. Department with general uptake functions in which nutrient recycling is either instantaneous or de- layed is considered in both the instantaneous and the delayed nutrient recycling models. However, the delayed nutrient

  6. Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whelan, Paul F.

    Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1 Ovidiu Ghita2 Pedro. In this paper we present a novel methodology to automate the recycling process of non-ferrous metal Waste from that the proposed solution can be used to replace the manual procedure that is currently used in WEEE recycling

  7. PPPL-3157 -Preprint Date: March 1996, UC-421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PPPL-3157 - Preprint Date: March 1996, UC-421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling material to be ejected into the plasma. This recycling of plasma fuel, which occurs primarily on the inner influx from the edge. Despite its importance, a full understanding of the factors influencing recycling

  8. PPPL3157 Preprint Date: March 1996, UC421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 PPPL颅3157 颅 Preprint Date: March 1996, UC颅421, 423, 426 Investigations of the Tritium Recycling material to be ejected into the plasma. This recycling of plasma fuel, which occurs primarily on the inner influx from the edge. Despite its importance, a full understanding of the factors influencing recycling

  9. Material Recycling at Product End-of-Life Jeffrey B. Dahmus and Timothy G. Gutowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    Material Recycling at Product End-of-Life Jeffrey B. Dahmus and Timothy G. Gutowski Department, Massachusetts, USA Abstract--This work focuses on developing a compact representation of the material recycling different ores, the work here provides insight into the relative attractiveness of recycling different

  10. Plasma wall interaction induced oscillations and their effects on the global recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    1 Plasma wall interaction induced oscillations and their effects on the global recycling from Devices 2007.05.20-22 NIFS #12;2 contents 1. MOTIVATION (ULFE & termination) 2. dynamics of recycling 3 in signals on heat loads, particle recycling, and impurity influx and contents. Frequency ~ 1-2楼10-3 Hz

  11. ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN LINERLESS SELF-ADHESIVE COIL STAMPS: R&D AND RECYCLING STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN LINERLESS SELF-ADHESIVE COIL STAMPS: R&D AND RECYCLING STUDIES Kim K been easy and quick to use, and have offered consistent adhesion. For recyclers, however, these adhesive stamps have caused concern for their paper recycling processes. In addition, there is the issue

  12. Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    Control of Delayed Recycling Systems with an Unstable Pole at Forward Path J. F. Marquez Rubio, B. del Muro Cu麓ellar and Olivier Sename Abstract-- Unstable time delay system and recycling system pose a challenge problem in their own. When unstable time delay system have recycle the control problem becomes

  13. Combining Retiming and Recycling to Optimize the Performance of Synchronous Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carloni, Luca

    Combining Retiming and Recycling to Optimize the Performance of Synchronous Circuits Luca P, CA 94720-1772 Abstract Recycling was recently proposed as a system-level design tech- nique to facilitate the building of complex System-on-Chips (SOC) by assembling pre-designed components. Recycling

  14. 84 Yun et al. Ribosome recycling factor Acta Cryst. (2000). D56, 8485 crystallization papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Se Won

    84 Yun et al. Ribosome recycling factor Acta Cryst. (2000). D56, 84卤85 crystallization papers Acta crystallographic studies of ribosome recycling factor from Escherichia coli Jungmin Yun,a Wookhyun Kim,a Sung Chul rights reserved Ribosome recycling factor (RRF) catalyzes the disassembly of a termination complex during

  15. The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    The Covered Device Recycling (Act 108) of 2010 (CDRA) A General Overview Electronic products address the manufacture, sales, and end-of-life collection, management and recycling of covered devices to their covered devices. o Must establish and conduct ongoing recycling programs that offer covered device

  16. Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species identity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flecker, Alex

    REPORT Stoichiometry of nutrient recycling by vertebrates in a tropical stream: linking species in recycling nutrients, thus providing a mechanism for how animal species identity mediates ecosystem processes) recycled nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in a tropical stream supports stoichiometry theory. Mass

  17. The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    The Low-Recycling Lithium Boundary and Implications for Plasma Transport Erik Michael Granstedt transport mechanism in high-temperature low-recycling fusion experiments, and in the absence of stabilizing hydrogen and impurity emission in LTX in order to determine the lower bound on recycling that can

  18. Aggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

    to the stability of ecosystems (DeAngelis, 1992). With nutrient recycling, waste-products and dead organisms fromAggregation methods in food chains with nutrient recycling B.W. Kooi a, *, J.C. Poggiale b , P recycling is taken into account. The food chain is formed by a nutrient and two populations, prey

  19. Recycling practices of spent MgO-C refractories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P.

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recycling options of spent MgO-C refractories from an electrical arc furnace (EAF) have been evaluated. The economic, quality of spent refractories and products made from it, the ease of implementation of a recycling practice and the interest of steel melt shops were considered. It was decided that the best option of most EAF shops would be to recycle spent MgO-C refractory as a foaming slag conditioner because of their MgO content. Crushed MgO-C spent refractories can be reused directly back into an EAF without complex and costly beneficiation. Even though this practice is simple, it is critical to know the optimum amount of MgO in the slag to achieve the best foaming quality. A computer model was designed to find the optimum MgO amount. This modeling also helps the melt shop extend refractory service life, increase the energy efficiency, increase productivity, and decrease the amount of slag. Issues related to the refractory recycling will be discussed.

  20. Process for gasifying carbonaceous material from a recycled condensate slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forney, Albert J. (Coraopolis, PA); Haynes, William P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or other carbonaceous material is gasified by reaction with steam and oxygen in a manner to minimize the problems of effluent water stream disposal. The condensate water from the product gas is recycled to slurry the coal feed and the amount of additional water or steam added for cooling or heating is minimized and preferably kept to a level of about that required to react with the carbonaceous material in the gasification reaction. The gasification is performed in a pressurized fluidized bed with the coal fed in a water slurry and preheated or vaporized by indirect heat exchange contact with product gas and recycled steam. The carbonaceous material is conveyed in a gas-solid mixture from bottom to top of the pressurized fluidized bed gasifier with the solids removed from the product gas and recycled steam in a supported moving bed filter of the resulting carbonaceous char. Steam is condensed from the product gas and the condensate recycled to form a slurry with the feed coal carbonaceous particles.

  1. Bacteriorhodopsin production by cell recycle culture of Halobacterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    complex carbon/nitrogen sources and amino acids for the growth of H. halobium R1 (Um et al., 1997a). Yeast extract as the carbon and nitrogen source supported best cell growth and bacteriorhodopsin production in the fermenter and 0.1 l in the recycling loop. Cell broth was circulated at 1.2 l/min by diaphragm pump

  2. Hydrogen recycling with multistep and resonance line absorption effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, R.; Lauzon, J. (INRS-Energie, C. P. 1020, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of hydrogen at a neutralizer plate in a tokamak divertor is considered, with particular emphasis on the effects of multistep atomic processes and photoexcitation by the resonant Lyman {alpha} line. These effects are shown to be significant for parameters relevant to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) (S. A. Cohen {ital et} {ital al}., J. Nucl. Mater. {bold 176} {bold 177}, 909 (1990)).

  3. Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Recycling Water: one step to making algal biofuels a reality Manuel Vasquez, Juan Sandoval acquisition of solar power, nuclear power, and biofuels to diversify the country's domestic energy profile, the chemical make-up of biofuels allows them to be readily converted into their petroleum counterparts making

  4. Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Steven H.

    Recycling Energy to Restore Impaired Ankle Function during Human Walking Steven H. Collins1 walking, largely at the transitions between steps. The ankle then acts to restore energy during push-off, which may be the reason that ankle impairment nearly always leads to poorer walking economy

  5. please recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    on the other. In short: We need environmental managers who know business, law, public policy and/or engineeringplease recycle. Creating Leaders of Consequence for a Sustainable Future Hybrid Environmental Professional Program Providing financial aid for dual degree students Today's environmental leaders need a foot

  6. Recycling Campaign Prizes for best project proposal to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    coffee cups into the paper bin; which makes us come to the conclusion that communication around, but prevention and raising awareness is better. There are new posters being utilized, what other ways can that is described below. Register Each coordinator is asked to send an e-mail (subject: Recycling Campaign Award

  7. Morphology and properties of recycled polypropylene/bamboo fibers composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phuong, Nguyen Tri; Guinault, Alain; Sollogoub, Cyrille [Laboratoire des Materiaux Industriels Polymeres, CNAM, Paris (France); Chuong, Bui [Polymer Center, Hanoi University of Technology (Viet Nam)

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polypropylene (PP) is among the most widely used thermoplastics in many industrial fields. However, like other recycled polymers, its properties usually decrease after recycling process and sometimes are degraded to poor properties level for direct re-employment. The recycled products, in general, need to be reinforced to have competitive properties. Short bamboo fibers (BF) have been added in a recycled PP (RPP) with and without compatibilizer type maleic anhydride polypropylene (MAPP). Several properties of composite materials, such as helium gas permeability and mechanical properties before and after ageing in water, were examined. The effects of bamboo fiber content and fiber chemical treatment have been also investigated. We showed that the helium permeability increases if fiber content is higher than 30% because of a poor adhesion between untreated bamboo fiber and polymer matrix. The composites reinforced by acetylated bamboo fibers show better helium permeability due to grafting of acetyl groups onto cellulose fibers surface and thus improves compatibility between bamboo fibers and matrix, which has been shown by microscopic observations. Besides, mechanical properties of composite decrease with ageing in water but the effect is less pronounced with low bamboo fiber content.

  8. Impact of increased electric vehicle use on battery recycling infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vimmerstedt, L.; Hammel, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Jungst, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and Federal regulations have been implemented that are intended to encourage more widespread use of low-emission vehicles. These regulations include requirements of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and regulations pursuant to the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 and the Energy Policy Act. If the market share of electric vehicles increases in response to these initiatives, corresponding growth will occur in quantities of spent electric vehicle batteries for disposal. Electric vehicle battery recycling infrastructure must be adequate to support collection, transportation, recovery, and disposal stages of waste battery handling. For some battery types, such as lead-acid, a recycling infrastructure is well established; for others, little exists. This paper examines implications of increasing electric vehicle use for lead recovery infrastructure. Secondary lead recovery facilities can be expected to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead-acid electric vehicle battery recycling. However, they face stringent environmental constraints that may curtail capacity use or new capacity installation. Advanced technologies help address these environmental constraints. For example, this paper describes using backup power to avoid air emissions that could occur if electric utility power outages disable emissions control equipment. This approach has been implemented by GNB Technologies, a major manufacturer and recycler of lead-acid batteries. Secondary lead recovery facilities appear to have adequate capacity to accommodate lead waste from electric vehicles, but growth in that capacity could be constrained by environmental regulations. Advances in lead recovery technologies may alleviate possible environmental constraints on capacity growth.

  9. EA-1919: Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Programmatic EA evaluates alternatives for the management of scrap metal originating from DOE radiological control areas, including the proposed action to allow for the recycle of uncontaminated scrap metal that meets the requirements of DOE Order 458.1. (Metals with volumetric radioactive contamination are not included in the scope of this Programmatic EA.)

  10. FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    FEASIBILITY OF TARGET MATERIAL RECYCLING AS WASTE MANAGEMENT ALTERNATIVE L. EL-GUEBALY,* P. WILSON for Publication February 3, 2004 The issue of waste management has been studied simultaneously along with the development of the ARIES heavy-ion-driven inertial fusion energy (IFE) concept. Options for waste management

  11. Fermilab Recycler Ring: Technical design report. Revision 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, G. [ed.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the technical design of the Fermilab Recycler Ring. The purpose of the Recycler is to augment the luminosity increase anticipated from the implementation of the Fermi III upgrade project, which has as its main component the Fermilab Main Injector construction project. The Recycler is a fixed 8 GeV kinetic energy storage ring. It is located in the Main Injector tunnel directly above the Main Injector beamline, near the ceiling. The construction schedule calls for the installation of the Recycler ring before the installation shutdown of the Main Injector. This aggressive construction schedule is made possible by the exclusive use of permanent magnets in the ring lattice, removing the need for expensive conventional iron/copper magnet construction along with the related power supplies, cooling water system, and electrical safety systems. The location, operating energy, and mode of construction are chosen to minimize operational impacts on both Fermilab`s ongoing High Energy Physics program and the Main Injector construction project.

  12. Cold bond agglomeration of waste oxides for recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Alessio, G.; Lu, W.K. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of waste oxides has been an on-going challenge for integrated steel plants. The majority of these waste oxides are collected from the cleaning systems of ironmaking and steelmaking processes, and are usually in the form of fine particulates and slurries. In most cases, these waste materials are contaminated by oils and heavy metals and often require treatment at a considerable expense prior to landfill disposal. This contamination also limits the re-use or recycling potential of these oxides as secondary resources of reliable quality. However, recycling of some selected wastes in blast furnaces or steelmaking vessels is possible, but first requires agglomeration of the fine particulate by such methods as cold bond briquetting. Cold bond briquetting technology provides both mechanical compacting and bonding (with appropriate binders) of the particulates. This method of recycling has the potential to be economically viable and environmentally sustainable. The nature of the present study is cold bond briquetting of iron ore pellet fines with a molasses-cement-H{sub 2}O binder for recycling in a blast furnace. The inclusion of molasses is for its contribution to the green strength of briquettes. During the curing stage, significant gains in strength may be credited to molasses in the presence of cement. The interactions of cement (and its substitutes), water and molasses and their effects on the properties of the agglomerates during and after various curing conditions were investigated. Tensile strengths of briquettes made in the laboratory and subjected to experimental conditions which simulated the top part of a blast furnace shaft were also examined.

  13. CHEMICAL WASTE RECYCLING PROGRAM All types of batteries are collected by Chemical Waste Services (CWS) for recycling. These include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Services (CWS) for recycling. These include alkaline, lithium, rechargeable, coin batteries, lead-cadmium (ni-cads), nickel metal hydride, lithium, etc. They are individually bagged and placed phones, drills, computers, cameras, PDAs, toys and games. It is also used as a corrosion resistant

  14. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  15. Unanticipated potential cancer risk near metal recycling facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raun, Loren, E-mail: raun@rice.edu [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Statistics, MS 138, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251-1892 (United States); Pepple, Karl, E-mail: pepple.karl@epa.gov [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)] [State and Local Programs Group, Air Quality Policy Division, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, Policy, Analysis, and Communications Staff, Mail Drop C404-03, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Hoyt, Daniel, E-mail: hoyt.daniel@epa.gov [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States)] [Air Surveillance Section, US EPA, Region 6, 6EN-AS, 1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas, TX 75202-2733 (United States); Richner, Donald, E-mail: Donald.Richner@houstontx.gov [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Houston Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of Pollution Control and Prevention, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Blanco, Arturo, E-mail: arturo.blanco@houstontx.gov [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States)] [Pollution Control and Prevention, Environmental Health Division, Houston Department of Health and Human Services, 7411 Park Place Blvd., Houston, TX 77087 (United States); Li, Jiao, E-mail: jiao.li@rice.edu [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)] [Wiess School of Natural Science, Rice University, 6100 Main St., Houston, TX 77005 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Metal recycling is an important growing industry. Prior to this study, area sources consisting of metal recycling facilities fell in a category of limited regulatory scrutiny because of assumed low levels of annual emissions. Initiating with community complaints of nuisance from smoke, dust and odor, the Houston Department of Health and Human Services (HDHHS) began a monitoring program outside metal recycler facilities and found metal particulates in outdoor ambient air at levels which could pose a carcinogenic human health risk. In a study of five similar metal recycler facilities which used a torch cutting process, air downwind and outside the facility was sampled for eight hours between 6 and 10 times each over 18 months using a mobile laboratory. Ten background locations were also sampled. Iron, manganese, copper, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were detected downwind of the metal recyclers at frequencies ranging from 100% of the time for iron to 2% of the time for mercury. Of these metals, chromium, nickel, lead, cobalt, cadmium and mercury were not detected in any sample in the background. Two pairs of samples were analyzed for total chromium and hexavalent chromium to establish a ratio of the fraction of hexavalent chromium in total chromium. This fraction was used to estimate hexavalent chromium at all locations. The carcinogenic risk posed to a residential receptor from metal particulate matter concentrations in the ambient air attributed to the metal recyclers was estimated from each of the five facilities in an effort to rank the importance of this source and inform the need for further investigation. The total risk from these area sources ranged from an increased cancer risk of 1 in 1,000,000 to 6 in 10,000 using the 95th upper confidence limit of the mean of the carcinogenic metal particulate matter concentration, assuming the point of the exposure is the sample location for a residential receptor after accounting for wind direction and the number of shifts that could operate a year. Further study is warranted to better understand the metal air pollution levels in the community and if necessary, to evaluate the feasibility of emission controls and identify operational improvements and best management practices for this industry. This research adds two new aspects to the literature: identification of types and magnitude of metal particulate matter air pollutants associated with a previously unrecognized area source, metal recyclers and their potential risk to health. -- Highlights: Air monitoring study in response to community complaints found metal contamination. Metal recyclers found to potentially pose cancer from metal particulates Chromium, nickel, cobalt and cadmium samples were detected in five metal recyclers. These metals were not detected in background air samples. Estimated increased cancer risk ranges from 1 in 1,000,000 to 8 in 10,000.

  16. Using sludge on land raises more than crops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerardi, M.H.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

  17. Land application of sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

  18. Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

  19. Economic Feasibility of Electrochemical Caustic Recycling at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poloski, Adam P.; Kurath, Dean E.; Holton, Langdon K.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Fountain, Matthew S.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains a review of potential cost benefits of NaSICON Ceramic membranes for the separation of sodium from Hanford tank waste. The primary application is for caustic recycle to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreatment leaching operation. The report includes a description of the waste, the benefits and costs for a caustic-recycle facility, and Monte Carlo results obtained from a model of these costs and benefits. The use of existing cost information has been limited to publicly available sources. This study is intended to be an initial evaluation of the economic feasibility of a caustic recycle facility based on NaSICON technology. The current pretreatment flowsheet indicates that approximately 6,500 metric tons (MT) of Na will be added to the tank waste, primarily for removing Al from the high-level waste (HLW) sludge (Kirkbride et al. 2007). An assessment (Alexander et al. 2004) of the pretreatment flowsheet, equilibrium chemistry, and laboratory results indicates that the quantity of Na required for sludge leaching will increase by 6,000 to 12,000 MT in order to dissolve sufficient Al from the tank-waste sludge material to maintain the number of HLW canisters produced at 9,400 canisters as defined in the Office of River Protection (ORP) System Plan (Certa 2003). This additional Na will significantly increase the volume of LAW glass and extend the processing time of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Future estimates on sodium requirements for caustic leaching are expected to significantly exceed the 12,000-MT value and approach 40,000-MT of total sodium addition for leaching (Gilbert, 2007). The cost benefit for caustic recycling is assumed to consist of four major contributions: 1) the cost savings realized by not producing additional immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass, 2) caustic recycle capital investment, 3) caustic recycle operating and maintenance costs, and 4) research and technology costs needed to deploy the technology. In estimating costs for each of these components, several parameters are used as inputs. Due to uncertainty in assuming a singular value for each of these parameters, a range of possible values is assumed. A Monte Carlo simulation is then performed where the range of these parameters is exercised, and the resulting range of cost benefits is determined.

  20. Recycling flows in eMergy evaluation: A Mathematical Paradox? N.Y. Amponsah, O. Le Corre1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit茅 de

    37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Recycling involving recycling or reuse of waste. If waste exergy (its residual usefulness) is not negligible, wastes could serve as input to another process or be recycled. In cases of continuous waste recycle or reuse

  1. Proceedings of 2008 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee Grant #DMI-0423484 Analysis of Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    #DMI-0423484 Analysis of Recycling Systems Timothy G. Gutowski Malima I. Wolf Jeffrey B. Dahmus Dominic 02139 Abstract: This paper outlines past and future work on the topic of recycling systems. This project focuses on the performance of recycling systems from a range of perspectives. The recyclability

  2. Alabama Energy and Cost Savings for New Single- and Multifamily Homes: 2009 and 2012 IECC as Compared to the 2006 IECC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Robert G.; Taylor, Zachary T.; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Goel, Supriya

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Codes (IECC) yield positive benefits for Alabama homeowners. Moving to either the 2009 or 2012 IECC from the 2006 IECC is cost effective over a 30-year life cycle. On average, Alabama homeowners will save $2,117 over 30 years under the 2009 IECC, with savings still higher at $6,182 with the 2012 IECC. After accounting for upfront costs and additional costs financed in the mortgage, homeowners should see net positive cash flows (i.e., cumulative savings exceeding cumulative cash outlays) in 2 years for both the 2009 and 2012 IECC. Average annual energy savings are $168 for the 2009 IECC and $462 for the 2012 IECC.

  3. Energy Management by Recycling of Vehicle Waste Oil in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassan Ali Durrani

    Abstract: Pakistan has been suffering from an energy crisis for about half a decade now. The power crisis is proving to be unbearable, so importing huge amount of hydrocarbons from abroad to meet its energy needs. This study therefore focuses on the analysis of energy and environmental benefits for vehicle waste lubricant oil pertaining to its reuse by means of: (i) regain the heating value of used oils in a combustion process and (ii) recycling of waste oil to make fresh oil products. The waste oil samples were tested by ICP method and the test results were compared with standard requirements. It was found that the matter could effectively be solved by means of waste oil management practices together with collection centers, transports and processors by encouraging and financial help for the recycling industry. The importance and worth of this work concludes minor levels of hazardous elements when regained the heating value from the waste lubricating oil.

  4. Lead contamination around a kindergarten near a battery recycling plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung-Der Wang; Chang-Sheng Jang; Yaw-Huei Hwang; Zueng-Sang Chen [National Taiwan Univ. (China)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead poisoning has been noticed for more than a thousand years. Increased lead absorption and/or impaired neurobehavioral function among children who lived nearby lead smelters were reported in many different countries. In November of 1987, a worker from a lead battery recycling smelter suffered from anemia and bilateral weakness of his extremities. He was diagnosed as lead poisoning at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). A subsequent epidemiological survey of the workers from this recycling smelter showed that 31 out of 64 who came for a medical examination suffered from lead poisoning. Since there was a kindergarten next to the factory, we performed this study to determine whether there was an increased lead absorption among children of the exposed kindergarten and its association with the extent of air and soil pollution in the surrounding area. 12 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Chlorinated solvent replacements recycle/recovery review report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beal, M.; Hsu, D.; McAtee, R.E.; Weidner, J.R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Berg, L.; McCandless, F.P.; Waltari, S.; Peterson, C. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a literature review of waste solvents recycle/recovery methods and shows the results of solvent separations using membrane and distillation technologies. The experimental solvent recovery methods were conducted on solvent replacements for chlorinated solvents at Montana State University. The literature review covers waste solvents separation using distillation, membranes decantation, filtration, carbon adsorption, solvent extraction, and other vapor-phase separation techniques. The results of this study identify solvent distillation methods as the most common separation technique. The alternative separation methods typically supplement distillation. The study shows the need for industries to identify waste solvent disposal methods and investigate the economics of waste solvent recycling as a possible waste reduction method.

  6. Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

  7. Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

  8. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Regional or global WEEE recycling. Where to go?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jinhui, E-mail: jinhui@tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lopez N, Brenda N.; Liu, Lili; Zhao, Nana; Yu, Keli; Zheng, Lixia [State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), School of the Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Source and Destination countries involved in the movement of WEEE have been studied. ? Legislation, facilities and EPR are presented in Source and Destination countries. ? Mostly Destination countries do not have EPR established and have informal facilities. ? Source countries: good technology, EPR established and mostly WEEE regulation enacted. ? Regional WEEE recycling should be under global standards for Sources and Destinations. - Abstract: If we consider Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) management, we can see the development of different positions in developed and developing countries. This development started with the movement of WEEE from developed countries to the developing countries. However, when the consequences for health and the environment were observed, some developing countries introduced a ban on the import of this kind of waste under the umbrella of the Basel Convention, while some developed countries have been considering a regional or global WEEE recycling approach. This paper explores the current movements between Source and Destination countries, or the importers and exporters, and examines whether it is legal and why illegal traffic is still rife; how global initiatives could support a global WEEE management scheme; the recycling characteristics of the source an destination countries and also to ascertain whether the principle of Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) has been established between the different stakeholders involved in WEEE management. Ultimately, the Full Extended Producer Responsibility is presented as a possible solution because the compensation of the environmental capacity for WEEE recycling or treatment could be made by the contribution of extra responsibility; and also generating an uniform standard for processing WEEE in an environmentally sound manner could support the regional or international solution of WEEE and also improve the performance of the informal sector.

  10. Direct Solid-State Conversion of Recyclable Metals and Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiran Manchiraju

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Friction Stir Extrusion (FSE) is a novel energy-efficient solid-state material synthesis and recycling technology capable of producing large quantity of bulk nano-engineered materials with tailored, mechanical, and physical properties. The novelty of FSE is that it utilizes the frictional heating and extensive plastic deformation inherent to the process to stir, consolidate, mechanically alloy, and convert the powders, chips, and other recyclable feedstock materials directly into useable product forms of highly engineered materials in a single step (see Figure 1). Fundamentally, FSE shares the same deformation and metallurgical bonding principles as in the revolutionary friction stir welding process. Being a solid-state process, FSE eliminates the energy intensive melting and solidification steps, which are necessary in the conventional metal synthesis processes. Therefore, FSE is highly energy-efficient, practically zero emissions, and economically competitive. It represents a potentially transformational and pervasive sustainable manufacturing technology for metal recycling and synthesis. The goal of this project was to develop the technological basis and demonstrate the commercial viability of FSE technology to produce the next generation highly functional electric cables for electricity delivery infrastructure (a multi-billion dollar market). Specific focus of this project was to (1) establish the process and material parameters to synthesize novel alloys such as nano-engineered materials with enhanced mechanical, physical, and/or functional properties through the unique mechanical alloying capability of FSE, (2) verifying the expected major energy, environmental, and economic benefits of FSE technology for both the early stage 'showcase' electric cable market and the anticipated pervasive future multi-market applications across several industry sectors and material systems for metal recycling and sustainable manufacturing.

  11. Decontamination of process equipment using recyclable chelating solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jevec, J.; Lenore, C.; Ulbricht, S.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is now faced with the task of meeting decontamination and decommissioning obligations at numerous facilities by the year 2019. Due to the tremendous volume of material involved, innovative decontamination technologies are being sought that can reduce the volumes of contaminated waste materials and secondary wastes requiring disposal. With sufficient decontamination, some of the material from DOE facilities could be released as scrap into the commercial sector for recycle, thereby reducing the volume of radioactive waste requiring disposal. Although recycling may initially prove to be more costly than current disposal practices, rapidly increasing disposal costs are expected to make recycling more and more cost effective. Additionally, recycling is now perceived as the ethical choice in a world where the consequences of replacing resources and throwing away reusable materials are impacting the well-being of the environment. Current approaches to the decontamination of metals most often involve one of four basic process types: (1) chemical, (2) manual and mechanical, (3) electrochemical, and (4) ultrasonic. {open_quotes}Hard{close_quotes} chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving decontamination factors (Df`s) of 50 to 100, generally involve reagent concentrations in excess of 5%, tend to physically degrade the surface treated, and generate relatively large volumes of secondary waste. {open_quotes}Soft{close_quotes} chemical decontamination solutions, capable of achieving Df`s of 5 to 10, normally consist of reagents at concentrations of 0.1 to 1%, generally leave treated surfaces in a usable condition, and generate relatively low secondary waste volumes. Under contract to the Department of Energy, the Babcock & Wilcox Company is developing a chemical decontamination process using chelating agents to remove uranium compounds and other actinide species from process equipment.

  12. Magnetic error analysis of recycler pbar injection transfer line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed study of Fermilab Recycler Ring anti-proton injection line became feasible with its BPM system upgrade, though the beamline has been in existence and operational since year 2000. Previous attempts were not fruitful due to limitations in the BPM system. Among the objectives are the assessment of beamline optics and the presence of error fields. In particular the field region of the permanent Lambertson magnets at both ends of R22 transfer line will be scrutinized.

  13. Recycling of Waste Oxides in Steelmaking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R. J.

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research primarily examined the use of waste oxide briquettes (WOB), prepared from blast furnace and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) dusts and mill scale, in BOFs and in particular, the reasons for the methods to reduce slopping in BOF when WOBs are used. Also, the recycling of EAF and stainless steelmaking dusts were examined. It is found that at a critical FeO content in the slag, metal drops emulsify increasing the reaction area and rate drastically, promoting slopping. Recommendations were made to delay the build-up of FeO in the slag to this critical value, thus reducing slopping. Although recycling of EAF dusts in the EAF increased energy use and decreased productivity, it provides Fe units, reduces dust disposal by 25-40%, and increases the Zn content of the dust to acceptable levels for the use by Zn-producers. Stainless steelmaking dusts can also be recycled as WOBs adding Cr to the melt and generating CO gas resulting in good slag foaming.

  14. AISI waste oxide recycling program. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aukrust, E.; Downing, K.B.; Sarma, B.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 1995 AISI completed a five-year, $60 million collaborative development program on Direct Steelmaking cost-shared by DOE under the Metals Initiative. This program defined an energy-efficient and environmentally-friendly technology to produce hot metal for steelmaking directly from coal and iron ore pellets without incurring the high capital costs and environmental problems associated with traditional coke oven and blast furnace technology. As it becomes necessary to replace present capacity, this new technology will be favored because of reduced capital costs, higher energy efficiency, and lower operating costs. In April 1994, having failed to move forward with a demonstration plant for direct ironmaking, despite substantial efforts by both Stelco and Geneva Steel, an alternative opportunity was sought to commercialize this new technology without waiting until existing ironmaking capacity needed to be replaced. Recycling and resource recovery of steel plant waste oxides was considered an attractive possibility. This led to approval of a ten-month, $8.3 million joint program with DOE on recycling steel plant waste oxides utilizing this new smelting technology. This highly successful trial program was completed in December 1994. The results of the pilot plant work and a feasibility study for a recycling demonstration plant are presented in this final technical report.

  15. In situ recycling of contaminated soil uses bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevlin, P.J.; Reel, D.A.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OxyChem Pipeline Operations, primarily an ethylene and propylene products mover, has determined that substantial savings can be realized by adopting a bioremediation maintenance and recycling approach to hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. By this method, the soil can be recycled in situ, or in containers. To implement the soil-recycling program, OxyChem elected to use a soil remediator and natural absorbent product, Oil Snapper. This field maintenance material, based on an Enhanced Urea Technology, provides a diet to stimulate the growth of hydrocarbon-eating microbes. It works well either with indigenous soil microbes or with commercial microbes. The product is carried in field vehicles, which makes it immediately available when leaks or spills are discovered. Procedure for clean-up is to apply product and mix it into affected soil. Thus the contaminant is contained, preventing further migration; the contaminant is dispersed throughout the product, making it more accessible to the microbes; nutrients are immediately available to the microbes; and the material contributes aeration and moisture-retention properties.

  16. Geologic setting, petrophysical characteristics, and regional heterogeneity patterns of the Smackover in southwest Alabama. Draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopaska-Merkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D.; Tew, B.H.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the draft topical report on Subtasks 2 and 3 of DOE contract number DE-FG22-89BC14425, entitled ``Establishment of an oil and gas database for increased recovery and characterization of oil and gas carbonate reservoir heterogeneity.`` This volume constitutes the final report on Subtask 3, which had as its primary goal the geological modeling of reservoir heterogeneity in Smackover reservoirs of southwest Alabama. This goal was interpreted to include a thorough analysis of Smackover reservoirs, which was required for an understanding of Smackover reservoir heterogeneity. This report is divided into six sections (including this brief introduction). Section two, entitled ``Geologic setting,`` presents a concise summary of Jurassic paleogeography, structural setting, and stratigraphy in southwest Alabama. This section also includes a brief review of sedimentologic characteristics and stratigraphic framework of the Smackover, and a summary of the diagenetic processes that strongly affected Smackover reservoirs in Alabama. Section three, entitled ``Analytical methods,`` summarizes all nonroutine aspects of the analytical procedures used in this project. The major topics are thin-section description, analysis of commercial porosity and permeability data, capillary-pressure analysis, and field characterization. ``Smackover reservoir characteristics`` are described in section four, which begins with a general summary of the petrographic characteristics of porous and permeable Smackover strata. This is followed by a more-detailed petrophysical description of Smackover reservoirs.

  17. Waste collection systems for recyclables: An environmental and economic assessment for the municipality of Aarhus (Denmark)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, A.W., E-mail: awl@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Merrild, H.; Moller, J.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling of paper and glass from household waste is an integrated part of waste management in Denmark, however, increased recycling is a legislative target. The questions are: how much more can the recycling rate be increased through improvements of collection schemes when organisational and technical limitations are respected, and what will the environmental and economic consequences be? This was investigated in a case study of a municipal waste management system. Five scenarios with alternative collection systems for recyclables (paper, glass, metal and plastic packaging) were assessed by means of a life cycle assessment and an assessment of the municipality's costs. Kerbside collection would provide the highest recycling rate, 31% compared to 25% in the baseline scenario, but bring schemes with drop-off containers would also be a reasonable solution. Collection of recyclables at recycling centres was not recommendable because the recycling rate would decrease to 20%. In general, the results showed that enhancing recycling and avoiding incineration was recommendable because the environmental performance was improved in several impact categories. The municipal costs for collection and treatment of waste were reduced with increasing recycling, mainly because the high cost for incineration was avoided. However, solutions for mitigation of air pollution caused by increased collection and transport should be sought.

  18. Characterization of Transport and Solidification in the Metal Recycling Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C. Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1997-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of the transport and solidification of metal in the melting and casting processes is significant for the optimization of the radioactively contaminated metal recycling and refining processes. . In this research project, the transport process in the melting and solidification of metal was numerically predicted, and the microstructure and radionuclide distribution have been characterized by scanning electron microscope/electron diffractive X-ray (SEWEDX) analysis using cesium chloride (CSC1) as the radionuclide surrogate. In the melting and solidification process, a resistance furnace whose heating and cooling rates are program- controlled in the helium atmosphere was used. The characterization procedures included weighing, melting and solidification, weighing after solidification, sample preparation, and SEM/EDX analysis. This analytical methodology can be used to characterize metal recycling and refining products in order to evaluate the performance of the recycling process. The data obtained provide much valuable information that is necessary for the enhancement of radioactive contaminated metal decontamination and recycling technologies. The numerical method for the prediction of the melting and solidification process can be implemented in the control and monitoring system-of the melting and casting process in radioactive contaminated metal recycling. The use of radionuclide surrogates instead of real radionuclides enables the research to be performed without causing harmfid effects on people or the community. This characterization process has been conducted at the Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (HCET) at Florida International University since October 1995. Tests have been conducted on aluminum (Al) and copper (Cu) using cesium chloride (CSCI) as a radionuclide surrogate, and information regarding the radionuclide transfer and distribution in melting and solidification process has been obtained. The numerical simulation of the solidification of molten metal has been very successful for aluminium; however, a stability problem in the simulation of iron/steel solidification poses a challenge. Thus, additional development is needed to simulate the radionuclide transfer and distribution behaviors in the melting and casting processes. This project was initially based on a two-year plan. However, due to technical and financial difficulties, the project ended in FY96. The work which has been accomplished in the first year includes the characterization of radionuclide transfer and distribution in the melting-solidification process and the numerical simulation of metal solidification. The Argon-arc melting method was tested for the melting of copper and steel materials. Five tests were performed to characterize the transfer and distribution of radionuclides in the aluminiurn and copper melting/solidification process using CSC1 as radionuclide surrogates. The numerical simulation of molten aluminium and steel solidification process was performed. Different boundary conditions were applied in the simulations.

  19. Development of Recycling Compatible Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives and Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Severtson

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was the design of new water-based pressure-sensitive adhesive (PSA) products and coatings engineered for enhanced removal during the processing of recycled fiber. Research included the formulation, characterization, and performance measurements of new screenable coatings, testing of modified paper and board substrates and the design of test methods to characterize the inhibition of adhesive and coating fragmentation and relative removal efficiencies of developed formulations. This project was operated under the requirements that included commercially viable approaches be the focus, that findings be published in the open literature and that new strategies could not require changes in the methods and equipment used to produce PSA and PS labels or in the recycling process. The industrial partners benefited through the building of expertise in their company that they would not, and likely could not, have pursued if it had not been for the partnership. Results of research on water-based PSAs clearly identifies which PSA and paper facestock properties govern the fragmentation of the adhesive and provide multiple strategies for making (pressure-sensitive) PS labels for which the PSA is removed at very high efficiencies from recycling operations. The application of these results has led to the identification of several commercial products in Franklin International抯 (industrial partner) product line that are recycling compatible. Several new formulations were also designed and are currently being scaled-up. Work on recycling compatible barrier coatings for corrugated containers examined the reinforcement of coatings using a small amount of exfoliated organically modified montmorillonite (OMMT). These OMMT/paraffin wax nanocomposites demonstrated significantly improved mechanical properties. Paraffin waxes containing clay were found to have significantly higher Young抯 moduli and yield stress relative to the wax matrix, but the most impressive finding was the impact of the clay on the elongation at break; a nearly 400% increase was observed for a clay concentration of 0.5 wt.%. These coatings also demonstrate a number of other property enhancements, which make them a good candidate for continued research. Another approach explored in this research was the use of structured and self-cleaning surfaces. If the amount of coating utilized can be significantly reduced, the environmental impact is diminished.

  20. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes 路 Due to 颅 Climate Change 颅 Land Cover / Land Use Change 颅 Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change 路 Resolution 颅 Space 颅 Time Hydro-Climatic Change 路 Variability vs. Change (Trends) 路 Point data

  1. Design of Recycle/Reuse Networks with Thermal Effects and Variable Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavala Oseguera, Jose Guadalupe

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    -effective allocation of process streams (sources) to process units (sinks) without adding new equipment to the process. Examples of sources in direct recycle/reuse systems are the waste or low value streams considered for recycling. Examples of sinks are those units... performance targets which can be determined ahead of detailed design. In this regard, the ?pinch? technology is quite effective. Performance targets in terms of minimum amount of fresh requirements and waste flow are necessary for direct recycle/reuse...

  2. The Recycling Intentions of Sport Spectators: A Theory of Planned Behavior Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullough, Brian Patrick

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    implemented a recycling and composting program that saved the organization over $100,000 (Environmental Protection Agency, 2010). The money saved was from filling fewer solid waste dumpsters that are destined for the landfill. By decreasing their solid... waste through composting and recycling, the organization filled up fewer solid waste dumpsters during games at AT&T Ballpark. Despite these savings, there is still more potential for cost savings by increasing the recovery rates of recyclable materials...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - animal waste recycling Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measure for recycling of house-hold waste to agriculture 12;Sustainability analysis Bioenergy... , cereal grain), grass from seminatural ecosystem e.g. ... Source: Ris...

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile catalyst recycling Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile catalyst recycling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SUPPLIERS WITHIN AN ECOLOGICALLY...

  5. Implementation of EU Waste Recycling Regulation in Macedonia: The Challenges of Policy Integration and Normative Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilievska Kremer, Jannika Sjostrand

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    harmonization; plastic bottles; batteries; informal sector,recycling of PET plastic bottles and household batteries.3. Laws managing PET plastic bottles and batteries were

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - ash quality recycling Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Utilization Summary: Center for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik... CANMET Conference on Quality of Concrete Structures and...

  7. Accelerated test methods for evaluating alkali-silica reactivity of recycled concrete aggregates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert C (Author)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis reports the findings of a study carried out to determine the effectiveness of Accelerated Tests in evaluating the Alkali-Silica Reactivity of Recycled Concrete (more)

  8. Analysis of multi-recycle thorium fuel cycles in comparison with once-through fuel cycles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Lloyd Michael

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology for a thorium fuel recycling analysis that provides results for isotopics and radio-toxicity evaluation and (more)

  9. THE PERFORMANCE AND MODIFICATION OF RECYCLED ELECTRONIC WASTE PLASTICS FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF ASPHALT PAVEMENT MATERIALS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colbert, Baron W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Bulk electric waste plastics were recycled and reduced in size into plastic chips before pulverization or cryogenic grinding into powders. Two major types of (more)

  10. Final report of the High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama, April 15, 1990--April 14, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.M.; Clark, R.K.

    1998-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The experimental high energy physics group at the University of South Alabama worked on three experiments conducted at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. These experiments were E-705, E-771, and E-871. The group helped in taking data, analysis of data, and for one experiment in the construction of a new spectrometer. Experiment E-705 used 300 GeV/c p, {pi}{sup {minus}}, {anti p} and {pi}{sup +} on Li to study hadronic production of charmonium and direct photon production. The authors participated in the E-705 data analysis. They helped in the assembly of the E-771 spectrometer. E-771 used 800 GeV/c p-Si interactions to study hadronic beauty production and charmonium production. The groups task was to bring up the electromagnetic calorimeter and interface it into the data acquisition system. Off-line work done for the analysis of E-771 concentrated on the electromagnetic reconstruction package. Other work done in conjunction with E-771 included the development of a tracking program that used the Hough Transformation. In March of 1994, the group joined Experiment E-871. This experiment is a search for CP violation. The group took responsibility for the scintillation trigger hodoscopes to be used by the experiment.

  11. Water Recycling removal using temperature-sensitive hydronen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana B. Gupta

    2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to study the proposed Water Recycling/Removal Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogels. The main element of this technology is the design of a suitable hydrogel that can perform needed water separation for pulp and paper industry. The specific topics studied are to answer following questions: (a) Can water be removed using hydrogel from large molecules such as lignin? (b) Can the rate of separation be made faster? (c) What are the molecular interactions with hydrogel surface? (d) Can a hydrogel be designed for a high ionic strength and high temperature? Summary of the specific results are given.

  12. Biological Kraft Chemical Recycle for Augmentation of Recovery Furnace Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart E. Strand

    2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemicals used in pulping of wood by the kraft process are recycled in the mill in the recovery furnace, which oxidizes organics while simultaneously reducing sulfate to sulfide. The recovery furnace is central to the economical operation of kraft pulp mills, but it also causes problems. The total pulp production of many mills is limited by the recovery furnace capacity, which cannot easily be increased. The furnace is one of the largest sources of air pollution (as reduced sulfur compounds) in the kraft pulp mill.

  13. The Energy Impact of Industrial Recycling and Waste Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, W. C.

    of regulations and the most interest. There is a chain of regulation that extends from those who generate hazardous waste to those who transport, store, treat, and dispose of it. However, facilities that recycle or reuse hazardous wastes are excluded from...~e listed as available in waste-exchange catalogs. The haza~dous natu~e of these wastes is ext~emely impo~tant in dete~mining the benefits of exchanging them, because the costs of ~egulated disposal, sto~age, and t~eatment may be avoided by ~ecycling (4...

  14. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.'' The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  15. Recycling and composting demonstration projects for the Memphis region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, D. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and implementation of the project entitled ``Recycling and Composting Demonstration Projects for the Memphis Region.`` The project was funded by the Energy Task Force of the Urban Consortium for Technology Initiatives. This Project was implemented by the staff of the Special Programs Section of the Memphis and Shelby County Division of Planning and Development. The project began November 1, 1990, and was completed December 31, 1991. The purpose of the project was to evaluate the feasibility of a variety of solid waste disposal alternatives.

  16. Nuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArms Control R&DNuclear fuel recycling in 4 minutes Share Topic

  17. RECYCLING GALVANIZED STEEL: OPERATING EXPERIENCE AND BENEFrI'S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office ofMay 8,EMSLREAC/TS |9,RECYCLING

  18. Recycling Hybrid and Elecectric Vehicle Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office of EnvironmentalRecycling CarbonHybrid

  19. Recycling of Nutrients and Water in Algal Biofuels Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes Office of EnvironmentalRecycling(Engineering)

  20. UW-Approved Waste Disposal, Recycling and Treatment Sites Hazardous waste disposal at the University of Washington is coordinated by the EH&S Environmental Programs Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    UW-Approved Waste Disposal, Recycling and Treatment Sites Hazardous waste disposal, WA Rabanco Recycling Co Landfill Roosevelt, WA Waste Management, Columbia Ridge Landfill Arlington Refrigeration Shop Recovery Seattle, WA Fluorescent light tubes - intact Ecolights NW Recycle Seattle, WA Shop

  1. Proceedings of 2009 NSF Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, Honolulu, Hawaii Grant #0423484 Separation and Energy Use Performance of Material Recycling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutowski, Timothy

    #0423484 Separation and Energy Use Performance of Material Recycling Systems Timothy Gutowski Malima I Abstract: This paper outlines current research on the performance of recycling processes and systems of recycling processes. Descriptive terminology for separation performance is presented. The goal

  2. Status of LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid oil shale retort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, D.E.; Cena, R.J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the technical and economic barriers facing the introduction of an oil shale industry and we have chosen Hot-Recycled-Solid (HRS) oil shale retorting as the primary advanced technology of interest. We are investigating this approach through fundamental research, operation of a 4 tonne-per-day, HRS pilot plant and development of an Oil Shale Process (OSP) mathematical model. Over the last three years, from June 1991 to June 1993, we completed a series of runs (H10--H27) using the 4-TPD pilot plant to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the HRS process and answer key scale-up questions. With our CRADA partners, we seek to further develop the HRS technology, maintain and enhance the knowledge base gained over the past two decades through research and development by Government and industry and determine the follow on steps needed to advance the technology towards commercialization. The LLNL Hot-Recycled-Solid process has the potential to improve existing oil shale technology. It processes oil shale in minutes instead of hours, reducing plant size. It processes all oil shale, including fines rejected by other processes. It provides controls to optimize product quality for different applications. It co-generates electricity to maximize useful energy output. And, it produces negligible SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions, a non-hazardous waste shale and uses minimal water.

  3. A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M.; Greene, W.A.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20?25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.

  4. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Office of Conservation and Coastal Lands From Open Energy...

  5. Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Lauren

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

  6. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  7. GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 GEORGE LEA FOUNDER'S SCHOLARSHIP PUBLIC LANDS FOUNDATION P.O. Box 7226 Arlington, VA 22207 Scholarship Application Form This scholarship is being offered by the Public Lands Foundation, a national non

  8. Sale of Water Resource Land (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule requires an eight month advance notice period whenever a consumer-owned water utility intends to transfer water resource land, defined as any land or real property owned by a water...

  9. Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

  10. Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

  11. TRITIUM RECYCLING AND INVENTORY IN ERODED DEBRIS OF PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    .,, TRITIUM RECYCLING AND INVENTORY IN ERODED DEBRIS OF PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS* Ahmed Hassanein RECYCLING AND INVENTORY IN ERODED DEBRIS OF PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS AmvlED H.ASSANEIN Argonne Mm therefore, they can significantly infIuence plasma behavior and tritium inventory during subsequent

  12. Multi-Recycling of Transuranic Elements in a Modified PWR Fuel Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Alex

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    production/destruction, and radiotoxicity reduction as compared to a UOX and MOX assembly. It is found that the most beneficial recycling strategy is the one where all of the transuranics are recycled. The inclusion of Cm reduces the required U-235...

  13. EXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBER AND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH OPACITY PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    alkalinity, precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in situ within pulp fibers. Because paper made from fiber include increasing the recovery and utilization of recycled fiber and optimizing virgin fiber yieldEXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBER AND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH

  14. EXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBERAND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH OPACITY PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abubakr, Said

    , precipitates calcium carbonate (PCC) in situ within pulp fibers. Because paper made from fiber-loaded pulp increasing the recovery and utilization of recycled fiber and optimizing virgin fiber yield by relying moreEXTENDING FIBER RESOURCES: FIBER LOADING RECYCLED FIBERAND MECHANICAL PULPS FOR LIGHTWEIGHT, HIGH

  15. RECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RECYCLING AND REMOVAL OF OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES 颅 AN INTERACTIVE METHOD FOR REDUCTION OF NEGATIVE.borup@risoe.dk ABSTRACT: This paper describes a method for reduction of negative environmental impacts of wind turbines and an analysis of future removal and recycling processes of offshore wind turbines. The method is process

  16. Control of Reactor and Separator, with Recycle T. Larsson, S. Skogestadand Cheng-Ching Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control of Reactor and Separator, with Recycle T. Larsson, S. Skogestad拢and Cheng-Ching Yu This paper looks at control of a plant that consists of a reactor, separator and recycle of unreacted reactor where component A is converted to a product and the amount converted is given by 麓?碌?? ??脨

  17. DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable Hierarchical Bucky Aerogels**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    DOI: 10.1002/adem.201400414 Self-Assembled Recyclable Hierarchical Bucky Aerogels** By Mehmet, and recyclable multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) based light weight (density aerogels (BAGs than the energy dissipated by commercial foams with similar densities. 1. Introduction Aerogels

  18. Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Animesh

    Cold in-place recycling with bitumen emulsion Animesh Das1 Introduction The cold in-place recycling and binder in cold form (emulsion or cutback or foamed bitumen) is added. Externally acquired Reclaimed is calculated from the water to bitumen proportion in the emulsion. While estimating the volumetric parameters

  19. A Green Approach to Femtocells Capacity Improvement by Recycling Wasted Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Green Approach to Femtocells Capacity Improvement by Recycling Wasted Resources Leonardo S and transmit power. The proposed technique recycles redundant resources of OFDM transmissions (e.g., guard, a better average link quality, more efficient usage of spectrum resources and higher spatial reuse (co

  20. IJEP 8 ( 1 ) : 51-54 Municipal Solid Waste Recycle -An Economic Proposition for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    IJEP 8 ( 1 ) : 51-54 Municipal Solid Waste Recycle - An Economic Proposition for a Developing the disposal problem in an environmentally acceptable manner is, DO doubt, an economic proposition features of the pyrolysis process in particular. Suitability of the waste recycle techniques in the context

  1. ForReview.Confidential-ACS Plantwide Control to Economic Optimum of a Recycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    ForReview.Confidential-ACS Plantwide Control to Economic Optimum of a Recycle Process with Side #12;ForReview.Confidential-ACS Plantwide Control to Economic Optimum of a Recycle Process with Side, Trondheim N7491, Norway Abstract Plantwide control system design for economically optimum operation

  2. A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    A Property-Based Optimization of Direct Recycle Networks and Wastewater Treatment Processes Jose a mathematical programming approach to optimize direct recycle-reuse networks together with wastewater treatment of wastewater treatment units. In addition to composition-based constraints, the formulation also incorporates

  3. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 54 (2010) 163170 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lupi, Frank

    -off recycling sites is influenced by demographic factors such as age, education, income and household size-off center operators are able to save on labor and transportation costs because these costs are transferred and Adams (1999) study the effect of disposal fee and household characteristics on recycling rates and waste

  4. N-Glycans Mediate Apical Recycling of the Sialomucin Endolyn in Polarized MDCK Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisz, Ora A.

    N-Glycans Mediate Apical Recycling of the Sialomucin Endolyn in Polarized MDCK Cells Beth A. Potter domain. This has led to a greater understanding of how proteins are sorted along the biosynthetic pathway surface, proteins can be recycled back to the appropriate cell- surface domain, transcytosed

  5. Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct and indirect effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    Feedbacks of consumer nutrient recycling on producer biomass and stoichiometry: separating direct exclusion cages to expose periphyton to recycled nutrients in the absence of direct grazing. In experiment 1 phosphorus and high body N:P. In experiment 1, we found that increasing catfish density led to lower biomass

  6. Int. Symposium on Recycling and Reuse of Glass Cullet 19-20 March, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    Int. Symposium on Recycling and Reuse of Glass Cullet 19-20 March, 2001 University of Dundee, Scotland Recycled Glass From Waste Material to Valuable Resource By Christian Meyer Department of Civil are finite. This awareness, coupled with the scarcity of suitable landfills, has led to the increasing

  7. Recycling and Uptake of Si(OH)4 when Protozoan Grazers Feed on Diatoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Recycling and Uptake of Si(OH)4 when Protozoan Grazers Feed on Diatoms Sabine Schultesa,1 on Si(OH)4 recycling was investigated with cultures of single- celled diatoms, Thalassiosira pseudonana in discarded feeding vacuoles. Over the first 24h, microzooplankton grazing even led to enhanced uptake of Si

  8. A Charge Recycling Differential Noise Immune Jabulani Nyathi, Valeriu Beiu, Suryanarayana Tatapudi, and David 3. Betowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyathi, Jabulani

    A Charge Recycling Differential Noise Immune Perceptron Jabulani Nyathi, Valeriu Beiu.wsu.edu Abslmct-This paper proposes a new differential neural These emerging nano devices have led to many in [SI, [91, [lo]. recycling differential noise-immune threshold logic (CRD-NTL) In this paper we shall

  9. SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION NOT CURRENTLY OPEN FOR INFORMATION ONLY Recycling Internship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SAMPLE INTERNSHIP DESCRIPTION 颅 NOT CURRENTLY OPEN 颅 FOR INFORMATION ONLY Recycling Internship Free and disassemble little stuff. You like warehouses. You'll want to look into our Recycling Internship. For more information and information on how to apply, please visit: http://www.freegeek.org/internships

  10. The Recycling Center at UAB opened March 2, 2009! It is located at 620 11th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedwell, David M.

    Paolone UAB Recycling Coordinator (205) 996-9043 GENERAL INSTRUCTIONS Please bring separated materialsThe Recycling Center at UAB opened March 2, 2009! It is located at 620 11th St. South. See map below for details. We accept materials listed to the left. The hours for drop- off are 6:30-9:00 a

  11. Investigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture: a choice experiment approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    in France (excluding agriculture waste) [1], the recycling of urban organic waste is a strong environmentalInvestigating citizens' preferences for recycling Residual Organic Products in agriculture or mineral fertilizers. The paper addresses in particular 3 environmental effects: the organic waste

  12. RPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via structural transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    -assembly of molecular electronics and smart materials will bring a new era in the field of material science.1 HoweverRPM-2: A recyclable porous material with unusual adsorption capability: self assembly via, fully recyclable porous material (RPM-2) with a very high sorption capability. Self

  13. GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

  14. Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Land & Water Conservation Program Conservation Easements: A Step by Step Guide PRELIMINARY STEPS: Step 1: Landowner expresses interest in land conservation. Step 2: Discuss the land with the landowner officially designated as prime. Source: municipal conservation commission or NH DES, Wetlands Bureau.* o Deer

  15. LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

  16. Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the Purification of Water with Systems (a NationalWater Recycling . 99 8. Groundwater Replenishment System Purification

  18. Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Autonomous Landing of MAVs on an Arbitrarily Textured Landing Site using Onboard Monocular Vision a novel solution for micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) to autonomously search for and land on an arbitrary landing site using real- time monocular vision. The autonomous MAV is provided with only one single

  19. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

  20. 78.1: Ultra Compact Polarization Recycling System for White Light LED based Pico-Projection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    78.1: Ultra Compact Polarization Recycling System for White Light LED based Pico-Projection System polarization recycling system, for white light LED based projectors, is proposed. White light LED is applied. In this paper, we propose an ultra compact polarization recycling system for white light LED based projection